Literature
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Literature

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014 | SELF

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Pop

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This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Aug
10
Literature @ Seaport (Fulton Stall Market)

NYC, New York, USA

NYC, New York, USA

Aug
07
Literature @ Piano's Lounge NYC

New York, New York, USA

New York, New York, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


Kevin Adickes is the Where's Waldo? of Austin punk.
In addition to fronting on-again, off-again Victorian punks MothFight!, he was spotted during Free Week performing with new electro trio Spells. Somehow he makes more racket on guitar in local quartet Literature.
Quadrant completed by Nathaniel Cardaci on vocals and guitar, bassist Seth Whaland (founder of local cassette and vinyl label Natrix Natrix), and drummer Erik Smith, the tightly wound quartet speaks in three-minutes-or-less pop-punk unfurled into high-energy shows and onto vinyl. Last year's "Cincinnati" b/w "It's Cruel" 7-inch, recorded by onetime Texan Greg Ashley as a follow-up to 2009's cassette Hello Berlin, was among the year's finest. Recently, Literature landed lovesick jangler "Manmade Man" on the latest scene preserver from local Matador Gerard Cosloy, Casual Victim Pile II (see "Texas Platters," Feb. 25).
Literature's approach to music is key. Back in December, the band held a fundraiser to finance a video for "It's Cruel" by screening two Keanu Reeves movies at Bolm Studios: Point Break and Johnny Mnemonic. Now the video's done: a shot-for-shot remake of Reeves' and Patrick Swayze's infamous chase scene from Point Break.
Adickes answered questions about Literature's subtext.
Austin Chronicle: What was the thought process in starting Literature?
Kevin Adickes: The band started as a joke and now we're just laughing all the way to the bank.
AC: What kind of joke did it start out as?
KA: I wanted to start a really unpretentious backing band that'd find a new lead singer for every show. Nathaniel was visiting Austin for about five days so we seized the opportunity and conjured up a hat-full of songs to perform at a party. It went over well, and when he inevitably moved here, we forgot about the whole "new lead singer for every show" conceit.
AC: Do songs come pretty easily? How does a Literature song present itself?
KA: Nate or I will come up with a riff that either temporarily ruins our friendship or brings us closer together. - Austin Chronicle


Literature became veritable darlings of the indie blogosphere following the release of their debut 7”, Cincinnati, in 2010, and have continued to deliver infectious, jangly power pop ever since. This frantically cheerful Texan band is the ideal opiate, if not for the masses, then at least for people with a taste for captivating propulsive pop melodies. And when their full-length debut, Arab Spring, hit the proverbial shelves, via Bandcamp, on the first day of this year, it reinforced what music lovers in Austin already knew: that Literature is a band whose work we could all do to bone up on.



The band has inspired comparisons to the likes of The McTells and The Bluebells, and lead singer and guitarist Nathaniel Cardaci agrees that British music has played a formative role in the development of their sound. Despite widespread critical approval though, the quartet, rounded out by guitarist Kevin Attics, drummer Erik Smith and bassist Seth Whaland, still lives the life of a band on the verge of breakout success.

“Our relationship is very sitcom-ish,” Attics says. “We might as well all be living together in some terrible, hokey sitcom premise. We all have our catchphrases.” Born of Austin’s thriving live music scene, Literature’s members came together through house shows and shared musical tastes, and the band was able to hone their skills in a musical landscape with no shortage of outlets. “There’s a lot going on every night,” Cardaci says of the city. “People tend to get burnt out. Sometimes it can be hard.“ Attics adds, “In other cities I’ve lived in, normally there’d be one show to go to. Here, it’s really easy to miss some really good things. It’s a really rich scene.”

Coming from the self-proclaimed live music capital of the world clearly has some pitfalls. With so many acts vying for the attention of the city’s audiences, Cardaci says it can be difficult to stand out from the crowd. “There are so many freaks, so even if you wanted to, it’s hard to stand out,” he says. “I tried to make a joke here in Austin about somebody wearing a horse mask and prancing around. But, I’m sure there’s a band doing that.” The comment induces snickers from his band mates, and the humour hints at the group’s attention to other markets. “We try not to focus on Austin so much,” Attics says. “It’s easier for us to stand out in most other cities than it is for us in our hometown.”



Online interest generated by Arab Spring proves that point. The band agrees that they’ve been pleased by the predominantly good reviews, but were surprised by the album’s reach, all the way to the East Coast. “We weren’t expecting that, ” Attics says. The east coast was just the start for them though, as the record found admirers overseas too. “We had this one crazy email from Japan, out of nowhere,” he continues. “We thought it was someone sending it as a joke because the translation in English was so bizarre.”

Back on the home front, the album has been getting praise from fans and critics alike. Reviews have been accumulating on message boards and music blogs, and the new material has even caught the attention of other noteworthy musicians. “People here tend to really like it,” Attics says. “One of our favourite bands, the Pains of Being Pure of Heart, wrote about the record, saying they really liked it, which was a big deal for us.”With a growing following spread across North America and beyond, the band is planning to tour more extensively in the coming year. Destinations include both the east and west coasts, as well as some soon to be determined dates in Canada.

As if the preparations for those travels weren’t enough to keep the Literature lads busy, they’re also set to record a single, slated for release before the end of the summer. Cardaci assures that listeners can expect another full-length album from the band too. They’re currently working on a handful of new songs that he and Attics say build upon the sound they’ve already established. “It’s much more sensual, I think, in a certain way,” Attics says. “Not like Prince or anything,” Cardaci is quick to clarify. “It’s a lot more ambitious. I think we’re going to have longer songs, and a little more texture. Yeah, sensual is the right word, but not overtly sensual.”

The album will represent a departure from the power-pop esthetic that they’ve built a reputation on, with stylistic nods towards influences like Robyn Hitchcock and Martin Newell. A much more paisley pop record, according to Attics. “It’ll look like the 2000’s answer to the eighties’ answer to psych pop.” With a new album in the works and increasing demands for North American tour dates, Cardaci feels like the band is gaining momentum, but despite the steadily building buzz surrounding their most recent release, Literature still have their feet firmly planted on the ground.

“We’re not thinking too far past this record that we’re working on right now,” Cardaci says. “We’re just trying to stay on our to - Ion Magazine


http://austinist.com/2012/02/07/literature_-_arab_spring_album_revi.php - Austinist/Gothamist


http://austinist.com/2012/02/07/literature_-_arab_spring_album_revi.php - Austinist/Gothamist


"The great thing about indie pop crowds is they’re super polite — the bad thing is they’re maybe too polite. That meant that budding acts like Vancouver’s Thee AHs, Pennsylvania’s Swiss Alps, and Spain’s Zipper got more or less the same enthusiastic reception as Literature (also from Pennsylvania), who basically blew the lid off Cake Shop..." - DoNYC


I love good guitar jingle-jangle as much as the next guy, but...... there is no but. I love guitar jingle-jangle as much as the next guy. Why does there always have to be a "but" with you? And Literature are another good jingle-jangle guitar band that make me feel something resembling another something that very well could be called the residue of happiness. Huh. Who knew? I like this happiness thing.

This new band is from Philadelphia by-way-of Austin. I sure hope they didn't do that move in the winter because that's an extra tough weather adjustment to make, in addition to the tough adjustment of moving clear to the other side of the country, and why put yourself through all that, Literature? They play pretty perky pop that makes mouths happy - oh wait, maybe I'm getting them confused with Twizzlers. Well, that's understandable as this is candy (hey-ooooo) for the ears.

Literature have been getting props lately from their stylistic sound partners The Pains of Being Pure at Heart. So you know what that means, right? If you like The Pains - The Pains like Literature - therefore you must also like Literature. It's called logic, guys.

Here're a couple good jingle-jangle guitar tracks for you by Literature. You'll like it, but....... no but. You. Will. Like. It.
- Oh My Rockness


Originally from Austin and now based out of Philadelphia, Literature make sparkling, speedy janglepop that is likely to appeal to fans of Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Felt or The Wedding Present. Or even members of those bands -- TPOBPAH put Literature's album, Arab Spring, on their Best of 2012 list. You can stream the whole thing below and its a free download via their Bandcamp. They also have a brand new 7" which you can also stream below (or download).
Literature have a few tour dates coming up, including one in NYC on January 25 at Cake Shop with Australian ex-pats Scott & Charlene's Wedding , Slow Warm Death and Cool Serbia. It's their first NYC show since moving to the East Coast and more info is here. All tour dates are listed below, along with the album and single streams. - Brooklyn Vegan


Although the members of Literature are about to leave Austin for Philadelphia, we can still include them in the group of bands here right now that are candidates for success on a national level. The group, which formed in 2008, could easily take the place of many of the indie bands currently bouncing around the country from festival to festival, stopping in at a number of Austin clubs a couple times a year.

The difference between Literature and some of those bands is that they are actually good. They've proved that for a few years now on Austin stages, and their debut full-length, "Arab Spring," is definitive evidence. The four members — guitarist Kevin Adickes, lead vocalist and guitarist Nathaniel Cardaci, bassist Seth Whaland and drummer Mike Yaklin — are pros in a live setting, churning out their jangly rock and power pop without any nonsense.

The album captures that and blows it up with bigger production. Standouts include the speedy "Push Up Bra," with spit-out vocals that shine with punk gloss atop a chorus of fuzzy kazoo-like backup voices; and "Arab Spring" in which guitars rev up against you-made-your-bed lyrics: "I don't feel bad/not even sad/I don't feel bad about your pre-dic-a-ment." There's not much else in town that sounds like this, which makes it even harder to see them pack up. Here's hoping they're back soon.

— P.M. - AUSTIN STATESMAN


Earlier this month, Austin-based garage rockers released their debut full-length Arab Spring. Their album packs 11 songs in just under 24 minutes, impressively exhibiting their cohesive and infectious power pop. Having opened for Ted Leo and recorded with Greg Ashley (Gris Gris), the group seems posed to turn heads as they take their new record on the road this month.

Check out “Rooney,” a track off of Literature’s latest album, in the streaming player below. - PASTE


There’s something so effortlessly iconic about listening to Literature’s debut record, Arab Spring. There’s the elegant, simple cover. The one word band name that screams “smart indie rock band.” The title that recalls the Cure’s “Killing an Arab” and Arab Strap. And of course, it helps that the tunes combine Buzzcocks’ power pop punk with the indie pop leanings of the Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Camera Obscura and the Changes.

At just 10 songs, Arab Spring doesn’t waste any time trotting out one hooky, semi-moody hit after another. “14 Seconds” kicks off the record right, and from there it never lets up. Actually, you could just as easily start with side two’s first cut, “Grifted,” as the LP could be played as a continuously catchy loop, aside from the slow country pseudo-song “I’m Right Here.” That one kind of comes out of nowhere and ends before it even registers.

Granted, the band kind of cherrypicks from its favorite artists from the last 40 years (Perhaps too much on “Push-Up Bra,” a song that I really loved until I realized it apes the chorus from Buzzcock’s “Everybody’s Happy Nowadays”). Literature definitely trots out its record collection here.

But it’s a really good record collection, and there’s no denying the alternately ambient and danceable moments that dominate Arab Spring. It’s a record that’ll sound great soundtracking parties, but also those 2 a.m. nights by yourself. Literature really delivered here, as the band’s debut is endlessly listenable, thoroughly jangle-y and just downright good. Tunes this insistent cannot be denied. - PUNK NEWS



By the time Literature played, Beerland was pretty empty. The vanished crowd missed out on what was easily the night’s best act. The four guys play energetic, dancey pop-punk that calls to mind Devo, Television, or more recently the Strokes or Vampire Weekend. The lead-guitarist/singer provides tipsy, shouty vocals in the style that’s so popular nowadays. The rhythm and lead guitarists have mastered the art of trading off parts, the drummer plays super-fast disco-ish fills, and the bass player manages to hold the whole ruckus together. Also noteworthy are the lead guitarist’s stage moves, which rival those of my all-time favorite Carrie Brownstein. Periodically he tiptoes, jumps, pivots, and even does a Michael Jackson catwalk while playing crazy-fast licks. Literature are talented musicians. I am eager to hear more of these guys, and wouldn’t be surprised at all if they start playing bigger venues. - bigwesternflavor


Brooklyn is today’s creative mecca of indie music. Rarely can a struggling musician find better opportunities for creating novel music than in that famous borough. But the typical narrative has run counterclockwise for Nathaniel Cardaci, one of the founding members of local Austin record label Natrix Natrix Records anda member of the buzzworthy Austin band Literature.
After he located to Brooklyn a few years ago, Cardaci’s friends back in Austin started messing around with a new side project and asked him to come back to complete the group. Cardaci agreed to join and made the trip back home to Texas. After a year of “making loud noises,” according to the band’s MySpace page, “melodies emerged from broken equipment and, one day, someone showed up with some actual chords and verse.”
This humble side project, borne out of random loudness on broken equipment , has since become Literature. The interesting quintet* of self-proclaimed “gadabouts” self-released their demo earlier this year, and it is promising to say the least.
Literature’s demo has been much anticipated since the Internet release of its eerily catchy song “Girls in Space” last fall. Naturally, when I saw “Girls in Space” missing from the four-song track list, I was a bit disappointed. That is, until I actually listened to the album.
Opening tracks “Apples” and “Lily as an Afterthought,” are swinging ditties characterized by sweet lyrics and whimsical, jangly guitar riffs. Both retain the low-fi edge of “Girls in Space”, but with more melodic structure. Album closer “Grifted” is an uplifting, hip-swinging track that musically embodies the song’s first line: “If you think that we’re in trouble now and you think there’s no way out — don’t be scared.”
While the rest of the demo is charming and mellow, its third track, “The Prime Meridian” has a sultry edge that shows an intriguing darker, more sensual side of the band’s lyrical persona. The only downside is that it’s just a demo and only has four songs. Hopefully summer won’t end before we can get our hands on some more material from this quickly emerging quartet.
Literature’s Demo is available exclusively at Waterloo Records. - DAILY TEXAN


Brooklyn is today’s creative mecca of indie music. Rarely can a struggling musician find better opportunities for creating novel music than in that famous borough. But the typical narrative has run counterclockwise for Nathaniel Cardaci, one of the founding members of local Austin record label Natrix Natrix Records anda member of the buzzworthy Austin band Literature.
After he located to Brooklyn a few years ago, Cardaci’s friends back in Austin started messing around with a new side project and asked him to come back to complete the group. Cardaci agreed to join and made the trip back home to Texas. After a year of “making loud noises,” according to the band’s MySpace page, “melodies emerged from broken equipment and, one day, someone showed up with some actual chords and verse.”
This humble side project, borne out of random loudness on broken equipment , has since become Literature. The interesting quintet* of self-proclaimed “gadabouts” self-released their demo earlier this year, and it is promising to say the least.
Literature’s demo has been much anticipated since the Internet release of its eerily catchy song “Girls in Space” last fall. Naturally, when I saw “Girls in Space” missing from the four-song track list, I was a bit disappointed. That is, until I actually listened to the album.
Opening tracks “Apples” and “Lily as an Afterthought,” are swinging ditties characterized by sweet lyrics and whimsical, jangly guitar riffs. Both retain the low-fi edge of “Girls in Space”, but with more melodic structure. Album closer “Grifted” is an uplifting, hip-swinging track that musically embodies the song’s first line: “If you think that we’re in trouble now and you think there’s no way out — don’t be scared.”
While the rest of the demo is charming and mellow, its third track, “The Prime Meridian” has a sultry edge that shows an intriguing darker, more sensual side of the band’s lyrical persona. The only downside is that it’s just a demo and only has four songs. Hopefully summer won’t end before we can get our hands on some more material from this quickly emerging quartet.
Literature’s Demo is available exclusively at Waterloo Records. - DAILY TEXAN


Brooklyn is today’s creative mecca of indie music. Rarely can a struggling musician find better opportunities for creating novel music than in that famous borough. But the typical narrative has run counterclockwise for Nathaniel Cardaci, one of the founding members of local Austin record label Natrix Natrix Records anda member of the buzzworthy Austin band Literature.
After he located to Brooklyn a few years ago, Cardaci’s friends back in Austin started messing around with a new side project and asked him to come back to complete the group. Cardaci agreed to join and made the trip back home to Texas. After a year of “making loud noises,” according to the band’s MySpace page, “melodies emerged from broken equipment and, one day, someone showed up with some actual chords and verse.”
This humble side project, borne out of random loudness on broken equipment , has since become Literature. The interesting quintet* of self-proclaimed “gadabouts” self-released their demo earlier this year, and it is promising to say the least.
Literature’s demo has been much anticipated since the Internet release of its eerily catchy song “Girls in Space” last fall. Naturally, when I saw “Girls in Space” missing from the four-song track list, I was a bit disappointed. That is, until I actually listened to the album.
Opening tracks “Apples” and “Lily as an Afterthought,” are swinging ditties characterized by sweet lyrics and whimsical, jangly guitar riffs. Both retain the low-fi edge of “Girls in Space”, but with more melodic structure. Album closer “Grifted” is an uplifting, hip-swinging track that musically embodies the song’s first line: “If you think that we’re in trouble now and you think there’s no way out — don’t be scared.”
While the rest of the demo is charming and mellow, its third track, “The Prime Meridian” has a sultry edge that shows an intriguing darker, more sensual side of the band’s lyrical persona. The only downside is that it’s just a demo and only has four songs. Hopefully summer won’t end before we can get our hands on some more material from this quickly emerging quartet.
Literature’s Demo is available exclusively at Waterloo Records. - DAILY TEXAN


Literature’s credentials are pretty impeccable, almost a Natrix Natrix supergroup. Fronted by Nathan Cardaci, with Moth! Fight!’s Kevin Attics, Natrix founder Seth Whaland, and DATED's Erik Smith contributing to the quartet, the band comes off as a rugged mix of the Modern Lovers and Gang of Four with a nice pop aftertaste. While the recording is somewhat rough, the infectious punch of the songs still comes through, especially on the jaunty lilt of “Lily as an Afterthought.” Opener “Apples” slowly builds up from dual guitars to Cardaci’s lazily monotoned and buried vocals drawling, “Get ready, get able, we’re gonna get signed to a bigger label, one that knows just what we mean.” It’s an hilarious and catchy tune, mostly because of the discrepancy between the ambitious sentiments and laconic, enervated vocals. Live, Cardaci leads the band with a jittery, schizophrenic energy, which fits these tunes well, especially the cut between his shouted, unraveling yelps on the post-punky “The Prime Meridian” and the smooth accompanying arrangement. Closer “Grifted” is a bit more accessible, though the recording drowns and roughs up Cardaci’s vocals too much. While Cardaci figures out how best to deliver his singing style, however, he can rest assured his band is unloading some fantastically catchy music behind him, making Literature worth keeping an eye and ear on as they continue to pull it together.
- Doug Freeman
- Austin Sound


Discography


Literature - Hello Berlin E.P. (Voice Academy)
Literature - Cincinnati 7' (Square Of Oppostion & V.A.Records)
LIteratue - ARABSPRING LP ( Square of Opposition & Austin Town Hall records)
Literature - Tie-Dye (Square of Opposition)

Photos

Bio

Arab Spring, the debut album from Philadelphia-transplants Literature has turned a lot of heads in the indiepop community. The band's debut showcases a taut, novel sound; an assemblage of power-pop and jangling guitars that'll prompt you to dance in your garage. It was listed by both The Pains of Being Pure at Heart and WFMU as one of the best releases of 2012. They've previously been featured on Matador Records co-founder Gerard Cosloy's Casual Victim Pile II Compilation, performed on Terre T's "Cherry Blossom Clinic", played SXSW, and recorded with Greg Ashley (of the Gris Gris).

Now they're ready for their moment in the sun following a breakout show at NYC Popfest 2013 where they "basically blew the lid off" the place according to DoNYC. The festival found them alongside such bands as Close Lobsters, The School, The Bats, and a host of other jangle-pop legends.

Band Members