MARMALAKES
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MARMALAKES

Austin, Texas, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2008 | INDIE

Austin, Texas, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2008
Band Pop Folk

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Jan
04
MARMALAKES @ Empire Control Room & Garage

Austin, TX

Austin, TX

Mar
15
MARMALAKES @ SXSW

Austin, Texas, USA

Austin, Texas, USA

Feb
16
MARMALAKES @ The Parish

Austin, Texas, USA

Austin, Texas, USA

Music

Press


While The Sour Notes were on the inside stage at Mohawk on 2/9, Roky Moon and BOLT! (who I missed), Speak, and Marmalakes filled the outside stage as part of No Play Music's Marmalakes & The Sour Notes 7-inch Split release party.
Pictures from the inside stage can be seen over here. Pictures of Marmalakes and Speak, with a video of Roky Moon and BOLT!, below...

Pictures on web page - Brooklyn Vegan


While The Sour Notes were on the inside stage at Mohawk on 2/9, Roky Moon and BOLT! (who I missed), Speak, and Marmalakes filled the outside stage as part of No Play Music's Marmalakes & The Sour Notes 7-inch Split release party.
Pictures from the inside stage can be seen over here. Pictures of Marmalakes and Speak, with a video of Roky Moon and BOLT!, below...

Pictures on web page - Brooklyn Vegan


Written by Don Simpson // November 17, 2011 // Austin, Music

Austinites Max Colonna, Josh Halpern & Chase Weinacht — collectively known as Marmalakes — released their sophomore EP EvenClothed on November 15th. They will be celebrating with a record release show at the Blue Theatre (916 Springdale, Austin, TX) on Saturday, November 19th with Buxton and DanaFalconberry opening. AdobeAirstream sat down with Max last week at Quack’s — Hyde Park’s iconic bakery and coffee shop — to chat about all things Marmalakes.

A2: Even Clothed is Marmalakes’ second EP — is there a reason you choose to release EPs over LPs?

MC: The biggest reason is financial — the cost of recording and processing that many tracks. And it was a process just to get all of these tracks together. There just aren’t that many songs that we want to record at any one time. We go in and out of phases in terms of which songs we like, which songs are new and fresh and we are really excited about, and what people want to hear. And, of course, between the time of recording and releasing you’re already sick of the songs. Finding enough material to make a cohesive LP is difficult. When we put out a LP we want to put out a real album. How would we approach that? Would we write all of the songs around the same time? Or would we try to piece together a LP of songs that we have already written?

A2: EPs also seem easier to sell now that MP3s have become the norm. It was much more difficult “back in the day” to get people to buy a CD with only six songs on it.

MC: MP3 technology definitely does make it easier; but we still print CD copies of our EPs because we want the physical thing to give to people at our shows to have evidence that they saw us — a reminder. Sure, we can tell our audience at a show to go to our website and download the album, but you can never guarantee that someone is going to remember to do that.

A2: What are the benefits of giving away music for free?

MC: Really, just spreading it around and having as many people listen to our music as possible. Most of the time we will have our six song EPs available for download for $5.00, with one or two tracks as free downloads. Sometimes, after a big show, if a lot of people are asking about how they can hear our music, we will post the download of our EP for free. The reality is that playing live shows and touring is really how you make your name and any money. Record sales these days don’t really count for a whole lot, because it is so easy to proliferate stuff for free without any of the money actually going to the artist. Which is fine, it is something you can’t really fight now because that’s just the way it is, so you have to adapt.

A2: What are the benefits of being a three-piece?

MC: Having just the three of us really increases the level of cohesion we can have together. And we have been playing together long enough now that we can play off of each other really well. A lot of people mention how close and tight we are and that really comes from it just being the three of us.

A2: How do you, as a band, approach songwriting?

MC: It’s usually a joint effort. Chase is the primary lyricist and he comes to me and Josh with a song written on acoustic guitar. Then, we will talk about what kind of vibe we are going for, sonically what we are envisioning, what pops into our heads as we are listening to it. We then arrange all of the parts together as a group and make sure we all like it.
A2: How do the vocal structures get integrated into the songs?

MC: We do all of that together too. And it depends on the songs — there are some songs that are very centered on the vocal structures. Josh often comes in really quickly with some harmonies that he likes and then we discuss where we want those harmonies to be. We typically work on the overall song structure first, then we add the frilly stuff — the knickknacks — like vocal harmonies and interesting musical twists that we like to throw in now and then to keep our listeners on their toes… It keeps us on our toes too.

A2: I’ve heard that Marmalakes practice three times a week. I would imagine that is a necessity, considering the complexity of your songs.

MC: We definitely like to keep it interesting for ourselves and for whoever is listening. It is just fun to add new things, making it more complicated and interesting for ourselves while we are playing the songs. We really like to challenge ourselves.

A2: How did you decide to have your record release at the Blue Theatre?

We wanted to play somewhere we never performed before because we like to explore new places, new territories. We were thinking about places that we thought would be good and would book us on short notice. The Blue Theatre is a really cool space in East Austin, on Springdale near Airport. The layout really makes people pay attention to the stage, and we like attentive audiences!
- Adobe Airstream


Written by Don Simpson // November 17, 2011 // Austin, Music

Austinites Max Colonna, Josh Halpern & Chase Weinacht — collectively known as Marmalakes — released their sophomore EP EvenClothed on November 15th. They will be celebrating with a record release show at the Blue Theatre (916 Springdale, Austin, TX) on Saturday, November 19th with Buxton and DanaFalconberry opening. AdobeAirstream sat down with Max last week at Quack’s — Hyde Park’s iconic bakery and coffee shop — to chat about all things Marmalakes.

A2: Even Clothed is Marmalakes’ second EP — is there a reason you choose to release EPs over LPs?

MC: The biggest reason is financial — the cost of recording and processing that many tracks. And it was a process just to get all of these tracks together. There just aren’t that many songs that we want to record at any one time. We go in and out of phases in terms of which songs we like, which songs are new and fresh and we are really excited about, and what people want to hear. And, of course, between the time of recording and releasing you’re already sick of the songs. Finding enough material to make a cohesive LP is difficult. When we put out a LP we want to put out a real album. How would we approach that? Would we write all of the songs around the same time? Or would we try to piece together a LP of songs that we have already written?

A2: EPs also seem easier to sell now that MP3s have become the norm. It was much more difficult “back in the day” to get people to buy a CD with only six songs on it.

MC: MP3 technology definitely does make it easier; but we still print CD copies of our EPs because we want the physical thing to give to people at our shows to have evidence that they saw us — a reminder. Sure, we can tell our audience at a show to go to our website and download the album, but you can never guarantee that someone is going to remember to do that.

A2: What are the benefits of giving away music for free?

MC: Really, just spreading it around and having as many people listen to our music as possible. Most of the time we will have our six song EPs available for download for $5.00, with one or two tracks as free downloads. Sometimes, after a big show, if a lot of people are asking about how they can hear our music, we will post the download of our EP for free. The reality is that playing live shows and touring is really how you make your name and any money. Record sales these days don’t really count for a whole lot, because it is so easy to proliferate stuff for free without any of the money actually going to the artist. Which is fine, it is something you can’t really fight now because that’s just the way it is, so you have to adapt.

A2: What are the benefits of being a three-piece?

MC: Having just the three of us really increases the level of cohesion we can have together. And we have been playing together long enough now that we can play off of each other really well. A lot of people mention how close and tight we are and that really comes from it just being the three of us.

A2: How do you, as a band, approach songwriting?

MC: It’s usually a joint effort. Chase is the primary lyricist and he comes to me and Josh with a song written on acoustic guitar. Then, we will talk about what kind of vibe we are going for, sonically what we are envisioning, what pops into our heads as we are listening to it. We then arrange all of the parts together as a group and make sure we all like it.
A2: How do the vocal structures get integrated into the songs?

MC: We do all of that together too. And it depends on the songs — there are some songs that are very centered on the vocal structures. Josh often comes in really quickly with some harmonies that he likes and then we discuss where we want those harmonies to be. We typically work on the overall song structure first, then we add the frilly stuff — the knickknacks — like vocal harmonies and interesting musical twists that we like to throw in now and then to keep our listeners on their toes… It keeps us on our toes too.

A2: I’ve heard that Marmalakes practice three times a week. I would imagine that is a necessity, considering the complexity of your songs.

MC: We definitely like to keep it interesting for ourselves and for whoever is listening. It is just fun to add new things, making it more complicated and interesting for ourselves while we are playing the songs. We really like to challenge ourselves.

A2: How did you decide to have your record release at the Blue Theatre?

We wanted to play somewhere we never performed before because we like to explore new places, new territories. We were thinking about places that we thought would be good and would book us on short notice. The Blue Theatre is a really cool space in East Austin, on Springdale near Airport. The layout really makes people pay attention to the stage, and we like attentive audiences!
- Adobe Airstream


Posted on February 27, 2012 by Do512

Text on web page - Do512 Blog


Posted on February 27, 2012 by Do512

Text on web page - Do512 Blog


Photos on web page - Austin 360


Photos on web page - Austin 360


Videos on web page. - The Austin Chronicle


Videos on web page. - The Austin Chronicle


BY ASHLEY NICOLE HARDY, 1:10PM, THU. NOV. 10, 2011

The Parish will be hosting Norwegian indie-rocker, Sondre Lerche, on its stage tomorrow night, Friday, November 11.
Having toured around the United States and Europe, Lerche will be sure to bring his charm and ever so carefully crafted lyrics to all in attendance. Come hang out in the intimate, upstairs hideaway and be ready to fall in love with Sondre Lerche.
Doors open at 8:00 p.m. Buy your tickets in advance for $15 ONLINE, or pay $17 at the door and risk the show being sold out when you get there. Come early and check out the opener, Austin's own Marmalakes! - The Austin Chronicle - Chrontourage


BY ASHLEY NICOLE HARDY, 1:10PM, THU. NOV. 10, 2011

The Parish will be hosting Norwegian indie-rocker, Sondre Lerche, on its stage tomorrow night, Friday, November 11.
Having toured around the United States and Europe, Lerche will be sure to bring his charm and ever so carefully crafted lyrics to all in attendance. Come hang out in the intimate, upstairs hideaway and be ready to fall in love with Sondre Lerche.
Doors open at 8:00 p.m. Buy your tickets in advance for $15 ONLINE, or pay $17 at the door and risk the show being sold out when you get there. Come early and check out the opener, Austin's own Marmalakes! - The Austin Chronicle - Chrontourage


You'll be hearing a lot about Scottish Rite Theater in 2012 if Emily Marks has her way. The Girls Rock Camp Austin founder has recently made the leap over to the oldest operating theatre in the city, and she wants to pump that venerable space full of new energy and activity. That doesn't mean Marks is turning her back on children's theatre, which has made up most of the work on the SRT stage for the past seven years. After all, her previous job was all about connecting young people with creative outlets, and she isn't about to give up on that. She just wants to expand SRT's offerings to kids and their families and take it in some fresh directions, like, say, a play for youth directed by one of the Rude Mechanicals or a concert for the wee ones by Mother Falcon.
If the latter strikes you as blue-sky dreaming, then you'll just have to make your way over to 18th and Lavaca this Saturday at 1:30pm, when the Austin Music Award-winning band will indeed take the SRT stage to headline a family concert that also includes Les Rav and cartoons. It's part of the week's big kickoff to the new era of Scottish Rite. At 8pm that night, Mother Falcon will be back, along with Hello Wheels and the Altered Five, for a concert celebrating the national release of the band's debut album, Alhambra (see "SXSW Records," Music, March 18, 2011). But before either of those events comes PechaKucha Night Austin Vol. 13. On Thursday, Feb. 23, the fast-paced creative information series presents its first program of the year, which includes singer Kat Edmonson; writer and comedian Owen Egerton; artists Melissa Miller, Denise Prince, Faith Schexnayder, and Nancy Mims; band Total Unicorn; graphic designer Erin Mayes; art director Scott McAfee; and Marks herself, who, with Scottish Rite Mason Don Eames, will provide some background on the venue. The action starts, as always, at 8:20pm.
This is just the beginning, Marks promises. The next couple of months will include Graham Reynolds leading a concert reprise of his Duke Ellington remixes, Marmalakes (with a family matinee as well as an evening concert), and, during South by Southwest, a Deadbird Records showcase with Mother Falcon, Les Rav, the Silent Comedy, Marianne Dissard, Hellfire Social, Agent Ribbons, the Diamond Center, Seryn, the Sour Notes, the Silver Chords, and more. Beyond that, Marks is especially interested in bringing together artists who might not have worked together so they can have a chance to expand their creative horizons. And naturally, she's hot to have young artists – musicians, actors, writers, filmmakers, you name it – creating work in SRT. She's reinventing the 19th century opera house into a 21st century arts incubator. To keep up with what she's cooking there, visit www.scottishritetheater.org. - The Austin Chronicle


You'll be hearing a lot about Scottish Rite Theater in 2012 if Emily Marks has her way. The Girls Rock Camp Austin founder has recently made the leap over to the oldest operating theatre in the city, and she wants to pump that venerable space full of new energy and activity. That doesn't mean Marks is turning her back on children's theatre, which has made up most of the work on the SRT stage for the past seven years. After all, her previous job was all about connecting young people with creative outlets, and she isn't about to give up on that. She just wants to expand SRT's offerings to kids and their families and take it in some fresh directions, like, say, a play for youth directed by one of the Rude Mechanicals or a concert for the wee ones by Mother Falcon.
If the latter strikes you as blue-sky dreaming, then you'll just have to make your way over to 18th and Lavaca this Saturday at 1:30pm, when the Austin Music Award-winning band will indeed take the SRT stage to headline a family concert that also includes Les Rav and cartoons. It's part of the week's big kickoff to the new era of Scottish Rite. At 8pm that night, Mother Falcon will be back, along with Hello Wheels and the Altered Five, for a concert celebrating the national release of the band's debut album, Alhambra (see "SXSW Records," Music, March 18, 2011). But before either of those events comes PechaKucha Night Austin Vol. 13. On Thursday, Feb. 23, the fast-paced creative information series presents its first program of the year, which includes singer Kat Edmonson; writer and comedian Owen Egerton; artists Melissa Miller, Denise Prince, Faith Schexnayder, and Nancy Mims; band Total Unicorn; graphic designer Erin Mayes; art director Scott McAfee; and Marks herself, who, with Scottish Rite Mason Don Eames, will provide some background on the venue. The action starts, as always, at 8:20pm.
This is just the beginning, Marks promises. The next couple of months will include Graham Reynolds leading a concert reprise of his Duke Ellington remixes, Marmalakes (with a family matinee as well as an evening concert), and, during South by Southwest, a Deadbird Records showcase with Mother Falcon, Les Rav, the Silent Comedy, Marianne Dissard, Hellfire Social, Agent Ribbons, the Diamond Center, Seryn, the Sour Notes, the Silver Chords, and more. Beyond that, Marks is especially interested in bringing together artists who might not have worked together so they can have a chance to expand their creative horizons. And naturally, she's hot to have young artists – musicians, actors, writers, filmmakers, you name it – creating work in SRT. She's reinventing the 19th century opera house into a 21st century arts incubator. To keep up with what she's cooking there, visit www.scottishritetheater.org. - The Austin Chronicle


City of Austin
8pm, The Parish If there's one thing the city of Austin does particularly well it's branding. This local showcase spotlights some of the most remarkable – and marketable – talent in town. Relative newcomer Click-Clack sounds like a Texas alternative to Sage Francis' Strange Famous hip-hop collective on his free, downloadable debut, Housework. Teen punks Schmillion take all the right cues from the Runaways. The mostly female outfit appeared in Spike Jonze's Grammy-winning short, "The Suburbs," and earned an opening slot on Arcade Fire's Texas tour last year. Endearing folk-pop trio Marmalakes recalls a collegiate version of Vampire Weekend, bound for bigger stages and radio airplay. Burly bluesman Nakia thrilled television audiences in prime time last year on The Voice, but his solo work is even more visceral and engaging. Fresh off an appearance with his former coach Cee Lo Green at the Austin City Limits Music Festival, the Twitter celebrity just released a new autobiographical anthem, "Dreamin' Big." Local Latin specialists El Tule close the evening with big-band panache. – Austin Powell - The Austin Chronicle


City of Austin
8pm, The Parish If there's one thing the city of Austin does particularly well it's branding. This local showcase spotlights some of the most remarkable – and marketable – talent in town. Relative newcomer Click-Clack sounds like a Texas alternative to Sage Francis' Strange Famous hip-hop collective on his free, downloadable debut, Housework. Teen punks Schmillion take all the right cues from the Runaways. The mostly female outfit appeared in Spike Jonze's Grammy-winning short, "The Suburbs," and earned an opening slot on Arcade Fire's Texas tour last year. Endearing folk-pop trio Marmalakes recalls a collegiate version of Vampire Weekend, bound for bigger stages and radio airplay. Burly bluesman Nakia thrilled television audiences in prime time last year on The Voice, but his solo work is even more visceral and engaging. Fresh off an appearance with his former coach Cee Lo Green at the Austin City Limits Music Festival, the Twitter celebrity just released a new autobiographical anthem, "Dreamin' Big." Local Latin specialists El Tule close the evening with big-band panache. – Austin Powell - The Austin Chronicle


Marmalakes/the Sour Notes
"White Height"/"Two Hands Wait" (No Play)

Another split, this white vinyl prompted last week's raucous release party at Mohawk, which was a raging success for these two young Austin indie bands. Pop-power trio Marmalakes bashes out its slow, sultry "White Height" in some alt.universe meeting of Ben Kweller's Radish and the Punch Brothers' Chris Thile, while the Sour Notes get brassy on a Fountain of Wayne-like goose bump cruise. Jared Boulanger needs to cut loose at the crescendo of this otherwise tease to the group's upcoming full-length.
- The Austin Chronicle


Marmalakes/the Sour Notes
"White Height"/"Two Hands Wait" (No Play)

Another split, this white vinyl prompted last week's raucous release party at Mohawk, which was a raging success for these two young Austin indie bands. Pop-power trio Marmalakes bashes out its slow, sultry "White Height" in some alt.universe meeting of Ben Kweller's Radish and the Punch Brothers' Chris Thile, while the Sour Notes get brassy on a Fountain of Wayne-like goose bump cruise. Jared Boulanger needs to cut loose at the crescendo of this otherwise tease to the group's upcoming full-length.
- The Austin Chronicle


Marmalakes
Tuesday, March 13, 10pm, Parish
Amid the nascent pop scene emerging in Austin over the past few years, Marmalakes has found its music at an ideal intersection, balancing exuberant live shows and contemplative, intelligent songwriting. The local trio of Chase Weinacht, Josh Halpern, and Max Colonna, all in their early 20s, delivers folk pop with both a youthful restlessness and eye for detail.
"We're certainly surrounded by an energetic and enthusiastic group of creative folks," offers Weinacht. "As far as impressions, I honestly don't believe that anyone in our community of bands would say their No. 1 goal is 'I want to be famous.' I think the general feeling of all these folks is 'Let's make the best music we know how to make.'
"These bands – Mother Falcon, Little Lo, Hello Wheels, the Sour Notes – we're all playing with pop structures unabashedly. We're all working hard. As far as how Marmalakes fit it into it musically, I think we're wordier than most."
That focus on the live experience and investment in nurturing a scene has helped build an impressive community of both musical collaboration and fans, capped lastmonth at the Mohawk with Marmalakes' split 7-inch release with fellow locals the Sour Notes. With an eye toward releasing its third EP in April, Marmalakes continues to hone its sound, building on 2010's impressive debut Wonder Winds and last year's more adventurous arrangements of Even Clothed.
"The reason our second EP is a bit more exploratory is because we had a better idea of what it means to put together a record," Weinacht surmises. "Since we'd been a live-oriented band for a good while, with Wonder Winds we wanted to try to present our live energy while at the same time keeping it interesting enough for some replay value.
"With Even Clothed, we were able to play around a bit more. I think we felt more adapted to the studio environment altogether, and due to the opportunities we've been given to play lots of different kinds of shows, we've made a handful of different arrangements of each song, and with the Even Clothed version we felt we had to be definitive."

- The Austin Chronicle


Marmalakes
Tuesday, March 13, 10pm, Parish
Amid the nascent pop scene emerging in Austin over the past few years, Marmalakes has found its music at an ideal intersection, balancing exuberant live shows and contemplative, intelligent songwriting. The local trio of Chase Weinacht, Josh Halpern, and Max Colonna, all in their early 20s, delivers folk pop with both a youthful restlessness and eye for detail.
"We're certainly surrounded by an energetic and enthusiastic group of creative folks," offers Weinacht. "As far as impressions, I honestly don't believe that anyone in our community of bands would say their No. 1 goal is 'I want to be famous.' I think the general feeling of all these folks is 'Let's make the best music we know how to make.'
"These bands – Mother Falcon, Little Lo, Hello Wheels, the Sour Notes – we're all playing with pop structures unabashedly. We're all working hard. As far as how Marmalakes fit it into it musically, I think we're wordier than most."
That focus on the live experience and investment in nurturing a scene has helped build an impressive community of both musical collaboration and fans, capped lastmonth at the Mohawk with Marmalakes' split 7-inch release with fellow locals the Sour Notes. With an eye toward releasing its third EP in April, Marmalakes continues to hone its sound, building on 2010's impressive debut Wonder Winds and last year's more adventurous arrangements of Even Clothed.
"The reason our second EP is a bit more exploratory is because we had a better idea of what it means to put together a record," Weinacht surmises. "Since we'd been a live-oriented band for a good while, with Wonder Winds we wanted to try to present our live energy while at the same time keeping it interesting enough for some replay value.
"With Even Clothed, we were able to play around a bit more. I think we felt more adapted to the studio environment altogether, and due to the opportunities we've been given to play lots of different kinds of shows, we've made a handful of different arrangements of each song, and with the Even Clothed version we felt we had to be definitive."

- The Austin Chronicle


Text in Magazine - Austin Monthly


Text in Magazine - Austin Monthly


Nashville Review: A publication of Vanderbilt University: Fall 2011 Issue
December 1, 2011

"Turquoise Balloons" is a track off of "Even Clothed," Marmalakes’ second EP which was released on November 15, 2011. Their first EP, "Wonder Winds" was released in July 2010. Their lyric-attentive songs are laced with harmonies and youthful enthusiasm. It’s easy to see the poeticism in both the sound and the form of their soulful and evocative soundscapes. Here, Greek tragedy could meet pop music.

- Rebecca Bernard - Nashville Review: A publication of Vanderbilt University


Nashville Review: A publication of Vanderbilt University: Fall 2011 Issue
December 1, 2011

"Turquoise Balloons" is a track off of "Even Clothed," Marmalakes’ second EP which was released on November 15, 2011. Their first EP, "Wonder Winds" was released in July 2010. Their lyric-attentive songs are laced with harmonies and youthful enthusiasm. It’s easy to see the poeticism in both the sound and the form of their soulful and evocative soundscapes. Here, Greek tragedy could meet pop music.

- Rebecca Bernard - Nashville Review: A publication of Vanderbilt University


December 2, 2011

Marmalakes' 2010 EP, Wonder Winds, proved an impressive debut behind the local trio's intricate exuberance, and their seven-song sophomore follows suit. The EP careens through "The Adventures of Jubilant John in Giggle City" and unhinges on "Colour of Defeat," but underlying charm and classical guitar tones prevail on the jumping "Geneva Hall," string-strewn "Red Metal Rescue," and beautifully sullen closer "Balmorhea." (3 stars)

- Doug Freeman - Austin Chronicle


December 2, 2011

Marmalakes' 2010 EP, Wonder Winds, proved an impressive debut behind the local trio's intricate exuberance, and their seven-song sophomore follows suit. The EP careens through "The Adventures of Jubilant John in Giggle City" and unhinges on "Colour of Defeat," but underlying charm and classical guitar tones prevail on the jumping "Geneva Hall," string-strewn "Red Metal Rescue," and beautifully sullen closer "Balmorhea." (3 stars)

- Doug Freeman - Austin Chronicle


December 2, 2011

Marmalakes' 2010 EP, Wonder Winds, proved an impressive debut behind the local trio's intricate exuberance, and their seven-song sophomore follows suit. The EP careens through "The Adventures of Jubilant John in Giggle City" and unhinges on "Colour of Defeat," but underlying charm and classical guitar tones prevail on the jumping "Geneva Hall," string-strewn "Red Metal Rescue," and beautifully sullen closer "Balmorhea." (3 stars)

- Doug Freeman - Austin Chronicle


December 2, 2011

Marmalakes' 2010 EP, Wonder Winds, proved an impressive debut behind the local trio's intricate exuberance, and their seven-song sophomore follows suit. The EP careens through "The Adventures of Jubilant John in Giggle City" and unhinges on "Colour of Defeat," but underlying charm and classical guitar tones prevail on the jumping "Geneva Hall," string-strewn "Red Metal Rescue," and beautifully sullen closer "Balmorhea." (3 stars)

- Doug Freeman - Austin Chronicle


October 14, 2011

From the fabric of Austin’s own musical talent comes a band who’s folk melodies can soothe you into love, even if only for the span of one of their EP’s. Marmalakes is composed of Austin natives Max Colonna, Josh Halpern, and Chase Weinacht. I had the pleasure of chatting with Chase the other day. If you have never run into the 22 year old, almost UT grad, up and comer, you are missing out. He is as charming as his music is delightful. The energy and respect he emits when talking about his band mates just proves that the Marmalakes are a group not to be missed.

Full interview follows...

- Ashley Nicole Hardy - Girl About Austin


October 14, 2011

From the fabric of Austin’s own musical talent comes a band who’s folk melodies can soothe you into love, even if only for the span of one of their EP’s. Marmalakes is composed of Austin natives Max Colonna, Josh Halpern, and Chase Weinacht. I had the pleasure of chatting with Chase the other day. If you have never run into the 22 year old, almost UT grad, up and comer, you are missing out. He is as charming as his music is delightful. The energy and respect he emits when talking about his band mates just proves that the Marmalakes are a group not to be missed.

Full interview follows...

- Ashley Nicole Hardy - Girl About Austin


November 10, 2011

The shaggy-mopped, fresh-faced guys in the band Marmalakes are strong evidence that the kids that grew up in Austin are usually cooler than the kids that didn’t.

Since forming four years ago, the boys of Marmalakes have turned out a crop of literate pop tunes that capture the joy and pain of youth. The band’s debut EP Wonder Winds combines the intimacy of a living room show with a lyrical maturity of a band twice their age. On Tuesday Nov. 15, Marmalakes ups the ante with the follow-up Even Clothed. The fidelity’s higher, and the arrangements are more complex. The record’s opener “Geneva Hall” is today’s song of the day.

“Geneva Hall” finds Marmalakes at their most wide-eyed. The song jitters with nervous energy. It starts with a quick tempo and a jazzy, if restrained, delivery that hints at some anarchic fun just bubbling underneath. Like a soda can shaken to the point of bursting, when the band let’s loose, it’s a thrilling release.

You can see Marmalakes this Friday when they open for Norwegian indie-popper Sondre Lerche at the Parish.

- Paul Carrubba - KUT 90.5 Song of the Day


November 10, 2011

The shaggy-mopped, fresh-faced guys in the band Marmalakes are strong evidence that the kids that grew up in Austin are usually cooler than the kids that didn’t.

Since forming four years ago, the boys of Marmalakes have turned out a crop of literate pop tunes that capture the joy and pain of youth. The band’s debut EP Wonder Winds combines the intimacy of a living room show with a lyrical maturity of a band twice their age. On Tuesday Nov. 15, Marmalakes ups the ante with the follow-up Even Clothed. The fidelity’s higher, and the arrangements are more complex. The record’s opener “Geneva Hall” is today’s song of the day.

“Geneva Hall” finds Marmalakes at their most wide-eyed. The song jitters with nervous energy. It starts with a quick tempo and a jazzy, if restrained, delivery that hints at some anarchic fun just bubbling underneath. Like a soda can shaken to the point of bursting, when the band let’s loose, it’s a thrilling release.

You can see Marmalakes this Friday when they open for Norwegian indie-popper Sondre Lerche at the Parish.

- Paul Carrubba - KUT 90.5 Song of the Day


November 15, 2011

It starts with chemistry. You add natural talent, clever lyrics, a unique stage presence, and a little modesty. What do you get? Marmalakes, the Austin band who has stirred up quite a buzz which is not to be missed.
It has been an exciting year for these guys. Last Friday, they opened for Sondre Lerche at The Parish. They also were recently invited to play their first official SXSW show, as well as anticipating the release of their sophomore EP, "Even Clothed," which is available today online.

The key to that Marmalakes charm can be found at their shows around town. Their folk-rock sound compliments their genuine love for their fans. When they play, the energy in the room is contagious. They capture creativity, imagination, and theatrics in each set they play.

The release show for their EP, "Even Clothed," will be this Saturday, November 19th at The Blue Theatre (916 Springdale). Doors open at 7 pm and the show kicks off with Dana Falconberry (8 pm), followed by Buxton (9 pm), then Marmalakes (10 pm). It is an all ages show with a $7 cover.

By Ashley Nicole Hardy, 10:51AM, Tue. Nov. 15
- Chrontourage


November 15, 2011

It starts with chemistry. You add natural talent, clever lyrics, a unique stage presence, and a little modesty. What do you get? Marmalakes, the Austin band who has stirred up quite a buzz which is not to be missed.
It has been an exciting year for these guys. Last Friday, they opened for Sondre Lerche at The Parish. They also were recently invited to play their first official SXSW show, as well as anticipating the release of their sophomore EP, "Even Clothed," which is available today online.

The key to that Marmalakes charm can be found at their shows around town. Their folk-rock sound compliments their genuine love for their fans. When they play, the energy in the room is contagious. They capture creativity, imagination, and theatrics in each set they play.

The release show for their EP, "Even Clothed," will be this Saturday, November 19th at The Blue Theatre (916 Springdale). Doors open at 7 pm and the show kicks off with Dana Falconberry (8 pm), followed by Buxton (9 pm), then Marmalakes (10 pm). It is an all ages show with a $7 cover.

By Ashley Nicole Hardy, 10:51AM, Tue. Nov. 15
- Chrontourage


November 17, 2011

Austin-based indie-pop trio Marmalakes first hit the scene four years ago, and released their debut recording, the EP Wonder Winds, last year. But even before having an official recording under their belts, they were already making an impression as one of Austin’s best new bands and packing venues like the Mohawk, simply through word of mouth.

Bassist Max Colonna, drummer Josh Halpern, and guitarist Chase Weinacht have a presence that’s the embodiment of all things youthful, animated and energetic. And once again, with their second EP, Even Clothed, they craft irresistible, effervescent pop tunes that capture that buoyant spirit. Only this time, you hear a more refined pace, a move toward more sophisticated arrangements, and that lyrical maturity of a band twice their age. Still, it doesn’t take away from the charm and intimate vibe that the band seems to radiate so effortlessly.

Marmalakes is having an EP release show this Saturday night at a wonderful venue, The Blue Theater, located at 916 Springdale in East Austin, in the very heart of the East Austin Studio Tour. Opening the show are special guests Buxton and Dana Falconberry. Doors open at 7 p.m., and the music begins at 8 p.m. This one comes highly recommended.

- Laurie Gallardo
- KUT 90.5 Austin Music Minute


November 17, 2011

Austin-based indie-pop trio Marmalakes first hit the scene four years ago, and released their debut recording, the EP Wonder Winds, last year. But even before having an official recording under their belts, they were already making an impression as one of Austin’s best new bands and packing venues like the Mohawk, simply through word of mouth.

Bassist Max Colonna, drummer Josh Halpern, and guitarist Chase Weinacht have a presence that’s the embodiment of all things youthful, animated and energetic. And once again, with their second EP, Even Clothed, they craft irresistible, effervescent pop tunes that capture that buoyant spirit. Only this time, you hear a more refined pace, a move toward more sophisticated arrangements, and that lyrical maturity of a band twice their age. Still, it doesn’t take away from the charm and intimate vibe that the band seems to radiate so effortlessly.

Marmalakes is having an EP release show this Saturday night at a wonderful venue, The Blue Theater, located at 916 Springdale in East Austin, in the very heart of the East Austin Studio Tour. Opening the show are special guests Buxton and Dana Falconberry. Doors open at 7 p.m., and the music begins at 8 p.m. This one comes highly recommended.

- Laurie Gallardo
- KUT 90.5 Austin Music Minute


November 19, 2011

Tonight marks the release of local trio Marmalakes‘ newest EP, Even Clothed.

At their live performances, Marmalakes has got to be one of the most dynamic bands I have come across. Their ability to start and stop, and beyond that, to achieve extreme changes in volume is pretty remarkable.

Even Clothed kicks off with the track that showcases those abilities the most. “Geneva Hall”, which would likely be the single from this record, frantically changes from quiet near-whispering lyrics, to loud bombastic instrumental bridges. It’s quite a well-written song too. I wouldn’t be surprised if this one starts popping up on local radio stations.

This EP quickly shifts into a more somber vibe, and never again reaches the energy of it’s first track. It’s obviously intentional. It seems Marmalakes are venturing into more folk-ish and contemplative songs.

The second track, “Colour of Defeat”, is slow and soulful and takes quite a while to develop. It’s an interesting change from the first song, and the pacing of the entire EP is similarly unpredictable. Another highlight in the record is “Red Metal Rescue”, which builds into a large swelling of orchestral instruments toward the end.

What I find actually the most salient about this collection of songs is the sounds used. The drums are mic’d and played in a way that brings out all of their dynamics, and there is some experimenting with recordings of some non-instruments (maybe physical objects and toys, almost like foley art).

Definitely give Even Clothed a listen, but more importantly check out their show tonight at the Blue Theater.

It happens real soon now, so don’t miss your chance to see them live.

- Geoff - Ovrld


November 19, 2011

Tonight marks the release of local trio Marmalakes‘ newest EP, Even Clothed.

At their live performances, Marmalakes has got to be one of the most dynamic bands I have come across. Their ability to start and stop, and beyond that, to achieve extreme changes in volume is pretty remarkable.

Even Clothed kicks off with the track that showcases those abilities the most. “Geneva Hall”, which would likely be the single from this record, frantically changes from quiet near-whispering lyrics, to loud bombastic instrumental bridges. It’s quite a well-written song too. I wouldn’t be surprised if this one starts popping up on local radio stations.

This EP quickly shifts into a more somber vibe, and never again reaches the energy of it’s first track. It’s obviously intentional. It seems Marmalakes are venturing into more folk-ish and contemplative songs.

The second track, “Colour of Defeat”, is slow and soulful and takes quite a while to develop. It’s an interesting change from the first song, and the pacing of the entire EP is similarly unpredictable. Another highlight in the record is “Red Metal Rescue”, which builds into a large swelling of orchestral instruments toward the end.

What I find actually the most salient about this collection of songs is the sounds used. The drums are mic’d and played in a way that brings out all of their dynamics, and there is some experimenting with recordings of some non-instruments (maybe physical objects and toys, almost like foley art).

Definitely give Even Clothed a listen, but more importantly check out their show tonight at the Blue Theater.

It happens real soon now, so don’t miss your chance to see them live.

- Geoff - Ovrld


Any conversation about the best new bands in Austin has to include Marmalakes, a trio that on the strength of last year’s debut EP, Wonder Winds, and charmingly buoyant live shows has helped galvanize a scene of unassuming, earnest and impressive young artists. On songs like the anthemic “Vittoria”, the band catches a perfect pop folk-pop hook that shadows elements of Local Natives and even Vampire Weekend, while winding through detailed landscapes with an alliterative laden wit. Marmalakes will be releasing their second EP later this year, but you should catch them as soon as possible, which happens to be this Thursday, February 10 at the Mohawk along with Austin heavy-hitters Fastball, and rising starts Quiet Company.

- Doug Freeman
February 7th, 2011 - Austin Sound


There seems to be an often overlooked variable in music, something that has a profound effect on an artist’s long term success: Personality. The feeling that you not only can relate to the artist, but that you know them better for having heard their music. Ubiquity, over time, seems to come more from an artist’s ability to communicate then their genre or style. It is with this in mind that I approach Marmalakes with some confusion; a band that translates themselves into their music this well should really be a better known Austin band.

Marmalakes are actually pretty new; their charming debut and lone release, Wonder Winds, came out last summer. But don’t let their newness fool you; these guys are clearly tight musicians. Their lyrical skill is best demonstrated on their two best songs: “Vittoria” and “(A Scene Through) Cellophane.”

“Vittoria” is a pulsing, five and a half minute ode to the eponymous female. With an effective use of dynamics, and with lyrics like “We were introduced in Riccardo’s apartment / You drew back curtains and framed full ashtrays / And as he pleaded, you only fiddled / Heels on tile, a window reply, the silence of riddles” the song immediately pulls you into its world, only to have it come crashing down with the chorus.

“(A Scene Through) Cellophane” is a little more laid back. Built on a breezy guitar line and brush stroked drums, “Cellophane” falls into place like street lights blurring together at 2 a.m. as you walk home, no longer drunk and blissfully sleepy. The lyrics deliver here as well with lines like “The night’s a scene through cellophane / The sockets speak in squinted strain / Creases are increasing, trenches tiny and thin”. Marmalakes write their songs like English majors with lines like this bursting with clever cadences and rolling alliterations.

Personality goes a long way in a band, and Marmalakes definitely takes it there. But once the feeling of intimate sharing wears off we are left with layered lyrics, clever chord structures, and earnest musicianship. You can decide for yourself at approximately 11 pm this Friday. Or just stream their entire catalogue here.

–Derick
April 28th, 2011
- Ovrld


Mohawk, Jan. 5

Judging from the number of underage hand stamps at Mohawk on Wednesday night, the venue may have the Free Week distinction of having made as much money at the door as at the bar. The Red River double-decker has become an incubator for Austin's newest young indie entries, and the headlining Marmalakes justified a packed inside house. Dark Water Hymnal opened behind Jeremy Ballard's plaintive poetry, driven by a percussive broil and Andrea Couch's spectral violin, especially on new tunes "Wind and Waves" and "Center of the Spark" from upcoming sophomore LP Collapse the Structure. Little Lo commenced with a cacophony that aimed for the Arcade Fire in the septet's catharsis, but soon settled into a softer folk-pop swoon that hearkened Anathallo in frontman Ryan James McGill's quaking, stuttering vocals and nasal-pinched croon. The group proved adept at both extremes, from a hushed and surprisingly effective adaptation of William Blake's "A Poison Tree" to the closing surge of "Broken Skin." Sandwiched between Little Lo and Marmalakes, Danny Malone seemed a tried veteran, and his impressive solo set suggested as much, highlighting how far the local songwriter has come in a couple of years. Before a backdrop of Christmas lights and shaded lamps, Malone arrested the audience with acoustic opener "Close Enough" from his most recent Cuddlebug and the upbeat guitar slap of "My Affection." Despite the odd iPod-backed balloon-drop interlude, Malone's showcase beckoned for breakout attention. Keeping the room near capacity till close, Marmalakes bounded with a ruckus as the trio cut through last year's debut EP, Wonder Winds. Their smooth harmonies and pop polish, especially on scene-making jam "Vittoria," establish Marmalakes as Austin's most compelling answer to Local Natives. If Free Week sets the local musical tone for the year, 2011 looks promising.

- Doug Freeman - Austin Chronicle


Mohawk, Jan. 5

Judging from the number of underage hand stamps at Mohawk on Wednesday night, the venue may have the Free Week distinction of having made as much money at the door as at the bar. The Red River double-decker has become an incubator for Austin's newest young indie entries, and the headlining Marmalakes justified a packed inside house. Dark Water Hymnal opened behind Jeremy Ballard's plaintive poetry, driven by a percussive broil and Andrea Couch's spectral violin, especially on new tunes "Wind and Waves" and "Center of the Spark" from upcoming sophomore LP Collapse the Structure. Little Lo commenced with a cacophony that aimed for the Arcade Fire in the septet's catharsis, but soon settled into a softer folk-pop swoon that hearkened Anathallo in frontman Ryan James McGill's quaking, stuttering vocals and nasal-pinched croon. The group proved adept at both extremes, from a hushed and surprisingly effective adaptation of William Blake's "A Poison Tree" to the closing surge of "Broken Skin." Sandwiched between Little Lo and Marmalakes, Danny Malone seemed a tried veteran, and his impressive solo set suggested as much, highlighting how far the local songwriter has come in a couple of years. Before a backdrop of Christmas lights and shaded lamps, Malone arrested the audience with acoustic opener "Close Enough" from his most recent Cuddlebug and the upbeat guitar slap of "My Affection." Despite the odd iPod-backed balloon-drop interlude, Malone's showcase beckoned for breakout attention. Keeping the room near capacity till close, Marmalakes bounded with a ruckus as the trio cut through last year's debut EP, Wonder Winds. Their smooth harmonies and pop polish, especially on scene-making jam "Vittoria," establish Marmalakes as Austin's most compelling answer to Local Natives. If Free Week sets the local musical tone for the year, 2011 looks promising.

- Doug Freeman - Austin Chronicle


For all its youthful restlessness and exuberance, Marmalakes' debut EP carries a developed eye for detail and ear for nuance. A welcome injection of vigor to the folk-pop fold, the local trio keeps the pace light and lively behind ganged harmonies, with winding lyricism flickering through scenes like Polaroid flashes. Opener "(A Scene Through) Cellophane" touches on the territory of Page France, while "Vittoria" bursts with an anthemic abandon. The EP marvels in fits of alliteration, from the rushing clatter of "Conversation" to the calming, Low Anthem lull of "Cast On." "Ode to Johnnie Martin" carries just enough weariness to suggest Marmalakes can be as serious as they are clever without sacrificing an underlying charm, and closer "Hands Alone in the House" weaves its mystical narrative atop an intensely loping rhythm that crumbles into cathartic howls. Marmalakes may yet be young, but Wonder Winds is a smart and infectious first offering.

***

BY DOUG FREEMAN - The Austin Chronicle


For all its youthful restlessness and exuberance, Marmalakes' debut EP carries a developed eye for detail and ear for nuance. A welcome injection of vigor to the folk-pop fold, the local trio keeps the pace light and lively behind ganged harmonies, with winding lyricism flickering through scenes like Polaroid flashes. Opener "(A Scene Through) Cellophane" touches on the territory of Page France, while "Vittoria" bursts with an anthemic abandon. The EP marvels in fits of alliteration, from the rushing clatter of "Conversation" to the calming, Low Anthem lull of "Cast On." "Ode to Johnnie Martin" carries just enough weariness to suggest Marmalakes can be as serious as they are clever without sacrificing an underlying charm, and closer "Hands Alone in the House" weaves its mystical narrative atop an intensely loping rhythm that crumbles into cathartic howls. Marmalakes may yet be young, but Wonder Winds is a smart and infectious first offering.

***

BY DOUG FREEMAN - The Austin Chronicle


Three-piece folk pop band, Marmalakes are as sweet as honey. With their beautiful harmonies and their expressive lyrical style, it’s just criminal this band isn’t signed. Especially now that the folk pop genre seems to have exploded with new artists, with bands such as Mumford And Sons rising to the top.

Their captivating vocals greatly echo that of vocalist Conor Oberst from “Bright Eyes.” However, I feel Marmalakes do it far better. Meaning, their style is a lot more enthusiastic and less melancholy than that of the band “Bright Eyes.” They have a far more energetic enthusiasm to their songs, which strongly conveys their genuine passion for what they do. You can just tell that they love making music, and this passion is most evident in songs “Conversation”, “(A Scene Through) Cellophane” and “Vittoria.”

marmalakes Marmalakes // Wonder Winds EP// Self Released // 06.07.10

From listening to their EP “Wonder Winds” you just know they would be a joy to watch live. This is because not only does the band captivate us with their voices, they also have an intriguing, almost poetic lyrical style. Thus, it is clear that all band members certainly are “lyrically attentive.”

Nevertheless, as relative as it is to say, it does all come down to a matter of taste, and if you are not a fan of this new wave of folk pop, then this band is not for you.

However, if you love bands such as Mumford and Sons, Bright Eyes, and Vampire Weekend I can guarantee you will fall in love with Marmalakes, and their EP “Wonder Winds” is something you should not be without.

Submitted by Laura Jayne Reynolds on September 1, 2010 – 3:33 pm - Never Enough Notes (UK)


Three-piece folk pop band, Marmalakes are as sweet as honey. With their beautiful harmonies and their expressive lyrical style, it’s just criminal this band isn’t signed. Especially now that the folk pop genre seems to have exploded with new artists, with bands such as Mumford And Sons rising to the top.

Their captivating vocals greatly echo that of vocalist Conor Oberst from “Bright Eyes.” However, I feel Marmalakes do it far better. Meaning, their style is a lot more enthusiastic and less melancholy than that of the band “Bright Eyes.” They have a far more energetic enthusiasm to their songs, which strongly conveys their genuine passion for what they do. You can just tell that they love making music, and this passion is most evident in songs “Conversation”, “(A Scene Through) Cellophane” and “Vittoria.”

marmalakes Marmalakes // Wonder Winds EP// Self Released // 06.07.10

From listening to their EP “Wonder Winds” you just know they would be a joy to watch live. This is because not only does the band captivate us with their voices, they also have an intriguing, almost poetic lyrical style. Thus, it is clear that all band members certainly are “lyrically attentive.”

Nevertheless, as relative as it is to say, it does all come down to a matter of taste, and if you are not a fan of this new wave of folk pop, then this band is not for you.

However, if you love bands such as Mumford and Sons, Bright Eyes, and Vampire Weekend I can guarantee you will fall in love with Marmalakes, and their EP “Wonder Winds” is something you should not be without.

Submitted by Laura Jayne Reynolds on September 1, 2010 – 3:33 pm - Never Enough Notes (UK)


I’m really diggin’ this EP. Wonder Winds is Marmalakes first release and it’s jam packed with lively & catchy folk-pop tunes. From track 1 to the last, the EP grabs your attention and keeps it warm and snug throughout its short and sweet 23 minute run time. Hear the entire EP here, then head over to the Cactus Cafe in Austin on July 9th to check out their EP release show. Here’s my favorite off the EP, “Ode To Johnnie Martin.”

- Quentin Self - New Dust


Marmalakes is a band from Austin, Texas. I saw them just last night at the New Dust house show/cook out in support of Mont Lyons (Who I've featured on the playlist back in November of last year) Really enjoyed the show, they were giving out their EP "Wonder Winds" which just came out July 6th. Listen to a couple of tracks from the EP below.

- Josh Blalock - BIRP! (Blalocks Indie/Rock Playlist)


For the past few weeks here at KVRX, the Marmalakes debut album has been at the top of our hitless 39. We thought it only fitting to bring them into the Local Live studio for a short set. They ended up surprising us with two. One electric that retained all of the dynamicism and hard hitting power the Marmalakes are becoming known for, and one soft-spoken acoustic set that highlighted the inherent melodic nature in all of their music. The songs run from Antonioni films to walking with shoes in West Texas, from loud to quiet, from heartfelt to accusingly distant, usually all within the same track. Above all, a great set from a band on the rise, and we were happy to be here to document it.

-Aaron Malzahn - KVRX 91.7 Local Live


For the past few weeks here at KVRX, the Marmalakes debut album has been at the top of our hitless 39. We thought it only fitting to bring them into the Local Live studio for a short set. They ended up surprising us with two. One electric that retained all of the dynamicism and hard hitting power the Marmalakes are becoming known for, and one soft-spoken acoustic set that highlighted the inherent melodic nature in all of their music. The songs run from Antonioni films to walking with shoes in West Texas, from loud to quiet, from heartfelt to accusingly distant, usually all within the same track. Above all, a great set from a band on the rise, and we were happy to be here to document it.

-Aaron Malzahn - KVRX 91.7 Local Live


Hello again! So I have some good news and some bad news: the bad news is that all of you who read my blog with maximal religious fervor will have to wait one more day for tales of Bonnaroo because last night I got really distracted by a band that’s new to me, and you should hear about them now; the good news is, I got really distracted by a band that’s new to me and you get to hear about them now! Last night I went up to The Parish to catch The Frontier Brothers because we all know they’re my favorite Austin band, but I also got to see Speak, The Eastern Sea and Marmalakes. Everyone was making a big fuss about Speak, which turned out to be fun, but largely a glorified karaoke night. Their tunes were danceable, but the audience, as my friend described, looked like Night of the Living Dead all the way up to the stage. Anyway, you can check them out at ACL and decide for yourself, but I was underwhelmed. It may just be one of those things where it was built up too much beforehand, like M. Night Shyamalan’s The Village, or something.

But back to the matter at hand, MARMALAKES! Marmalakes in a word? Joyful. Soulful. Okay, two words. Guitarist, Chase Weinacht, told me that he and drummer, Josh Halpern, had been playing together for about three years, but Marmalakes are just on their second year together. Anyway, this local trio kicked off the night, explicitly thrilled to be playing The Parish for the first time, and their energy spread like a fever. I literally heard an AMEN! or two slip from the audience. It was hardly 9:00 and the place was bouncing, attention completely commanded by the unassuming Marmalakes. Simply put, these guys were arguably the set of the night. When their set first got started, the sincerity behind Weinacht's, vocals lured me away from the bar, but I have to admit that before the second song, I was already planning to write that they were another nice, folky band in town. What began as a standard mellow set, with brushes on drums and tender vocal harmonies, spontaneously erupted throughout the entire set into delightful indie rock.

I’d say the vocals are reminiscent of The Decemberists, and their folk-inspired riffs and honest songwriting remind me of The Avett Brothers, but that’s as far as I’ll draw comparisons; Marmalakes play with a truly unique cadence that’s pleasantly full of surprises and doesn’t compare to many bands out there right now. Things first picked up when they started to play my personal favorite lick, “Vittoria,” and these guys just came uncorked; acoustic guitars rarely rock this hard. This is not to say that I didn’t love the slower songs; it’s quite the contrary. At one point, Halpern, gave the sticks a rest and impressed everyone with his voice as we all sank together into the poetic lyricism and organic rhythm. All three of these guys have a voice on them for sure, and the vocal harmonies stand out as one of the most enjoyable parts of their sound. They played a new song called, “Turquoise Blue,” and I haven’t caught the ooh-eee-oohs so hard in a long time; it was my first time seeing the band and I already felt myself singing along.

I hope everyone will venture out to see Marmalakes as soon as possible. It is not every day you come across a band this talented that is as gracious, warm and sincere; it’s remarkable and refreshing. This band plays with a wide-eyed wonder that intrigues and it’s hard not to smile when you see musicians legitimately having this good a time making music together. I somehow lucked into acquiring their new EP at the show last night, but you can get your hands on it at their release party, July 8 at Cactus Café with Mother Falcon. It would be really foolish to miss this show, so make sure to check their WEBSITE! To all the cool kids, I’ll see you there.

- Morgan Giles
6/18/2010 - Area 41


Music Monday
By Francisco Marin, Daily Texan Staff
Published: Monday, August 30, 2010

Chase Weinacht, Josh Halpern and Max Colonna are Marmalakes, the folk trio that has exploded into Austin ears following the release of their debut EP, Wonder Winds.

The scene in July was magnificent. Amid the standing room-only crowd at the Cactus Cafe and the soft clinking of cocktail glasses and dim lighting, Marmalakes took the stage.

For the night, the cafe wasn’t a listening room as much as it was a holding place for like-minded attendees clapping in sync with the band and cheering wildly, as they did in Marmalakes’ rolling epic “VITTORIA.” At other times, Marmalakes spun a web of delicate, almost overwhelming emotion, as in their back-country ballad, “Cast On.”

Made of Max Colonna on bass, Josh Halpern on drums and Chase Weinacht on guitar — all members share vocals — Marmalakes has the ability to transfix audiences with their constantly shifting style. One of their most recent songs, for instance, “Hands Alone in the House,” is a delightfully sinister throwback to the dark murder ballads of old.

Marmalakes will take the stage this Saturday at the Cactus Cafe opening for Alejandro Escovedo, an Austin music icon in his own right.

The band got together to collectively answer some questions The Daily Texan had in anticipation of their upcoming show.

The Daily Texan: When did Marmalakes first get started, and how?

Marmalakes: We’ve known each other since middle school and went to high school together. Josh and Chase began playing duo drums and guitar sets about four years ago, and Max joined in about two and a half years ago. We started playing under the moniker “Marmalakes” shortly after Max joined.

DT: One adjective to describe Marmalakes’ music?

Marmalakes: Folkie-dokey.

DT: What was the first CD you purchased with your own money?

Josh: Who Let The Dogs Out by Baha Men (at Toys “R” Us).
Max: Astro Lounge by Smash Mouth.
Chase: The “Space Jam” soundtrack. I was obsessed with Michael Jordan as a kid.

DT: If your band could collaborate with any living musician in the world, who would it be?

Marmalakes: Joanna Newsom.

DT: What album have you listened to the most in the last week?

Max: Mezzanine, Massive Attack.
Josh: Being There, Wilco.
Chase: The Orchard, Ra Ra Riot.

DT: What was the best show you’ve ever played?

Marmalakes: Our EP release show at the Cactus Cafe in July was pretty spectacular. We unexpectedly sold it out and shared the stage with our friends Little Lo and Mother Falcon. Seriously one of the best nights, period.

DT: What is your favorite song to play live?

Marmalakes: It changes all the time, but recently “Auctioneer” has been going really well.

DT: When you were forming the band, were there any alternate band names you didn’t pick?

Marmalakes: “The Poogly Wooglies” was on the short list, but we figured that was too close to “Piggly Wiggly.” The early duo sets were billed as “Luigi” and then “A.M. Tealights.”

DT: Where is your favorite place to eat in Austin?

Marmalakes: Tom’s Tabooley, the Old School BBQ & Grill and Juan In A Million.

DT: What is your favorite website or blog?

Marmalakes: Daytrotter.com.

DT: What is a perfect day for you?

Marmalakes: Coffee, listen to John Aielli, rehearsal, Frisbee, silly stuff, Bananagrams, bike ride, coffee, show, listen to KVRX.

DT: What’s the best thing about Austin?

Marmalakes: Tex-Mex.

DT: What’s the worst thing about Austin?

Marmalakes: There are so many bands all playing so often that you could never get a chance to see as many as you’d like.

DT: Describe your perfect sandwich.

Marmalakes: “The Ainsworth” at Fricano’s Deli.

DT: What are you reading right now?

Max: “Principles of Biochemistry,” Fifth Edition.
Josh: “The Jason’s Deli Catering Guide.”
Chase: “The Voyage Out,” Virginia Woolf.

DT: The usual coffee shop order?

Marmalakes: Quack’s iced coffee.

DT: Best pair of shoes?

Marmalakes: Anything not too worn out to dance or run in.

DT: Your favorite breakfast cereal?

Josh: Raisin Bran.
Max: Honey Nut Cheerios.
Chase: Apple Jacks.

DT: Fill in the blanks: If I weren’t ___, I would be ___.
Max: If I wasn’t Chase, I would be Josh.
Josh: If I wasn’t Max, I would be Chase.
Chase: If I wasn’t Josh, I would be Max.

---

WHAT: Marmalakes with Alejandro Escovedo
WHERE: The Cactus Cafe
WHEN: Saturday, 8:30 p.m.
WEB: marmalakes.bandcamp.com
TICKETS: $5
- The Daily Texan


Hard work pays off, and sometimes it sells out the Cactus Cafe. Such was the case mid-July when a line of eager fans and friends made its way out the door and around the corner of the legendary venue in hopes of being admitted to Marmalakes' EP release party.

The Cactus hit capacity during the opening act, and throughout the evening, members of Marmalakes made their way up and down the line, apologizing for the unanticipated problem. Though no band wants to turn fans away, selling out a legendary venue is exactly the sort of problem you want to have at your release show.

Wonder Winds, the new 6-song EP from the Austin trio, has already turned some heads. Rather than a collection of songs, Wonder Winds plays as a cohesive work. It's intelligent folk-pop, accessible and delivered with refreshing honesty.

The album opens with “(A Scene Through) Cellophane,” a driving, metaphorical tale of “absurdly small” infantrymen abundant with airy harmonies and reverberating drums. “Vittoria,” the following track, is one of those songs that is so good it seems like it should have been written years ago, and by the end, it's stuck in your head. Both “Ode to Johnnie Martin” and “Conversation” emphasize the strength and maturity of Marmalakes’ songwriting. “Cast On” is a slow, pensive tune tied together with distant acoustic guitar, gentle voices, and a Dylan/Springsteen-esque harmonica solo. Wonder Winds concludes with the loud “Hands Alone in the House.”

From their impressive live performances, it’s obvious Chase Weinacht, Josh Halpern, and Max Colonna work tirelessly, successfully executing air-tight harmonies and flawless breakdowns and buildups. Instead of strutting on stage and asserting themselves above the audience, Weinacht and company wear their gratitude on their sleeves, profusely thanking their listeners and displaying love for their craft.

Take heed, aspiring musicians: This is where hard work and passion takes you. You’re going to root for Marmalakes.

Posted by Aaron Miller Mon Aug 2, 11:25am - Earache! Austin Music and Downloads Blog - AustinChronicle.com


Hard work pays off, and sometimes it sells out the Cactus Cafe. Such was the case mid-July when a line of eager fans and friends made its way out the door and around the corner of the legendary venue in hopes of being admitted to Marmalakes' EP release party.

The Cactus hit capacity during the opening act, and throughout the evening, members of Marmalakes made their way up and down the line, apologizing for the unanticipated problem. Though no band wants to turn fans away, selling out a legendary venue is exactly the sort of problem you want to have at your release show.

Wonder Winds, the new 6-song EP from the Austin trio, has already turned some heads. Rather than a collection of songs, Wonder Winds plays as a cohesive work. It's intelligent folk-pop, accessible and delivered with refreshing honesty.

The album opens with “(A Scene Through) Cellophane,” a driving, metaphorical tale of “absurdly small” infantrymen abundant with airy harmonies and reverberating drums. “Vittoria,” the following track, is one of those songs that is so good it seems like it should have been written years ago, and by the end, it's stuck in your head. Both “Ode to Johnnie Martin” and “Conversation” emphasize the strength and maturity of Marmalakes’ songwriting. “Cast On” is a slow, pensive tune tied together with distant acoustic guitar, gentle voices, and a Dylan/Springsteen-esque harmonica solo. Wonder Winds concludes with the loud “Hands Alone in the House.”

From their impressive live performances, it’s obvious Chase Weinacht, Josh Halpern, and Max Colonna work tirelessly, successfully executing air-tight harmonies and flawless breakdowns and buildups. Instead of strutting on stage and asserting themselves above the audience, Weinacht and company wear their gratitude on their sleeves, profusely thanking their listeners and displaying love for their craft.

Take heed, aspiring musicians: This is where hard work and passion takes you. You’re going to root for Marmalakes.

Posted by Aaron Miller Mon Aug 2, 11:25am - Earache! Austin Music and Downloads Blog - AustinChronicle.com


Austin’s Marmalakes sold-out their EP release show at the Cactus in August, despite the fact that it was just their debut release. But word is traveling fast for the local trio, and it’s backed by the strength of their exuberant live shows and that EP, Wonder Winds. Their folk-rock sound is fresh and fun, and they’re bringing it to the Mohawk this Saturday (Sept. 11) for a 6:30 set time at the Wild Frontier Fest. That doesn’t leave much time to memorize the twisting words of “Vittoria,” but it’s guaranteed the song will be stuck in your head after just one spin. Take a listen below.

–Art Levy - KUT 90.5 Texas Music Matters


Austin’s Marmalakes sold-out their EP release show at the Cactus in August, despite the fact that it was just their debut release. But word is traveling fast for the local trio, and it’s backed by the strength of their exuberant live shows and that EP, Wonder Winds. Their folk-rock sound is fresh and fun, and they’re bringing it to the Mohawk this Saturday (Sept. 11) for a 6:30 set time at the Wild Frontier Fest. That doesn’t leave much time to memorize the twisting words of “Vittoria,” but it’s guaranteed the song will be stuck in your head after just one spin. Take a listen below.

–Art Levy - KUT 90.5 Texas Music Matters


Discography

"Wells" Single -- self-released, March 14, 2013

"In Arnica" EP -- self-released, May 1, 2012

"Wait / White" 7-inch split w/ The Sour Notes -- No Play Music, February 7, 2012

"Even Clothed" EP -- self-released, November 15, 2011

"Wonder Winds" EP -- self-released, July 6, 2010

All releases are streaming at http://marmalakes.bandcamp.com.

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