Lines In The Sky
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Lines In The Sky

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2011 | INDIE

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2011
Band Rock Progressive

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Oct
11
Lines In The Sky @ Urban Artifact

Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

Sep
19
Lines In The Sky @ The End

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Sep
13
Lines In The Sky @ Media Rerun

Murfreesboro, Tennessee, United States

Murfreesboro, Tennessee, United States

Aug
29
Lines In The Sky @ Mr. Roboto Project

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

Aug
24
Lines In The Sky @ Growlers

Memphis, Tennessee, United States

Memphis, Tennessee, United States

Jul
12
Lines In The Sky @ The Basement East

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Feb
11
Lines In The Sky @ The End

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Feb
09
Lines In The Sky @ Media Rerun

Murfreesboro, Tennessee, United States

Murfreesboro, Tennessee, United States

Dec
10
Lines In The Sky @ The Cobra

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nov
01
Lines In The Sky @ Mercy Lounge

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Nashville, Tennessee, United States

Aug
12
Lines In The Sky @ Urban Artifact

Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

Aug
11
Lines In The Sky @ Seven Sense Festival 2016

Louisville, Kentucky, United States

Louisville, Kentucky, United States

Aug
10
Lines In The Sky @ Musica

Akron, Ohio, United States

Akron, Ohio, United States

Aug
07
Lines In The Sky @ Buffalo Iron Works

Buffalo, New York, United States

Buffalo, New York, United States

Aug
05
Lines In The Sky @ The Saint

Asbury Park, New Jersey, United States

Asbury Park, New Jersey, United States

Aug
04
Lines In The Sky @ Dockside Bar at Dave & Buster's

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Aug
02
Lines In The Sky @ Middle East Upstairs

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Aug
01
Lines In The Sky @ Radio Bean Coffeehouse

Burlington, Vermont, United States

Burlington, Vermont, United States

Jul
29
Lines In The Sky @ Amityville Music Hall

Amityville, New York, United States

Amityville, New York, United States

Jul
28
Lines In The Sky @ MilkBoy ArtHouse

College Park, Maryland, United States

College Park, Maryland, United States

Jul
27
Lines In The Sky @ Riff House Pub

Chesapeake, Virginia, United States

Chesapeake, Virginia, United States

Jul
25
Lines In The Sky @ The Pour House Music Hall

Raleigh, North Carolina, United States

Raleigh, North Carolina, United States

Jul
22
Lines In The Sky @ The Rabbit Hole

Charlotte, North Carolina, United States

Charlotte, North Carolina, United States

Jul
20
Lines In The Sky @ The Canal Club

Richmond, Virginia, United States

Richmond, Virginia, United States

Jul
19
Lines In The Sky @ Sycamore Deli

Blacksburg, Virginia, United States

Blacksburg, Virginia, United States

Music

Press


"BEACON Album Review - Excellent 4.0 - "Happy, bouncy, technical Prog-Pop, What's Not To Love?""

A couple of days ago, Good Tiger released their second album, We Will All Be Gone, and I found myself initially underwhelmed. I loved their debut album's combination of technical guitar playing and frontman Elliot Coleman's soulful ceiling-caressing vocals to a fault, and the significant cutting back on the technicality of the sophomore album made it a lot less enjoyable on first listen. We Will All Be Gone has subsequently grown on me as a completely separate entity from its predecessor, but I still find myself missing the over-the-top guitar work that made the first album so much fun. Fortunately, I have Lines in the Sky (henceforth, LITS) to fill that void with Beacon.

A Nashville-based progressive rock power-trio, LITS has put out three albums since 2014 that have all mined more or less the same sonic territory as their newest release Beacon. There hasn't been as much an evolution of their sound as there has been a maturation and honing of it. What you get with Beacon is flashy—but not aggressively so—musicianship combined with soaring vocal melodies. And it's all delivered in concise and fat-free slices of radio-ready pop/rock bliss.

While there is certainly a verbose quality to the musicianship on Beacon, the playing on the album doesn't ever overpower the songs. There are winding jumpy riffs and grooves that bounce off each other and spiral in unexpected directions, but Beacon's focus never wavers and the musicianship always exist to support the songs. With songwriting as dense and instrumentals as busy as these, it is often easy for songs and albums to feel claustrophobic and directionless, especially when the instruments are competing with the vocals, but LITS uses their instrumental flash in very tasteful ways and find ways for every piece of the puzzle to coexist. While the basis of the album's sound is progressive-leaning post-hardcore, incorporating jazzy math-rock and understated electronica flourishes, that has a well-defined identity which makes the album sound cohesive as a whole, there is enough variation and creativity to prevent it from sounding tired and repetitive.

The only downside to the album is that Beacon does not sound particularly groundbreaking, and struggles a little bit to be memorable. Every song has enough cool parts to make you replay it, but even after a couple of listens to the album you may struggle to remember a standout hook. However, Beacon's combination of upbeat attitude, sheer musicianship and heavy melodicism is just undeniably...likeable. After all, what's not to like about happy, bouncy, technical prog"

Highlights:
Not About You
Teeth
Ancient Insult - Sputnik Music (SputnikMusic.com)


"Lines In The Sky merge progressive metal with pop on "Nereus" video premiere"

You could call Nashville's Lines in the Sky a progressive metal band but that's only a fraction of the story. Walloping drums and breathtaking, truly electric riffs make the case for the heavy but pop-inflected vocals and a gift for musical dynamics suggests there's something deeper, more expansive afoot. And that's just "Nereus", a holdover from the group's 2016 LP, Parallel Travel, but also a testament to the group's tenacity, an ability to weather internal frictions and emerge with more new music via the album Beacon, due 30 January.

Taking its name from the shapeshifting Greek god, "Nereus" specifically touches on the paradigm shift experienced between age 21 and 24. Jesse Brock, frontman and principal writer, notes that the tune has its roots in the personal. "These ages have exhibited some of our most radical changes of personality and thought," he says, "which has sometimes resulted in some form of volatility. In a general sense, I think this potential for volatility is too often overlooked and maybe it would do good to embrace it as the song suggests."

He's quick to point out that the origins and evolution itself were filled with conflict. "The original idea was radically different than what we have now," he offers. "We were much and younger and more stubborn, musically, so, naturally, we found about its direction. We eventually decided to shelve the idea because of this tension. However, when we pulled it back out (about a year later), we finished the song in about a day. It's like we needed to grow into our musical selves and abilities in order to finish the track." - PopMatters


"World Cafe Live Concert Review - Lines In The Sky"

http://www.rebelnoi.se/articles/concert-review-lines-in-the-sky-w-the-madeleine-haze-at-world-cafe-live-on-
Lines in the Sky’s assortment of influences—such as Devin Townsend, Peter Gabriel, Coheed and Cambria, and Meshuggah—helped make their past two LPs (Hilasterion and Parallel Travel) so engaging. Naturally, they included several tracks from those records; for instance, they began with “Nereus,” whose intricate rhythms and high-pitched melodies evoked The Dear Hunter and Thank You Scientist, and eventually brought out “Feed the Wolves,” complete with serene harmonies and effective backing effects. Elsewhere, “Not About You” really showcased Jesse’s penchant for poppy songwriting and singing, while “Teeth” conjured the spaciness of modern BTBAM and “Admiral” offered perhaps the most drastic and impressive dynamic shifts of their set. These selections, coupled with other equally impressive ones (including a beefed-up cover of Sting’s “Seven Days”), exemplified how well Lines in the Sky can mesh inspirations into an original sound. Plus, their self-effacing interactions with the crowd in-between songs brought an added layer of likability to the performance.

Lines in the Sky brought their A-game…there wasn’t a wasted moment…packed a staggering amount of jaw-dropping instrumentation, compositional diversity, and melodic appeal, generat(ing) a lot of anticipation for their upcoming record…. - Rebel Noise (Jordan Blum, writer)


"Must See Shows - Lines In The Sky"

Lines In The Sky plays a breathtaking brand of blissful, richly melodic progressive rock that is as expansive and impressionistic as their name. On their latest album, “Parallel Travel,” the band lays down unpredictable time changes and complex rhythms while singer/guitarist Jesse Brock layers in ghostly guitar lines and stacks vocal harmonies to the heavens. It’s an intriguing synthesis of different styles, and Brock is blunt about why the band marries the melodic to the progressive. “With this music that we make,” he says, “we think about how we can make those time changes less noticeable, where more people can groove to it despite that fact that there are some complex things happening under the hood. We want you to still be able to feel the pulse and still be able to move to it. I spend a lot of time in making memorable melodies not just across the choruses but the verses, as well.” - Greeneville Journal (Vincent Harris, writer)


"Press release - Lines In The Sky"

File Under: Rock/Alternative/Progressive/Ambient

Artist: Lines In The Sky
Album: Beacon
Label: Faster Steps Records
Release Date: January 30th, 2018

English composer Frederick Delius famously remarked that “music is an outburst of the soul,” and if there’s one emerging band that exudes this sentiment, it’s Nashville-based trio Lines In The Sky. Formed several years ago by brothers Jesse and Bowman Brock (vocals/guitar and percussion, respectively) and currently completed by bassist Ben McAnelly, Lines In The Sky’s prior two LPs—2014’s Hilasterion and 2016’s Parallel Travel (both of which were mixed by Grammy-winner Tim Palmer)—demonstrated an exceptional blend of progressive rock technicality, alternative rock attitude, pop/rock magnetism, and ambient introspection. As such, their masterful merging of heartfelt harmonies, tight yet adventurous instrumentation, and poignant lyricism pinpointed an act whose ambition and focus matched their vigorous songwriting and arrangement skills.

Looking back now, however, those albums also serve as the satiating appetizers for the main course that is Beacon, the group’s strongest record yet. By maintaining everything that makes their formula work while simultaneously emphasizing a stronger sense of cohesion, focus, and dynamic equity (between chaotic and calm movements), Lines In The Sky has created something truly superlative. Like the works of stylistic siblings Coheed and Cambria, Closure in Moscow, In the Presence of Wolves, Circa Survive, and The Mars Volta, Beacon combines flamboyant frenzy with invigorating and earnest accessibility to yield not only the band’s finest outing thus far, but also a testament to how striving, hypnotic, and ultimately rewarding rock music can be when you have players like these behind it.

Having recently replaced two former bassists—Zack Wakefield and Max Ingersoll—McAnelly makes his studio recording debut with Lines In The Sky on Beacon. At first, he saw the opportunity as “a massive challenge . . . [but] one that [he] was really looking forward to” because he was already a major fan and friend. In particular, he was “nervous about playing with Bowman” because, as he puts it, “his rhythm is so precise and I’m still working on meeting him on this level.” In retrospect, McAnelly still sees difficulty in the position, yet he also enjoys it a lot since “the highly physical shows and intense musical compositions are very fun to try and match.” Likewise, the Brock brothers had their eyes on him for a while due to their “serious respect for his playing.” As Beacon proves, he’s an invaluable asset to the music, helping to “solidify and unify the ensemble in terms of writing and image.”

In fact, Beacon reveals its evolutions from the get-go, as opener “Not About You” explodes with some of Lines In The Sky’s most elaborate and entrancing guitar riffs to date. Behind them, Bowman and McAnelly (both of whom are classically trained musicians) provide sophisticated yet subtle rhythms while Jesse’s singing soars with trademark wounded smoothness. As always, his melodies and lyrics provide a relatable and fetching juxtaposition to the instrumental intricacies beneath them; in particular, the chorus (“I don’t understand / Why you think we can / Go about this love / Without the stops and starts / We’re not in the clear / Till this disappears / Gotta work for what we wanted / Gotta burn what we don’t need”) expresses the universality of romantic hardships with irresistibly impassioned catchiness. Naturally, they also throw in a virtuosic breakdown near the end of the track that, coupled with its perpetual hooks, makes “Not About You”—like all of Beacon—a must-hear sequence for fans of welcoming songwriting and wild scores alike (not that they’re mutually exclusive, of course!)

As the collection continues, the trio ceaselessly illustrates why Beacon is their most multifaceted and focused effort ever. Whether it’s the progressive metal meltdowns (that evoke Haken, Periphery, and Riverside) in-between the poppy angst of “A Great Deal,” “Ancient Insult,” and “Beacon,” the heavenly harmonies and luscious lightness that permeate “Teeth” and [especially] “Library,” the infectiously disorienting syncopation of “Judith” (in which McAnelly and Bowman perform with the magic of a shared mind), or the beautiful serenity of closing piano ballad “The Crawl,” Lines In The Sky ensure that every moment of Beacon is a tour-de-force of artistic advancements and audience-pleasing splendor.

That said, the group isn’t shy about admitting which selections stand out most for them. For example, McAnelly loves how the “sense of melody and arrangement come together beautifully” in “Library” (which contains Jesse’s “lyrical retelling of the union between the characters of The Librarian and The Didact” from the Halo video game series). Bowman concurs while also expressing how “Judith” is “fun to play and different from every other LITS song” because it draws from “a ton of unusual sources.” As for Jesse, he picks “Teeth” because of its groove and Peter Gabriel vibe (the opening was even modeled after “The Rhythm of the Heat”), as well as the title track because it’s “a rollercoaster of a song.” Remarkably, he adds that both pieces are “about two characters in the same story. They’re engaged in a conflict of passions and concessions. It’s fun to think of them as one element.”

Speaking of “Teeth,” it was recently chosen as the initial single from the LP, which, as you’d expect, was a tough decision to make: “This album isn’t the longest full-length we’ve done, so we wanted to be really strategic about what to put out first. ‘Teeth’ ended up being the most logical decision because it touches all of the bases for our previous work while also hinting at some of the new directions,” they declare.

Although Beacon conveys similar themes as its predecessors (such as the heaviness of “relationships, monetary strains, and life decisions”), it still shows “more maturity” in terms of its structures and lyrics. They clarify: “We were able to really hone in on some very precise ideas instead of using broad strokes to generalize an emotion or an experience. Musically, we are much more diverse than we used to be.” Whereas Jesse served as the “primary songwriter who’d come up with most of the parts” on Hilasterion and “a majority” of Parallel Travel, Beacon was “very collaborative,” with Bowman and McAnelly helping the configurations and “narrowing the scope of what Jesse was trying to accomplish.” In other words, they’ve “established a great writing environment that incorporates everyone’s ideas equally.”

Of course, an album’s artwork is a crucial part of its appeal, too, and on that end, Lines In The Sky once again goes farther than ever before. Equal parts post-apocalyptic Western wasteland and Blade Runner-esque ultramodern dystopia, Beacon’s imagery (courtesy of “fantastic photographer and 3D artist” Casey Moore) is “really reflective” of what the band stands for since they “love sci-fi and fantasy works” and “tend to hold very futurist ideas.” At the same time, it also echoes their playful goofiness (as demonstrated by them journeying across the aforementioned landscape on sleek hoverbikes seemingly pulled straight from Halo).

Whereas many artists are hesitant to discuss overt stimuli and similarities, Lines In The Sky are wholly transparent about acknowledging their forbearers. Explicitly, they cite Coheed and Cambria, Peter Gabriel, and Sting as being “hugely influential on all of our work . . . especially regarding vocals and arrangements.” Beyond that, McAnelly channels his “deep love for jazz” throughout the disc, Bowman tips his hat to Pat Metheny and Chick Corea, and Jesse recognizes the “super tight” marvels of The Contortionist (as well as The Weeknd, whose “unparalleled pop creativity” and “brutal honesty” have been impacting their music “for some time”). Clearly, Lines In The Sky find comfort and inevitability in being compared to others; as they put it, “It’s kind of flattering, really. After all, you’re being self-defeating if you say that you’re completely different from anyone else. You’re always building on the ideas of the people before you. It’s not a bad thing, but you should strive to push the envelope and put your own spin on things.” With Beacon, Lines In The Sky do precisely that.

Despite looking forward with this third outing, Lines In The Sky hasn’t forgotten their past, either, as the group is also prepping to release a video for “Nereus” from Parallel Travel. Described as presenting a “fascinating turn on crime, gun violence, the reversing of victimization, and the power of taking action and making choices,” it was developed and filmed before McAnelly joined the troupe (so only Jesse and Bowman appear) by Casey Pierce. The band elaborates: “We love how he shot the chase, and the actors did a fantastic job with their roles.” Although it was never “intended to be about any one issue or make a statement about [their] own stances,” now seems the perfect time to release it considering “everything that has been happening in the country recently.” As such, Lines In The Sky wants it to promote “overcoming things such as fear and ignorance without making it a political warzone. If someone is able to garner a more specific meaning and realize something on a more personal level, then we’ve accomplished our goal with it,” they conclude.

Expectedly, the trio sees the live experience as a quintessential part of their growth; specifically, they’ve become “more open to experimenting musically”—including having all three members sing—as well as begun considering implementing a more elaborate lighting component to make their sets “more engaging.” Perhaps the chief benefit of being on stage so often over the years is enhancing their abilities to do “what a lot of modern progressive bands” find problematic: “play complex parts and still move effectively. We’re much better at this than we used to be.” While Lines In The Sky—like many acts—“will tell you that they’re never fully happy with their live performances,” Jesse, Bowman, and McAnelly welcome such opportunities to “always try something new and reach a new level” in an attempt to avoid complacency and boredom.

Luckily, they’ll get arguably their biggest chance yet to do just that when they play the Church of Prog segment (the first slot) of RoSfest 2018 at the Majesty Theater in Gettysburg, PA on Sunday, May 6th. As the premiere American progressive rock gathering for the past fifteen years or so, the Rites of Spring festival is known for drawing some of the biggest bands in the genre (both past and present), and next year’s three-day show will be no exception. In fact, Lines In The Sky will share the bill with Philadelphia’s Shadow Merchant, Chicago’s District 97, California’s Perfect Beings, Peru’s Flor de Loto, and even legendary Italian ensemble PFM (Premiata Forneria Marconi), among others. At this point, Lines In The Sky hopes to blow everyone away by “playing the new album in its entirety and maybe one of the older tracks.” Outside of that, they’re planning to promote Beacon in cities like Boston, New York, New Jersey, and Richmond, VA (McAnelly’s hometown), plus venture towards the Pacific Northwest. Of course, European shows are always on their radar, too.

Above all else, Lines In The Sky wants Beacon to be “a fun listening experience” that blends “the essence of traditional/old prog with newer, more contemporary ideas” while maintaining “a cohesion in how every song is part of a singular work.” From its initial bursts of electric anarchy to its closing passage of ebony and ivory tranquility, this third studio effort nails all of those attributes and more, making it a triumphant statement in every way. As its name suggests, Beacon shines not only as the trio’s greatest achievement to date, but as a glorious entry into the genre as a whole. Check it out for yourself and see why there’s a great deal indeed to love about Lines In The Sky.


You can pre-order Beacon via iTunes here!

For more information, contact Jane Brock at thelinesinthesky@gmail.com. Also, find Lines In The Sky online:

Twitter - @linesinthesky
Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/linesintheskymusic
Instagram - @linesintheskymusic
Website - https://www.linesinthesky.com
Bandcamp - https://linesinthesky.bandcamp.com
Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/linesinthesky - Jordan Blum (PopMatters, Paste, The PROG Report, Metal Injection, et al.)


"Album Review - Lines In The Sky "Parallel Travel""

"...these tunes impress...and lead LITS out of their inspiration's shadows and into their own place in the rock landscape."--Cole Allen

Band: Lines In The Sky
Album: Parallel Travel
Released: 04/29/2016

Before I ever even knew the music of Rush, I wasn’t a fan. It was no fault of their own. I place the blame on a college roommate that spent our entire freshman year learning how to play guitar to “Tom Sawyer.” What started as sloppy chord work in the fall became a choppy, high-pitched cover by the end of spring. While his improvement was impressive, it was a terrible introduction to a band highly regarded for their musicianship.

Needless to say, when I read that one of Lines In The Sky’s common comparisons was to the Canadian progressive rock legends, I was a bit reluctant to review their upcoming album. Having never previously heard the Nashville trio, the last thing I wanted was to go into the review haunted by bad dorm rock nearly 20 years ago. Luckily, while there is a resemblance in parts to Geddy Lee and company, LITS’ sound spans far beyond one singular artist.

Comprised of brothers Jesse and Bowman Brock, on vocals and drums, respectively, and friend Max Ingersoll on bass, it’s immediately clear that Lines In The Sky is talented well beyond its musicians’ youth. And though they come from the home of the Grand Old Opry and Ms. Rayna Jaymes herself (Google it), country appears to be the one genre absent from their repertoire. In Parallel Travel, their second full-length LP, LITS teeters between hard rock, alternative, pop and progressive rock like Philippe Petit crossing the Twin Towers on a wire. From song to song there are nods to past and present artists, while LITS fights to carve out their own unique sound. It may be this duality of embracing their influences while seeking to define themselves that inspired the album name.

Parallel Travel opens with “History,” a solemn, quiet tune unlike any of its nine counterparts. In the vein of intros to albums like U2’s Joshua Tree, Kings of Leon’s Only By The Night, or Coldplay’s Parachutes, it feels like a tease of things to come. Bare of LITS’ trademark guitar shredding and frantic percussions, “History” is a small peek to the sonic compilation that follows.

From there the album ventures down two paths —subtly different, yet defining of who the young trio is as musicians. Songs like “Nereus” and “Admiral” are likable and clean. The vocals, strings and beats are crisp, clear and neatly arranged. It’s in these songs that fans of Rush will find a home. While these tunes impress by displaying LITS’s melodic mobility and keen producing skills, the life of the album is fully realized in the tracks that harness a raw, kinetic energy. Highlighted by “Threads,” “Element 115” and the album’s title track, “Parallel Travel,” Jesse Brock’s vocals take on a greater sense of urgency and lead LITS out of their inspiration’s shadows into their own place in the rock landscape.

One of the greatest challenges of young bands is their ability to find their own place in the market — not just commercially, but sonically. Are they able to take the music that has inspired them to create something new or does their sound become a generic blend of influences? At the outset of Parallel Travel, it’s unclear if LITS’ can shake the comparisons; there is a heavy aura of Rush and modern rockers Muse and Coheed and Cambria. And while Parallel would be a more-than-suitable nod to LITS’ idols if it continued down that path, it’s when the band diverge from that course to a freer, more organic sound that the album shines. If their journey of growth and discovery continues to evolve, maybe in 20 more years there will be a student with many sleepless nights haunted by a roommate’s amateur attempt at trying to learn guitar to a LITS’ gem off Parallel Travel. - Loud and Heavy


"Premiere: Listen to "Admiral" From Lines In The Sky"

"Lines In The Sky incorporate everything from metal, jazz, and pop into their forthcoming LP, Parallel Travel. It all gets wrapped up into one chunk of sound on “Admiral”...--Ray Roa

PREMIERE: LISTEN TO “ADMIRAL” FROM LINES IN THE SKY
2 months agoRay RoaFeatured, Music, News uhvoY1ChBmhIlpYVg-Sn87_jrxlstn-_RIZ8EpFZ9Hs,4gkDO5L-K3zCWmIj8X8i7CspOW2M-buKq0P4BcTZBo0
Lines In The Sky incorporate everything from metal, jazz, and pop into their forthcoming LP, Parallel Travel. It all gets wrapped up into one chunk of sound on “Admiral,” which SubAp! is premiering today.

The track was intended to be a ballad with a slow jazzy feel, but the Nashville-based three-piece ended up making some production and arrangement changes that doubled the tempo to 200 bpm, according to frontman and songwriter, Jesse Brock.

“If the music doesn’t convince me on the words then it proves to be a dull listening experience,” Brock said in an email. “The arrangement in the verses helps put into perspective the energy that is put into a changing relationship. This ultimately leads up to a point that either makes or breaks what is going on. The release of the resolution is felt in the chorus and is reflected by the scarcity of the arrangement and the basic voicing of the chords in the guitar. Real-life changes in relationships may take different turns as well.” - Suburban Apologist


"Lines In the Sky Shares 'Planet' Video From Upcoming Release "Parallel Travel""

Nashville trio, Lines in The Sky are sharing the music video for their track, "Planet" exclusively through The Prelude Press! The fun GoPro video serves as a snapshot into the bands' lives, including performance videos, footage from the studio and more. "Planet" also comes from Lines in The Sky's upcoming release, Parallel Travel expected in Spring 2016.

Singer, songwriter and guitarist Jesse Brock had this to say about the song:

"Planet originally came to me as a super sappy love song. However, that vein of writing has always seemed very bland to me and I didn't want to throw a redundant lyric over a cool musical piece. The final lyric came to me several days before we recorded the track. At first it seemed weird that I was writing a 'love song' about our planet. I let the idea sink a little and I finally saw the connect between the words and the music. It's a very epic lyrical concept tied together with a dynamic piece of music and really personifies planet Earth."

Stay connected and updated with Lines in The Sky on Facebook and Twitter. - The Prelude Press


""Forward-thinking welcome variety, fun and ferocious""

If you’re tired of run-of-the-mill rock, then you need to spend some time with Lines In The Sky. Cutting-edge and catchy as all get out, the Nashville trio’s forward-thinking brand of punk is guaranteed to add some welcome variety to your regular rotation, especially if you’re a fan of Coheed and Cambria and other progressive acts.

Today, we’re excited to bring you the outfit’s latest single, “Element 115,” a high-octane banger that’s equally fun and ferocious. Stream it below and share your thoughts with us in the replies.

“‘Element 115’ is one of our oldest songs,” vocalist Jesse Brock told UTG via email. “It deals lyrically with coming to terms with the death of a friend or family member, something I was dealing with during the time I wrote this song. Musically, we were going for a groovy ‘Muse-esque’ feel. Our drummer Bo really sits in the pocket on this track, and the bass has some really prevalent rhythms that help achieve this feel.”

The band’s latest offering is taken from their impending sophomore LP, Parallel Travel, which is set to hit shelves later this Spring. - Under The Gun Review


"Lines In the Sky's "This World Is Not Big Enough For Me" Is A Prog Punk Banger"

For a three-piece band, Lines In The Sky sure know how to make a hell of a lot of noise. The Nashville-based trio peddle in rock that is aggressive and progressive, without falling into screamy cliches or jam-band noodling. Today, we’re debuting their brand new song “This World Is Not Big Enough For Me,” and if we’re being completely honest, it kinda sounds like Patrick Stump fronting Circa Survive. That might sound kinda weird, but we promise it works. Frontman Jesse Brock explains: "“The lyrics of ‘This World Is Not Big Enough For Me’ focuses on some severe issues of confidence that I have felt periodically. This one in particular deals with issues of weight, literally. The problem of hearing ‘be comfortable with your image’ while pop culture screams in your face that being overweight is detestable. Like many other issues, this one is very complex and facing it takes a lot of willpower. It is a struggle many people can relate to.”

Lines In The Sky’s new album, Parallel Travel, will be released in 2016; get more info here." - Substream Magazine


"Video Premiere Lines In the Sky"

We’re pleased to bring you the premiere of Lines in the Sky‘s new music video for their track “New Season” (watch below). The video was directed by Seth Kays of ManMade Media Co.

The band comments on the video:

“When we started the process behind the visual for ‘New Season’, we wanted it to be a dark humorous shoot. We really wanted to capitalize on rejecting the mainstream-marketed Christmas (like true rockers) and portray how silly it all looks. The whole thing is basically a satire on the over-saturated, materialistic Christmas season. Tying that in with the lyrical message, the modern Christmas season is not what it claims to be. Hence the title ‘New Season’. Today’s Christmas holiday as become a chore where people go through the motions. This is referenced when we are running around the tree and throwing gifts into the fire. We hope the video conveys, if anything, that we want people to recognize the monotony of the season and explore a more meaningful tradition.” - New Noise Magazine


"Lines In the Sky "Hilasterion", our overall verdict "Excellent""

OUR OVERALL VERDICT
"EXCELLENT"
‘Atoning sacrifice’, ‘mercy seat’ and ‘propitiation’ are all hermeneutically acceptable translations of the ancient greek term: Hilasterion. Which one of these, if any, applies to these eleven pristine recordings by Nashville’s Lines in the Sky is a question I found myself pondering as this album sunk it’s vivid atmospherics into me.

Mixed by the eminent Tim Palmer whom audiophiles may recall from other high fidelity albums such as Pearl Jam’s “Ten” and U2’s “All That You Can’t Leave Behind”, the sonic width of this album is a joy to behold. With toms spaced out around the listener’s stereo field and the lovely rumble of the low end of this band ringing through, Palmer has really brought the best out of these takes. It was an exceptionally good move by the band to get him to mix and it’s a partnership that could serve them well in the future if they can keep him on board.

Progressive rock to me is firstly about R O C K, but a close second is the importance of a great singer with an excellent melodic ear. It was very pleasing to listen to Jesse Brock’s melodic choices as the album unfolded, and the boy’s certainly got the voice to be able to do justice to said choices. The clarity of the mixing and space left by the guitars really allows Jesse Brock’s voice to shine through and the lyrics to be comprehendible. For such emotional and righteous sounding music this is important. The listening experience for me was comparable to some of The Butterfly Effect’s album’s, a journey from start to finish with a story being told all the while.

I became mentally exhausted trying to keep track of the perpetual fills by drummer/percussionist Bowman Brock. It’s amazing that with so much going on in his rhythm work that the songs never seemed crowded at all. I would love to see him play this album live and dare say that it would be akin to a drumming clinic. The guitars were a tad disappointing to me, though. I tend to prefer earthier, sludgier tones and don’t resonate well with crystal clear sounds. However, this is a personal preference. As far as progressive/ambient guitar tones go, these are certainly up to the task.

Opening with the feel-shifting “Nine Flights High” there is no doubt what the audience can expect from this album. The classic prog-rock interlude in this song would stand strong next to most of Rush’s catalogue (and I don’t make that reference lightly!). Having fallen in love with this truly epic interlude I was mortified to realize that the band had released an edit of the song without half of it. Understandably, though, this is a strategic (if creatively stifling) move that bands seeking mainstream radio approval must take nowadays. The first three songs on this album are classily woven together into a single movement, the second part of which is a short instrumental segue. This made me think that with the complexity and proficiency of the musicianship on display here that this whole album could be quite legitimately released as an instrumental version too.

The album continues to move in very well orchestrated manner, ebbs and flows notably depicting reflective moments on acoustic guitars, some beautiful falsetto, classic rock solos and always pristine, panned drums. Favourite tracks for mine are “Dig Deeper”, ‘Living by the Coast’ and the aforementioned “Nine Flights High”. I would implore all serious purveyor’s of progressive rock music to attend to the Lines in the Sky website to get a copy of the album but more importantly, to see them do this live.

Whilst I don’t always listen to progressive rock, when I do, I really enjoy the good stuff! I readily and with great confidence place Hilasterion in this category. Lines in the Sky definitely found a place in my playlist, and I foresee this album becoming a really good album for the road. As for the meaning of the word and the story being told, well I think that’s best left between the songs and the listener. - Bucket List Music Reviews


"Album Review: Lines In the Sky - Hilasterion"

“Solid musicianship...flawless voice...gorgeous symphony-like orchestration of guitars, bass, and drums...Hilasterion could easily be a soundtrack to an entire movie, from top to bottom. The music really takes you on a journey, filled with peaks, valleys, and unadulterated rock power...Lines In the Sky's star is about to shine even brighter.” - Rock On Philly


"Hilasterion featured on Tunecore's New Music Tuesdays blog!"

Lines In the Sky's full-length album Hilasterion is a featured Rock pick on Tunecore's "New Music Tuesdays" blog, alongside new releases from established artists Jars of Clay and Epic Rap Battles of History. - Tunecore


""If you're tired of run-of-the-mill rock, then you need to spend some time with Lines In The Sky""

If you’re tired of run-of-the-mill rock, then you need to spend some time with Lines In The Sky. Cutting-edge and catchy as all get out, the Nashville trio’s forward-thinking brand of punk is guaranteed to add some welcome variety to your regular rotation, especially if you’re a fan of Coheed and Cambria and other progressive acts.

Today, we’re excited to bring you the outfit’s latest single, “Element 115,” a high-octane banger that’s equally fun and ferocious. Stream it below and share your thoughts with us in the replies.

“‘Element 115’ is one of our oldest songs,” vocalist Jesse Brock told UTG via email. “It deals lyrically with coming to terms with the death of a friend or family member, something I was dealing with during the time I wrote this song. Musically, we were going for a groovy ‘Muse-esque’ feel. Our drummer Bo really sits in the pocket on this track, and the bass has some really prevalent rhythms that help achieve this feel.”

The band’s latest offering is taken from their impending sophomore LP, Parallel Travel, which is set to hit shelves later this Spring. For more info, follow Lines In The Sky on Twitter. - Under The Gun Review


"PREMIERE: Listen to "Admiral" From Lines In The Sky"

Lines In The Sky incorporate everything from metal, jazz, and pop into their forthcoming LP, Parallel Travel. It all gets wrapped up into one chunk of sound on “Admiral,” which SubAp! is premiering today.

The track was intended to be a ballad with a slow jazzy feel, but the Nashville-based three-piece ended up making some production and arrangement changes that doubled the tempo to 200 bpm, according to frontman and songwriter, Jesse Brock.

“If the music doesn’t convince me on the words then it proves to be a dull listening experience,” Brock said in an email. “The arrangement in the verses helps put into perspective the energy that is put into a changing relationship. This ultimately leads up to a point that either makes or breaks what is going on. The release of the resolution is felt in the chorus and is reflected by the scarcity of the arrangement and the basic voicing of the chords in the guitar. Real-life changes in relationships may take different turns as well.”

Have a listen to the track below, and plan on seeing the LP released at the end of next month. - Suburban Apologist


"PREMIERE: Listen to "Admiral" From Lines In The Sky"

PREMIERE: LISTEN TO “ADMIRAL” FROM LINES IN THE SKY

Lines In The Sky incorporate everything from metal, jazz, and pop into their forthcoming LP, Parallel Travel. It all gets wrapped up into one chunk of sound on “Admiral,” which SubAp! is premiering today.

The track was intended to be a ballad with a slow jazzy feel, but the Nashville-based three-piece ended up making some production and arrangement changes that doubled the tempo to 200 bpm, according to frontman and songwriter, Jesse Brock.

“If the music doesn’t convince me on the words then it proves to be a dull listening experience,” Brock said in an email. “The arrangement in the verses helps put into perspective the energy that is put into a changing relationship. This ultimately leads up to a point that either makes or breaks what is going on. The release of the resolution is felt in the chorus and is reflected by the scarcity of the arrangement and the basic voicing of the chords in the guitar. Real-life changes in relationships may take different turns as well.”

Have a listen to the track below, and plan on seeing the LP released at the end of next month. - Suburban Apologist


"Happy, bouncy, technical Prog-Pop, What's Not To Love?"

A couple of days ago, Good Tiger released their second album, We Will All Be Gone, and I found myself initially underwhelmed. I loved their debut album's combination of technical guitar playing and frontman Elliot Coleman's soulful ceiling-caressing vocals to a fault, and the significant cutting back on the technicality of the sophomore album made it a lot less enjoyable on first listen. We Will All Be Gone has subsequently grown on me as a completely separate entity from its predecessor, but I still find myself missing the over-the-top guitar work that made the first album so much fun. Fortunately, I have Lines in the Sky (henceforth, LITS) to fill that void with Beacon.

A Nashville-based progressive rock power-trio, LITS has put out three albums since 2014 that have all mined more or less the same sonic territory as their newest release Beacon. There hasn't been as much an evolution of their sound as there has been a maturation and honing of it. What you get with Beacon is flashy—but not aggressively so—musicianship combined with soaring vocal melodies. And it's all delivered in concise and fat-free slices of radio-ready pop/rock bliss.

While there is certainly a verbose quality to the musicianship on Beacon, the playing on the album doesn't ever overpower the songs. There are winding jumpy riffs and grooves that bounce off each other and spiral in unexpected directions, but Beacon's focus never wavers and the musicianship always exist to support the songs. With songwriting as dense and instrumentals as busy as these, it is often easy for songs and albums to feel claustrophobic and directionless, especially when the instruments are competing with the vocals, but LITS uses their instrumental flash in very tasteful ways and find ways for every piece of the puzzle to coexist. While the basis of the album's sound is progressive-leaning post-hardcore, incorporating jazzy math-rock and understated electronica flourishes, that has a well-defined identity which makes the album sound cohesive as a whole, there is enough variation and creativity to prevent it from sounding tired and repetitive.

The only downside to the album is that Beacon does not sound particularly groundbreaking, and struggles a little bit to be memorable. Every song has enough cool parts to make you replay it, but even after a couple of listens to the album you may struggle to remember a standout hook. However, Beacon's combination of upbeat attitude, sheer musicianship and heavy melodicism is just undeniably...likeable. After all, what's not to like about happy, bouncy, technical prog"

Highlights:
Not About You
Teeth
Ancient Insult - Sputnik Music (sputnikmusic.com)


"BEACON Album Review - Excellent 4.0 - "Happy, bouncy, technical Prog-Pop, what's not to love?""

A couple of days ago, Good Tiger released their second album, We Will All Be Gone, and I found myself initially underwhelmed. I loved their debut album's combination of technical guitar playing and frontman Elliot Coleman's soulful ceiling-caressing vocals to a fault, and the significant cutting back on the technicality of the sophomore album made it a lot less enjoyable on first listen. We Will All Be Gone has subsequently grown on me as a completely separate entity from its predecessor, but I still find myself missing the over-the-top guitar work that made the first album so much fun. Fortunately, I have Lines in the Sky (henceforth, LITS) to fill that void with Beacon.

A Nashville-based progressive rock power-trio, LITS has put out three albums since 2014 that have all mined more or less the same sonic territory as their newest release Beacon. There hasn't been as much an evolution of their sound as there has been a maturation and honing of it. What you get with Beacon is flashy—but not aggressively so—musicianship combined with soaring vocal melodies. And it's all delivered in concise and fat-free slices of radio-ready pop/rock bliss.

While there is certainly a verbose quality to the musicianship on Beacon, the playing on the album doesn't ever overpower the songs. There are winding jumpy riffs and grooves that bounce off each other and spiral in unexpected directions, but Beacon's focus never wavers and the musicianship always exist to support the songs. With songwriting as dense and instrumentals as busy as these, it is often easy for songs and albums to feel claustrophobic and directionless, especially when the instruments are competing with the vocals, but LITS uses their instrumental flash in very tasteful ways and find ways for every piece of the puzzle to coexist. While the basis of the album's sound is progressive-leaning post-hardcore, incorporating jazzy math-rock and understated electronica flourishes, that has a well-defined identity which makes the album sound cohesive as a whole, there is enough variation and creativity to prevent it from sounding tired and repetitive.

The only downside to the album is that Beacon does not sound particularly groundbreaking, and struggles a little bit to be memorable. Every song has enough cool parts to make you replay it, but even after a couple of listens to the album you may struggle to remember a standout hook. However, Beacon's combination of upbeat attitude, sheer musicianship and heavy melodicism is just undeniably...likeable. After all, what's not to like about happy, bouncy, technical prog"

Highlights:
Not About You
Teeth
Ancient Insult - Sputnik Music (SputnikMusic.com)


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

English composer Frederick Delius famously remarked that “music is an outburst of the soul,” and if there’s one emerging band that exudes this sentiment, it’s Nashville-based trio Lines In The Sky. Formed by brothers Jesse and Bowman Brock (vocals/guitar and percussion, respectively) and currently completed by bassist Ben McAnelly, Lines In The Sky’s prior two LPs—2014’s Hilasterion and 2016’s Parallel Travel (both mixed by Grammy-winner Tim Palmer)—blended exceptional progressive rock technicality, alternative rock attitude, pop/rock magnetism, and ambient introspection. 

Those albums now serve as the satiating appetizers for the main course that is Beacon, the group’s strongest record yet. Maintaining everything that makes their formula work while simultaneously emphasizing a stronger sense of cohesion and dynamic equity, Lines In The Sky has created something truly superlative. Like the works of stylistic siblings Coheed and Cambria, [Rush], Circa Survive, and The Mars Volta, Beacon combines flamboyant frenzy with invigorating earnest accessibility to yield not only the band’s finest outing thus far, but also a testament to how hypnotic and ultimately rewarding rock music can be when you have players like these behind it.

Beacon reveals itself from the get-go, as opener “Not About You” explodes with some of Lines In The Sky’s most elaborate and entrancing guitar riffs to date. Bowman and McAnelly (both of whom are classically trained musicians) provide sophisticated yet subtle rhythms while Jesse’s singing soars with trademark wounded smoothness. As always, his melodies and lyrics provide a relatable fetching juxtaposition to the instrumental intricacies beneath them. Naturally, they also throw in a virtuosic breakdown near the end of the track that, coupled with its perpetual hooks, makes “Not About You”—like all of Beacon—a must-hear sequence for fans of songwriting and wild scores alike.

The collection ceaselessly illustrates why Beacon is their most multifaceted yet focused effort ever.  The progressive metal meltdowns (evoking Haken, Periphery, and Riverside) in-between the poppy angst of “A Great Deal,” “Ancient Insult,” and “Beacon,” the luscious lightness that permeates “Teeth” and [especially] “Library,” the infectiously disorienting syncopation of “Judith” (in which McAnelly and Bowman perform with the magic of a shared mind), or the beautiful serenity of closing piano ballad “The Crawl,” Lines In The Sky ensure that every moment of Beacon is a tour-de-force of artistic advancements and audience-pleasing splendor.

Lines In The Sky are transparent about acknowledging their forbearers. They cite Coheed and Cambria, Peter Gabriel, and Sting as being “hugely influential on all of our work . . . especially regarding vocals and arrangements.” McAnelly channels his “deep love for jazz”, Bowman tips his hat to Pat Metheny and Chick Corea, and Jesse recognizes the “super tight” marvels of The Contortionist (as well as The Weeknd, whose “unparalleled pop creativity” and “brutal honesty” have been impacting their music “for some time”). 

The trio sees the live show as a quintessential part of their growth. Being on stage so often over the years has enhanced their abilities to do “what a lot of modern progressive bands” find problematic: “play complex parts and still move effectively.” Luckily, they’ll get arguably their biggest chance yet to do just that when they play the Church of Prog segment of RoSfest 2018 in Gettysburg, PA.  As the premiere American progressive rock gathering for the past fifteen years, the Rites of Spring Festival is known for drawing some of the biggest bands in the genre.

Lines In The Sky wants Beacon to be “a fun listening experience” that blends “the essence of traditional/old prog with newer, more contemporary ideas” while maintaining “a cohesion in how every song is part of a singular work.” From its initial bursts of electric anarchy to its closing passage of ebony and ivory tranquility, this third studio effort nails all of those attributes and more, making it a triumphant statement in every way. As its name suggests, Beacon shines not only as the trio’s greatest achievement to date, but as a glorious entry into the genre as a whole. 

Band Members