Mandippal
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Mandippal

Kitchener, Ontario, Canada | Established. Jan 01, 2011 | SELF | AFM

Kitchener, Ontario, Canada | SELF | AFM
Established on Jan, 2011
Solo Pop Singer/Songwriter

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Apr
29
Mandippal @ McCabe's

London, Ontario, Canada

London, Ontario, Canada

Apr
22
Mandippal @ Molly Bloom's

Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

Apr
15
Mandippal @ McCabe's

London, Ontario, Canada

London, Ontario, Canada

Music

Press


As Canadian Music Week hits the city of Toronto this week, I had the chance to talk to Mandippal about it. Having never been myself, I got to know a bit more about the event. This year, CMW is happening across 60 venues and the lineup is jam-packed with amazing artists like Mandippal. He’s playing on Friday May 8th at The Vault, but the festival will have concerts every night of the week up until May 10th.
Robyn Homeniuk (RH): Which year of CMW was your first? Whose performance inspired you the most a) as a human and b) as a musician?
Mandippal (M): My first CMW… I don’t really remember. I THINK it was back in 2008, when I released my first EP. As for inspiration that year, I remember seeing Peter Katz one night. I had watched him perform in Kitchener a year or so prior, and was completely inspired to write songs as well as he did, and does. To this day, I consider him to be my favourite male singer/songwriter in Canada, and he is one of the best humans you’ll meet.

RH What is your favourite type of concert to play? Give me venues or locations or sizes… get creative with this one!
M: I just love playing shows. I don’t have a preference where the show is. I could be playing cover songs at a bar with 100 people, or playing a small acoustic set in a room with 15 people. I honestly don’t care. As long as I’m playing music and putting a smile on one person’s face in that room, then I’ve done everything I had set out to do.

RH: To you as an artist, what makes CMW so important ?
M: Canadian Music Week has always been a staple in my music life. I have been attending it since back in 2007, I didn’t even show case that year. It’s been the place where I have networked the most. It’s still that to me: a place where musicians and music lovers can meet and potentially collaborate and do something different. It’s grown and changed SO much over the years, like moving from March to May a few years ago. And it’s giving so many more chances to other up-and-coming acts to get their voices heard. With a guy like Justin Kwan at the helm now, who has such a great mind for this scene, it’s only going to keep getting better.

RH: How do we get you, Mandippal, to come to Montreal?
M: How do you get me to come play in Montreal? Book me a show!
RH: As you know, I love your music — especially that 2010 stuff. Any news in the music making front? Soundcloud clips are much appreciated, we love to share sounds!
M: I haven’t released anything new since 2014, but you can hear that full EP on soundcloud! I am currently writing some new music, and hopefully debuting some new songs as my showcase on Friday night.


RH: What / who / where /when are YOUR CMW 2015 picks? As in, who and when and where and why should I go to one event each night? I’m so excited I can’t choose. Nepotism is appreciated. Use Instagram names or Twitter names too! That’ll help people track down the concerts.
M: Even though I can’t attend half of these, as I’m not going to BE in town until Friday, here are my picks and where I would go:

Rachael Kennedy – The best NEW singer/songwriter to come out of Toronto in the last year or two. She sounds like no one else out there right now, and has such a great knack for writing hook after hook. She’s at The Cameron House on Tuesday May 5th @ 10PM. twitter.com/rachaelsmusic


Leah Daniels – One of the better country voices we have in Canada. Boots & Bourbon on Thursday May 7th @ 9PM (request Let Love Decide) twitter.com/LeahDaniels

Donovan Woods – the FUNNIEST banter you will hear, coming out of a guy who sings such heart-wrenching songs. He’s headlining my show: The Vault @ One King West – twitter.com/donovanwoods

RH: What’s your favourite YouTube clip of yourself?
M: There are no good videos of me on YouTube, nothing prior to 2011 is online unfortunately. Just head to my site mandippal.com!

Mandippal can be heard there.
Tickets to see Mandippal at CMW are available at this link. - Montreal Rampage


The best music is often from those artists that many have not heard of. And on that note, we introduce to you Mandippal. His music soothes the soul and offers a soulful and smooth listen to anyone. We had a chance to catch up with this Canadian talent and discover what really make him tick as an artist. Check it out.
~~~
You’re music is quite current and relevant right now, and to many, you may still be a bit of a question mark. So let’s dive right in, shall we? Where do you come from?

I’m from South Western Ontario, but was born in England a short 26 years ago. I’ve grown up in Kitchener, Ontario and now reside between Cambridge & Toronto, Canada.

What led you to music? Was it this natural talent that you had as child that you decided to further cultivate? Was it sheer interest and passion? Or like many, did you fall into it?

It was a combination of a few things. I did, sort of, fall in to it after a rough few years in school when I was younger. Then, I used it as an outlet to vent. But I always had an ear for music, and would always make it a point to discover new music. It was and still is the only thing I have ever really had a knack for, and so I thought I’d try and see what I could make out of it.

“I want to be that escape, or a place to reflect, or a place to remember.”

You’re embarking upon this incredible journey that a lot of people only dream of, and you’re actualizing your dreams. As a South Asian who is not going down the path of medicine or engineering, how have your parents been? Typically, desis will respect the arts from afar, but when it comes to their own children, it’s often shunned. What has your experience been like?

It was a struggle at first, but my family is so supportive now. It’s always in the back of their mind, and the back of mine, that what if this whole thing doesn’t work? They’ve always wanted me to have a back up plan. I’ve just always been of the mindset that if I have a back up plan, that means I won’t succeed in the field I want to thrive in. So, here I am trying to thrive.

Which particular struggles or challenges have you faced that have directly influenced your music?

That’s easy: Heartache, heartbreak, and all the in-betweens, but not just my own. It could be yours. It could be a family member. I try to write what I know and I try to write what everyone can relate to.

“John Mayer…he’s actually the reason I learned how to play guitar, I used to copy his chords on YouTube clips I watched when I was younger.”

What is your vision on life? You motto? Is your music a reflection of that?

Carpe Diem. Seize the day. I heard that line in “Dead Poet’s Society” and have always tried to stand by that. Especially in a dog-eat-dog industry that is the music business, you have to take what you can when the opportunity arises. I’m not sure if that reflects in my music, but it is something I stand by every day.

What is it that you are trying to achieve by creating music? What is your ultimate goal?

My goal is to live comfortably off of my music, be that as a writer, an artist, or on the road full time. As long as I’m happy, and as long as I can make others happy, then I’m doing the job that I’ve set out to do. I want people that listen to my music to know that they aren’t alone in what they have went through. I want to be that escape, or a place to reflect, or a place to remember.

Who are your musical influences?

My biggest “influences” are Jason Mraz, who I’ve seen in concert about 8 or 9 times (I’ve lost count over the years) and John Mayer. He’s actually the reason I learned how to play guitar, I used to copy his chords on YouTube clips I watched when I was younger. Having two older sisters, I grew up on a variety of music from Boys II Men to Jon Secada to The Cranberries… it was a lot of good music that allowed me to discover great music. Nowadays, it’s people like Ed Sheeran, Frank Ocean, Keith Urban… It’s a diverse list, and I could go on for days!

Who are your life inspirations?

Those would have to be my sisters. They’ve both struggled, in their own ways, and still seem to walk with a smile in whatever they do. It shows me that my problems are never bigger than anyone else’s.
You’re talented, successful, good-looking, annnd, single?
Almost all of the above…

How are you managing to balance your personal relationships with a thriving music career?

I have a select, tight-knit group of friends. I try to surround myself with people who are genuine, honest, and respectful both to me and to themselves. It’s easy to manage because they are the best kind of people to have around.

Aside from singing, you’re a songwriter as well. What inspires you to create music? What’s the creative process like?

Everything. I know that sounds grossly cliché, but it’s true. When I was first starting out, I used to only be able to write things if they happened to me. But like I said before, inspiration can come from anywhere. As for the process, I never write a song the same way twice. I could have a cool melody or a hook, and then write a guitar part over it, or vice versa. I have a lot of unfinished pieces that turn out to be finished when I combine them with another. It’s always every changing.

“Carpe Diem. Seize the day…I’m not sure if that reflects in my music, but it is something I stand by every day.”

Tell us a little bit about your upcoming album.

I haven’t been this excited about anything in a very, very, very long time.
I met my producer, Justin Abedin, who has worked with artists like jackSOUL (he was a founding member, and played guitar in the house band of Canadian Idol for many years) and Justin Hines, at an open mic in 2010. I had always watched him, and wanted to cross paths or work with him one day, for the sheer honest answer that the two of us share the same skin tone. It was pride, for me, to see one of our own destroying stages across Canada with a flawless ability to bring music to life. We exchanged numbers and, in a few weeks, started working together. I went through music changes, life changes, self changes, and at the end of the two year process, we created one of the best projects I have ever been a part of. This was my first time recording with a band, and hearing my songs in that sort of light. I felt like a child half the time when I listened back.

It is a 5 song EP, consisting of songs that I’ve written over the last two years. They are songs about love: either the kind you are trying to find, the kind you are trying to learn from, or the kind you are pining for again. The best answer I can give is that this is me. Everything you hear, every note I sing, every word I say, is me. And I couldn’t be happier realizing that. And I hope it comes across in that way. - Two Mangoes


If you've been within earshot of a contemporary radio station lately, you've undoubtedly heard the new brand of singer-songwriter that's dominating the airwaves. Although the lyrical sentiments have largely remained the same -- love and other everyday struggles -- the music is often a blend of many styles, a reflection of the varied tastes prevalent among both artists and audiences.

Although Mandippal Jandu may not be as well known as some of this crowd, such as Justin Nozuka, he is on the verge of crossing that threshold as a result of several busy years on the Toronto club scene.

The Kitchener native moved there after high school, following his long-held passion for songwriting, and released his debut EP, When It's Only Me Standing, in 2007. Now in the midst of working on a full-length followup, Jandu is coming back to Waterloo to host a monthly songwriters circle, and he's bringing along many of his fellow up-and-coming friends.

"It's not a concept that seems to be as prevalent anymore," Jandu says of the evenings that will feature at least three artists sharing the stage at Maxwell's Music House on the first Wednesday of every month.

"But I think some of our audiences haven't experienced it yet, so the circles have been received pretty well so far."

Jandu adds that all of the singer-songwriters he's approached have been equally receptive about participating. "There's a lot of people in Toronto who really want to play in Waterloo but haven't really had the opportunity yet. I'm happy to provide that opportunity because I think when one of us helps another out, it's always mutually beneficial."

Jandu speaks from experience when describing the dog-eat-dog Toronto scene, but adds that he didn't hesitate to dive into it the first chance he got. "I had a band with my sister called Sibling Rivalry when I was 15 and she was in university, but when she graduated I was kind of left on my own without any knowledge of the music business. But once I got to Toronto, I learned pretty quickly and made some great friends in guys like Peter Katz and Matt York who helped get me my first shows. It feels kind of weird now that I think I've got more of a name in Toronto than I do in my hometown."

Of course, Jandu wants to rectify that situation as soon as possible once he finishes his new album, and is looking forward to using the songwriter circles to test out new material. "My recordings that I'm proudest of to this point are mostly acoustic because that's how I generally play live, but I'm hoping to get some full band arrangements on the new album," he says.

"The stuff I'm writing now is tending to be more upbeat anyway. I recently did a songwriting retreat in Muskoka and worked with a bunch of artists who really opened my eyes to the potential of doing that kind of material. My goal has become to write a bunch of upbeat songs that I'm really happy with, because there's only so many sad songs that even have a chance of getting played on the radio."

- Jason Schneider - The Record (Kitchener), Guelph Mercury (Guelph)


January 8th, 2007

Success often comes to those who work hard at what they’re good at and passionate about, and for Cambridge’s Mandippal Jandu, that thing has always been music.

He started singing when he was a child, but only realized he could really sing and play guitar in high school.

“(In Grade 9) I was in a musical at my high school called Guys and Dolls,” Jandu said. “That’s when I first realized I did have a voice. Then, I picked up a guitar before Grade 10.”

Shortly thereafter, he began composing his own music, first with his sister Sandy and then on his own. He said personal experiences are what motivated him to start writing music.

“Writing is my way of relieving my own stress, getting my points across,” he said. “It lets me take a lot of weight off my already heavy shoulders.”

Jandu started off playing in a band called Sybling Rivalry with his sister, but switched over to playing solo or with his own band after she went off to teacher’s college.

“She became a teacher, and I continued to play - it was a great thing, having that with her,” he said. “I learned a lot about writing and singing, and she does still sing, but she doesn’t perform anymore - she’s happily married.”

Jandu said although most of his playing is done solo, he does play with a band on occasion that includes guitarists Sam Ellis and Matt Hortobagyi, bassist Andrew Irvine and drummer Jody Dowdall.

Jandu said although he has great passion and interest in pursuing music, the popular social networking website MySpace has helped him further his music more than anything.

“When I started getting serious about (my music), I found out about MySpace.com, which has to be the best invention for musicians to come along in the longest time,” he said. “I’ve booked most of my shows and gotten most of my following through it, and many of my friends and people I play shows with I’ve met there as well.

“It’s the best tool if you know how to use it to your advantage.”

Jandu is currently part of the Four Voices tour with fellow acoustic songwriters Jesse Pitcher, Chisai Jackson and Tim Tibbits.

“The Four Voices tour is essentially a singer/songwriter circle,” Jandu said. “A songwriter circle is where you have, in this case, four musicians onstage at the same time who take turns playing a song each. The cool thing about this tour is, we all know each other’s songs, so we throw in harmonies and guitar solos and other random things (while someone else is playing.)

“It’s a really cool concept and a fun thing to be a part of.”

Jandu said aside from playing at open mics regularly and at every opportunity you get, the best advice he has for budding musicians is using MySpace.

“If someone visits your page and likes your stuff, they will ask you to play shows with them - I’m living proof of that,” he said. “I spent my last year in Toronto not knowing anybody there, and through word of mouth and MySpace.com, my first show was with one of the best indie acts in Toronto.”

Mandippal Jandu and his acoustic solo performances can be seen at Wilf’s at Wilfrid Laurier University with Tyler Schwende on Jan. 20, 2007. A full-band performance can be seen at the Red Rooster Café with Vacuity and The Free Press on Feb. 9.

For more information on Mandippal Jandu, visit www.mandippaljandu.com and www.myspace.com/mandippal.
- SPOKE - Conestoga College


These days when people think of a semi-mainstream pop/rock singer/songwriter, they seem to picture a skinny, Caucasian male in his early 20’s with long, curly hair that perfectly falls on to his shoulders. However, in the case of Mandippal Jandu, they get something a little different. The main parts are there (skinny, male, early 20’s) but what is different, in no other obvious terms, is his ethnicity.

Born in Leyton, London, England, and raised in Canada, Mandippal Jandu is a Punjabi artist breaking out in the independent music scene in Toronto, Ontario. Except, he isn’t doing this with Bhangra or Bollywood cheesy pop songs. In the last few years, many Indian artists from different parts of Canada have made a big name for themselves in the worldwide Indian music industry (Jazzy B for one), but you hardly ever hear of an Indian artist doing the same thing in the world of English music. And Mandippal is doing just that. At only 21, he has already made a lasting impression in the singer/songwriter scene in Toronto, and his ethnicity is one reason that has allowed him to stand out and gain as much success as he has.

In 2006, he was the February featured artist on TorontoIndie.com and was the youngest artist, one of only two South-Asians, nominated for a Toronto Independent Music Award for “Best Indie”. He has also shared the stage and gained friendships with two of Canada’s latest Indie exports to the UK, Justin Nozuka and Birds Of Wales.

Coming from a family of respected Indian musicians and writers, like Jandu Littranwala (Jazzy B, Safri Boys) and Talvin Singh, Mandippal is hoping to keep that respect going through his own endeavours. With his new CD, “When It’s Only Me Standing”, now released independently in Canada and online, already getting praised by listeners and musicians alike, we will just have to wait and see what comes next for Mandippal Jandu.

Brit-Asian salutes Mandippal Jandu this month… - Brit Asian Magazine (UK)


Toronto Indie Dot Com Showcase

Last night I attended the latest (and apparently the last for awhile) Toronto Indie Showcase and it was a cool laid back great time. Interestingly, while I’m usually a big supporter of the local music scene, I was there specifically to see a couple of our neighbours from the US of A. But, as always, I knew that the locals were not going to disappoint either.

First off, Paul Michel, who I’ve recently decided is my indie rock hero of the moment, played a fantastic set. He showcased songs from both his current soon-to-be-released CD “The Quiet State of Panic” and his previous recording “These Are All Beautiful Things.” Mixing it up with some solo numbers, as well as some band tunes, Paul’s rabid falsetto sounded positively chilling when singing tunes like “The Fire Theft.” He demanded our attention and, to use an old cliché, you could hear a pin drop. Although the evening was apparently supposed to be more on the mellow side, Paul couldn’t help but rock out a bit, and “Perfect Someday” was one of the highlights. And it rocked!

The Receiver came out next and it was hard to believe that all the magnificent sounds on the stage were only coming from two guys (or 3 when Paul Michel joined in.) These brothers from Columbus Ohio are insanely talented, and for a moment, I found myself forgetting that I was in a small club, in a sort-of comfortable couch, watching this show. These guys will make the leap to stadium-size venues with the greatest of ease and a song like “In Tunnels” would lend itself nicely to a ridiculously insane laser light spectacular.

Next up, was Toronto’s Dala, a female acoustic duo who was last year signed to Universal music. The harmonies were beautiful and flawless, and the energy of these two ladies was certainly contagious. The relatively short set was filled out by the girls’ outrageously giddy stage banter. They looked like they were having fun, and that’s becoming quite rare these days in the world of folk music, where many of their contemporaries take themselves waaaaay too seriously.

Finally, we had headliner Mandippal Jandu. He performed like the pro that he is, and his humility was very endearing. What impressed me most is both the sincerity in his singing voice and his seemingly effortless style of guitar playing. He had said that he was really nervous headlining such an accomplished group of performers, but he needn’t have worried so much. He held his own with great poise, and he better get used to the headliner spot, because if he keeps putting on shows like last night, he’ll be headlining often.


Toronto Indie Dot Com is an excellent website for reading all about what's going on in the world of local Toronto Indie music. Go there and read it often! You can also visit their myspace page. - http://itsnotthebandihateitstheirfans.blogspot.com/2006/10/toronto-indie-dot-com-showcase.html


So Mandippal, how is it you kept your real name instead of taking a stage name?

Well, think about it: who in the world, besides me, has the name Mandippal? For all you know it COULD BE a stage name. Jokes aside, that is my real name. Mandippal Jandu. I’m Punjabi. The reason I wanted to keep it is because there are next to no Punjabi or Sikh musicians out there in ‘rock’ music. I want to represent my culture, and I hope I do a good job of that.

What was it that first made you want to pick up a guitar?

I had always wanted to do some musical…so I usually accompanied my mum to the temple when I was a kid to sing hymns and play the Harmonium (kind of like an accordion you play sitting down). And then, in my teen years, my sisters both got me into some different music from Boys II Men to Jon Secada to Live to The Cranberries. I just really dug music and the guitar I heard on them. And then…I heard Eric Clapton: Unplugged…and that my friend is where the inspiration came about.

When can we expect your previous project sybling rivalry to reunite?

I couldn’t tell you really. My sister is getting married in the summer, so the chances of us writing again together aren’t getting that much better. That was a great experience. We got really close after that, and I realized that I did have some writing ability in me as well. My sister is my favourite voice, and she’s taught me so much over the years. We do the occasional “reunion” gig, but I don’t know if we’ll ever go back to being sybling rivalry again. Though, I would love it. I mean, I’m not tooting my own horn here, but we sounded bloody good together.

Who would you like to work with, production wise and writing/singing collaboration?

That is something I’ve been thinking about for a long time. Tonight, I played with Jesse Labelle, and I’d love to write something with him. If you know me, then you know how much of a fan of Jason Mraz I am. That would be a HUGE dream of mine to write with him, or even just play for him. Then there are artists like Ron Sexsmith, Holly McNarland, Sarah Slean, and two other local heroes of mine: Matt York and Peter Katz.

You got some help on your album Writing At 1a.m. What was it like stepping outside of being a strictly acoustic artist and having your songs with a band?

It was great. I had all the acoustic parts and the vocals done, and I had just planned to go in and record a few songs and make it an acoustic album, but things changed. We decided to do the band thing. Dan Rochester, who recorded the CD and plays guitar (and some bass and drums) on the album, and Dan Cameron, who plays drums on a few tracks, came in and made my stuff sound sensational compared to what I imagined it. The band I play with now, they only came in to record the final track on the CD called “Yours Truly”. The CD arrangements compared to the live arrangements are totally different. If you hear the CD, you’ll get a totally different feel for the songs when you see us live.

Who do you think is the next to watch out for?

In the local scene? I’m not sure. There are guys breaking out, like Peter Katz and Matt York. Out of some local performers I’ve seen, I’m going with Melissa Mills. I’ve only been friends with this girl for over a month now, but she has so much honesty in her voice and her words and her performance…it’s really something. The Free Press are also a band to ‘watch out for’. I’ve been a friend with these guys since I moved to Toronto. We are all regulars at the Healey’s Tuesday Open Jam, and they rock the house. I’ve opened a show for them too, and they are super cool. So yeah. Melissa and The Free Press are my picks.

What do you think is the message that you’d like people to have after listening to your music?

I don’t know. Haha. Messages are the toughest things to get across. I’d hope that some people in the audience can at least relate to the things I write about, because it may or may not have happened to them, and it may or may not have happened to someone they know about. I’m very honest and open, and have been known to wear my heart out on my sleeve. That’s just the same in my music. I’m one of the most honest people you will ever meet.
- TorontoIndie.com


January 8th, 2007

Success often comes to those who work hard at what they’re good at and passionate about, and for Cambridge’s Mandippal Jandu, that thing has always been music.

He started singing when he was a child, but only realized he could really sing and play guitar in high school.

“(In Grade 9) I was in a musical at my high school called Guys and Dolls,” Jandu said. “That’s when I first realized I did have a voice. Then, I picked up a guitar before Grade 10.”

Shortly thereafter, he began composing his own music, first with his sister Sandy and then on his own. He said personal experiences are what motivated him to start writing music.

“Writing is my way of relieving my own stress, getting my points across,” he said. “It lets me take a lot of weight off my already heavy shoulders.”

Jandu started off playing in a band called Sybling Rivalry with his sister, but switched over to playing solo or with his own band after she went off to teacher’s college.

“She became a teacher, and I continued to play - it was a great thing, having that with her,” he said. “I learned a lot about writing and singing, and she does still sing, but she doesn’t perform anymore - she’s happily married.”

Jandu said although most of his playing is done solo, he does play with a band on occasion that includes guitarists Sam Ellis and Matt Hortobagyi, bassist Andrew Irvine and drummer Jody Dowdall.

Jandu said although he has great passion and interest in pursuing music, the popular social networking website MySpace has helped him further his music more than anything.

“When I started getting serious about (my music), I found out about MySpace.com, which has to be the best invention for musicians to come along in the longest time,” he said. “I’ve booked most of my shows and gotten most of my following through it, and many of my friends and people I play shows with I’ve met there as well.

“It’s the best tool if you know how to use it to your advantage.”

Jandu is currently part of the Four Voices tour with fellow acoustic songwriters Jesse Pitcher, Chisai Jackson and Tim Tibbits.

“The Four Voices tour is essentially a singer/songwriter circle,” Jandu said. “A songwriter circle is where you have, in this case, four musicians onstage at the same time who take turns playing a song each. The cool thing about this tour is, we all know each other’s songs, so we throw in harmonies and guitar solos and other random things (while someone else is playing.)

“It’s a really cool concept and a fun thing to be a part of.”

Jandu said aside from playing at open mics regularly and at every opportunity you get, the best advice he has for budding musicians is using MySpace.

“If someone visits your page and likes your stuff, they will ask you to play shows with them - I’m living proof of that,” he said. “I spent my last year in Toronto not knowing anybody there, and through word of mouth and MySpace.com, my first show was with one of the best indie acts in Toronto.”

Mandippal Jandu and his acoustic solo performances can be seen at Wilf’s at Wilfrid Laurier University with Tyler Schwende on Jan. 20, 2007. A full-band performance can be seen at the Red Rooster Café with Vacuity and The Free Press on Feb. 9.

For more information on Mandippal Jandu, visit www.mandippaljandu.com and www.myspace.com/mandippal.
- SPOKE - Conestoga College


Discography

Ready To Stay EP - November 2013
When It's Only Me Standing - August 2007

Photos

Bio

"One of TO's more prolific singer-songwriters, continuing to be a pillar and mentor to the community" -  Lonely Vagabond Exclaim.ca

From playing guitar in his Kitchener high school music class, to selling out hometown venues, to showcasing at major festivals, Mandippal has certainly come a long way in his decade career as a musician, establishing himself as one of the hardest working artists in Ontario.

Coming from a family of well-respected musicians and writers (like Mercury Prize winner Talvin Singh), Mandippal has been gaining a steady following, by focusing solely on his own blend of poetry and pop/rock. He has made a lasting impression in Ontario’s booming singer/songwriter scene, performing with notable acts like Tim Hicks, Fred Penner, Hannah Georgas, Lindi Ortega, Said The Whale, The Walkervilles, Jesse Labelle, Justin Nozuka, Jully Black, Sarah Slean, and many others.

In the last few years, Mandippal’s success has certainly started to show. He has been featured on CBC Radio One (Fresh Air , Metro Morning, Here and Now), South Asian Newsweek (OMNI TV), IndieCan Radio (Toronto), The Record (Kitchener-Waterloo), along with showcases at CBC’s Sounds Of The Season, Burlington Sound Of Music Festival, NXNE Music & Film Festival, Canadian Music Week, S.C.E.N.E. Music Festival, and COCA’s Regional & National Conferences.

With over a decade of songwriting and performing under his belt, 200 shows played a year, 2000+ EPs sold in his last effort, and his latest release Ready To Stay, produced by Justin Abedin (Jacksoul, Justin Hines), Mandippal is recognized as a serious player. With the ability to capture an audience with his tone and humility, it’s only a matter of time before he wins you over as well.

Band Members