Machines Are People Too
Gig Seeker Pro

Machines Are People Too

Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States | INDIE

Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States | INDIE
Band Alternative EDM

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


Here is a short video documentary of local pop group Machines Are People Too. Created by Graham Uhelski, this slightly meandering 12-minute interview/soundbite gives insight to the band’s background, and what they hope to accomplish in the future. (More after the jump.)

Machines Are People Too’s lead singer Brian Sylvester is also behind a local record label called Memetic Society that is soon to release a compilation entitled Tennesthesia. Featuring local artists such as MRP2, Forest Magic, Moonlight Bride and The Distribution, Tennesthesia‘s goal is stated as this on the Memetic Society website:

We want to experience music as an innate, preternatural reflex to its own reticulating nervous system, where Tennessee’s own topography is transmuted waveform. Our hope is that Tennesthesia is catching, that the sounds of our fair state continue to invigorate the minds of those they reach, and that eventually metaphor will be moot next to the transformative sound of this fair state.

Related: MRP2 smokes indoors and has an excellent drummer - chattarati


Click link for video - Nao is Now - Music Media Blog


Probably the coolest group of guys to come to the Star Bar hail out of Chattanooga and are called Machines Are People Too. Off the bat, from listening to their music on their MySpace page, the closest sounding band that comes to mind is Radiohead because of the ruggedly soft voice of the lead singer. However, MRP2 have a wider array of musicianship, having elements of chill music and dance music. Plus, they have a catchy tune that Radiohead doesn't carry, and a tune that will get the crowd rocking. With a saxophonist, drummer, a couple of keyboardists and a beat maker, these guys are an act that no one should miss.
- Examiner Atlanta


Click link for video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNyR0f0xBTg&feature=related - LimeLight Nashville


Click link for video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKxloyIHMPM&feature=related - StarBar


Freaks Live at StarBar (Click Link) - StarBar


Click link for video - 4th Ward Heroes


The audience was entertained by acts such as:

Opportunities
Machines Are People Too
The Woes (Brooklyn, NY)
- The Loop - UTC


Last weekend I tried — unsuccessfully — to step outside my comfort zone at the Pajama Jami-Jam Dance Party at 412 Market.

As the name suggests, sleepwear was the recommended attire for the Jami-Jam, hosted by GhostPlayer, the guys who put on last year’s Sexy Christmas Party and Zombies: a Dance Party.

To some, dancing in your jammies probably sounds like a lot of fun, but I can’t dance without injuring those around me, and I have no sleepwear to speak of (my negligee was out for retailoring).

Nevertheless, I’ve been in the world of rock and folk music too long. I was determined to expand my horizons, even if I ended up looking foolish.

When I arrived, I took my place in the snow at the rear of a long line of shivering, scantily clad girls and guys wearing boxers or pants made of thin, printed fabric. Several bursts of frigid wind later, I stopped regretting wearing jeans.

Once I found my way inside, however, I discovered about half the audience also had declined to follow the dress code. So much for that source of friction.

The audience was split between those dressed as if for any other show and those whose interpretation of pajamas was “almost nothing” — or in the case of comedian/emcee Joel Ruiz, a Cupid outfit straight out of a twisted Hanes commercial.

The room that held this menagerie was surprisingly large. I’d always imagined 412 Market (aka Club Fathom or Mosaic, depending on whom you ask) to be a much smaller venue, but even with several hundred people at the Jami-Jam, there was plenty of breathing room.

While lasers seared my retinas and I tripped the light fantastic to the music of DJs Ghostplayer, Flashmob, Machines R People 2, Flannel Boy, Wannabe, Bassel and Lights and Sounds, I realized my other concern — my inability to dance — was also unfounded.

Apparently, dancing, in a traditional sense, isn’t mandatory at raves.

Based on my Jami-Jam research, there are three acceptable ways to move to trance/house music: moshing, glowsticking (weaving patterns with LED lights on the end of strings) and standing around looking superior and disinterested. I choose option No. 3.

Despite my best efforts to step out of my element, I ended up having a blast and felt right at home.

Still, isn’t a failed attempt better than none at all?
- Chattanooga Times Free Press


Last weekend I tried — unsuccessfully — to step outside my comfort zone at the Pajama Jami-Jam Dance Party at 412 Market.

As the name suggests, sleepwear was the recommended attire for the Jami-Jam, hosted by GhostPlayer, the guys who put on last year’s Sexy Christmas Party and Zombies: a Dance Party.

To some, dancing in your jammies probably sounds like a lot of fun, but I can’t dance without injuring those around me, and I have no sleepwear to speak of (my negligee was out for retailoring).

Nevertheless, I’ve been in the world of rock and folk music too long. I was determined to expand my horizons, even if I ended up looking foolish.

When I arrived, I took my place in the snow at the rear of a long line of shivering, scantily clad girls and guys wearing boxers or pants made of thin, printed fabric. Several bursts of frigid wind later, I stopped regretting wearing jeans.

Once I found my way inside, however, I discovered about half the audience also had declined to follow the dress code. So much for that source of friction.

The audience was split between those dressed as if for any other show and those whose interpretation of pajamas was “almost nothing” — or in the case of comedian/emcee Joel Ruiz, a Cupid outfit straight out of a twisted Hanes commercial.

The room that held this menagerie was surprisingly large. I’d always imagined 412 Market (aka Club Fathom or Mosaic, depending on whom you ask) to be a much smaller venue, but even with several hundred people at the Jami-Jam, there was plenty of breathing room.

While lasers seared my retinas and I tripped the light fantastic to the music of DJs Ghostplayer, Flashmob, Machines R People 2, Flannel Boy, Wannabe, Bassel and Lights and Sounds, I realized my other concern — my inability to dance — was also unfounded.

Apparently, dancing, in a traditional sense, isn’t mandatory at raves.

Based on my Jami-Jam research, there are three acceptable ways to move to trance/house music: moshing, glowsticking (weaving patterns with LED lights on the end of strings) and standing around looking superior and disinterested. I choose option No. 3.

Despite my best efforts to step out of my element, I ended up having a blast and felt right at home.

Still, isn’t a failed attempt better than none at all?
- Chattanooga Times Free Press


Discography

Upcoming Release - TENNESTHESIA compilation CD

Photos

Bio

Electro-Dance band Machines Are People Too formed in Chattanooga, TN in the sweaty summer months of '09. After dancing to JJ's music at a number of house parties, Brian finally got the opportunity to put clean vocals over JJ's well-produced beats. The two began writing together and performing as Machines Are People Too at monthly dance parties with two keyboards, a laptop, and a microphone. Their DIY EP consisted of 4 songs released only on cassette. Each hand-stamped tape included custom labels and provided you with a tangible alternative to free downloads.

After a year of dancing and playing with DJs, the duo was ready to expand their band and overall sound. Longtime friend, Cain Lassiter, was asked to blow his saxophone on a few tracks and proceeded to bring his other talents to the band. With one hand on the sax and the other on the keys, Cain continues to add innovation to MRP2. Drummer, Ivan Garcia leaves the hi-hat/snare combo commonly found in electronic bands behind and takes full control of his kit. Keeping the beat better than any beat machine and filling the gaps with style, Ivan became the perfect addition to Machines.

The band's eclectic sound and progressive music creates a live show that leaves no toes untapped. Crowd favorite "I Get By" promotes "picking it up on the dance floor" and never fails to fill the room with sweat. Frontman, Brian Sylvester will be atop a speaker performing a call-and-response with Cain or pushing his way through the crowd creating dance parties with every step. JJ will get your head bobbing in time with his. Your heartbeat will synchronize with Ivan's pulsating drum beats. Machines Are People Too with leave you with no other choice but to let go and dance.

PLEASE CLICK OUR PRESS AREA FOR ALL MUSIC VIDEOS