Lloyd Brown
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Lloyd Brown

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May
14
Lloyd Brown @ West Indian Sport and Socia Club

Manchester, None, United Kingdom

Manchester, None, United Kingdom

May
08
Lloyd Brown @ TBA

None, None, Grenada

None, None, Grenada

Sep
12
Lloyd Brown @ Mozambique Live

Laguna Beach, California, USA

Laguna Beach, California, USA

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Music

Press


Lloyd Brown is surely the consistent force in reggae, British or otherwise... - United Reggae Magazine - By Angus Taylor


BBC MUSIC REVIEWS LLOYD BROWN'S "FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION"
courtesy of Angus Taylor (published 2009-11-19)

Everything reggae lovers could hope for, and recommended without reservation.

Lloyd Brown has long been British reggae's best-kept secret in terms of ability and mainstream exposure. His thirteenth album, For Your Consideration (with its Oscars-referencing title) is yet another ample demonstration of why more accolades and awards are well overdue.

Blessed with an instantly recognisable easy-going voice, and fully conversant with lovers, soul and roots music – whether his own songs or unusual covers that take the original to the next level – Lloyd is the complete reggae singer.

This time, he concentrates on his own material: chastising the bad elements that hamstring the reggae industry (For Your Consideration), the artists who use gangster lyrics (Blah, Blah, Blah) and youths who act them out (the Heptones-sampling Badboy with Mr Williamz and Juxci D).

Reprimands aren’t all that Brown wishes us to consider, however. A Song About Nothing is an ode to idling in the tradition of The Beatles’ I'm Only Sleeping. The wistful Place in the Sun, invokes the Caribbean to some distinctly British smooth jazzy soul. And Find a Solution is a mellow yet urgent call for social and political change.

The rhythms are the perfect mix of mindfulness and modernity. Excavations include the backing to Wailing Souls’ Jah Give Us Life for the stirring Live the Life You Love (featuring Sweetie Irie and Chukki Starr), and Lloyd Charmers’ Going in Circles for the Charmers/Phillip Gadd-produced Sweet Bitter Earth. Meanwhile, Dean Fraser (who lent Lloyd the rhythm for She's Royal for the equally good Show Me That You Love Me in 2007) supplies his rework of Bob Marley’s Jah Live for Know Yourself.

Brown first came to attention with the harmony group Sweet Distortion in the mid-1980s. He performed in the musical Black Heroes in the Hall Of Fame, and carved a niche in the 90s as a lovers rock singer, before taking an overtly Rasta direction towards the end of the millennium.

Boasting more tracks than eclectic predecessor Brownie Points but the same level of quality control, For Your Consideration is everything reggae lovers could hope for. Considered, and recommended without reservation.

Brown's Riddimworks Productions crafted songs and rhythms on FYC are 'the perfect mix of mindfulness and modernity'
- Angus Taylor BBC MUSIC


Okay I know I just did a preview post and I did another sort of kind of coming soon post not too long ago (and don't worry, we'll be back to your regularly scheduled program tomorrow morning) (and not to mention the fact that there're two brand spanking new reviews right there for your consumption, one of which is probably the longest one I've done all year) (biggup Black Dillinger) (I digress), but LLOYD BROWN HAS A NEW ALBUM! This is a ridiculously big deal for all people who have functioning ears. For Your Consideration is the latest creation of the greatest UK Reggae act on the planet, the veteran of veterans and one of my favourite artists the venerable Lloyd Brown. The album, as it's three (or four or five) predecessors Brownie Points, the WICKED Silver and Said & Done, comes via Brown's own Riddimworks imprint and outstanding UK label, Cousins Records. Anytime Mr. Brown brings forth a new project, it's pretty much guaranteed to be a winner and apparently he's brought in a few of his friends including the stellar Chukki Star and the currently soaring Mr. Williamz. So definitely take a minute and pick up For Your Consideration, dropping next week, if you love just ridiculously sweet music with a message (and you know you do). - Achis' Reggae Blog


How do you register intelligence in terms of music? I’m sure somewhere there exists some big and beautiful and well regarded learning institution of music where graduates go on to be some of the most outstanding vocalists and players of instruments in the world, but how many times have you heard of the exact opposite of something like that? Think about your favourite singer and who may have taught them how to sing (I think more times it‘ll be a ‘grandparent‘ rather than a music professor). Think about just how many musicians you know of who are genuine MASTERS at their craft, but haven’t had very much, if any at all, formal training on their particular instrument(s). And now think about how many times you’ve found yourself vibing your favourite song and thinking ‘wow, this artist must have gotten their degree very quickly’. It just doesn’t happen like that! And in Reggae music in particular, where so many of our artists (MOST of them) simply come from places and circumstances where the University route is just not an option, to not regard them as SMART, simply because they haven’t risen through those ranks academically is fucking stupid in my opinion. In my opinion, I think that with something as NATURAL, yet UNIQUE as music, that intelligence is best measured in terms of examination of the overall artist, regardless of their scholastic prowess or lack thereof. There are quite a few artists on the scene today whose music, in my opinion, just comes with such a powerful sense of musical and just general acuity, that despite not meeting them and not even knowing of their schooling background, you just get the feeling that this person REALLY knows what’s going on. They ‘get it’! I’ll point to more recent artists (of course), like Queen Ifrica, like Tanya Stephens and, of course, Vaughn Benjamin of Midnite, amongst others (Lutan Fyah, Sizzla, Junior Kelly etc.) who just give off that vibes of brainpower and, really listening to their music, when at its best, can be like a learning session or a life experience. Another artist I have push into that class as someone who really exudes not only intelligence, but confidence in that intelligence as well is Mr. Lloyd Brown. Currently BY FAR my favourite artist checking in on the UK Reggae scene (biggup my next favourites also, Peter Spence and Bitty McLean and some new artists as well, more on one of them later), the venerable Brown makes a very specific type of vibes which, even when I don’t necessarily enjoy a tune in particular, I can almost always see where he was going with it, which unfortunately is a VERY unique and downright rare quality to have. And I’ll make the case that this is because, throughout his extremely long tenure making Reggae music (nearing thirty years now, he’s basically been making Reggae for as long as I’ve been on earth), he has done so with a sense of CLASS and INTELLIGENCE that, at this point just comes across so well in his material and anytime he has something new to show to the world, I’d like to be one of the first to see it.


So what’s so smart about this fellow, Lloyd Brown’s music? Well, first of all (and of course, I don’t use this as my only standard), to me it says something when I can basically lock someone in a studio and he/she can produce and sing for their own project in any way necessary, which is what Brown does and furthermore, he does it for other artists as well (and even has gone to downright STRANGE lengths I believe in producing and directing VIDEOS for himself and others also). And on the vibes, the first thing you get from Lloyd Brown’s music definitely is a sense of the CLASS and quality of the work (again, even if you may not like a particular tune), but that same sense of quality is quickly overtaken, at least in my opinion, that you’re dealing with someone who clearly knows what they’re doing and truly capable of going about carrying it out as well. As a fairly recent fan of Brown’s, within the last two years or so, I’ve almost been amazed at how quickly his music, new and old, has grown on me and this is so despite the fact that I had a less than ‘WOWED’ reaction to his last album, Brownie Points, last year (which I described as essentially a ‘victory lap’ of sorts following the HUGE album that was Silver in 2007), but I’ve been going through some of his back catalogue and while it’s unsurprising that I enjoyed the music, the degree to which I’ve enjoyed a great deal of it has definitely been somewhat shocking (there’re two albums he has, one is Deep and the other is Said & Done, both are BEAUTIFUL) and he‘s also become one of my favourite and most ‘dependable‘ artists also. So, that being so, it isn’t shocking at all, that I’ve essentially reserved a spot in my players for late every year now when Brown typically releases an album and this year is no different as he now brings forth an album, For Your Consideration. Like each of Lloyd Brown’s last three albums (to my knowledge), For Your Consideration come - Achis Reggae Blog


Radio Interview, San Francisco, CA - Spliff Skanking Show


Radio Interview, San Fransisco, CA - Pam Pam's Show


Submitted this August 24, 2008

This review is from: Said And Done (MP3 Download)
Concerning the artist in question here, I can't exactly recall the last time an artist has grown on me so quickly through an album to really become one of my favourite artists at the moment. Due to the natural nature and progression of reggae music (where releasing CONSTANT singles is not exactly an indication of a forthcoming album or an album at all for that matter), the typical way I get attracted to an artist is through a steady stream of singles which, although not ALL of them will be hits, will just easily lead me to recognizing the skills of the artist and I am essentially HOOKED from that point. Recent cases of this have included, of course, young LETHAL dancehall head Bramma de Bomba who is slowly showing (at least to me) the rather elusive skill of consistency in the dancehall; prior to Bramma there was the captivating Alaine (even though she did eventually forward her album, twice) and going even further back I'll draw on names like Lutan Fyah and even Vybz Kartel, such is the normal way of today's reggae. Usually. Even with the elder and more established artists, the situation tends to be similar in a case where at that point I would have almost certainly heard their names and heard some of their music and for whatever reason, I take a listen to more recent stuff (or even older stuff in some cases) and through a selection of singles, they can actually become amongst my absolute favourite artists. Somewhat recent cases of this would be names like Yami Bolo within the last year or two, Glen Washington (nice nice pieces from Mr. Washington I've been hearing), Steve Machete from a few years back and Bahamian veteran Monty G as well, who has been heading a small but well strong contingent of artists from the Bahamas (check Jah Hem). Just from the top of my head, thinking about an artist who would have caught my attention on such a MAJOR level due largely to the strength of an album alone: The first name on the list would probably be Pressure Busspipe, whose 2005 debut album, The Pressure Is On (which, incidentally, featured Glen Washington on the album's only combination) captured not only my attentions, but many in the reggae world, including Jamaican production ace Don Corleone who has since swept down and signed up the St. Thomas chanter adding him to a small dynamic group of artists, truly near the forefront of modern hardcore reggae. Pressure's case is so unusual for me and if you asked me to list a name of my current ten favourite artists, you could definitely expect to see his name and it's been that way since that very first album reached and more times that denotes something pretty special.

Apparently something else pretty special which I ran into just within the last year is the vibes of veteran UK vocalist Lloyd Brown, whose Silver album has obviously had such a wonderful impression on me. Even more downright odd is the case of Brown that I actually WELL knew of Mr. Brown prior to the Silver album and literally picked it up as somewhat of a ..refreshers course' on his vibes and due to the very nice hype surrounding it (the album was celebrating his twenty-fifth year in the business) and it refreshed and impressed all at the same time. Silver was an album which was definitely impressive although it wasn't necessarily an album which caught the attentions of a flood of new fans unlike Pressure's case (obviously as the difference in the length of both artists' careers and popularity at the time of the respective albums); it really wasn't a landmark album for most people, even more odd. The bottom line in Lloyd Brown's case for me is that the man just really makes some SWEET SWEET music. You just CANNOT call yourself a reggae head and not appreciate the levels of Lloyd Brown to some degree. So powerful was Silver and Brown's vibes overall that he has not only did it lead me to more into the vibes of Brown, but also some of his peers. Just within the last year I've taken a greater look at artist who I was somewhat familiar with such as Bitty McLean, Peter Hunnigale and the WELL SOLID Peter Spence, opening up a WIDE array of even more sweet vibes as the UK artists tend to focus more on what would be long considered ..old-school' but do so with a very technologically modern twist which is absolute delightful to listen to. Silver was actually Brown's eleventh album to date (and he already has number twelve loaded and ready to go shortly, more on that in a bit) which leaves ten other heaping full albums of very fine material (for the most part) to go through for me and I chose to start with the next one sequentially, 2006's Said & Done. S&D, like Silver (and the next one) came through Brown's own Riddimworks Productions and well rising UK staple, the respected Cousins Records from Donville Davis distributing (just as they did with Silver) (and the next one). Previously, of the two well known UK labels, essentia - Ras Achis review on www.amazon.com


Nov 11th 2008

Brownie Points by Lloyd Brown
Top marks yet again for one of the UK's finest singers.

In an ideal world Lloyd Brown would be much more famous than he is. His instantly recognisable tones would be lauded in the same breaths as those of Tarrus Riley and Peter Morgan, his definitive renditions of Mario's Let Me Love You and Robbie Williams' Angels would be fighting for the number one spot in the pop charts, and he'd be recognized as the greatest interpreter of others' songs since Sinatra – while being a pretty good writer to boot.

But it's not an ideal world, and Brown is probably more famous for his battle-of-the-sexes tune Stress than for his impressive body of albums post growing out his locks and becoming more spiritual in direction. He has sometimes proved an elusive character to get hold of (whether to arrange an interview or for something as simple as to buy a t shirt), suggesting he may be as laid back about marketing himself as the powers that be in the music media are about marketing him.

The title of his latest self produced set (for Riddimworks) isn't just a throwaway play on his name. Like some of the best reggae long players of late, Brownie Points is a concept album. Each track begins with a phone eq'd female voice giving a separate saying (or "Brownie Point") key to understanding what makes the man tick.

There are fewer cover versions this time. But the compositions, programmed-drum-with-live-instrument arrangements and magpie creative tendencies are as strong as on previous releases Said & Done and Silver. Opener Return Of The One skips to a brokenish beat spliced with camera shutter sounds and a lyric borrowed from Beres Hammond. Memba Dis (Brownie Point: "There Will Always Be Haters So Fuck 'em") waxes rock rap retaliation over a sample from the horns intro to Bob Marley's Natty Dread. The angry-woman-chastising Nought Point Zero (Brownie Point: "Hell Hath No Fury Than An Ex Who's Vex") continues his association with Rootdown Productions (fans of their Crystal Woman rhythm may remember his cut, No Stone Unturned, as one its finest incarnations). It rests on a backing track whose foreboding bass line, acoustic stabs and bent electric lead notes - akin to those that haunt Hugh Mundell and Augustus Pablo's Africa Must Be Free By 1983 - represent a return to form for the Germans after the catchy but slight I Love.

The final Brownie Point on the album is "Dennis Emmanuel Brown. Inspiration. Full Stop." And if any singer alive carries the Crown Prince's standard for sweet singing, ease with writing songs, performing old favourites, and the language of both love and culture, it is his namesake Lloyd. Brownie Points is yet another "dix points" winner from the most important voice in British reggae today.

- By Angus Taylor


February 9, 2008

Longevity in the business of making and producing reggae music is something which is not very easily attainable by most people. In this day and age, when it is becoming more and more difficult for even labels to stay afloat (have to say though I was SHOCKED, when I heard the recent news of the largest reggae label in the world, VP Records, buying its closest competitor, Greensleeves); for producers to continue churning out quality riddims which will work as the perfect backdrops for artists; and the artists themselves to produce not only first hits to get the door open, but subsequent hits to keep it open, simply making reggae music has become a very difficult thing to do for a length of time. Therefore, I have to confess that it brings utter joy to me when I learn of, or am simply reminded of (which is the case here) artists who have remained in the business with good regularity and consistency for any kind of substantial period of time. Now, when you combine this with several other factors, such as the fact that such an artist not only continues to make music regularly, but make GOOD music consistently, you get to a point where, perhaps for just this era alone, you are dealing with an individual who may someday (if they aren't already) become a sort of a legend in the business. While typically, of course, it is the Jamaican artists who tend to more often than any others fall into this category (take a look at the current scope of the Jamaican reggae elite and you see constant examples of artists who, although still relatively young men, have decades of work dedicated to the vibes), taking a look outside of my own backyard, there are even more and more faces doing equally impressive things all over the extended reggae world. In this case, the area of interest happens to be a very powerful one with the UK vibes which, by virtue of having a HUGE Jamaican and second generation Jamaican (and represented likewise are strong populations from several other Caribbean islands as well) populace, can lay claim to having one of the strongest reggae (particularly on the roots side) communities in the world outside of Jamaica itself. Thus, we see names which are very revered in the UK, such as the sweet voiced Peter Hunnigale, of course Macka B, the amazing Bitty McLean, Tippa Irie and Roger Robin as solo artists (of course when speaking of groups you get into household reggae names such as Steel Pulse and Aswad) who have established or are in the process of establishing names for themselves certain to NEVER be forgotten on the UK reggae scene and even reaching all the way back to Jamaica (and I might also add to that list both popular singers Prince Malachi and Mikey General, both of whom were born in the UK but made their names primarily in Jamaica).

Another name which would move in the same categories is without a doubt that of Lloyd Brown. The London born singer has spent nearly three decades in reggae music working both in front and behind the scenes and establishing himself as one of the UK's longest living and still most talented reggae artists of all time. Brown style is one which is almost a microcosm of the entire UK scene in that, STILL, in 2007-2008, the vibes in the UK come across with the classic feel of the Jamaican roots scene, circa 1960-70. I'll always have a `sweet tooth' for the vibes because its always interesting to see a more modern version, with the technology available now alongside the talents available now taking a (RESPECTFUL) attempt at recapturing a vibe which you only hear during classics hour and stage shows here in Jamaica. Another wonderful thing about the vibes from the UK is that it doesn't appear to be an intentional thing to recapture the classic sound, instead, they do it because it is what the fans genuinely enjoy and it is the natural style of vibes. And those same fans make Brown and his peers exceedingly popular across Europe as they perform throughout the continent (and occasionally find time to make it to the other side of the ocean as well for performances and recordings). Lloyd Brown's story isn't (at least to my knowledge) exactly exceptional, (which is the same that can be said for many artists who just happen be so obviously, yet quietly and humbly skilled) as he (see Luciano, see Tinga Stewart, see Bushman etc.) got his start on various sound systems and working with various studios and vocal groups throughout London (including an inevitable tour of duty with legendary UK sound Saxon), which is the same route taken by most of his peers in the music. However, what definitely tends to separate Brown (even today) is his seemingly inexhaustible will for his music. When Lloyd Brown is working on something, if you really want to know what it is, you need not search very hard as he is ULTRA hands on in terms of making his music, presenting his music as well as promoting the vibes. Take our current situation for example: Lloyd Brown now brings his lates - Achis (Kingston, JA/Philipsburg, SxM)


RIDDIMWORKS PRODUCTIONS AND COUSINS RECORDS
ANNOUNCES THE BRAND NEW ALBUM
FROM LLOYD BROWN.
FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION
TO BE RELEASED NOVEMBER 9, 2009.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Riddimworks and Cousins Records proudly presents the brand-new album from arguably the U.K’s premier reggae singer/songwriter “For Your Consideration” by Lloyd Brown featuring seventeen brand new tracks with collaborations from Sweetie Irie, Chukki Starr, Don Ricardo, Mr. Williamz and Juxci D.

Over the course of the past two and a half decades, Lloyd Brown has risen to the very pinnacle of his profession, and with a string of hit singles and critically acclaimed albums to his credit, is now hailed as one of this country’s best ever reggae singer/songwriters. Born and raised in London to Jamaican parents, he began his career in 1979 by dee-jaying in “blues-dances” before progressing on fully fledged sound-systems in the early eighties with London-based sound-systems Jah Marcus, Exodus and East Man. In 1982 after taking a sabbatical in Jamaica, he then joined vocal harmony group Sweet Distortion, who were voted Best Reggae Newcomers by the readers of Black Echoes music magazine in 1984.

By 1987 Sweet Distortion had successfully auditioned for the part of the Jackson Five in the acclaimed British musical, “Black Heroes In The Hall Of Fame”, but amicably split up soon afterwards, leaving Lloyd free to pursue a solo career Lloyd's earliest singles included “Music Medley”, “Ring Up My Number” and “The Love In Me”, all of them released on Robert Ribs’ Unity label circa 1987. In the meantime, he’d started performing more demanding roles with Black Heroes In The Hall Of Fame – most notably those of Otis Redding, Marcus Garvey, Haile Selassie and Nelson Mandela.

“Sharing The Night” (produced by Junior Frost), then provided him with his first No. 1 hit, and was voted Reggae Single Of The Year in 1990. “You Can't Hurry Love”, “For The Love Of You” and “Love U Down” (his second No. 1 hit, and another Reggae Single Of The Year) soon followed, together with a version of Otis Redding’s “These Arms Of Mine”. Despite his success with other people’s songs, Lloyd was increasingly writing his own material by this time, as demonstrated on “It's A Love Thing”, which marked the start of his long-standing partnership with dee-jay Tippa Irie. Their follow-up smash hit, “Stress”, caused controversy since it put into song what many men were thinking about their female partners, both singles duly topped the UK reggae charts collectively for fourteen weeks, then won the duo a well deserved contract with Arista Records, who released their follow-up single, Baby Mother (another vibrant slice of social commentary) in 1995. The said album recorded for Arista during this period was subsequently released as “Combination” on Discotex at the end of 2001 – Lloyd & Tippa’s association with Arista having ended as unexpectedly as it had begun.

The durable Mr. Brown embarked on a run of hits for Jet Star Records that still shows no sign of abating three years later. Their most significant triumph to date has been a massively successful cover of Craig David’s “Fill Me In”, as included on Vol. 2 of Jet Star’s Pop Hits In A Reggae series. With Fill Me In getting regular airplay in Jamaica – where Lloyd enjoys widespread support – Jet Star then helped further his dominance with several other notable single releases, including “Hook It Up”, “Put It Down” and “Memories”, which like “Humanity Part 2” (recorded for Mikey Koos’ ARM label), is another joyous celebration of old school reggae vibes, and so steeped in nostalgia, it could bring tears to the eyes.

In-between voicing for Jet Star, Lloyd then began work on an independent project with international hit maker Bitty McLean, who’d served his apprenticeship with UB40. Aided and abetted by Bitty’s production and engineering skills, and with his own creative ideas going into overdrive, Lloyd completed the nucleus of his album “Deep” at Bitty’s Platinum Suite studios in Birmingham before adding a choice selection of Jet Star material into the mix. It was the kind of album only true craftsmen could produce. Its dazzling range of lyrical perceptions being matched to some of the most enthralling, contemporary reggae and crossover rhythms heard all year. “I Know” (inspired by Bob Marley’s Kinky Reggae) subsequently became one of 2001’s biggest reggae hits, even as Deep was being acclaimed as a masterpiece and his best album thus far.

By the time the follow-up “Against The Grain”, was released two years later, his tally of hit singles had swelled to include “You Must Know”, co-starring Don Campbell; “Bless Me” and the unstoppable “Main Squeeze”, which rocketed into the Reggae Top 5 on both sides of the Atlantic. Like its predecessor, Against The Grain was another world-class collection, showcasing tracks like the popular “Mr. Brown”, “Food For Thought” (a version of Aswad’s Warrior Charge); he and Omar’s stunn - Riddimworks Productions


Discography

LLOYD BROWN'S DISCOGRAPHY (as of 11th September 2009)

Straight No Chaser - 1995
1. Stress (Miserable Woman) feat.Tippa Irie
2. Love U Down
3. Straight No Chaser feat.Tippa Irie
4. Sharing The Night
5. All Things Best
6. A Mother’s Prayer
7. Mo Bay Blue
8. It’s A Love Thing feat.Tippa Irie
9. Lonely Girl
10. Stress (The Remix) feat. Tippa Irie
11. Mo Bay Blue (Reprise)

Rhyme And Reason - 1999 (Disc One)
1. I Love You
2. Pass It On
3. The Father's Love
4. Quality Time
5. U.n.i.t.y
6. Champagne Reggae
7. Groovin'
8. Real Love
9. The Way I Feel featuring Lorna Asher
10. Blackbirds
11. Believe
12. Nightshift
13. Music featuring Peter Spence
14. Forgive Me

Rhyme and Reason - 1999 (Disc Two)
1. Lessons
2. H.M.P.
3. Tell Me Who
4. We Need A Revolution
5. Power Of Jah
6. Stand Up
7. Everything Is Everything
8. Zion
9. Put Down Your Arms
10. Cry Freedom
11. Dub Lessons
12. Power Of Dub
13. Stand Dub
14. Whose Dub
15. H.M.P. Dub
16. Acappella From Zion

Deep - 2001
1. Intro
2. Father’s Eyes
3. Hook It Up
4. I Know
5. Inner City Blues feat. Don Campbell, Peter Hunnigale, Noel McKoy, Phoebe One
6. Fill Me In
7. Memories
8. Ride On
9. Another Song
10. Cold
11. Forbidden Lovers feat. Pam Hall
12. You Only Live Once
13. It’s All Good
14. Prisoner In The Street
15. Listen Me Good feat. Don Ricardo
16. Humanity Pt II
17. Make Ends Meet

Combination (feat Tippa Irie) - 2002
1. Shockin’ Out feat Peter Hunnigale
2. UK Reggae
3. Musical Letter
4. Love Of A Lifetime
5. Wonderous Things
6. Take You Home
7. Love In Me
8. On The Wire
9. Reggae Street
10. Stress (Remix)
11. Py-aka
12. Baby Mother (Remix)
13. Too Bad Mind

Against The Grain - 2003
1. Intro
2. Ebony Jones
3. Main Squeeze
4. No More
5. Food For Thought
6. Mr. Brown
7. You Must Know feat. Don Campbell
8. Close To Thee
9. The Living Years
10. Bless Me
11. Romeo ‘for my grandson’
12. Sitting In Limbo
13. Nothing But Love
14. Cant Done
15. Satisfy My Soul
16. Jerusalem
17. Smile
18. Feeding Off The Love Of The Land feat. Omar
19. Love Within The Music

Toe 2 Toe (feat. Peter Hunnigale) - 2004
1. Oh Honey - Peter Hunnigale
2. Slowly But Surely - Lloyd Brown
3. Pounds And Dollars - Peter Hunnigale
4. Bring Back The Love - Lloyd Brown
5. Sunrise To Sunset - Peter Hunnigale
6. No Way No How - Lloyd Brown
7. Can't Hold On - Peter Hunnigale
8. Black Bags - Lloyd Brown
9. Wish - Peter Hunnigale
10. Fire And Rain - Lloyd Brown
11. Starght Through The Middle - Peter Hunnigale
12. No Watch Dat - Lloyd Brown
13. Better World - Peter Hunnigale
14. Knights In White Satin - Lloyd Brown
15. Precious Love - Peter Hunnigale
16. Full Hundred - Lloyd Brown

Dreams To Remember - 2004
1. Intro
2. Bongo Nyah
3. In The Mood
4. Since You Been Gone
5. Dreams To Remember
6. Rocksteady
7. Desiderata
8. So Near So Far feat. Fiona
9. I Miss You
10. Me Without You
11. Rejoice Your Blessing
12. Guide Me
13. Come
14. Spellbound
15. Singerman feat. Fiona
16. So Lonely
17. No One Can
18. Heartache
19. Heartaches feat. Sasha

Really Together (feat. Fiona) - 2005
1. Really Together Intro
2. Show and Tell
3. What Good Am I
4. Really Together
5. Why Can't I Touch You
6. Private Number
7. Your Time
8. I Love the Way
9. Break Up To Make Up
10. Creeping
11. Number One
12. La La La At the End
13. Never Mind
14. So Near So Far
15. Singer Man

Reggae Max - 2005
1. Main Squeeze
2. Sharing The Night
3. It's A Love Thing
4. Love you Down
5. Lonely Girl
6. Fill Me In
7. Black Bags
8. This You Must Know feat. Don Campbell
9. Put It Down
10. Hook It Up
11. Memories
12. Figure 8
13. Satisfy My Soul
14. These Arms Of Mine
15. No Way No How
16. I Know
17. Regignition
18. With These Eyes
19. Maria
20. Food For Thought

Said And Done - 2006
1. Intro
2. Can’t Get Me Out
3. U’re Not Alone
4. Luv Me Long
5. So We Deal Wid Dem feat. Beres Hammond
6. Can U Feel My Vibe
7. Badmind Ideaology
8. No
9. Press Start
10. Let Me Love You
11. New Day
12. In Love
13. Breathe
14. Irie and Mello
15. I Know Jah
16. Lift Up My Soul
17. You Do Something To Me
18. Hold On
19. Outro

Silver - 2007
1. Show Me That You Love Me
2. What Would You Do
3. Charcoal Bridge
4. Unconventional People
5. Can't Keep A Good Man Down
6. From The Root
7. I'm Sorry
8. Angels
9. Leave The Guns Alone
10. We Need Love
11. Deliver Me From My Enemies
12. Up To You
13. Oh Mother
14. Interlude
15. Seacole
16. African Children Part II
17. Revolution

Brownie Points - 2008
1. Intro/Return Of The One
2. Love Is
3. Let Music Feed feat. Lady Lex
4. Loco Theng
5. It Takes Two feat. Sylvia Tella & Colonel Mite
6. Dear John
7. Nought Point Zero
8. Memba Dis feat. Serocee
9. Forgive Them feat. Peter Spence
10. More Love
11. Full Appreciation
12. Ray Of Light

For Your Consideration - 2009
1.Intro/For Your Consideration

Photos

Bio

LLOYD BROWN
BIOGRAPHY

Over the course of the past two and a half decades, Lloyd Brown has risen to the very pinnacle of his profession, and with a string of hit singles and critically acclaimed albums to his credit, is now hailed as one of this country’s best ever reggae singer/songwriters.

Born and raised in London to Jamaican parents, he began his career in 1979 by dee-jaying in “blues-dances” before progressing on fully fledged sound-systems in the early eighties with London-based sound-systems Marcus, Exodus and East Man.

After taking a sabbatical in Jamaica, he then joined vocal harmony group Sweet Distortion, who were voted Best Reggae Newcomers by the readers of Black Echoes in 1984, just prior to their guest appearance on the BRAFA (British Reggae Artists Famine Appeal) single, Let's Make Africa Green Again. Led by Lloyd’s namesake and early source of musical inspiration, Dennis Brown, this record helped raised funds for Ethiopian famine victims, and remains a milestone of UK reggae history. By 1987 Sweet Distortion had successfully auditioned for the part of the Jackson Five in the acclaimed British musical, Black Heroes In The Hall Of Fame, but split up soon afterwards, leaving Lloyd free to pursue a solo career.

His earliest singles included Music Medley, Ring Up My Number and The Love In Me, all of them released on Robert Ribs’ Unity label circa 1987. In the meantime, he’d started performing more demanding roles with Black Heroes In The Hall Of Fame – most notably those of Otis Redding, Marcus Garvey, Haile Selassie and Nelson Mandela. Sharing The Night (produced by Junior Frost), then provided him with his first No. 1 hit, and was voted Reggae Single Of The Year in 1990. You Can't Hurry Love, For The Love Of You and Love U Down (his second No. 1 hit, and another Reggae Single Of The Year) soon followed, together with a version of Otis Redding’s These Arms Of Mine.

Despite his success with other people’s songs, Lloyd was increasingly writing his own material by this time, as demonstrated on It's A Love Thing, which marked the start of his long-standing partnership with dee-jay Tippa Irie. Their follow-up smash hit, Stress, caused controversy since it put into song what many men were thinking about their female partners, but both singles duly topped the UK reggae charts, then won the duo a well deserved contract with Arista, who released their follow-up single, Baby Mother (another vibrant slice of social commentary), in 1995. An album recorded for Arista during this period was subsequently released as Combination on Discotex at the end of 2001 – Lloyd & Tippa’s association with Arista having ended as unexpectedly as it had begun.

Undaunted by such disappointments and eager to reclaim his popularity among grassroots reggae fans, Lloyd began recording with leading UK lovers’ rock producers Groove And & Quarter, who issued his debut album, Straight No Chaser, in 1996. Among the many highlights was A Mother's Prayer, which he recorded with a veritable Who’s Who of UK soul and reggae talent and dedicated to the memory of his mother, who’d recently died of cancer. Two other tracks, Jah Works and Increase The Peace, offered early evidence of the roots and culture content he was to showcase on his next set, Rhyme & Reason, which he recorded for Saxon. Prior to its release in 1998, the singles Need A Revolution and Power Of Jah had marked a turning point in both his life and career. His new head of dreadlocks illustrated this change of direction, and he began writing lyrics with far more spiritual content than before, even whilst continuing to make sublime lovers rock hits such as Night Shift, Blackbird and Real Love. He named Buju's 'Til Shiloh LP as a formative influence during this stage of his career, and after announcing that the emergence of the new cultural artists had taken reggae to a different plane, said he wanted to sing songs that will uplift people. His Saxon album thus had transformation at its artistic core, and with its emphasis on self-penned material, proved a masterly showcase of his talents.

Once Saxon producer Lloyd “Muscle Head” Francis had decided to concentrate on his sound-system, rather than production, the durable Mr. Brown embarked on a run of hits for Jet Star that still shows no sign of abating three years later. Their most significant triumph to date has been a massively successful cover of Craig David’s Fill Me In, as included on Vol. 2 of Jet Star’s Pop Hits In A Reggae series. With Fill Me In getting regular airplay in Jamaica – where Lloyd enjoys widespread support – Jet Star then helped further his dominance with several other notable single releases, including Hook It Up, Put It Down and Memories, which like Humanity Part 2 (recorded for Mikey Koos’ ARM label), is another joyous celebration of old school reggae vibes, and so steeped in nostalgia, it could bring tears to the eyes.

In-between voicing for Jet Star and making preparations f