Luke Jackson
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Luke Jackson

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Band Rock Singer/Songwriter

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""...And Then Some Is One Of Those Albums It's Impossible Not To Love" ****/5"

"...And Then Some Is One Of Those Albums It's Impossible Not To Love" ****/5 MOJO Magazine, November 2010
See the full review here:
http://tinyurl.com/LukeMOJOreview - MOJO Magazine November 2010


"“...brilliant songwriter and talented singer of catchy songs”"

“...brilliant songwriter and talented singer of catchy songs” - www.rootstime.be


""Come Tomorrow" might be one of the songs of the year.""

Here's a treat. Toronto's Luke Jackson hooked up with Magnus Börjeson of Beagle and Favorita, and went to Sweden to record this pop gem that will appeal to fans of the aforementioned band as well as anyone who likes smart, sophisticated, melodic pop. "Come Tomorrow" might be one of the songs of the year: an insanely catchy chorus, great melody and just overall pop perfection. The rest of the songs have a tough act to follow, but they come through as well: the laid-back "Trouble" has a fine Josh-Rouse-does-the-70s sound; Jackson dons a Cockney accent in the fun, uptempo "Goodbye London"; "Half a World Away" is a jangly number with definite Swedish influence; and "Longest Day" is a rocking power popper a la fellow Canadian Tal Bachman. Don't let this one slip by you.
-Steve Ferra, Absolute Powerpop - Steve Ferra, Absolute Powerpop


""...both commercially accessible and artistically credible." 5/5"

Luke Jackson obviously spent a great deal of time and energy creating this record. Although Jackson is from London, England, he traveled to Sweden to record ...And Then Some with producer Magnus Borjeson (formerly of the bands Beagle and Favorita). The two musicians were united by a love of pop music which is obvious when listening to these tunes. This ten-track album features soaring, glistening pop that is at times slightly reminiscent of Scott McCaughey (The Young Fresh Fellows, Minus 5). The songs are slick and feature plenty of overdubs and layered vocals. This album was recorded entirely on analog equipment which may explain the nice warm sound. What we find interesting about Luke Jackson's music is that it is both commercially accessible and artistically credible. Cool pop cuts include "Come Tomorrow," "Trouble," "Half a World Away," and "1970's Kids TV Show Theme." (Rating: 5/5)
-babysue®

- babysue®


""Passionate and uncomplicated feel-good music” 8.8/10"

…And Then Some is a pop-rock musical feast – a tantalizing collection of audio confections – that never tries to overcome its associations. From the minute “Come Tomorrow” kicks in, it becomes a challenge to wipe a delirious smile off your face as you become swept into a snappy and upbeat ascension of vocal harmonies and mid-60s guitars that inject a euphoric sense of musical innocence into your consciousness. It’s almost disabling; the harder you try to figure out the reference for Jackson’s playing, the more you feel your efforts are being undermined and disabled by the fact that by the third run around of the chorus, you’re already singing along. It leaves you wondering how the hell he swept you over to the pop-rock side so effortlessly…

While you’re sitting there deciding whether to congratulate him or listen to the track again to see how he accomplished such a feat, “This Life” slyly enters with a knee-jerkingly beautiful string line that begins to wrap its warm arms across the soundscape. Transitioning into Jackson’s acoustic guitar playing and midrange vocals, it flourishes into a Beatles-esque instrumental verse complimented by oohs and ahhs that effortlessly sway in the far reaches of the background. Continuing on a mellow note, “Trouble” picks up with more of Jackson’s acoustic playing, introducing a lush palette of warm tonal colours, and incorporating several flute and celesta lines nearing the midpoint.

As an upbeat champion for the first half of the album, “Goodbye London” moves the sound from acoustic to electric, supporting Jackson’s rapid and vivid lyrical imagery with lines like Goodbye London, goodbye rainy South End Green/Goodbye Camden, goodbye dodgy Thai cuisine/I’m going to miss you, you always make me feel 15/Goodbye London, I won’t forget that you were always good to me. Picking up a similar momentum tracks later in “Half a World Away” and “Longest Day” the mature pop sound and sweeping production invite you to close your eyes and lie still to find yourself floating in its depths.

Ending with “The Fear”, Jackson introduces a big song that begins innocently enough with a downscale acoustic guitar line, that’s soon accompanied by a lap steel guitar before crescendoing into the warm embrace of a string section. Evoking a Pink Floyd “Wish You Were Here” sentiment, it balances happy and sad, as lyrics such as We’ve all got the disease, but we’ve all got the cure/We’ve all got the fear, but our hearts are all pure drift across a melancholic dreamscape, illustrating Jackson’s capability as a poet just as much as composer.

All the comparisons that could easily be made with the likes of Neil Young, George Martin and Brian Wilson become obliterated by the sheer songwriting strength of Jackson’s musical personality by the end of the album. He has effortlessly created his own sophisticated pop-rock sound that breathes a musical passion, allowing him to stand outside the shadows of his predecessors. …And Then Some is everything you could ask for: passionate and uncomplicated feel-good music, and then some.


The Verdict: 8.8/10

- Alexander Jasperse, The Muse’s Muse - Alexander Jasperse, The Muse’s Muse


"Toronto Star review"

“Greatly enhanced by a melancholy string arrangement courtesy of Robert Kirby (who will forever be associated with his work on Nick Drake's debut, Five Leaves Left), this acoustic ballad by a Toronto-based singer-songwriter is the kind of affecting rumination that would resonate widely (instead of just deeply) if only some enterprising song wrangler were to place it over the closing scene to a Grey's Anatomy episode.” (From "Come Tomorrow" seven-inch single/DVD, snipr.com/lukevideoblog)
- John Sakamoto, Toronto Star

- John Sakamoto, Toronto Star


"“…And Then Some will have your head swirling with pure pop rock goodness...""


Straight out of his right hemisphere, “…And Then Some” is the new release from Luke Jackson that will have your head swirling with pure pop rock goodness. It all began with Luke pondering the question, “WHY NOT make an album with my favourite musicians on the planet?” Why not indeed. If the results sound this good every time, then every artist should begin their project pondering this question.

I detect a lot of Merrymakers, Roxette, and even Abba throughout this collection of flawless pop tunes – perhaps due to the fact they were recorded in Sweden; or just as likely, my mind was biased to hear such influences since I knew it was recorded in Sweden! At any rate, what I am trying to say is that Luke Jackson has put out a record that power pop fans sharing my taste in music are going to adore.

The sleek packaging and extensive linear notes accompanying the CD speak to the perfectionism that Luke strives for – his goal is to get everything right, down to the last detail. This philosophy extends into his music of course and the results speak for themselves. “Come Tomorrow” (available below as a free mp3 for a limited time) is a perfect example of the type of music you’ll find on this excellent release. With an instantly catchy chorus and plenty of oohs and aahs backing things up, this track hits all the right buttons…and then some. And there is much more where that came from. “Half A World Away” and “Longest Day” are additional standouts with an upbeat and peppy vibe, with memorable melodies and sweet harmonies. The more contemplative “This Life” and “The Fear” are outstanding, showcasing the brilliant mix between pop sensibilities combined with expertly executed orchestration. “Let go of the things you know you’ll never control, you got to lose the fear or it’ll eat you whole”.

Fans of Bleu, E.L.O. / Jeff Lynne, Owsley, or Swedish power pop must check out Luke Jackson.

iPOD-worthy: 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 10

Check out a FREE mp3 of “Come Tomorrow” courtesy of Luke. Hurry – link expires in one week!

- Bill’s Music Forum


"“one of this year’s most joyful and instantly lovable pop albums.”"

Luke Jackson, And Then Some: After almost a decade of writer’s block, Luke Jackson escaped to Sweden to arouse his creativity through the company of close friends - producer Christoffer Lundquist (Roxette, Cardigans), drummer Jens Jansson (Brainpool) and bassist Magnus Borjeson (Cardigans) - all who helped Jackson piece together one of this year’s most joyful and instantly lovable pop albums. Moreover, And Then Some is taken to the next level through stunning string arrangements by Robert Kirby (Nick Drake, Elvis Costello and John Cale) on key tracks: “This Life”, “All I Can Do” and “The Fear”. (Urban Myth Recordings) ~3 ½ Stars
- Jason Gladu, Popjournalism - Jason Gladu, Popjournalism


""I had never heard of Luke Jackson before but today he is the smartest man alive!""

Suddenly Everything Has Changed

Life has a way of revealing itself, over and over again, no matter where you think you may be headed or how your want your journey to go, life will present itself. There is always a purpose, always guiding hand, and always a goal.

"Brother its such a long road we've been walking on" (from "Orange Sky")

Yesterday, I was forced to embark on a new journey, turn the page as they say, and honestly I have never felt better. I am not frightened, I am strengthened, I am ready. I have a stronger sense of urgency today, and an honest feeling of clarity. I am resolute, passionate, and ready for it all to begin.

On my way home my emotions fluttered and my thoughts raced. I drove in silence for the first time that I can remember. Where was I headed? What did I want? I stopped by my PO Box like I do every evening (only it was six hours earlier), and pulled out ...And Then Some by Luke Jackson. I played the first track, "Come Tomorrow" as I pulled into the empty parking lot at home. I had never heard of Luke Jackson before but today he is the smartest man alive!

"I haven't felt this good in years/I only hope everything's as it appears to be/I should have more faith in my heart/Instead of waiting for the moment that it falls apart"

"Come tomorrow in the depths of my despair/I am frightened, I'm enlightened, I'll survive/Beg or borrow, I could lose I don't care/ I can taste it, I won't waste it, I'm alive"

"All I want is to know for sure - the best is yet to come"

- What To Wear During An Orange Alert - What To Wear During An Orange Alert


""Just an excellent album that touches the spectrum of emotions." 8/10"

“…And Then Some” is the new release from Luke Jackson that has the best of Swedish pop all rolled into one release. The great opening single "Come Tomorrow" has a lot of Merrymakers and Beagle in it's soul. It's got an instantly catchy chorus and plenty of dreamy harmonies. That single is contrasted with the softer “This Life” which recalls both ELO and even Chilliwack, with it's upbeat "Day by day we pass the time away" chorus and orchestral details. "Goodbye London" is great balance between pop sense and brit-rock. The song illustrates a series of life's obstacles and Luke's troubles when stricken by a period of writer's block during the summer of 2006. The arrangements here are flawless, and they run from quick paced hot to the cool and soulful ballad "A Little Voice." Jackson gathered a great crew here, including Brianpool/Roxette producer and multi-instrumentalist Christoffer Lundqvist and Brainpool bandmate Jens Jansson on drums and the legendary Magnus Borjeson (Beagle, Favorita, Metro Jets, Cardigans) on bass. "Half a World Away" is a smooth and dense production that combines these wonderful influences. The piano theatrics and sweeping strings of "All I Can Do" sound like a latter day Klaatu song (it just has a very Canadian feel about it). This is a expressive album that wears it's heart on it's sleeve with "Longest Day" like Oasis meeting Kansas (love that organ solo bridge) Fans of Bleu, Jeff Lynne, Canadian or Swedish power pop will flip for Luke Jackson. Just an excellent album that touches the spectrum of emotions. 8/10
-Aaron Kupferberg, powerpopaholic.com - Aaron Kupferberg, powerpopaholic.com


""...George Martin would definitely approve.”"

Take a world-seasoned singer-songwriter (don’t be afraid of this one), punt him over to one of Sweden’s better analog studios and then ship his roughs to a UK string arranger. The result is And Then Some. Luke Jackson, in spite of the sardonic and slightly arrogant look on his mug, is a very good musician.
I heard influences on this CD ranging from The Beatles and the Kinks to that annoying band that did the Shrek tune. I truly enjoyed the simple fact that I couldn’t predict where the progressions and the melodies were headed based on an intro, and Jackson’s writing displays ample savvy and cunning - the kind that come only with maturity.
The pillowy-soft orchestral arrangements? Good songs are made even better. George Martin would definitely approve. The flute in “Trouble” is just so right.
Scandinavian production always stands out. In this case the CD’s got a pushed-to-the-limits-of-acceptable-overall-gain edge that makes it unique and, go figure, gives it a vintage vibe that suits. I expected to hear LP static between songs. There’s a perceptible noise floor. The dynamics are intact. The sound’s not squashed into a bandwidth the depth of an A4 photocopy. Ah, analog. Trashy nostalgic. Raw. 
At least one tune stood out: if The Monkees had been real men they may have written “Goodbye London,” a Brit-punk radio scorcher just waiting to take the Chelsea mohawk set by its pierced ears and give it an anthem.
Jackson’s thin, quavery voice is kinda Euro-pop-chic. It suits the overall pastiche, especially when swirling through the backing vocals, and the melodies succeed partly due to its character - or lack thereof. It grates on a small speaker.
Insects in the unguent add up to very few. The snare sounds a bit like a wooden spoon on a soggy waffle, but given the overall retro groove that doesn’t detract too much. What does detract is the apparent absence of a kick drum and the rattiest lead guitar tone I’ve ever heard - a Telecaster at its worst - thin and abrasive. Thankfully, we don’t have to sit through more than a couple of solos, and the acoustic guitars carry so much groove the definition lacking in the kick goes unnoticed.
And Then Some may provide more solid sonic food than the baby teeth of the average radio-candy junkie can hoe through, which would be a real shame ‘cause this is good music. The danger is that Oasis might get the credit for it... 

- Simon Harrison, Wainwright Edge - Wainwright Edge


Discography

And Then Some (CD/LP, 2008)
Come Tomorrow (7"/DVD, 2008)
Momentum (album, 2002)
Split (album, 1998)

Photos

Bio

In the Spring of 2006, a seven-year email correspondence culminated in the meeting of Luke Jackson and Magnus Börjeson. Luke had long been a devoted fan of two of the Swedish musician’s former bands: Beagle and Favorita, and the two songwriters finally met in Paris where Magnus was mid-tour playing in The Cardigans. By the end of the weekend they were like old friends and Luke had accepted an invitation to Sweden for the upcoming Midsummer long weekend holiday. These celebrations were taking place in the countryside outside Malmö at the Aerosol Grey Machine - the stunning all-analogue recording studio of Christoffer Lundquist, producer and multi-instrumentalist extraordinaire, former member of Roxette and founding member of Brainpool, another of Luke’s favourite bands.

The Midsummer weekend was a magical time filled with wonderful people, beautiful weather, great music, fantastic food and free-flowing booze of the highest quality. As Luke boarded his flight back to London in a Schnapps-induced fog, he considered the invitation to “come back and record any time”. It had been six years since the release of his self-produced second album “Momentum”, and Luke knew that the songs currently springing from his right hemisphere were the best he’d ever written.

“WHY NOT make an album with my favourite musicians on the planet?” he mused.

And so Luke returned to Sweden in January 2008 and set to work in the studio with Magnus on bass and Christoffer’s Brainpool bandmate Jens Jansson on drums. The four musicians worked quickly and spontaneously to capture half a dozen songs, including “Come Tomorrow” which Luke had begun writing the day before leaving for Sweden. Luke returned to London buzzing with excitement. Not one to manifest small, he sent the rough mixes of the songs to renowned London-based string arranger Robert Kirby (Nick Drake, Elvis Costello, John Cale etc). To Luke’s delight and surprise, Kirby loved the songs and offered to write orchestrations for the album and accompany Luke to Sweden to conduct the necessary recording sessions with nine players from Malmö’s Opera Orchestra.

Luke had managed to bring together two of his most beloved musical worlds: the pop sensibilities of his friends in Sweden, and the distinctive eloquence of Robert Kirby’s string arrangements. It is the collision of these two worlds which makes “...And Then Some” so compelling. Densely layered guitars and vocal harmonies fuse with sweeping string lines, none of which ever draw the ear too far from what lies at the heart of Luke’s music...gorgeous, expressive, unpretentious songs born of the trials and tribulations of a life lived to the fullest.

...And Then Some was released NOVEMBER 4th 2008 on Popsicle Recordings/Urban Myth and is distributed in the States by Darla and in Canada by F.A.B.

In addition to the tri-fold digipack with full colour 16 page booklet, the album comes in an audiophile LP edition, half-speed mastered by the legendary Stan Ricker (Joe’s Garage, Brothers In Arms, and the mobile fidelity edition of Dark Side Of The Moon), pressed on 180-gram vinyl in a beautiful gatefold sleeve.

There is also a 45rpm 7” featuring Come Tomorrow b/w A Little Voice which comes with a hidden download and a DVD featuring the video for Come Tomorrow and studio footage of the sessions for A Little Voice.

Some reviews of “…And Then Some”:

“All the comparisons that could easily be made with the likes of Neil Young, George Martin and Brian Wilson become obliterated by the sheer songwriting strength of Jackson’s musical personality by the end of the album. He has effortlessly created his own sophisticated pop-rock sound that breathes a musical passion, allowing him to stand outside the shadows of his predecessors. …And Then Some is everything you could ask for: passionate and uncomplicated feel-good music, and then some.” 8.8/10
- Alexander Jasperse, The Muse’s Muse

“one of this year’s most joyful and instantly lovable pop albums.”
- Jason Gladu, Popjournalism

“I truly enjoyed the simple fact that I couldn’t predict where the progressions and the melodies were headed based on an intro, and Jackson’s writing displays ample savvy and cunning - the kind that come only with maturity. The pillowy-soft orchestral arrangements? Good songs are made even better. George Martin would definitely approve.”
- Simon Harrison, Wainwright Edge

“…And Then Some” will have your head swirling with pure pop rock goodness...“Come Tomorrow” is a perfect example of the type of music you’ll find on this excellent release. With an instantly catchy chorus and plenty of oohs and aahs backing things up, this track hits all the right buttons…and then some.”
- Bill’s Music Forum

"....a bulls-eye as far as melody, songwriting and accessibility is concerned...anyone who likes crunchy pop-rock and atmospheric melancholy tunes will enjoy this album."
- www.rocktimes.de

"a handsome 90s inspired britpop album with beautif