Library Science
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Library Science

Seattle, Washington, United States

Seattle, Washington, United States
Band Pop Reggae

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Dec
26
Library Science @ clubs

FOR TOTAL LIST PLEASE LOOK AT WWW.LIBSCI.COM, Washington, USA

FOR TOTAL LIST PLEASE LOOK AT WWW.LIBSCI.COM, Washington, USA

Feb
06
Library Science @ Chop Suey`

Seattle, Washington, USA

Seattle, Washington, USA

Jan
06
Library Science @ Neumos

Seatle, Washington, USA

Seatle, Washington, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


For our complete press kit (which includes latest reviews, clippings, and articles) please download the following PDF:

http://www.libsci.com/library_science_press_kit.pdf

Library Science puts their own spin on the classic form in ways that aren't easy to describe. It's obvious they've got a reverence for the innovators, but there's a dissonant, electro feel. They thow in unexpected, weird sounds and samples--toy xylophone melodies, wheezing accordion drones, heavily buzzing guitars--that make this stuff totally unique.
--The Stranger

As to what you’ll see? Their own unique “version of live electro post-dub psychedelic disco slo-dance music with flashing lights and customized video.” Come again? “King Tubby meets Daft Punk.” Ummm…? “It's the hottest fucking thing!” Alright champ, keep that lab coat on; we’ll be there!
--Not For Tourists

“a sound you can effortlessly ease into, somewhere between the bass, the vibraslap and the melodica.” “expect some friendly surrealism from their full-on audio-visual spectacle. Also note that one of the band members is a boy named Sue.”

“It was like Lee Perry running out of weed on a yacht cruise and opting for some borrowed Zoloft.”
--Montreal Mirror

Usually when people say music sounds "cartoony," they mean it's big, dumb, and sloppy, full of kiddie melodies and sappy lyrics. Seattle's Library Science, which plays an experimental, electronic offshoot of dub reggae, is not that kind of cartoony. There's something about their music, though (and entire aesthetic, down to the wacky album art) that is utterly visual.
--The Pacific Northwest Inlander

The last minute of High Life Honey's "Dummy Pants" resembles a dubbed-out episode of Ren & Stimpy, minus the dialogue
--Seattle Weekly

It might sound like Seattle's Library Science, an outfit that plays the only music I've ever heard that warrants simultaneous knife hits and ecstasy ingestion! I don't usually listen to what a band says about itself, but LS is right: They might melt you.
--Willamette Week


- Various papers


For our complete press kit (which includes latest reviews, clippings, and articles) please download the following PDF:

http://www.libsci.com/library_science_press_kit.pdf

- Library Science


http://www.inlander.com/soundadvice/317864547460119.php

Visual Dub

by JOEL HARTSE

POST ROCK AND DUB The Library Science drops some synaesthetic beats

Usually when people say music sounds "cartoony," they mean it's big, dumb, and sloppy, full of kiddie melodies and sappy lyrics. Seattle's Library Science, which plays an experimental, electronic offshoot of dub reggae, is not that kind of cartoony. There's something about their music, though (and entire aesthetic, down to the wacky album art) that is utterly visual.


It doesn't hurt that both the band's leader, Andy Arkley, and his bandmate Courtney Barneby (joined by Tony Sacco and Peter Lynch on every instrument imaginable) are visual artists by day. "We bring our own video projector and a screen" to live shows, Arkley explains. The band tours with an artist who "triggers and builds these videos live while we play, like a video sampler."


Arkley, who goes by the inexplicable pseudonym Sir Mildred Pitt, spoke about the band's visual inspiration from his home in Seattle. "A lot of times when we're creating songs, we come up with a visual idea of where we want the song to go," he says. "'At this part it's like you're falling, and birds would be flying and an airplane would fly by.' Some sort of visual imagery would come along as we're creating the song. That's how a lot of our songs are."


This explains how the band comes up with titles to the compositions on their latest album, The Chancellor, which they just released on their own Happi Tyme Records (also home to another of Arkley's projects, the Bran Flakes). The Chancellor is full of songs that are as offbeat and playful as their titles, from the slinky "Porn in the Woods (A Bygone Era)" to the somber "The Saddest Video Game in the World." But it doesn't explain how they became a group of nerdy non-Jamaican dudes playing reggae.


"The original idea was we were inspired by dub music," Arkley says. He was looking for another outlet besides the sound-collage experimentalism of the Bran Flakes and his pop-oriented project Twizzle. The Library Science was driven by music like "King Tubby or Scientist or Lee 'Scratch' Perry," he says. "We went down that direction a little bit, but we didn't want to be a straight-on reggae band or roots reggae band. We're changing into something a little bit more eclectic. We're not about the red, yellow and green and the marijuana and Jah."


In fact, the Library Science probably has as much in common with electronic post-rock bands like as they do with reggae. Their first album, High Life Honey, was firmly rooted in dub and heavy on melodica (that keyboard thing you blow into, sounds like an accordion), but with the experimental spirit they've expanded on The Chancellor. Think of M83 with a rock-steady beat.


"Doing what we want to do — when I try to define it, sometimes it gets a little complicated for me," Arkley says. "Some of the new music we've been doing is a little dancey and disco-ey, like the Clash's Sandinista — a little more ska'd up then a straight-on pop song or something." Of course, since its members play bass, keyboards, melodica, guitar and trumpet (often trading instruments, often playing more than one at the same time), the Library Science's eclectic instrumentation itself kind of precludes the possibility of a "straight-on pop song."


"Live, there's me playing bass and a keyboard bass," says Arkley. "And then we have Peter, who plays guitar and trumpet and xylophone and keyboard, switching instruments on almost every song — and Courtney playing melodica, Casio, synthesizer and a sampler, and he's switching between those instruments the whole time. A lot of the stuff we recorded has, like, 10 parts in it — we have to figure out which one of the parts we're gonna play."


The Library Science doesn't have a drummer — beats are provided by a machine — which simplifies things a little, considering the amount of gear they have to lug everywhere. "It's kind of a strange setup, but we have two big tables with all the instruments on them, switching the whole time." Arkley adds. "I'm the most traditional, just playing a bass all the way through. The bass lines have to be real steady."


Their Spokane stop is the first on their cross-country tour to New York. It's the band's first major cross-country tour, although they did do the West Coast a couple of years ago. "We just hope our band makes it across the U.S.," Arkley says. If they can make it through the cartoony landscapes of their own music night after night, they should be OK.


Library Science plays the Caterina Winery with For Years Blue and Kid Theodore on Friday, Aug. 31, at 7 pm. $7. Call 328-5069.


Publication Date: 8/29/07



- The Pacific Northwest Inlander


http://lineout.thestranger.com/2007/06/library_science

I wish there was more of a reggae scene here in Seattle (big ups to Stephen and Zion's Gate Records), but at least we have a kickass dub band pumping out low, slow, extra-spacial vibes.They're called Library Science and they're our Band of the Week.

I fiend for this kind of music, the kind that evokes massive distances and alien landscapes but always thrums along on a sensual, almost subliminal beat. For all its reverb-heavy darkness, there's something innately playful about the stuff, especially so with Library Science. They've got all the requisite dub flourishes--bubbly bass lines, barely-there chinka-chinka guitar, ethereal melodica, kinky electronic dalliance. But Library Science puts their own spin on the classic form in ways that aren't easy to describe. It's obvious they've got a reverence for the innovators, but there's a dissonant, electro feel. They thow in unexpected, weird sounds and samples--toy xylophone melodies, wheezing accordion drones, heavily buzzing guitars--that make this stuff totally unique.

They've got a couple gigs coming up--August 11 at Central Saloon, August 30 at Rendezvous--and word is they're terrific live.

- Jonathan Zwickel, Music Editor
June 27, 2007
- The Stranger


Discography

Dolphin (Happi Tyme Records) 2010
The Chancellor (Happi Tyme Records) 2007
High Life Honey (Happi Tyme Records) 2003

Photos

Bio

For their third album, Library Science beckons your close attention, shocks your dance nerve, and calls you to shout “Do It To It!”. Cartoon-length songs drop gummi worm melodies over a latticework of guitars, synths, samples, bass and drums.

The Go! Team meets Philip Glass and Lee “Scratch” Perry. Raise your arms cuz Library Science is handing out clap attacks!

Seattle's Library Science consists of Mildred Pitt (also of the Bran Flakes), Courtney Barnebey, and Peter Lynch. Formed in 2003, their live shows put FUN front and center with frenetic improvised video mixing and a whirl of sonic textures coaxing rapt attention from the eyes and ears, if not the bodies of their audience members.