Lazer/Wulf

Lazer/Wulf

 Atlanta, Georgia, USA
BandMetalJazz

Lazer/Wulf is an instrumental metal trio, sometimes with vocals, or maybe an evil funk group with thrash roots, or a jazz trio from Hell. Whatever it is, it's not the easiest thing to describe. Imagine a giant trampoline rigged to explode: fun for everybody, but likely to kill you at any moment.

Biography

Style:

Lazer/Wulf is an instrumental metal trio, sometimes with distant vocals, or maybe it's an evil funk group with thrash roots, or a jazz trio from prog-Hell. Whatever it is, it's not the easiest thing to describe. Which makes it that much easier to love. Just ask the band's rabidly devoted following.

Lazer/Wulf is the product of constant, self-critical and insatiable evolution, where every song is a fully-realized and self-contained epic. It's thrash, it's indie rock, it's jazz fusion, crust punk, and doom sludge and funk in 7/8, but the seams between them aren't just invisible: they're simply not there. The songwriters balance their disparate emotions, objectives and influences, to form a brand new sum of its varied parts. It is an ongoing experiment in making conflict non-conflicting, cooking diverse and often adverse ingredients into a delicious and exhilarating whole.

Circumstantially, it's heavy as hell, and unifies varying audiences with how simply fun it all is, toeing the line between a challenging listen and utter alienation.

Lazer/Wulf is three very different guys, who each have very different musical perspectives and backgrounds, trying to keep each other impossibly fulfilled. And having a hell of a good time in that chaotic juggle. Imagine a giant trampoline rigged to explode: it's fun for everybody, but likely to kill you at any moment.

Bio:

Formed in Athens, GA in 2006, the wulves began as a five-piece, including vocalist Jimmy Baldwin and guitarist Robert Sullivan. After recording and self-releasing their 2006 debut demo, "Demo-Lition!," the band enjoyed local success as a gleefully violent metal band in a skeptical microcosm of indie rock. The band's reputation as Athens' most fun, irreverent and evil circus had earned the nomination of "Best Up & Coming Band" by the city's Flagpole Magazine.

But L/W's buzz of positive critical reception was stricken by the departure of founding member Sullivan and the increasingly bleak prognosis of Baldwin's health. The vocalist's throat had become pocked with polyps, and while the looming reparative surgery saved his vocal cords, it effectively ended his tenure as the band's frontman. Thus, the ranks of L/W rapidly dwindled to three, leaving Aiken, Peiffer and then-drummer Mathius to fend for themselves without their chosen genre's staples of harsh vocals and dual guitars.

Ironically, this new instrumental approach to their existing material and to the writing process of their forthcoming full-length, "The Void That Isn't," added exciting new layers to their already diverse sound. Less had, essentially, become more. What could have been a void, wasn't, and made the remaining parts that much more substantial.

This trimmed lineup allows for a heartier imagination, better communication between its members, and more confident stints into uncomfortable stylistic territory. The lack of a regular vocal crutch opens the band's instrumentation to more diverse audiences and breaks previously troublesome language barriers, while allows for more abstract arrangements overall. In June of 2008, Lazer/Wulf's new identity was named "Band of the Year" by Athens' Flagpole Magazine, topping the reigning indie-rock and pop incumbents.

Once "The Void" had been released, however, the Lazer/Wulf ranks dwindled again, this time in a way that couldn't be ignored: they needed a new drummer, and the Void's advertorial cycle must fall aside while the line-up is secured. After two years (!) of active searching, jazz drummer Brad Rice was finally found and inducted in 2011.

Now, Lazer/Wulf has shed the security of genre conventions in favor of creative curiosity and more honest and emotional song-writing, growing increasingly toward the likes of Dysrhythmia, Don Caballero and Battles, while firmly rooted and informed by its thrash and prog-metal origins. Its music continues to expand in every direction, heavier and lighter, wider but more focused. The machine is varied, vicious and endlessly willing.

Lazer/Wulf's first recording with this new line-up, the vinyl/cassette/downloadable EP "There Was A Hole Here. It's Gone Now," will see independent and digital release on 4/24/2012.

Discography

"The Void That Isn't," L/W's first full-length effort, was independently released in 2009, just before a crucial line-up change and hiatus. The disc has since been accepted for airplay by several Georgian radio stations (WUOG 90.5, Bulldog 103.7, WUGA 91.7, etc.) and was a finalist for "Athens Album of the Year" by Flagpole Magazine.

The band's first recording with a new line-up, the vinyl/cassette/downloadable EP "There Was A Hole Here. It's Gone Now," can be found at www.lazerwulf.bandcamp.com

Set List

Our songs tend to be long, but we can formulate set-lists to accommodate any alloted time, sometimes mixing songs or playing abridged or lengthened versions. No covers, yet.