Lucas Biespiel and His Dangerous Gentlemen
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Lucas Biespiel and His Dangerous Gentlemen

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After over a month on hiatus dealing with any number of other things, Ten Miles is back with new content. I’ve missed you all. Today I want to share this great new single by Boston’s Lucas Biespiel and his Dangerous Gentlemen. “Preacher” is the first single off their upcoming album, Stories of Your Sorrows. The album tells the story of a holy man who mourns his lost son as he attempts to bring happiness to those still in the world. “Preacher” is an engrossing introduction to the story. Funk-tinged rock that bleeds intensity and brings to mind the heroes of outlaw music. You can hear the gathering storm clouds as the instrumentals swell and darken behind Biespiel’s powerful voice. Check out “Preacher” below and keep an eye out for Stories of Your Sorrows this fall! - Ten Miles


After over a month on hiatus dealing with any number of other things, Ten Miles is back with new content. I’ve missed you all. Today I want to share this great new single by Boston’s Lucas Biespiel and his Dangerous Gentlemen. “Preacher” is the first single off their upcoming album, Stories of Your Sorrows. The album tells the story of a holy man who mourns his lost son as he attempts to bring happiness to those still in the world. “Preacher” is an engrossing introduction to the story. Funk-tinged rock that bleeds intensity and brings to mind the heroes of outlaw music. You can hear the gathering storm clouds as the instrumentals swell and darken behind Biespiel’s powerful voice. Check out “Preacher” below and keep an eye out for Stories of Your Sorrows this fall! - Ten Miles


Can you tell me about the songwriting/recording process?
I’ve never really had a set process for writing, which is on purpose. I think that writing a certain way every time is really limiting because you’re forcing every idea to be something, rather than letting it be what it is. So when I’m writing it starts from any good idea, whether it be a nice lyric, bass line, riff, chord progression, or whatever. From there, I already have a vision of what the song is, and in essence the song already exists, so all I’m doing is bringing that song to life the best I can. With “Preacher” it started from the chorus; a young man is in love with the teachings of an old preacher, not because he agrees with him, or because the preacher is right, but because he feels understood. Once I had that, my job was simply to tell the story of the preacher and tell why he’s come to believe what he does now. Again, once I have a vision for the song it’s already done, all I’m doing is bringing it to life.

In terms of recording, we did 90% of the album completely live in two, 6-hour sessions at Phoenix Down Recording Studios. Everybody there was great to work with, most of all John Scott, who runs the studio and co-produced the album with me. He really zoned in on what my idea and vision for the project was and brought it to life, and the band played the songs as well as we ever have. So the recording process flowed better than I ever could have hoped.
Lucas
If you could give any advice to aspiring musicians what would you tell them?
The main thing I’ve learned is that when your making music, you have to take your ego out of it. There are too many talented musicians out there who can’t look past what they’re thinking, or what their idea is. It’s as if making a suggestion to them is attacking their art, when what they should be doing is taking every opportunity to make their music better. Not to say you should compromise and change your vision just because someone has a different idea, sometimes you have to stand your ground. But give advice with the purpose of making the music better, not putting your own egotistical stamp on it, and take advice as means to make your art better, not as an attack. That is what’s made this band go so well to this point. Obviously, it’s my band and my project, so it’s my vision, but the Gentlemen are all unbelievably talented musicians, and without their advice and guidance there’s no way we’d be at the same level of playing as a group that we are now. Sean Oliver is an amazing bassist and everything he does is to make the rest of the band sound better. Griffin Davis, the drummer, keys in with Sean to help support the band as well, and that allows Sam Small (the guitarist) and I to be more free and more creative with what we’re doing. In turn, we’re very comfortable playing together, and that allows Sean and Griffin to take a few more liberties. So it’s all about respecting each other and taking your ego out of it. Once you can do that there’s no limit on what you can create.

If you could have any band cover one of your songs what band would you choose?
My feeling about covers is that they should always be very different than the original, so it’s hard to say who I’d like to do one of my songs because I think I’d like it more if it was someone unexpected. But I don’t know. There’s this electronic guy, Telephobia, on a label called Oligopolist Records in Portland, OR (where I’m from originally), and I’d love to hear him rework one of my songs.

If you could have one of your songs retroactively applied to a soundtrack which one would you pick?
There’s that great scene in Rushmore when Dirk finds out that Mr. Blume and Ms. Cross are having an affair, and then he writes the note to Max about it before Max confronts Blume. I think that if that scene was a little longer, “You Must Have Made a Mistake” would fit well there.

Lucas2

What is your favorite band memory?
As a full band, we haven’t been together too long, but for me it’s got to be the night we finished recording the album. Or I guess the morning we finished it. It was just John and I at the studio and we were finishing some overdubs, but things took a lot longer than we expected. I had a flight in the morning I had to catch, so we worked literally for 12 hours straight without a break and I went straight to the airport and caught the last call. Literally, they were saying, “last call for Biespiel” over the intercom and I came running over with my bag, violin, and ukulele. They closed the door about 2 seconds after I got on, and it wasn’t until I got home that I even had a chance to look back and realize that I’d finished recording an album. Hell of a day!
Was their a moment in particular that you decided or realized that you wanted to be a musician?
You know, for a lot of people it’s kind of a gradual thing, but for me there actually was a moment. I only vaguely remember it, but my mom tells this story a lot so I’ve come to know i - Rose Rundown


Can you tell me about the songwriting/recording process?
I’ve never really had a set process for writing, which is on purpose. I think that writing a certain way every time is really limiting because you’re forcing every idea to be something, rather than letting it be what it is. So when I’m writing it starts from any good idea, whether it be a nice lyric, bass line, riff, chord progression, or whatever. From there, I already have a vision of what the song is, and in essence the song already exists, so all I’m doing is bringing that song to life the best I can. With “Preacher” it started from the chorus; a young man is in love with the teachings of an old preacher, not because he agrees with him, or because the preacher is right, but because he feels understood. Once I had that, my job was simply to tell the story of the preacher and tell why he’s come to believe what he does now. Again, once I have a vision for the song it’s already done, all I’m doing is bringing it to life.

In terms of recording, we did 90% of the album completely live in two, 6-hour sessions at Phoenix Down Recording Studios. Everybody there was great to work with, most of all John Scott, who runs the studio and co-produced the album with me. He really zoned in on what my idea and vision for the project was and brought it to life, and the band played the songs as well as we ever have. So the recording process flowed better than I ever could have hoped.
Lucas
If you could give any advice to aspiring musicians what would you tell them?
The main thing I’ve learned is that when your making music, you have to take your ego out of it. There are too many talented musicians out there who can’t look past what they’re thinking, or what their idea is. It’s as if making a suggestion to them is attacking their art, when what they should be doing is taking every opportunity to make their music better. Not to say you should compromise and change your vision just because someone has a different idea, sometimes you have to stand your ground. But give advice with the purpose of making the music better, not putting your own egotistical stamp on it, and take advice as means to make your art better, not as an attack. That is what’s made this band go so well to this point. Obviously, it’s my band and my project, so it’s my vision, but the Gentlemen are all unbelievably talented musicians, and without their advice and guidance there’s no way we’d be at the same level of playing as a group that we are now. Sean Oliver is an amazing bassist and everything he does is to make the rest of the band sound better. Griffin Davis, the drummer, keys in with Sean to help support the band as well, and that allows Sam Small (the guitarist) and I to be more free and more creative with what we’re doing. In turn, we’re very comfortable playing together, and that allows Sean and Griffin to take a few more liberties. So it’s all about respecting each other and taking your ego out of it. Once you can do that there’s no limit on what you can create.

If you could have any band cover one of your songs what band would you choose?
My feeling about covers is that they should always be very different than the original, so it’s hard to say who I’d like to do one of my songs because I think I’d like it more if it was someone unexpected. But I don’t know. There’s this electronic guy, Telephobia, on a label called Oligopolist Records in Portland, OR (where I’m from originally), and I’d love to hear him rework one of my songs.

If you could have one of your songs retroactively applied to a soundtrack which one would you pick?
There’s that great scene in Rushmore when Dirk finds out that Mr. Blume and Ms. Cross are having an affair, and then he writes the note to Max about it before Max confronts Blume. I think that if that scene was a little longer, “You Must Have Made a Mistake” would fit well there.

Lucas2

What is your favorite band memory?
As a full band, we haven’t been together too long, but for me it’s got to be the night we finished recording the album. Or I guess the morning we finished it. It was just John and I at the studio and we were finishing some overdubs, but things took a lot longer than we expected. I had a flight in the morning I had to catch, so we worked literally for 12 hours straight without a break and I went straight to the airport and caught the last call. Literally, they were saying, “last call for Biespiel” over the intercom and I came running over with my bag, violin, and ukulele. They closed the door about 2 seconds after I got on, and it wasn’t until I got home that I even had a chance to look back and realize that I’d finished recording an album. Hell of a day!
Was their a moment in particular that you decided or realized that you wanted to be a musician?
You know, for a lot of people it’s kind of a gradual thing, but for me there actually was a moment. I only vaguely remember it, but my mom tells this story a lot so I’ve come to know i - Rose Rundown


Their music is bluesy and soulful with earthy, ageless vocals and tasty guitar licks that slide down like honey. It’s nicely crafted with percussive flourishes (rather than just “drumming”) and closely-knit vocal harmonies. This is good… really good. - Musings from Boston


Their music is bluesy and soulful with earthy, ageless vocals and tasty guitar licks that slide down like honey. It’s nicely crafted with percussive flourishes (rather than just “drumming”) and closely-knit vocal harmonies. This is good… really good. - Musings from Boston


Discography

Singles:
"Preacher" - June 20th, 2013 (Blue Brick Records)
"Paint Your Eyes Blue" - September 10th, 2013 (Blue Brick Records)

Albums:
"Stories of Your Sorrows" - October 1st, 2013 (Blue Brick Records)

Photos

Bio

Lucas Biespiel was fifteen when he played his first show at a small club in Portland named the Satyricon, a venue that is well known for being the meeting place of Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love. A talented violinist and singer, he quickly emerged as one of Portland's rising talents as the front man and lead singer for the Backyard Blues Boys. In a review of the BBBs album, “Tradin’ Twelves,” (2011) CBA President Greg Johnson called his songwriting, “down-right amazing.”

After relocating to Boston to attend Berklee College of Music, Biespiel began writing a new wave of material, which spawned his band, Lucas Biespiel and his Dangerous Gentlemen. The band is a group of Boston's finest young talents, bringing different styles and backgrounds together in an enriched fashion. Their debut Album, "Stories of Your Sorrows" is set to be released on October 1st, 2013, and will feature a wide spectrum of American styles of music, from country to R&B to funk to rock, and it's all rooted in the blues.