Lombok
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Lombok

Tangerang, West Java, Indonesia | SELF

Tangerang, West Java, Indonesia | SELF
Band Pop EDM

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"THE GREAT SOUTH-EAST - LOMBOK//LOM8OK"

LOMBOK//LOM8OK is the most recent musical endeavor undertaken by young Canadian musician Owen Hooper. His first release under this name, The Great South-East is a love letter to the dynamic city of Jakarta, Indonesia, where he spent a year living in a Muslim household. Raised on the island paradise of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, the fusion and melding of these two distinct cultures are apparent on this EP.

Rasa Sayange opens the album, an ambient folk song sung in Indonesian, translating to mean “I’ve got that feeling of love, hey!”. A sweet synth line runs throughout Bahasa, instantly lifting the listener to ‘a cloud up in the sky’. With references to both the sights of the West Coast, and South-East Asia, a delicate playful melody inspires a spirit of adventure. Taking it down to deep beneath the sea, Dinosaurs offers a more introspective side of Hooper shown through with ethereal vocals. In a classic “should I go, or should I stay” tune, Hooper explores the nature of decisions and the pay-off of taking chances on opportunities that have unclear outcomes. Expressing that ‘We Don’t Know where we’re going’, a steady beat throughout the song makes it an anthem for anyone facing cross-roads. An Imagination,possibly the most beautiful and relatable song on the album, is a lament about the internal conflict that exists as one grows older; the struggle to maintain innocence as the world dictates that you need to grow up. Featuring a metalphone and a cello, this track sweeps the listener to a place of beautiful and honest childishness. Closing up the EP is Ondel Ondel, is a farewell to the Great South-East. Continuing with the theme of simple and impossibly sweet synthesized melodies, this song perfectly wraps up the album with a sense of finality, but at the same moment making it clear that Hooper is clearly not finished with his musical vision.

STAND OUT TRACKS :: BAHASA and AN IMAGINATION

AVAILABLE ON :: BANDCAMP and SOUNDCLOUD and NOISETRADE and ITUNES - Peasant Vision


"THE GREAT SOUTH-EAST - LOMBOK//LOM8OK"

LOMBOK//LOM8OK is the most recent musical endeavor undertaken by young Canadian musician Owen Hooper. His first release under this name, The Great South-East is a love letter to the dynamic city of Jakarta, Indonesia, where he spent a year living in a Muslim household. Raised on the island paradise of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, the fusion and melding of these two distinct cultures are apparent on this EP.

Rasa Sayange opens the album, an ambient folk song sung in Indonesian, translating to mean “I’ve got that feeling of love, hey!”. A sweet synth line runs throughout Bahasa, instantly lifting the listener to ‘a cloud up in the sky’. With references to both the sights of the West Coast, and South-East Asia, a delicate playful melody inspires a spirit of adventure. Taking it down to deep beneath the sea, Dinosaurs offers a more introspective side of Hooper shown through with ethereal vocals. In a classic “should I go, or should I stay” tune, Hooper explores the nature of decisions and the pay-off of taking chances on opportunities that have unclear outcomes. Expressing that ‘We Don’t Know where we’re going’, a steady beat throughout the song makes it an anthem for anyone facing cross-roads. An Imagination,possibly the most beautiful and relatable song on the album, is a lament about the internal conflict that exists as one grows older; the struggle to maintain innocence as the world dictates that you need to grow up. Featuring a metalphone and a cello, this track sweeps the listener to a place of beautiful and honest childishness. Closing up the EP is Ondel Ondel, is a farewell to the Great South-East. Continuing with the theme of simple and impossibly sweet synthesized melodies, this song perfectly wraps up the album with a sense of finality, but at the same moment making it clear that Hooper is clearly not finished with his musical vision.

STAND OUT TRACKS :: BAHASA and AN IMAGINATION

AVAILABLE ON :: BANDCAMP and SOUNDCLOUD and NOISETRADE and ITUNES - Peasant Vision


"New Album: LOMBOK – “The Great South-East”"

Canadian Dream-Pop prodigy, Owen Hooper, chronicles his odyssey of living in Jakarta as a 16 year old Canadian foreign exchange student immersed in the fusion of Muslim and Southeast Asian culture. “The Great South-East” has been published under the name LOMBOK who already has quite the following on Facebook, Tumblr, and Twitter. From the opening track – which rings out in Bahasa Indonesian – to the rest of the lyrics in English, Hooper shares his journey in a musical montage of electronic dream-pop that is the soundtrack to his travels in Indonesia. The album alternates through themes which include seeing things from new perspectives, travelling, and love for the South-East Asian culture that adopted him appear throughout the whimsical tracks.

LOMBOK’s Bandcamp expresses Hooper’s intentions behind the tracks:

“Coming from a small town in British Columbia with not a single traffic light, to a city of ten million people, and living with a muslim family, the differences were obvious. But the very first day I could already see the similarities.”

Track 1: Rasa Sayange, is an adaptation of a traditional Indonesian folk song. Translated, the words mean “The Feeling of Love”. “This summed up the culture for me – a traditional song which describes the emotional state — the “feeling of love,” not just of loving someone. That impressed me. I wanted to sing this song as a tribute to this culture,” notes Hooper.

Track 2: Bahasa “I recorded the first version of this in my bedroom in my home in South Central Jakarta. It’s about how much there is to see in the world. Something I really got for the first time there.”

Track 3: Dinosaurs, has a moody, half dreaming, half awake feel to it. The song was inspired by an exhibit about Indonesian Independence at the National Monument Monas in Jakarta. In it, Hooper explores the ephemeral nature of historical legacy:

Track 4: We Don’t Know. Gets to the heart of the question everyone faces as they are finishing high-school, or college, or even at a crossroads in their lives. “Even if we have a direction, none of us know where we’re going exactly,” says Hooper. “So it’s all just a big adventure. On this trip, I was with other students from all over the world, who basically put their hands up to leave everything that they knew behind, not knowing what was in store. And taking that chance was really cool.”

Track 5: An Imagination, features Marc Jowett’s analogue contributions of cello and guitar, as well as a sample Metalophone, which is used in Indonesian Gamelan music. “This song is about the struggle between growing up and wanting to keep some childish innocence,” says Hooper.

Track 6: Ondel-Ondel ” This song is kind of about saying goodbye. It’s about the amazing things I saw from Bali to Lombok to the streets of Jakarta. Ondel-Ondel is a traditional Batawi ( old Jakarta) folk performance. I would sometimes drift off to sleep while stuck in traffic in Jakarta. A few times, when I opened my eyes I would see these massive costumed people dancing in the street. They were performing Ondel-Ondel to provide protection against calamities and warding off evil spirits.”

Throughout the album, the music carefully articulates the differences between the Western and Eastern cultures to the mind of a blossoming adult. It is available on Bandcamp for purchase so you best check it out! A preview track is embedded in the space below. - Rainy Dawg Radio at University of Washington


"New Album: LOMBOK – “The Great South-East”"

Canadian Dream-Pop prodigy, Owen Hooper, chronicles his odyssey of living in Jakarta as a 16 year old Canadian foreign exchange student immersed in the fusion of Muslim and Southeast Asian culture. “The Great South-East” has been published under the name LOMBOK who already has quite the following on Facebook, Tumblr, and Twitter. From the opening track – which rings out in Bahasa Indonesian – to the rest of the lyrics in English, Hooper shares his journey in a musical montage of electronic dream-pop that is the soundtrack to his travels in Indonesia. The album alternates through themes which include seeing things from new perspectives, travelling, and love for the South-East Asian culture that adopted him appear throughout the whimsical tracks.

LOMBOK’s Bandcamp expresses Hooper’s intentions behind the tracks:

“Coming from a small town in British Columbia with not a single traffic light, to a city of ten million people, and living with a muslim family, the differences were obvious. But the very first day I could already see the similarities.”

Track 1: Rasa Sayange, is an adaptation of a traditional Indonesian folk song. Translated, the words mean “The Feeling of Love”. “This summed up the culture for me – a traditional song which describes the emotional state — the “feeling of love,” not just of loving someone. That impressed me. I wanted to sing this song as a tribute to this culture,” notes Hooper.

Track 2: Bahasa “I recorded the first version of this in my bedroom in my home in South Central Jakarta. It’s about how much there is to see in the world. Something I really got for the first time there.”

Track 3: Dinosaurs, has a moody, half dreaming, half awake feel to it. The song was inspired by an exhibit about Indonesian Independence at the National Monument Monas in Jakarta. In it, Hooper explores the ephemeral nature of historical legacy:

Track 4: We Don’t Know. Gets to the heart of the question everyone faces as they are finishing high-school, or college, or even at a crossroads in their lives. “Even if we have a direction, none of us know where we’re going exactly,” says Hooper. “So it’s all just a big adventure. On this trip, I was with other students from all over the world, who basically put their hands up to leave everything that they knew behind, not knowing what was in store. And taking that chance was really cool.”

Track 5: An Imagination, features Marc Jowett’s analogue contributions of cello and guitar, as well as a sample Metalophone, which is used in Indonesian Gamelan music. “This song is about the struggle between growing up and wanting to keep some childish innocence,” says Hooper.

Track 6: Ondel-Ondel ” This song is kind of about saying goodbye. It’s about the amazing things I saw from Bali to Lombok to the streets of Jakarta. Ondel-Ondel is a traditional Batawi ( old Jakarta) folk performance. I would sometimes drift off to sleep while stuck in traffic in Jakarta. A few times, when I opened my eyes I would see these massive costumed people dancing in the street. They were performing Ondel-Ondel to provide protection against calamities and warding off evil spirits.”

Throughout the album, the music carefully articulates the differences between the Western and Eastern cultures to the mind of a blossoming adult. It is available on Bandcamp for purchase so you best check it out! A preview track is embedded in the space below. - Rainy Dawg Radio at University of Washington


Discography

The Great South-East, EP Released August 2013

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Bio

Lombok is a global dream pop project created by west coast Canadian singer songwriter Owen Hooper. The Great South-East, Lombok's first release was inspired by Hoopers travels in Indonesia as a foreign exchange student when he was 16. Hooper wrote, performed and produced the project in 2013 during his last year of high school.

Hooper, now 18, started recording and performing at a really young age. His father, Tom Hooper has gold and platinum records to his credit for his singer/songwriting work with the Canadian band Grapes of Wrath. His mother Suzanne Little also a recording artist, was signed to Polygram in the USA with her 90's band Lava Hay. So recording gear and writing music was part of the background in Hooper's house as he grew up.

In 2012, Hooper attended a public school in South Jakarta, undertook cultural and religious studies which gave him an appreciation of the muslim culture, and had a series of epic adventures which included a spot on a live entertainment national TV show, joining a popular indonesian reggae band (his host brothers' band) at various appearances, and excursions to barely visited beaches and places throughout the country including the spectacular island of Lombok. The CD is an homage to the adventure and the people of Indonesia.

Coming from a Salt Spring Island in British Columbia with not a single traffic light, to a city of ten million people, and living with a muslim family, the differences were obvious. But the very first day I could already see the similarities.

Band Members