The League of Extraordinary Gz
Gig Seeker Pro

The League of Extraordinary Gz

Boston, Massachusetts, United States | SELF

Boston, Massachusetts, United States | SELF
Band Hip Hop

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

Music

Press


"18 Acts That Smashed A3C"

13. League of Extraordinary G’s

They were on a amazing bill for DJ Booth and their presence is that of 3 rap groups. Despite that, what struck me most is their tee shirt. Not only is their tee shirt so fucking awesome, but it can be worn by the entire span of American ghettos just because of how street and hip hop it is. I literally met them in an elevator and saw their shirts and decided that they must be serious. Unfortunately since then, Esbe, The 6th st. bully had passed away. I found some links and great info on The FIxx that showcases the crews work. Follow them at @Loegz - URB Magazine


"League of Extraordinary G'z: A League of Their Own"

Austin, Texas’ League of Extraordinatry G’z might not have a city to boast as the roughest city or with the richest hip-hop scene, but when SXSW hits their small Texas town, a plethora of industry professionals descend upon their scene. In what has turned out to be golden opportunity for them to network and get their music out to the some of the industry’s most influential tastemakers, the self proclaimed ambassadors to the city of Austin have embraced SXSW and made it work for them in best ways possible.
Comprised of three groups Da C.O.D., Southbound and Dred Skott, this nine member collective describes themselves as one big family. Having performed at AllHipHop’s Best of Texas Showcase amidst Paul Wall & Chamillionaire’s reunion show, “The League” is primed for greater exposure as they are welcomed to AllHipHop.com’s Breeding Ground

AllHipHop: Explain the make up of the group.
Greezo:The League is comprised of 3 separate groups: Da C.O.D. (Greezo , Tuk-da-Gat, Lil J, S.Dot), the twin brothers that make up Southbound (Lowkey, Sandman) and Dred Skott (Reggie Coby, Esbe Da 6th Street Bully) We all came together in April 2009 shortly after SXSW. Prior to that, Dred Skott and Southbound had a relationship and we had done a couple of mixtape joints with Southbound. We were all highly regarded as Austin’s new talent and figured it would be a good look to come together and put out a mixtape. The more we started fucking with each other though, the more we realized that the League was something bigger than just a mixtape and eventually blossomed to what we are today – a big family. This was ever more apparent when we had to deal with the recent and unexpected loss of our brother, Esbe Da 6th Street Bully. Although he is no longer with us, he left each of us with a part of him and is riding with us in spirit. He left a behind a legacy which you’ll see and hear.
AllHipHop: How does SXSW influence your music?
Lowkey: It doesnt. I mean it doesn’t influence our music so much but instead has more of an impact on it. Austin is our hometown and SXSW is literally in our backyard. Real talk, its like down the street from us. But yeah, it gives us the access to network with artists, industry people, and music lovers from around the world. The livest thing about it is that you never know who you’re gonna bump into.
Reggie Coby: SXSW is the shit! Austin is our home and we are like ambassadors to the city. Like Low said you never know who you are going to bump into. Like in ’08, we met a bunch of cats from Norway after they had asked the Bully to use his lighter. After we start chopping it up, come to find out they were rappers and had been given a government grant to come out to SXSW. So we end up kicking it with them and shit and they came back to our studio smoked a couple blunts and we ended up making some music with them. We still keep in touch till this day. Shout out to Lar Vaular, Leo, and the rest of the camp.
Greezo: We’re also fortunate to have Matt Sonzala who does most of the booking at SXSW to be one our biggest supporters. Matt’s a big reason for a lot of the exposure The League has received from SXSW. Our first official showcase in 2010 was actually AllHipHop’s Best of Texas showcase with the Paul Wall & Chamillionaire’s reunion show.
S.Dot: Ohh yea, we gets it in at SXSW.

AllHipHop: Who are you currently working with, and who would you like to work with?
Tuk-da-Gat: Man, we have been blessed with some great opportunities. So far we have gotten a chance to make music with Dead Prez, Devin the Dude, Killa Kyleon, Killer Mike, Jackie Chain, Shane Eli, Question, K-Rino, Bavu Blakes, Big Rube of the Dungeon Family. This has also led to a couple tours we have done this past year. After having Jackie featured on our “2 Much” track he gave us the invite to open up for him on his west coast tour back in May. Later on in August the brothers Dead Prez had us come along with them after working with Dred Skott. Man I love to fuck with Yelawolf, Kendrick, LEP Bogus Boys, and even people that dont even do hip hop all day like Danger Mouse, Fishbone, Damien Marley, and all types of other different artists.
Greezo: We are also are collaborating with Swisha House on a mixtape project that will be released in the near future. So be on the lookout for that.
Reggie Coby: Kendrick Lamar, Goodie Mob, Outkast, Lupe, Erykah, Muhsinah, Ghostface, Bun, Mystikal
Lil J: Jon Connor, Rittz, Freddie Gibbs, K.R.I.T., Action Bronson
AllHipHop: What are your plans for 2012?
Reggie Coby: Continuing to focus on increasing our exposure and footprint in this game which we plan to do by releasing a number of projects as well as get on the road and do some more touring. We are also planning to make our 2012 SXSW showcase to be one those that will be talked about.
Lil J: Yea, after going on these past two tours across the US we definitely learned how important it is to get out your local scene and jump on the road. It opened up our eyes to see the response we got from cities like Lexington, Boise, Portland, Santa Barbara, El Paso, ATL, and Seattle.
AllHipHop: How has the DJBooth posting helped you guys?
Lowkey: Man, having released our Concealed Weapons 3 mixtape exclusively on DJBooth has most definitely helped us broadcast our music to a much wider audience online. This is the same site that has given a lot of today’s hottest artists their break into the game like Yelawolf, Freddie Gibbs, and Big K.R.I.T. So it was an honor to have been able to do that.
Greezo: Yeah, I actually met Nate at the beginning of the year when I was helping him find a venue for a DJBooth SXSW showcase this past year. He eventually had got handed one of our CDs at SXSW and reached out to us to do an exclusive project which we released in April. Building that relationship with DJBooth was key because 6 months later we were invited to perform at last months A3C festival in Atlanta on the DJBooth stage with Big K.R.I.T., Jean Grae, Saigon, Pill, Shane Eli, Aleon Kraft, Yonas, JNics, and Jon Hope.
AllHipHop: You guys had a few Jake One beats on the last project, talk to me about some of your favorite producers.
Tuk-da-Gat: We fuck real heavy with a producer out here in Austin named Matt Schad. Matt first produced SouthBound’s Seasons Change album. Since then he produced League favorites “We Gon Make It” and “Yes He Is” and a number of tracks on our upcoming projects. Also, Reggie Coby is a beast on the production tip. A lot the artists we have relationships were introduced through Reggie’s production. He produced the Devin single “What I Be On” and has worked with both Killer Mike and Dead Prez.
S.Dot: They don’t nickname him the “Genius” for nothing.
Greezo: We are also working with a producer out of Toronto named Frank Dukes who has produced for 50, Danny Brown, LEP Bogus Boys, Ghostface, and many others. The kid is dope. Be expecting to hear from him on a major level.
Reggie Coby: S1, Kanye, Dre, Quick, Organized Noize, Timbaland, No I.D., Just Blaze
AllHipHop: Explain the Austin, TX hip-hop scene and some of the other acts to look for out there.
Greezo: Austin is a melting pot of artists. Like most metropolitan cities, there is a local hip hop scene out here in Austin and its filled with a lot of talent. They brand Austin as a the live music capital of the world because of all the music options that are available every night and while there are local hip hop events in Austin it still lacks the casual hip hop listener looking for local hip hop. I think this in large part has to with Austin not having its own identity in the national hip hop game. We are hoping to change to that. I’m sure artists in similar cities experience the same thing. Some dope acts from Austin to look for are: Crew54, M.i, Phranchyze.
Reggie Coby: Yeah I also think it has to do with a lot of trash that’s out there on the local scene. Just because you’re a poet doesn’t mean you a rapper. Some acts I recommend check out are Kydd and Poison Boys.
Lil J: Ya’ll definitely check out my DIE SLO family. Also, if you onine you need to check the Texas Battle League which hosts freestyle battle throughout the state. Go on youtube and check some of those classic battles like Gutta vs. Phranchyze.
AllHipHop: What’s the next project called?
Greezo: Our next major release will be our first official album entitled #LeagueShit which is currently getting mastered by Mike Mo and set to be released sometime in the first half this upcoming year. In the meantime, we are working on 2 new projects. One with DJ Michael “5000? Watts of the Swisha House and the other with Frank Dukes. Fans can stayed tuned by following us at www.LOEGz.com.
AllHipHop: Will you all release solo projects or is there any possibility that the 3 groups within the group LOEGz will drop projects separately?
Reggie Coby: Oh yeah, without out a doubt we have a number of projects coming out of the League umbrella. I am producing an EP project with Bavu Blakes. Also, prior to my brother passing away we were working on a Dred Skott project I produced entitled W420 that was partially completed. I plan to finish that project. Also, eventually will follow up with my own solo album. Also, we have enough material to release a posthumous Esbe Da 6th Street Bully solo album.
S.Dot: Yeah Tuk-da-Gat and I are working on a follow up to the WhiteBoy Mixtape that we released last year. Lil J is also working on a project with DIE SLO’s Sertified and then we got Da C.O.D. album.
Lowkey: I finishing my solo SouthBound & Down project and then there is a Southbound album that is going to follow.
Reggie Coby: Yea, as you can see there is whole lot music that ya’ll are gonna be hit with. - AllHiphop.com


"League of Extraordinary Gz - Concealed Weapons 3"

The newest tape from our favorite up-and-coming Texas hip-hop group. The league continues to impress with great production and an array of talented MCs. Watch for them on their west coast tour with Jackie Chain. - The SMKA Experience


"Concert Preview: Texas Legends Hip Hop Showcase"

“It’s what Austin is known for on the urban side of things,” says Mr. Greezo of the League of Extraordinary Gz. He’s talking on the phone about Texas Relays weekend, the annual spring athletic event that brings thousands of people from around the state to Austin, many of whom happen to be young African-Americans looking to socialize.
This year, his group is participating in the inaugural Texas Legends Showcase, an event that aims to cater to the urban audience the Texas Relays draw. The showcase, which opens tonight and continues Friday, Saturday and Sunday, includes everything from a freestyle rap contest to a nightly entertainment roster heavy with recognized rap talent from Houston and Austin.
Eight members deep, The League of Extraordinary Gz is an amalgamation of three solid local hip-hop groups, C.O.D., Dred Skott and SouthBound.
They blend gritty street poetry with club bangers and startlingly soulful playas anthems tightly laced with Southern harmonies so seductive you might miss some of the borderline offensive subtext.
We hit Greezo up for his thoughts on the ATX hip-hop scene, SXSW and what to expect from this weekend’s performance.
Music Source: You’ve been on the Austin hip-hop scene for a minute now, how have you observed it evolving?
Mr. Greezo: This year is probably the best year for the Austin hip-hop scene. As far different representations, now it’s better than it’s ever been.
How would you compare the local scene to Houston or Dallas?
I believe that Austin has the potential to be bigger than those scenes as far as talent alone. But what Austin lacks that those other cities have is the casual fan. There are people in Austin who are really dope that do music but it seems like the majority of people who know about them are other artists. It’s not too many casual fans who know about the League of Extraordinary Gz versus in Houston (people) who know about Chamillionaire or Slim Thugg. I believe a lot of it has to do with this city’s reputation as the live music capital, aka musicians play music, as opposed to hip hop. So you can be an indie rock group in Austin and have four or five thousand Austin fans who come see you each week and buy your merch and CDs and stuff and you can survive like that, but as far as hip hop goes that’s not gonna happen. I’m not saying that the casual fan isn’t out there because they are; it’s just letting people know that there’s legitimate hip-hop artists here who have talent and who are professionals about this so we can be taken in a professional light.
How was your SXSW showcase?
Aw, man it was awesome. Those are the times that let me know that Austin has potential, because we’re a local group, we’re not signed, but we packed out our venue. We got good reviews. It was a lot of our fans, but it was a lot of new casual fans that came and saw us perform and that was really good as far as letting me know where we can go.
What can people expect from your show on Saturday?
We’re definitely gonna do music for the Texas Relays crowd. We’re gonna party and we’re just gonna have a good time. When people come to our shows they can expect a lot of energy. They can expect a lot of jammin’ music. They can expect a lot of pretty girls in the crowd. It’s a good atmosphere and a good party and they can definitely expect it not to be any sort of bs going on. We let people know off the rip, leave that at the house. Don’t bring that negativity to what we’re doing. And it’s always successful.
The Texas Legends shows are all at Easy Tiger, 709 East Sixth St.; cover is $20 a night. The League of Extraordinary Gz play Saturday night on a bill with Houston’s KB from Street Military.
- Austin American Statesman


"Concert Preview: Texas Legends Hip Hop Showcase"

“It’s what Austin is known for on the urban side of things,” says Mr. Greezo of the League of Extraordinary Gz. He’s talking on the phone about Texas Relays weekend, the annual spring athletic event that brings thousands of people from around the state to Austin, many of whom happen to be young African-Americans looking to socialize.
This year, his group is participating in the inaugural Texas Legends Showcase, an event that aims to cater to the urban audience the Texas Relays draw. The showcase, which opens tonight and continues Friday, Saturday and Sunday, includes everything from a freestyle rap contest to a nightly entertainment roster heavy with recognized rap talent from Houston and Austin.
Eight members deep, The League of Extraordinary Gz is an amalgamation of three solid local hip-hop groups, C.O.D., Dred Skott and SouthBound.
They blend gritty street poetry with club bangers and startlingly soulful playas anthems tightly laced with Southern harmonies so seductive you might miss some of the borderline offensive subtext.
We hit Greezo up for his thoughts on the ATX hip-hop scene, SXSW and what to expect from this weekend’s performance.
Music Source: You’ve been on the Austin hip-hop scene for a minute now, how have you observed it evolving?
Mr. Greezo: This year is probably the best year for the Austin hip-hop scene. As far different representations, now it’s better than it’s ever been.
How would you compare the local scene to Houston or Dallas?
I believe that Austin has the potential to be bigger than those scenes as far as talent alone. But what Austin lacks that those other cities have is the casual fan. There are people in Austin who are really dope that do music but it seems like the majority of people who know about them are other artists. It’s not too many casual fans who know about the League of Extraordinary Gz versus in Houston (people) who know about Chamillionaire or Slim Thugg. I believe a lot of it has to do with this city’s reputation as the live music capital, aka musicians play music, as opposed to hip hop. So you can be an indie rock group in Austin and have four or five thousand Austin fans who come see you each week and buy your merch and CDs and stuff and you can survive like that, but as far as hip hop goes that’s not gonna happen. I’m not saying that the casual fan isn’t out there because they are; it’s just letting people know that there’s legitimate hip-hop artists here who have talent and who are professionals about this so we can be taken in a professional light.
How was your SXSW showcase?
Aw, man it was awesome. Those are the times that let me know that Austin has potential, because we’re a local group, we’re not signed, but we packed out our venue. We got good reviews. It was a lot of our fans, but it was a lot of new casual fans that came and saw us perform and that was really good as far as letting me know where we can go.
What can people expect from your show on Saturday?
We’re definitely gonna do music for the Texas Relays crowd. We’re gonna party and we’re just gonna have a good time. When people come to our shows they can expect a lot of energy. They can expect a lot of jammin’ music. They can expect a lot of pretty girls in the crowd. It’s a good atmosphere and a good party and they can definitely expect it not to be any sort of bs going on. We let people know off the rip, leave that at the house. Don’t bring that negativity to what we’re doing. And it’s always successful.
The Texas Legends shows are all at Easy Tiger, 709 East Sixth St.; cover is $20 a night. The League of Extraordinary Gz play Saturday night on a bill with Houston’s KB from Street Military.
- Austin American Statesman


"League of Extraordinary Gz Pack Punch of Closed Fist"

?In the three-year-history of the Artist of the Week column, only twice have we featured someone or some act that was not entirely Houston-based, and one of those times was because a hurricane was destroying the city and we hastily abandoned ship. Today makes three.
Everyone, the League of Extraordinary Gz. The League, everyone.

The LOEGz is a hip-hop corporation that splits citizenship between Houston (yuss!) and Austin (throw-up noises). We'd actually nabbed one of their CDs from a clothing store several months ago on account of the flyness of the cover, but upon hearing that they weren't homegrown, we immediately smashed it into a trillion tiny pieces and set them all on fire one by one.

Alas, their rap effectiveness could not be entirely dismissed - the Gz are good, enjoyable, fun to listen to and, far as we can tell, not bastards. So we had some of their members answer questions about Sean Connery, what constitutes an appropriate level of G-ness and the worst song that they've ever made. Aces.

?Rocks Off: Standard opener: Tell everyone everything they need to know about the League of Extraordinary Gz in exactly six words.
Reggie: Listen. It's all in the music.
Lowkey: The power of the closed fist.

RO: The most obvious thing that needs to be asked: Why oh why did you pick a bad Sean Connery movie to base your name on? We mean, if it has to be Connery-related, what about The Untouchables? Or better yet: The Finding Forresters?
Lowkey [laughs]: I still never seen the actual movie, so as far as I'm concerned you should be asking him why he named his shitty movie after them G'z from Austin.
Greezo: People don't know the white boys in the League are second cousins and Sean Connery is their great granddaddy. True story.

RO: Are there rules you're required to follow when you're an Extraordinary G?
Tuk: You have to be extraordinary, for one, and also a G.
Greezo: Be extraordinary at any cost. When you wipe your ass, it better be extraordinary.


RO: Have you all ever had to talk to one of your members because their G-ness was only ordinary and lacking in extra? How do you handle that situation?
Lowkey: I had to call Sandman's G-ness in question when he joined the military because they wear uniforms and that's too close to being a cop... but they have big-ass guns, so G-ness intact. For now.
Tuk: That has yet to be an issue. Everyone in the League has thus far kept their G-ness at an extraordinary level. I don't forsee that being an issue, but if needed we'll cross that bridge when we come to it.


RO: The best song that you all have ever made is...
Tuk: Still in the making. You"ll hear it soon though.

RO: The worst song that you all have ever made is...
Tuk: A figment of your imagination. We don't make bad songs.


Up your own personal G-ness at www.LOEGz.com.


- Houston Press


"Casual Victims II SXSW 2011 Picks 2 Click"

The world hasn't really met its first Austin rapper. Locals MCs are well aware.
"I've considered going different places," admits Da C.O.D.'s Mr. Greezo, a veteran on the scene. "We have a lot of mentors who have been down this road and tried, but they had to leave Austin to go to a bigger market."
With too much love for the city that raised him, Greezo orchestrated a meeting of the minds, bringing together his group with two other crews C.O.D. has worked alongside extensively: Lowkey and Sandman's ice-cold SouthBound, and Dred Skott, the dexterous, soulful team of Reggie Coby and Esbe da Bully.
"It's like balling your fingers into a fist instead of poking someone in the eye," explains Coby. "Pooling your resources, your contact lists, the individual communities of everyone involved makes for a stronger monster."
It helps that the League of Extraordinary G'z is comprised of eight immensely capable lyricists, all of whom bring a unique perspective, voice, and level of vigor to the stage. The group's two Concealed Weapons mixtapes bang hard with wildly charismatic tales of street legend and ATX gutter tactics. A third installment's set to be shipped during South by Southwest, with an album coming hopefully at the end of the summer.
"We're using [Concealed Weapons 3] to let people know that the album's gonna be jamming," says Coby. "Not to take anything away from the last two tapes, but we kind of put those two together just so people would know what we're doing."
People outside of Austin's hip-hop scene are starting to take notice. The League opened for Invincible and Pharoahe Monch at November's Fun Fun Fun Fest, and they closed out February with an invitation to Denton's 35 Conferette festival. The group's also hired management based in Houston, which will keep the LOEG name flowing through bigger markets while still allowing them to operate out of Austin.
"Austin's the best city in the world, man," Greezo says. "Anybody will tell you that."
- Austin Chronicle


"22 Must See Hip Hop Artists at SXSW 2011"

15. The League of Extraordinary Gz
LOEGz may be the most important hip-hop outfit to sprout from the soil of Austin. The crew is deep, diverse, and rich in talent. With home court advantage and a mixtape premiere at SXSW, the Austin group is definitely a must-see. - TheRapUp.net


"35 Conferette Review"

I ended my night at Rubber Gloves, watching Austin’s League of Extraordinary Gz blaze the hip hop frontier. Several years ago, I had a roommate who told me the future of music was all hip hop. At the time, I was trapped in a Plato’s Cave of rock and roll and couldn’t see just how prescient my friend was. Very little excites me today the way hip hop does. All those other musical endeavors are mined out; everything in hip hop is new, adolescent and quaking. The League’s Mr. Greezo likens it to rock and roll in the ‘70s, when the boundaries of the craft had not yet been discovered.

Admittedly, hip hop is a little confounding to me. There is a lingering, racial self-consciousness there that may take several iterations to erase. Just knowing that Jedi Mind Tricks recognizes that the culture has become “a swarm of white kids” makes my presence in it seem tenuous. The League of Extraordinary Gz are at the intersection of all those concerns, crafting hip hop anthems in a city of University elites, staunch Texans and listless hippies.

The eight-member League of Extraordinary Gz is exemplary of those combined interests and perspectives, being a conglomeration of three other hip hop acts: C.O.D, Dred Skott, and Southbound. The League’s Reggie Coby, who one minute earlier was reticent to roll leaf beneath a painting in Rubber Gloves’ green room that was either the Zig-Zag man or Jesus, asserted that the bottom line to garnering appreciation from Austin’s diverse hip hop community is one’s ability to spit rhymes. I hope for the day that the rest of the public arrives at that simple ethic. - D Magazine


"The League of Extraordinary Gz - "We Gon Make it""

The homie Bavu Blakes shared a dope track & video from Austin supergroup League Of Extraordinary G’z entitled “We Gon Make It.” The group is a combination the Texas capital’s 3 premier groups: Dred Scott, Da C.O.D. & Southbound. You can download the crew’s entire project Concealed Weapons 2 now on Bandcamp. - Kevinnottingham.com


"Track of the Weekend: League of Extarordinary Gz (35 Conferette Preview)"

To round out unofficial Hip Hop Week here at DayBowBow, we have a hip hop group from Austin called League Of Extraordinary Gz. The Gz will be playing at 35 Conferette, at Rubber Gloves, on Friday night just before Beans.

You can download the Chop Steak (clever name, by the way) remix of their song “Loftin in Austin” below.

League of Extraordinary Gz–Loftin in Austin (Chop Steak Remix)

Verdict: I knew exactly nothing about the Austin hip hop scene before listening to a few of the groups and artists who are playing 35, including this one. I have to say that it’s a pretty interesting bunch. This group in particular has some clever lyrics and a good flow.

Houston is the Texas town known that’s surely the most known for hip hop, but the “home of the Longhorns” (in the words of the Gz) can hold its own. - DayBowBow.net


"LOEGz Memeber Reggie Coby Highlighted in Fader"


I stay on my Ps and Qs/ I stay on my weed and booze. This is the simple genius of Devin the Dude condensed into one line. To be honest, it’s shameful how little of this dude’s we’ve been listening to lately, but all that is about to change if Suite #420 (coming, you guessed it, on April 20th), is as good as this first leak. Produced by Reggie Coby, the mastermind behind Devin’s “What A Job” with Snoop and Andre. Still so good. - Fader Magazine


"Concealed Weapons 2 Review"

Connecting the dots from the Goodie Mob to the Geto Boys, the League of Extraordinary Gz – eight local rappers from Dred Skott, Southbound, and C.O.D. – is Austin's first rap supergroup. Its latest mixtape builds off the buzz of the first Concealed Weapons assault and raises the bar for the forthcoming debut from the Wu-Tang of Texas. Take it from Esbe: "Get ready, 'cause when it comes, it's on, mufucka!" The sprawling mixtape, mixed by the dynamic duo of Wes Sanders and DJ Knowledge, is nails-hard and whip-smart with 21 tracks of reality rap twisting ATX tales from Sixth Street to the Pink Monkey. Mr. Greezo, Reggie Coby, S. Dot, Sandman, and co. spit street politics and take aim at fad-chasing, skinny-jeans-rocking rappers before closing with "Trae Day," a middle finger to commercial radio and show of support for the Box-banned Houston MC. - Austin Chronicle


"Fun Fun Fun Fest Artist Preview"

Enter The League
If there was a Wu-Tang of the south, then Austin would be Shaolin and the League of Extraordinary Gz would be the clan. Even the League symbol is becoming as recognizable as the iconic W. Before you step foot into a League show you will see the state shaped gun logo shirts in the audience,evidence of the popularity of their aclaimed Concealed Weapons mixtape series. Sure Austin is known for its live music scene and indie rock and hipster bands, but we rarely hear of life outside of the infamous sixth street. But three groups , dred skott, C.O.D. and Southbound have come together to change that notion. Introducing The League of Extraordinary Gz.

All familiar faces in the underground Texas rap arena,their respective mixtape and album releases, have created significant fanbases spanning across state, and even continental lines. Experienced showmen they have won over huge audiences while opening and recording with major Hip Hop acts such as The Clipse, Killer Mike, J. Cole, Dead Prez, and Z-ro to name a few. And their up coming performance at fun fun fun fest won’t dissapoint.

In the words of Former Murder Dog Magazine writer and Houston’s Damage Control radio host Matt Sonzala , “The League of Extraordinary G’z are a force to be reckoned with. Comprised of some of the top MC’s from the strongest groups in Central Texas, Reality rap is not dead and these boys are proving it.” But dont be quick to label The League as just another Austin act. Each of the three groups involved is different as the other and it’s this dynamic that works to make the League what it is.

C.O.D. is a four-man powerhouse (Mr. Greezo, Tuk-Da-Gat, S. Dot, Lil’ Jay) whose loyal following makes them THE street movement of the League- making their name in the infamous Texas scene with their celebrated “Ova da Stove” mixtape series.

Dred Skott (Esbe, Reggie Coby) could be labeled easily as the Goodie Mob of Austin. But even that comparison is too limiting. This soulful duo is known for their humor, lyrics and uncompromising political slants. Even doing production for such legendary local acts as Devin the Dude.

And last but not least is SouthBound (Lowkey, Sandman). Twin brothers whose lyrical power could only be described as double homocide.These two MCs’ join together where streets and lyrical tenacity collide .

Between production, lyrics, and diversity in style, its no wonder the League’s following is growing.
The League of Extraodinary G’z is most definitely a movement to watch. Houston came up with screw, Dallas made us dougie, and Austin will complete the stage …at fun fun fun fest.
- Hater Magazine


"We Got Our Own Sound"

If the League of Extraordinary Gz is Austin’s version of the Wu-Tang Clan, then Reggie Coby is the group’s RZA. The Dred Skott mastermind is quick to let the rest of the crew take the lead, knowing full well that he’ll prove essential to each track’s foundation.

It’s a comparison that was no more evident than at the beginning of LOEGZ’s Wednesday set opening for Pittsburgh’s Wiz Khalifa at Ace’s Lounge, a 30-plus-minute set that found Coby hanging by the decks with DJ Grip and slithering to the front to lace each hard hitting track with his lighthearted, crooning hooks.
The rest of his crew – Southbound’s Lowkey, Dred Skott’s Esbe the Bully, and COD’s Tuk-da-Gat, S. Dot, and Lil J; no sign of Mr. Greezo – prowled about the front of the stage much in the same way Ghostface, Method Man, Raekwon, and company would. Led by solo efforts from Esbe and S. Dot, the crew did plenty to leave the mics hot at the close, flipping new single “Loftin N Austin” and Southbound’s “Keep Movin’” (cleverly sampling the Beatles’ “When I’m Sixty-Four”) in between tracks from the group’s forthcoming debut.

- Austin Chronicle


Discography

Dred Skott 4 President (2009)
Seasons Change (2009)
Ova tha Stove Vol 1 (2009)
Ova the Stove Vol 2 (2009)
Ova the Stove Vol 3 (2009)
Concealead Weapons (2009)
Concealed Weapons 2 (2010)
S. Dot vs Tuk Da Gat - The Whiteboy Mixtape (2010)
W420 (2011)
Southbound & Down (2011)
Concealed Weapons 3 (2011)
Self Titled Debut (2011)

Photos

Bio

"How many of ya'll are familiar with the League of Extraordinary G'z?" was the question posed by Bavu Blakes, indie rap veteran and reigning godfather of the Austin Texas Hip Hop scene, as he stood on a dimly lit stage in the summer of 2009 introducing a highly anticipated debut live performance. The crowd of locals exploded. They were familiar.

While many devoted fans of Hip Hop mourn a genre and culture on the decline, weakened in the wake of the bling decade and pop pandering, a revolution has been quietly building deep in the heart of Texas. Three separate but equally acclaimed independent rap groups in the capital city of Austin, recognizing a shared passion for raw musicality over endless empty club bangers, have decided to team up for what promises to be an exciting and defining event in Central Texas rap history: The League of Extraordinary G'z.

The lineup of "The League" consists of the groups C.O.D., Dred Skott, and Southbound, all familiar faces in the underground Texas rap circuit. With their respective mixtape and album releases, they have each earned themselves significant fanbases spanning across state, and even continental lines. All are experienced and traveled artists who paid their dues the hard way, winning over huge audiences while opening or recording with such major Hip Hop acts such as Wu Tang Clan, Wiz Khalifa, The Lox, Devin the Dude, Dead Prez, and Lil KeKe.

Band Members