Lynette Yetter
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Lynette Yetter

Los Angeles, California, United States

Los Angeles, California, United States
Band World Singer/Songwriter

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Reviewed by Susan Frances

If you can imagine what air, water, fire, and earth sound like in music notes, then you can imagine what Lynette Yetter’s songs sound like. The verses are spiritual in nature and have a worldly richness. Lynette Yetter is a wind player, singer, and composer trained in chamber music and jazz flute. She fell in love with the panpipes and uses them as her chief mode of expression.

For this album entitled “Espiritu Incaico / Inka Spirit”, she played panpipes, kena, drum, antara nazca, kena chincha, percussion, and lead vocals. Joining her are Hiroyuki Akimoto on guitar and harmony vocals, Juan Carlos Cordero on guitar and harmony vocals, Rosario Paredo on charango, and Alejandro Alarcon on panpipes and kena.

Her song “Memory” is an instrumental piece that uses these wind, string, and drum tools in a delightful array of swirling, airy, and high rising motions. It sounds like the wind blowing as it rumples ocean waves, kindles fires and swishes through earth's fauna and flora. The fluxes and peaks in the instrumentation are natural and possess musical aspects in ethnic music from South America and Japan.

Her song “Nam Myoho Renge Kyo” is pronounced with a Western Andes seasoning and peaceful chants as the lyrics recite:

“We are rich in spirit
We are the Pachamama (space/time continuum)
We are the Virgin (Mary)
We are divinity
We are eternity
With our music and culture
We can change the world.”

The song makes humans one with nature through the vibrations echoing in the bamboo reeds. Her song “Noqa Minero Kani” is a trance like mix of swirling pipes, gorgeous moving textures, expansive wavelengths, and sensory chanting. Her music gives nature its own expressive sound.

Lynette has recorded two CD’s from which many of her songs have been used on television specials and in films in the UK and America. Her songs have been played on radio stations in Bolivia, Ireland, and the US. She is a member of the Society of Ethnomusicology and speaks Spanish and Quechua. She is currently developing a production tentatively titled “Tales of the Andes,” a one woman theatre show about a free-spirited Californian who goes to the Andes to follow her dream to be a panpipe player and gets tangled in political intrigue. Subject matters that she knows a great deal about and can speak of. - http://www.northeastintune.com/index.php?bd=reg&sb=land&article=100626


Discography

AWARDS

ACADEMY AWARD Nominated, Best Documentary, RECYCLED LIFE, (played panpipes on the opening title credits)

BEST MUSIC VIDEO International, for "Nam Myoho Renge Kyo," Garden State Film Festival, Asbury Park, New Jersey, USA, March 2007

Music used in award-winning educational CD "Middle Ages, The Building of Nations", Teaching for Thinking, British Columbia, Canada. Named to the "Best Software of 2003" list at Children's Software Revue.

FILM / TV CREDITS

Heart of Art, Indie Film by Gail Bates and Carol Dunne

Instrumentos Musicales Pre Hispanicos, tv show, Lima, Peru

Life & Times, tv show, Los Angeles, CA

Promo spots, interviews and performances on many tv and radio stations in Bolivia, South America

DISCOGRAPHY

Lynette Yetter, Inka Spirit / Espiritu Inciaco, AYNI Studios, Bolivia

Lynette Yetter, Music of the Andes and More, Los Angeles, CA

"World History, A Comparative Civiliaztions Perspective"; Teaching for Thinking, British Columbia, Canada

"The Middle Ages, The Building of Nations"; Teaching for Thinking, British Columbia, Canada

Aztec Stories Part 2: Tonalmachyotl, Los Angeles, CA

Photos

Bio

BIOGRAPHY

Lynette Yetter was born in Los Angeles, California and lives in La Paz, Bolivia.
Renaissance woman Lynette is a musician/artist/writer who fell in love with the sound of the panpipes.

The haunting sound resonated deep in her soul, stirring a seemingly genetic memory of what it is like to live at one with each other, the earth and the infinite. Following that call of these bamboo reeds, Lynette has been seeking to learn all that she can about the people and culture that created this instrument. In her process she has studied panpipes, kena and charango with Andean musicians in California, Guatemala, Peru and Bolivia.

Lynette has recorded two CDs. Songs from her CDs have been used on television and in films on two continents, and are being played regularly on the radio in Bolivia, Ireland, and the U.S.

Ms. Yetter is a member of the Society of Ethnomusicology, speaks Spanish and Quechua, and has conducted informal research in the collection of prehispanic musical instruments in the Museo de Archeologia, Antropologia e Historia del Peru in Lima. Lynette also is a member of the award winning indigenous autochthounous panpipe group Los Sikuris Huj Maya of Puno, Peru.

Lynette is currently developing "Tales of the Andes" (working title), a feature-length film about a California free-spirit who goes to the Andes to follow her dream to be a panpipe player and gets tangled in political intrigue.