LUCKY STABB
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LUCKY STABB

Waterloo, Ontario, Canada | INDIE

Waterloo, Ontario, Canada | INDIE
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Grand Porch Party offers healthy fun and good music


Porch party Tenille Bonoguore is organizing the Grand Porch Party in her Waterloo neighbourhood on June 12. Philip Walker/Record staff
WATERLOO — The front porches of a number of Waterloo homes will be turned into mini-stages next month for a unique neighbourhood event.

Called the Grand Porch Party, the event will feature an eclectic mix of songwriters and musicians who will play on the porches for people walking by.

Organizer Tenille Bonoguore said the idea is to offer a fun, relaxing day for anyone who wants to hear some good music while enjoying a walk in the tree-lined neighbourhood behind Waterloo Towne Square.

The neighbourhood is bordered by Euclid, William, Roslin and Dawson streets.

Bonoguore was inspired by the annual winter art walk in the Frederick Street neighbourhood in Kitchener.

“I loved that idea. I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be awesome to have something similar in the summer?’ she said.

“But no one wants to be indoors. I imagine it to be a really nice, relaxing afternoon.’’

Bonoguore is managing editor of a national environmental magazine in Waterloo called Alternatives Journal. Its first music and environment issue is coming out this summer and she decided to tie the two events together.

It’s also Canadian Rivers Day.

Already, 11 musicians and bands have signed on. They’ll play from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 12.

One band is Lucky Stabb, described by Bonoguore as a Waterloo Region rock band “with hints of rowdy southern rock.’’

Band member Marco Pedrosa is looking forward to the event.

“The fact that this is a community event in our home area, sponsored by an insightful and thought-provoking publication, just makes it all the more exciting for us,’’ he said in an email.

“If we can entertain some people, and also help turn the community on to the thriving, but perhaps under-exposed music scene in K-W, then all the better.’’

Pedestrians will be invited to sit on residents’ front lawns if they want to stop to hear a particular band.

It will be mainly an acoustic affair, although musicians will be allowed a small amplifier.

“It’s not going to be a raucous thing,’’ Bonoguore said. “We don’t want to annoy the neighbours if they’re not keen.’’

She and husband Tony Reinhart just moved into their Alexandra Street home last October.

“I just started hitting up my new neighbours,’’ she said. “They love the idea. Most people that hear about it, they light up and get on board.’’

She’s still looking for more porches and more musicians.

She also plans to decorate sidewalks and create a music garden for children on Roslin Street, with homemade instruments they can bang around on.

So far, the lineup includes local rock band Lucky Stabb, the Billie Hollies, a female quartet from Toronto who meld jazz, folk, classical and opera; Childebeast, a local indie folk rock and power pop duo, Lazu Lie, an indie pop-rock quartet, Alex Machidon, an acoustic reggae-soul influenced singer-songwriter, Jesse Maranger, a Waterloo-based folksinger, Sam Nabi and Tynan, two singer-songwriters, and Carol and Friends, a four-piece steel drum band.

Julia Hambleton of the Billie Hollies will be playing her clarinet, “hopefully drinking a cool glass of lemonade and singing songs on a hot June day while the people of Kitchener walk by.

“Much like Halloween, you have an excuse to go door-to-door and meet your neighbours,’’ she said in an email.

She was impressed with Bonoguore’s “enthusiasm and desire to bring her community together around music and the environment.’’

The Swim Drink Fish music club, part of Lake Ontario Waterkeeper, a group working to protect waterways, is offering free one-year music club memberships to everyone who attends.

More information can be found at grandporchparty.wordpress.com. - KW Record


Grand Porch Party offers healthy fun and good music


Porch party Tenille Bonoguore is organizing the Grand Porch Party in her Waterloo neighbourhood on June 12. Philip Walker/Record staff
WATERLOO — The front porches of a number of Waterloo homes will be turned into mini-stages next month for a unique neighbourhood event.

Called the Grand Porch Party, the event will feature an eclectic mix of songwriters and musicians who will play on the porches for people walking by.

Organizer Tenille Bonoguore said the idea is to offer a fun, relaxing day for anyone who wants to hear some good music while enjoying a walk in the tree-lined neighbourhood behind Waterloo Towne Square.

The neighbourhood is bordered by Euclid, William, Roslin and Dawson streets.

Bonoguore was inspired by the annual winter art walk in the Frederick Street neighbourhood in Kitchener.

“I loved that idea. I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be awesome to have something similar in the summer?’ she said.

“But no one wants to be indoors. I imagine it to be a really nice, relaxing afternoon.’’

Bonoguore is managing editor of a national environmental magazine in Waterloo called Alternatives Journal. Its first music and environment issue is coming out this summer and she decided to tie the two events together.

It’s also Canadian Rivers Day.

Already, 11 musicians and bands have signed on. They’ll play from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 12.

One band is Lucky Stabb, described by Bonoguore as a Waterloo Region rock band “with hints of rowdy southern rock.’’

Band member Marco Pedrosa is looking forward to the event.

“The fact that this is a community event in our home area, sponsored by an insightful and thought-provoking publication, just makes it all the more exciting for us,’’ he said in an email.

“If we can entertain some people, and also help turn the community on to the thriving, but perhaps under-exposed music scene in K-W, then all the better.’’

Pedestrians will be invited to sit on residents’ front lawns if they want to stop to hear a particular band.

It will be mainly an acoustic affair, although musicians will be allowed a small amplifier.

“It’s not going to be a raucous thing,’’ Bonoguore said. “We don’t want to annoy the neighbours if they’re not keen.’’

She and husband Tony Reinhart just moved into their Alexandra Street home last October.

“I just started hitting up my new neighbours,’’ she said. “They love the idea. Most people that hear about it, they light up and get on board.’’

She’s still looking for more porches and more musicians.

She also plans to decorate sidewalks and create a music garden for children on Roslin Street, with homemade instruments they can bang around on.

So far, the lineup includes local rock band Lucky Stabb, the Billie Hollies, a female quartet from Toronto who meld jazz, folk, classical and opera; Childebeast, a local indie folk rock and power pop duo, Lazu Lie, an indie pop-rock quartet, Alex Machidon, an acoustic reggae-soul influenced singer-songwriter, Jesse Maranger, a Waterloo-based folksinger, Sam Nabi and Tynan, two singer-songwriters, and Carol and Friends, a four-piece steel drum band.

Julia Hambleton of the Billie Hollies will be playing her clarinet, “hopefully drinking a cool glass of lemonade and singing songs on a hot June day while the people of Kitchener walk by.

“Much like Halloween, you have an excuse to go door-to-door and meet your neighbours,’’ she said in an email.

She was impressed with Bonoguore’s “enthusiasm and desire to bring her community together around music and the environment.’’

The Swim Drink Fish music club, part of Lake Ontario Waterkeeper, a group working to protect waterways, is offering free one-year music club memberships to everyone who attends.

More information can be found at grandporchparty.wordpress.com. - KW Record


this is an online magazine. We're interviewed in issue 17, page 28 - Vents Magazine


this is an online magazine. We're interviewed in issue 17, page 28 - Vents Magazine


Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont.'s Lucky Stabb are an indie rock quartet who draw equally from '60s guitar pop, The Smiths and Neutral Milk Hotel.

They've just released their It's Now Or Later debut album, on which "Walkens The Line" can be found, and have drawn critical acclaim as far afield as Britain, where Consequence Of Sound called the record "uncontrollably fist-pumping." - chartattack.com


Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont.'s Lucky Stabb are an indie rock quartet who draw equally from '60s guitar pop, The Smiths and Neutral Milk Hotel.

They've just released their It's Now Or Later debut album, on which "Walkens The Line" can be found, and have drawn critical acclaim as far afield as Britain, where Consequence Of Sound called the record "uncontrollably fist-pumping." - chartattack.com


I don't usually defer completely to anyone else's assessment of a band, but in the case of It's Now Or Later, the debut full-length from Lucky Stabb, it seems appropriate. After all, just as I started writing this post I Googled the band and found out that not only had Consequence of Sound written about the band a couple of months ago, they'd said exactly what I'd planned on saying.

Obviously, they wrote it a lot more eloquently than I could have, dropping in references to the likes of Dead Kennedys, The Smiths, Elliott Smith and John Frusciante; I was just going to say the band sounded kind of like Kurt Cobain fronting a lo-fi garage rock band (see "Draws Me Near" for the best example). But on the whole, I have to say that my sentiment is exactly the same as theirs -- that Lucky Stabbs' debut is an unpretentious mix of a whole bunch of genres, and that it sounds like a throwback to the early '90s, to that brief moment when "alternative rock" covered a broad swath of styles and hadn't yet been codified into a specific, flannel-y sound.

Now, if I'd come up with that comparison on my own, I might find it a little suspect. That someone else noticed it as well, however -- and that I did so without even being aware of their existence -- makes me think there's probably something to it. What it all means, I guess, is that if you miss the early '90s (or even if you miss music that sounds like it stems from that era), then you'll definitely want to check out It's Now Or Later. - iHeartMusic.net


I don't usually defer completely to anyone else's assessment of a band, but in the case of It's Now Or Later, the debut full-length from Lucky Stabb, it seems appropriate. After all, just as I started writing this post I Googled the band and found out that not only had Consequence of Sound written about the band a couple of months ago, they'd said exactly what I'd planned on saying.

Obviously, they wrote it a lot more eloquently than I could have, dropping in references to the likes of Dead Kennedys, The Smiths, Elliott Smith and John Frusciante; I was just going to say the band sounded kind of like Kurt Cobain fronting a lo-fi garage rock band (see "Draws Me Near" for the best example). But on the whole, I have to say that my sentiment is exactly the same as theirs -- that Lucky Stabbs' debut is an unpretentious mix of a whole bunch of genres, and that it sounds like a throwback to the early '90s, to that brief moment when "alternative rock" covered a broad swath of styles and hadn't yet been codified into a specific, flannel-y sound.

Now, if I'd come up with that comparison on my own, I might find it a little suspect. That someone else noticed it as well, however -- and that I did so without even being aware of their existence -- makes me think there's probably something to it. What it all means, I guess, is that if you miss the early '90s (or even if you miss music that sounds like it stems from that era), then you'll definitely want to check out It's Now Or Later. - iHeartMusic.net


In the ever expanding indie-rock scene, more and more bands are committed to the essence of revival; Smith Westerns have incorporated 80s glam rock and Brit pop into their sophomore effort, Dye It Blonde; Tennis has brought 50s doo-wop/girl groups back to life; Bands like Best Coast and Wavves indulge in 60s surf pop; White Lies craft tunes that sound a lot like Depeche Mode. And then we have the somewhat overlooked nineties, a.k.a. the dawn of alternative rock, and the cornerstone bands (think Neutral Milk Hotel, Pavement) that made indie rock a prominent genre. While the latter are constantly being referenced by independent outfits, there seems to be a decline of indie rock groups swayed by the alternative rock formula.

Among the few bands out there that bring forth audibly vivacious 90's jams like Dinosaur Jr.’s Farm or R.E.M.’s upcoming Collapse Into Now, not many blend today’s contemporary indie rock with alternative pop from that decade without the lo-fi and distortion, or growing experimentalist fixation and electronic enthusiasm. Not many have put out just that good ol’, classic alternative album that could sit on the shelves alongside Foo Fighters’ The Colour And The Shape and Green Day’s Nookie, but could just as easily fit beside recent LPs like Surfer Blood’s Astro Coast or Harlem’s Hippies. Enter Lucky Stabb, a sprawling foursome out of Kitchener, Ontario, whose debut album conceives the very notion of alternative rock, but with a modern tinge that makes for a very likable batch of songs.

There is a small percentage of artists out there who can create mainstream music, but still be beloved by hipsters and indie-kids everywhere (Kanye West anyone?). Cold War Kids had massive appeal in the indie scene with their first two records, but couldn’t satisfy their loyal fans while trying to appeal to a larger audience with their most recent, Mine Is Yours. Lucky Stabb, on the other hand, allure to all, and they do it so carelessly and nonchalantly that they make it seem easy. Some members of the band have been playing together since high school, and it’s easy to hear the consistency and gracefulness in their music. Their debut effort, It’s Now Or Later, is an impressive one, enlisting a certain amount of pop merged with a boisterous heap of rock that doesn’t sound forced. It reminds you of a time when bands could rock out and wouldn’t worry whether their music wasn’t different enough, a time when you just wanted to produce some awesome rock jams and call it a day.



The tunes found on It’s Now Or Later are rowdy and uncontrollably fist-pumping, but they are also surprisingly radio accessible, from the smooth vibes of “Compliments” to rock ‘n’ roll anthem “Not The Girl”. Thanks to lead vocalists Marco Pedrosa and Treason Van Arch, there’s a degree of Southern-tinged raspiness apparent, but also heaps of polished, unadulterated expression. They sing about heartache and drugs, sex and anxiety. They move from lovely guitar ballads to angry assertiveness, and they can do it all in one song (see album closer “Draws Me Near”). Fan favorite “Sever” chronicles an emotionally violent relationship that continues in an ongoing cycle of cynicism and desperation. As such, Lucky Stabb go batshit crazy in one moment, and love you the next. The band has a wide range of influences, from Dead Kennedys and The Smiths, to Elliot Smith and Dead Prez. On the disc’s only laid-back ballad, “Thunder Ceilings”, you can hear Pedrosa’s interest in John Frusciante’s ambient guitar gazing. It’s a wonderful reminder of a seemingly lost 90s aesthetic.

“What has improved since the ’90s really?” Van Arch asked in a recent chat. “Most of the current radio bands sound like weak versions of good mid-90s bands. So much has changed in the age of mp3s, and success is spread pretty thin now. But the nineties were the new 1960s, as far as musical significance is concerned, in nearly every popular genre.” This all seems to hold true, and listening to It’s Now Or Later‘s friendly, balls to the wall attitude is representative of that alternative pop rock we all grew to love at one point or another. This young foursome of Van Arch, Pedrosa, lead guitarist Paul Lipton, and drummer Adrian Bos are a band deserving of praise, lost in a world-wide whirlwind of ’80s nostalgia and obscure throwbacks.

Lucky Stabb are currently working on a sophomore effort, heading towards a more “psychedelic jazz/punk direction,” if their recent jams are any indication. Their debut can be purchased on iTunes, or found on their label’s official website (Fauxtown Records). One listen to any track on It’s Now Or Later, and you’ll recognize that they are totally worth it. - Consequence of Sound


In the ever expanding indie-rock scene, more and more bands are committed to the essence of revival; Smith Westerns have incorporated 80s glam rock and Brit pop into their sophomore effort, Dye It Blonde; Tennis has brought 50s doo-wop/girl groups back to life; Bands like Best Coast and Wavves indulge in 60s surf pop; White Lies craft tunes that sound a lot like Depeche Mode. And then we have the somewhat overlooked nineties, a.k.a. the dawn of alternative rock, and the cornerstone bands (think Neutral Milk Hotel, Pavement) that made indie rock a prominent genre. While the latter are constantly being referenced by independent outfits, there seems to be a decline of indie rock groups swayed by the alternative rock formula.

Among the few bands out there that bring forth audibly vivacious 90's jams like Dinosaur Jr.’s Farm or R.E.M.’s upcoming Collapse Into Now, not many blend today’s contemporary indie rock with alternative pop from that decade without the lo-fi and distortion, or growing experimentalist fixation and electronic enthusiasm. Not many have put out just that good ol’, classic alternative album that could sit on the shelves alongside Foo Fighters’ The Colour And The Shape and Green Day’s Nookie, but could just as easily fit beside recent LPs like Surfer Blood’s Astro Coast or Harlem’s Hippies. Enter Lucky Stabb, a sprawling foursome out of Kitchener, Ontario, whose debut album conceives the very notion of alternative rock, but with a modern tinge that makes for a very likable batch of songs.

There is a small percentage of artists out there who can create mainstream music, but still be beloved by hipsters and indie-kids everywhere (Kanye West anyone?). Cold War Kids had massive appeal in the indie scene with their first two records, but couldn’t satisfy their loyal fans while trying to appeal to a larger audience with their most recent, Mine Is Yours. Lucky Stabb, on the other hand, allure to all, and they do it so carelessly and nonchalantly that they make it seem easy. Some members of the band have been playing together since high school, and it’s easy to hear the consistency and gracefulness in their music. Their debut effort, It’s Now Or Later, is an impressive one, enlisting a certain amount of pop merged with a boisterous heap of rock that doesn’t sound forced. It reminds you of a time when bands could rock out and wouldn’t worry whether their music wasn’t different enough, a time when you just wanted to produce some awesome rock jams and call it a day.



The tunes found on It’s Now Or Later are rowdy and uncontrollably fist-pumping, but they are also surprisingly radio accessible, from the smooth vibes of “Compliments” to rock ‘n’ roll anthem “Not The Girl”. Thanks to lead vocalists Marco Pedrosa and Treason Van Arch, there’s a degree of Southern-tinged raspiness apparent, but also heaps of polished, unadulterated expression. They sing about heartache and drugs, sex and anxiety. They move from lovely guitar ballads to angry assertiveness, and they can do it all in one song (see album closer “Draws Me Near”). Fan favorite “Sever” chronicles an emotionally violent relationship that continues in an ongoing cycle of cynicism and desperation. As such, Lucky Stabb go batshit crazy in one moment, and love you the next. The band has a wide range of influences, from Dead Kennedys and The Smiths, to Elliot Smith and Dead Prez. On the disc’s only laid-back ballad, “Thunder Ceilings”, you can hear Pedrosa’s interest in John Frusciante’s ambient guitar gazing. It’s a wonderful reminder of a seemingly lost 90s aesthetic.

“What has improved since the ’90s really?” Van Arch asked in a recent chat. “Most of the current radio bands sound like weak versions of good mid-90s bands. So much has changed in the age of mp3s, and success is spread pretty thin now. But the nineties were the new 1960s, as far as musical significance is concerned, in nearly every popular genre.” This all seems to hold true, and listening to It’s Now Or Later‘s friendly, balls to the wall attitude is representative of that alternative pop rock we all grew to love at one point or another. This young foursome of Van Arch, Pedrosa, lead guitarist Paul Lipton, and drummer Adrian Bos are a band deserving of praise, lost in a world-wide whirlwind of ’80s nostalgia and obscure throwbacks.

Lucky Stabb are currently working on a sophomore effort, heading towards a more “psychedelic jazz/punk direction,” if their recent jams are any indication. Their debut can be purchased on iTunes, or found on their label’s official website (Fauxtown Records). One listen to any track on It’s Now Or Later, and you’ll recognize that they are totally worth it. - Consequence of Sound


What is Fauxtown? The simple answer is that it's a local record label.

The not-so-simple answer is that it's "a group of like-minded freaks" who share an "amicable, mafia-like vibe" in a democratic musical collective that's like "a great, complicated love story."

That is how Fauxtown is described by a man who calls himself Young Coconut and claims to be a co-founder of the Fauxtown phenomenon.

This Young Coconut fellow, whose driver's licence actually reads David Fox, thinks all of this makes perfect sense: "It's so simple a simpleton could simplify it," he says.

Here are the known facts about Fauxtown:

Fact one: Fauxtown is indeed a record label, in the sense that it releases albums by 12 musical acts from around Waterloo Region.

Fact two: the quirky pop bands under the Fauxtown umbrella include Rough House, Mister Completely, Lucky Stabb, Childebeast, The Approachables and Yim Tin Tam.

Fact three: Those bands work together in a communal way, sharing instruments and jam spaces, and playing concerts together. Nice, huh?

Fact four: the musicians in Fauxtown created an online store, www.tricitymusic.ca, through which they sell their quirky pop records.

Fact five: Fauxtown has existed, inasmuch as a loosely knit bohemian musical collective can "exist," for pretty much exactly one year.

Fact six: In recognition of that milestone, the "like-minded freaks" at Fauxtown have organized an anniversary concert, which will happen the evening of Jan. 24 at The Groove Kitchen and Music Room in Cambridge.

Most of the bands involved with Fauxtown will perform on the show, which will be -- get this -- absolutely free. Such is the one-for-all, all-for-one philosophy behind the peculiar conglomeration called Fauxtown (www.fauxtownrecords.com).

"There will be no cover, but donations are welcome, of course," Young Coconut says. "Any and all are welcome to come out . . . and bring two friends." - KW Record


What is Fauxtown? The simple answer is that it's a local record label.

The not-so-simple answer is that it's "a group of like-minded freaks" who share an "amicable, mafia-like vibe" in a democratic musical collective that's like "a great, complicated love story."

That is how Fauxtown is described by a man who calls himself Young Coconut and claims to be a co-founder of the Fauxtown phenomenon.

This Young Coconut fellow, whose driver's licence actually reads David Fox, thinks all of this makes perfect sense: "It's so simple a simpleton could simplify it," he says.

Here are the known facts about Fauxtown:

Fact one: Fauxtown is indeed a record label, in the sense that it releases albums by 12 musical acts from around Waterloo Region.

Fact two: the quirky pop bands under the Fauxtown umbrella include Rough House, Mister Completely, Lucky Stabb, Childebeast, The Approachables and Yim Tin Tam.

Fact three: Those bands work together in a communal way, sharing instruments and jam spaces, and playing concerts together. Nice, huh?

Fact four: the musicians in Fauxtown created an online store, www.tricitymusic.ca, through which they sell their quirky pop records.

Fact five: Fauxtown has existed, inasmuch as a loosely knit bohemian musical collective can "exist," for pretty much exactly one year.

Fact six: In recognition of that milestone, the "like-minded freaks" at Fauxtown have organized an anniversary concert, which will happen the evening of Jan. 24 at The Groove Kitchen and Music Room in Cambridge.

Most of the bands involved with Fauxtown will perform on the show, which will be -- get this -- absolutely free. Such is the one-for-all, all-for-one philosophy behind the peculiar conglomeration called Fauxtown (www.fauxtownrecords.com).

"There will be no cover, but donations are welcome, of course," Young Coconut says. "Any and all are welcome to come out . . . and bring two friends." - KW Record


For some, it's signalling the end of the traditional music business. For others, it's the opportunity to get their music directly to listeners all over the world and, more importantly, get paid directly for it.

Either way, there's no stopping the digital download revolution, and now local artists can join in through a new website, tricitymusic.ca.

Launched about six months ago by Marco Pedrosa and other members of his band Lucky Stabb, the site allows independent musicians to submit recordings that are then made available to be downloaded in their entirety, along with artwork, for a nominal fee.

Pedrosa says the idea was born out of the frustration he and others he knew experienced in trying to get their CDs distributed on a large scale.

"When we started this new band, we tried to look seriously at some of the reasons why past bands we were in hadn't succeeded over the last 10 years, and the main ones were lack of label support and lack of outlets to sell the product. So those two things became equal priorities to getting the band going, and that grew into the idea for the website."

The challenges that came next were a business model and, of course, content.

"The first things we tested on the site were some of our old recordings we had lying around, and when it all seemed to work, we started approaching bands we knew to see if they would be interested.

"Now we're at the point where we're feeling confident to open it up to the entire community and make it a rallying point for the local music scene."

Pedrosa explains that the process involves an artist signing a non-exclusive open-ended contract for their work to be posted as digital downloads -- the site will also handle orders for physical CDs, although Pedrosa wants to avoid storing a large amount of stock. The artist then names the price for each download unit, and the split of all sales is 60-40 in favour of the artist.

For now, Pedrosa says the site is only posting full albums rather than individual songs -- like on iTunes -- partly to keep things simple, and partly out of his own personal downloading preferences.

Does he envision TriCityMusic.ca striking a blow against the corporate music establishment and another step into a brave new world? Perhaps more accurately, it's a case of thinking globally and acting locally.

"I might go out and see half a dozen bands that I really like, and then I'll never hear from them again," Pedrosa says.

"Most of the time, too, you don't have the money to buy a band's CD at a show, so at least with this site you can go to it the next day, spend ten bucks or so for the download, and maybe discover some other music while you're there. That's the appeal that we hope artists will see in working with us."
- KW Record


For some, it's signalling the end of the traditional music business. For others, it's the opportunity to get their music directly to listeners all over the world and, more importantly, get paid directly for it.

Either way, there's no stopping the digital download revolution, and now local artists can join in through a new website, tricitymusic.ca.

Launched about six months ago by Marco Pedrosa and other members of his band Lucky Stabb, the site allows independent musicians to submit recordings that are then made available to be downloaded in their entirety, along with artwork, for a nominal fee.

Pedrosa says the idea was born out of the frustration he and others he knew experienced in trying to get their CDs distributed on a large scale.

"When we started this new band, we tried to look seriously at some of the reasons why past bands we were in hadn't succeeded over the last 10 years, and the main ones were lack of label support and lack of outlets to sell the product. So those two things became equal priorities to getting the band going, and that grew into the idea for the website."

The challenges that came next were a business model and, of course, content.

"The first things we tested on the site were some of our old recordings we had lying around, and when it all seemed to work, we started approaching bands we knew to see if they would be interested.

"Now we're at the point where we're feeling confident to open it up to the entire community and make it a rallying point for the local music scene."

Pedrosa explains that the process involves an artist signing a non-exclusive open-ended contract for their work to be posted as digital downloads -- the site will also handle orders for physical CDs, although Pedrosa wants to avoid storing a large amount of stock. The artist then names the price for each download unit, and the split of all sales is 60-40 in favour of the artist.

For now, Pedrosa says the site is only posting full albums rather than individual songs -- like on iTunes -- partly to keep things simple, and partly out of his own personal downloading preferences.

Does he envision TriCityMusic.ca striking a blow against the corporate music establishment and another step into a brave new world? Perhaps more accurately, it's a case of thinking globally and acting locally.

"I might go out and see half a dozen bands that I really like, and then I'll never hear from them again," Pedrosa says.

"Most of the time, too, you don't have the money to buy a band's CD at a show, so at least with this site you can go to it the next day, spend ten bucks or so for the download, and maybe discover some other music while you're there. That's the appeal that we hope artists will see in working with us."
- KW Record


It’s Now Or Later may serve as the EP title, but it couldn’t be more fitting for Kitchener natives, Lucky Stabb, who have spent the their time honing their live show since solidifying their line up in 2008. Their debut studio effort comes on the heels of the four-piece lending their efforts to other musical projects such as Yim Tim Tam and The Approachables. Influenced by artists such as The Pixies and Elliot Smith, the band centres itself around 60’s-garage-band in likeness, modernized to fit into an alt indie rock project. Sharing stages with some of the city’s finest, the band is affiliated with Fauxtown Records – a DIY indie effort run by a combination friends and musicians in the tri-cities scene. “The community of talent in the area is tremendous!” the band says adding, “Not just in the indie genre either. How many countless times have we wandered into seedy bars in this area and witnessed Blues and Jazz masters playing their hearts out to tiny audiences. The talent is clearly here! The culture to support it unfortunately isn’t. Maybe if there were a cable outage for a year and people couldn’t get their entertainment fix from The Bachelorette, they’d start to look elsewhere and things would slowly begin to change.” Now with their EP in hand, the band is planning a double CD release party alongside Childebeast. “I would have to say the sound and song quality,” they say of their live show. “If you’re interested in indie rock in the vein of The Pixies, The Cure or even Blur, we’re the only band in the area that I know of pursuing that sound and doing it well live. Plus we like to quip with the audience a lot and Darrell can be pretty funny. One of the guys is an engineer by trade and I wouldn’t be surprised if he showed up to a gig one day with a beer serving robot. I would gladly write the software for it.” Mark your calendars for Friday night at Maxwell’s Music House in Waterloo as Lucky Stabb and Childebeast stand up to release their respective CD’s. “Success comes from the alignment of many stars,” the band advises new musicians. “If even one of these is out of line, then success may be beyond your reach. In the absence of industry support, your best weapon is an arsenal of catchy songs and the stamina to bring them to the people via relentless touring. Be careful to pick venues where you know a receptive audience is waiting. If all of that doesn’t work out, then there’s still something intensely gratifying about just being creative even if your album doesn’t kick the latest Backstreet Boys reunion off the top of the charts. Love what you do, and if commercial success is what you’re after, tackle it like a business problem, or find someone who can do that for you.” - Echo Weekly


It’s Now Or Later may serve as the EP title, but it couldn’t be more fitting for Kitchener natives, Lucky Stabb, who have spent the their time honing their live show since solidifying their line up in 2008. Their debut studio effort comes on the heels of the four-piece lending their efforts to other musical projects such as Yim Tim Tam and The Approachables. Influenced by artists such as The Pixies and Elliot Smith, the band centres itself around 60’s-garage-band in likeness, modernized to fit into an alt indie rock project. Sharing stages with some of the city’s finest, the band is affiliated with Fauxtown Records – a DIY indie effort run by a combination friends and musicians in the tri-cities scene. “The community of talent in the area is tremendous!” the band says adding, “Not just in the indie genre either. How many countless times have we wandered into seedy bars in this area and witnessed Blues and Jazz masters playing their hearts out to tiny audiences. The talent is clearly here! The culture to support it unfortunately isn’t. Maybe if there were a cable outage for a year and people couldn’t get their entertainment fix from The Bachelorette, they’d start to look elsewhere and things would slowly begin to change.” Now with their EP in hand, the band is planning a double CD release party alongside Childebeast. “I would have to say the sound and song quality,” they say of their live show. “If you’re interested in indie rock in the vein of The Pixies, The Cure or even Blur, we’re the only band in the area that I know of pursuing that sound and doing it well live. Plus we like to quip with the audience a lot and Darrell can be pretty funny. One of the guys is an engineer by trade and I wouldn’t be surprised if he showed up to a gig one day with a beer serving robot. I would gladly write the software for it.” Mark your calendars for Friday night at Maxwell’s Music House in Waterloo as Lucky Stabb and Childebeast stand up to release their respective CD’s. “Success comes from the alignment of many stars,” the band advises new musicians. “If even one of these is out of line, then success may be beyond your reach. In the absence of industry support, your best weapon is an arsenal of catchy songs and the stamina to bring them to the people via relentless touring. Be careful to pick venues where you know a receptive audience is waiting. If all of that doesn’t work out, then there’s still something intensely gratifying about just being creative even if your album doesn’t kick the latest Backstreet Boys reunion off the top of the charts. Love what you do, and if commercial success is what you’re after, tackle it like a business problem, or find someone who can do that for you.” - Echo Weekly


Discography

Debut Full-Length CD: "Its Now Or Later" - released October 2010
Available on iTunes and eMusic
Several tracks get airplay on Waterloo's SoundFM 100.3

Photos

Bio

Lucky Stabb is a four-piece rock group that combines a love of 60’s garage rock with modern indie rock sensibilities. Its members each participate in the process of song writing and take on whatever musical role is necessary to make a song the best that it can be. After a brief period of mutation following their formation in May of 2007, their line-up solidified in early 2008.

Lucky Stabbs’ members are veterans of Kitchener-Waterloo’s indie-music scene, having previously played and recorded with The Approachables, Yim Tim Tam, and The Peephole. Over the past couple of years, Lucky Stabb has taken its live show to audiences all over south western Ontario, including headlining shows at the Lancaster for CKMS’s The Rock Show, Kitchener’s Boat House and Circus Room, The Grad House and Maxwell’s Music House in Waterloo and Rancho Relaxo in Toronto.

Having honed their live show, and just emerged from the studio with their debut LP entitled “Its Now or Later”, Lucky Stabb is ready to once again hit the streets to promote its infectious and catchy brand of indie pop-rock.

Lucky Stabbs’ website: www.luckystabb.com, is the best place to keep up with what the band is up to and includes band photos, news, concert footage, and song demos.

Lucky Stabb is also a founding member of the Kitchener-Waterloo based label and music collective Fauxtown Records which just celebrated its second anniversary. More information on the label can be found at: www.fauxtownrecords.com.

Lastly, Lucky Stabbs’ interest in the arts extends beyond music and into the realm of film. The band is featured on the soundtrack of a feature film produced in 2010 titled "A Dime and a Deuce". The film was created, directed and produced by Lucky Stabb’s Treason VanArch. The band will also soon be self-producing a number of music videos to coincide with the release of their debut album.