Massive Scar Era
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Massive Scar Era

Cairo, Egypt | Established. Jan 01, 2005 | SELF

Cairo, Egypt | SELF
Established on Jan, 2005
Band Metal Hardcore

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When Alexandria native Sherine Amr started an all-girl metal band back in 2005, she was lauded as a progressive feminist fighting against oppression in the local metal scene and in wider Egyptian society. The truth was more prosaic. “It wasn’t like that at all,” says Amr, on the phone from Cairo where both she and violinist Nancy Mounir now reside. “I had a major problem with my mother. She said I could never be locked in a room with guys. So I had to get my girlfriends together and persuade them to play. Our original drummer wasn’t a drummer at all, I just asked her to try it so we could jam. She wanted to sing really. I had another friend who played guitar and I managed to convince her to play bass. That was the only way I could convince my mom to let me play.”

Amr got into metal 10 years ago at the age of 16 when she borrowed a friend’s Metallica tape. Although she’d only just started playing the guitar, Amr quickly began writing her own songs (“I learned four chords – my songs aren’t hard at all”) and decided to put a band together. She named it Massive Scar Era, which (kind of) abbreviates to Mascara – as a reminder of the band’s feminine core. Only Amr and Mounir remain from the original line-up. They met at a jazz concert, where they’d both gone to watch friends who were playing. “She was sat next to me and she had her violin with her,” says Amr. “She was so enthusiastic and so interactive with the music, it was cute. I went up and asked her if she was into metal. She said, ‘What?’ I’m like, ‘Metal.’ ‘What’s that?’ She was a disaster. She didn’t know anything. But I asked her if she wanted to jam with me anyway.

“At first, she wasn’t really into the music, she didn’t understand it. But she found stuff she fell in love with and now she’s a metalhead.”

Despite their inexperience (even now, they’ve only released two EPs), the band grabbed attention, although a lot of that, initially, was probably due to the fact that an all-female Arab metal band was a good hook. Still, the ability to come up with catchy melodies, and Amr’s blend of sweetly sung vocals coupled with an impressive metal growl helped.

The band were the first metallers to play at Alexandria’s famous library, and they began to get fans from overseas. Which is how guys finally came to join; in 2009, Massive Scar Era were booked to play a festival in Sweden “and our drummer couldn’t arrange a visa.” Now Maged Faltas plays drums and Karim Mounir plays bass. “My mom started to realize that not all guys were evil and they weren’t going to rape us or anything,” Amr says.

There are still plenty of challenges, though. They hardly ever get to play in their home country, for one. “You can’t,” Amr says. “They banned metal. We used to do small, underground gigs, but we stopped. The minute the police find out, they come and ask for papers and everything… It’s too much hassle. It’s really bad, you know? This is where I grew up. And we can’t play here.”

Instead, they’re looking overseas. They’re booked to play the Elements of Rock festival in Switzerland in March (visas permitting) and both Amr and Nancy Mounir are keen to leave Egypt in order to pursue their dream. “We want to go to the States,” says Amr. “We’d have better opportunities. And to be honest, I don’t like living in Egypt much. It’s a very judgmental society.” - Rolling Stone Middle East


Sherine Amr, lead vocalist/guitarist of Egypt’s Massive Scar Era, shed light on everything from revolution songs to street rap when we spoke to her in the midst of the Arab Spring this May. Now we get to learn more about Amr’s own music from the post-hardcore band’s newly-released video for their song, “Pray.” Off the band’s latest EP Comes Around You, the video plays up their DIY ethics and punk ideology with minimal light, silhouettes and raw shots of the quartet rocking out.

The band serves as an influential platform for Egyptian youth, and accordingly their lyrics are simple yet poignant: “You’re pushing me/To be someone I hate to see.” With Amr on vocals and guitar and Nancy Mourir as violinist, Massive Scar Era adds a femininity to an otherwise male-dominated genre, flawlessly switching from cathartic screams to melodic croons from both Amr and the violin. - MTV


It’s a Sunday night at El Sawy Culture Wheel—a good place to catch a heavy metal show in Cairo—and the twenty-seven-year-old Sherine Amr is bellowing the lyrics to “The World Is Rising,” a tense, churning song of war and triumph. Moshing is common at El Sawy gigs, but tonight the crowd watches politely, nodding so slightly that only a fellow metalhead might recognize the gesture as headbanging. This happens every time the band plays in Egypt, Amr says. It’s as though listeners can’t quite grasp that a woman’s voice could be so harsh.

Amr’s heavy-metal love story is, at least on the surface, textbook: when she was sixteen, someone loaned her a Metallica CD and she never looked back. But this was in Egypt, in 2001, four years after security forces raided the homes of nearly a hundred metalheads, arresting them on spurious occult charges. Most were released within a fortnight, but the chilling effect on Egypt’s metal scene lasted nearly a decade. Western heavy metal stormed the Middle East in the late nineteen-eighties and early nineteen-nineties, taking over the airwaves just as it did in America and Europe. But in heavily Islamic nations like Lebanon, Morocco, and Egypt, the genre’s popularity was followed by crackdowns, arrests, and government bans, leaving nascent heavy-metal communities in shreds.

Amr has a warm, kind face framed by long, curly brown hair; it would be obvious to say she doesn’t look like a hardcore metalhead. Nevertheless, she’s one of many musicians in the region working to rebuild metal’s strength. Like other girls, she began studying music early on, learning to sing at age six. But when she picked up a guitar at nineteen, it was to play metal. At the time, she was struggling with career plans after dropping out of law school; her family expected she would marry and start a family. Hoping to discourage her new hobby, Amr’s mother forbade her to play music with men, prompting the teen to form Egypt’s first all-female heavy-metal band, Massive Scar Era. She recruited a classically trained violinist, Nancy Mounir, early on, establishing the band’s signature mix of crushing riffs and Arabian-inflected melodies.

As Egypt’s metal scene recovered, Massive Scar Era built a following in seaside Alexandria. And tensions at home increased for Amr. “My older sister thought that I’m turning into a satanist and even [told] my mom to get a sheikh to read the Koran for me, to make sure that if I’m haunted by the devil, it will go away,” she says, punctuating the statement with a laugh. Her family’s attitude changed in 2010, when the director Ahmed Abdalla asked the band to be in “Microphone,” his film exploring Alexandria’s underground scene. Amr was shocked by the invitation, but eager to tell the band’s story—and disprove local rumors that Massive Scar Era was only popular because it was an all-women band. Again, Amr’s mom protested, prompting Abdalla to blur the band’s scenes. But when Amr’s family saw “Microphone,” “They understood what kind of pressure they put on me for playing the music I like,” she says. “That movie was a turning point in my life.” They’ve been supportive ever since.

Women heavy-metal musicians are increasingly common in the West, whereas in the Middle East and North Africa, you can typically count a country’s female metal performers on one hand—but that’s changing. As the region’s young women fight for equal political footing, they’re also cropping up in bands that play extreme music. As they’re raising their voices, they’re also finding acceptance—and friction—in unexpected places. “Metal is loud, and when people judge from the outside, one might perceive it as motivation or encouragement towards aggression, violence, anger, or loss of personal faith,” says Heidi Habib, founder of Dubai’s one-woman heavy-metal outfit, Hera, who sports long, dark hair, dramatic makeup, and tattoos. “For myself, it’s just a plea to be heard.”

Although many of these women’s families dug in their heels at the idea of their daughters joining the metal fray, they also arguably paved the way. Amr was raised in a religious but relatively liberal household, where she was encouraged to sing and play piano. Hadeel Ladki, the singer for Lebanon’s Testrogen, grew up in a similarly liberal Muslim household in Kuwait, where her parents urged her to learn the piano. Ladki’s father frowned on her budding interest in singing until he saw that it wasn’t interfering with her academics. Ladki, who wears a ponytail and little makeup during gigs, says metal offered her a respite from Kuwait’s “closed and uptight” culture, and allowed her to set herself apart from other Kuwaiti girls, who “tend to be very shallow… most of them wear the hijab, which is a sign of them choosing the religious path, but you can tell by the way they talk that they were forced into it.”

Even non-religious women who join the region’s metal bands can face serious challenges. In Iran, home to the metal band Frosted Leaves, i - The New Yorker


It’s a Sunday night at El Sawy Culture Wheel—a good place to catch a heavy metal show in Cairo—and the twenty-seven-year-old Sherine Amr is bellowing the lyrics to “The World Is Rising,” a tense, churning song of war and triumph. Moshing is common at El Sawy gigs, but tonight the crowd watches politely, nodding so slightly that only a fellow metalhead might recognize the gesture as headbanging. This happens every time the band plays in Egypt, Amr says. It’s as though listeners can’t quite grasp that a woman’s voice could be so harsh.

Amr’s heavy-metal love story is, at least on the surface, textbook: when she was sixteen, someone loaned her a Metallica CD and she never looked back. But this was in Egypt, in 2001, four years after security forces raided the homes of nearly a hundred metalheads, arresting them on spurious occult charges. Most were released within a fortnight, but the chilling effect on Egypt’s metal scene lasted nearly a decade. Western heavy metal stormed the Middle East in the late nineteen-eighties and early nineteen-nineties, taking over the airwaves just as it did in America and Europe. But in heavily Islamic nations like Lebanon, Morocco, and Egypt, the genre’s popularity was followed by crackdowns, arrests, and government bans, leaving nascent heavy-metal communities in shreds.

Amr has a warm, kind face framed by long, curly brown hair; it would be obvious to say she doesn’t look like a hardcore metalhead. Nevertheless, she’s one of many musicians in the region working to rebuild metal’s strength. Like other girls, she began studying music early on, learning to sing at age six. But when she picked up a guitar at nineteen, it was to play metal. At the time, she was struggling with career plans after dropping out of law school; her family expected she would marry and start a family. Hoping to discourage her new hobby, Amr’s mother forbade her to play music with men, prompting the teen to form Egypt’s first all-female heavy-metal band, Massive Scar Era. She recruited a classically trained violinist, Nancy Mounir, early on, establishing the band’s signature mix of crushing riffs and Arabian-inflected melodies.

As Egypt’s metal scene recovered, Massive Scar Era built a following in seaside Alexandria. And tensions at home increased for Amr. “My older sister thought that I’m turning into a satanist and even [told] my mom to get a sheikh to read the Koran for me, to make sure that if I’m haunted by the devil, it will go away,” she says, punctuating the statement with a laugh. Her family’s attitude changed in 2010, when the director Ahmed Abdalla asked the band to be in “Microphone,” his film exploring Alexandria’s underground scene. Amr was shocked by the invitation, but eager to tell the band’s story—and disprove local rumors that Massive Scar Era was only popular because it was an all-women band. Again, Amr’s mom protested, prompting Abdalla to blur the band’s scenes. But when Amr’s family saw “Microphone,” “They understood what kind of pressure they put on me for playing the music I like,” she says. “That movie was a turning point in my life.” They’ve been supportive ever since.

Women heavy-metal musicians are increasingly common in the West, whereas in the Middle East and North Africa, you can typically count a country’s female metal performers on one hand—but that’s changing. As the region’s young women fight for equal political footing, they’re also cropping up in bands that play extreme music. As they’re raising their voices, they’re also finding acceptance—and friction—in unexpected places. “Metal is loud, and when people judge from the outside, one might perceive it as motivation or encouragement towards aggression, violence, anger, or loss of personal faith,” says Heidi Habib, founder of Dubai’s one-woman heavy-metal outfit, Hera, who sports long, dark hair, dramatic makeup, and tattoos. “For myself, it’s just a plea to be heard.”

Although many of these women’s families dug in their heels at the idea of their daughters joining the metal fray, they also arguably paved the way. Amr was raised in a religious but relatively liberal household, where she was encouraged to sing and play piano. Hadeel Ladki, the singer for Lebanon’s Testrogen, grew up in a similarly liberal Muslim household in Kuwait, where her parents urged her to learn the piano. Ladki’s father frowned on her budding interest in singing until he saw that it wasn’t interfering with her academics. Ladki, who wears a ponytail and little makeup during gigs, says metal offered her a respite from Kuwait’s “closed and uptight” culture, and allowed her to set herself apart from other Kuwaiti girls, who “tend to be very shallow… most of them wear the hijab, which is a sign of them choosing the religious path, but you can tell by the way they talk that they were forced into it.”

Even non-religious women who join the region’s metal bands can face serious challenges. In Iran, home to the metal band Frosted Leaves, i - The New Yorker


(Alexandria, Egypt)

* ????? ??? (Sherine Amr) - ???????????? & ??????? ????? / ?????? Sherin EMR (Sherine Amr) - Classic & growling vocals / guitar
* ????? ????? (Nancy mounir) - ??????? / ???-????? / ??????????? Mounir Nancy (Nancy mounir) - violin / backing vocals / Sound Technician
* ????? ????? (Rowan Karem) - ?????? Kerim Rowan (Rowan Karem) - Gatare
* ???? ??????? (Sarah el Kasrawy) - ???-?????? Sarah Karsava (Sarah el Kasrawy) - bass guitar
* ??? ????? (Ola Ayman) - ???????? Eyman Ola (Ola Ayman) - drums

Massive Scar Era (Mascara)

???????????? ????? ???????, ???????????, ????? ? ????????. Unique blend of metal, electronics, jazz and classics.
?? ??????? ?????? ??????, ??????, ??? ??? - ????? ????????? ?????????? ?????-??????, ??????? ?????????? «Ring Of Fire» ( ????. : ??????????-????? ?????? ?? ????? ?????, ??????? ?????? ? ???? ??????????)! Do not be sinning against the truth, saying that it is - a real Egyptian super-project, the female equivalent of «Ring Of Fire» (Note: Neoclassic metal band from Mark Bolza, Vitaly Cuprite and Tony McAlpine)!

????????? ????? ???????????????? ?????????, «Massive Scar Era» ?????????? ??????????? ????????????? ??????????? ?????, ????????????? ???????????????? ??????????. Established five girls Alexandria, «Massive Scar Era» offers fans a musical versatility dish, flavored with neoclassical elements. ???????? ?? ???????? ?????????????? ????????????, ???????? ????????? ?????????? ???????? ????????????? ??? ???????, ??? ? ?????????? ??????, ???????????? ?????? ?????? ? ???????, ? ????? ???????? ????? ?????????. Despite orgomnoe stylistic diversity, the hallmark of the collective is the use of both pure and skrimyaschego vocals, original installment flute and violin, as well as a rich sound of keyboards.

???????? - ??? ????? ??????? ?????? ? ????? ???????. Title - under a complex music and concise texts. ??????????? ??????????? ????????????, ????????? ? ????? «Mascara», ????? ?????????, ??? "??? ???????? ?????". Scathing deciphering abbreviations, inscribed in the word «Mascara», can be translated as "the era of mass slaughter.

?????? ??????? ??????? ??????? (????? ??? ???????????? «Nail polish») ????????? 1 ??????? 2005 ???? ? ??????????????? ??????????. The first concert of the trial team (then known as «Nail polish») held on August 1, 2005 at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina. ?? ?????? ????? ???????, ???????? ??????? ? ?????????????? ?????????? ?????. He was very successful in adopting the girls justice chosen course. ????????? ?????? ??????? ???? ? ?????? ?? ??????? ???????, ??????? ??????? ? ??????????? ????????????? ?? ?????? ? ??? ??????? ???????. Participants are familiar with each other on past teams, so the transition to making music together does not cause them any problems.

?????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ???????. The project is very quickly picked up steam. ????? ?????????? ?????? - ??? ?????? ? ???? ???????????? ???????. Among the achievements of the group - two personal and one collective award. ? ????????????? ??????????? ???????? 2006-?? ????, ?????????? ??????????????? ???????????, ?????? ????? ????? ?????????? ?????? ????? ??? (Sherine Amr), ? ????? ????????? - ????? ????? (Nancy Mounir), ?????? ????? ? ????????? ??????. The international music competition 2006-year, organized by the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, the first place among the singers took Sherin EMR (Sherine Amr), and among the violinists - Mounir Nancy (Nancy Mounir), first place in the team event.

??? ????? ???????? ?????????, «Massive Scar Era» ???????? ????? ?????? ????????? ? ???????, ????????? ??????? ?? ????????? ??? ??????????????????, ??? ? ?????????????????? ???????. After giving a series of successful concerts, «Massive Scar Era» engaged the closest relations with the press, constantly flashing on the pages of both specialist and general information editions.
???, ??? ???????? ? 2007-? ???? ? ???????? «The Daily Star Egypt»: Here's what was written in 2007, the year in the journal «The Daily Star Egypt»:

«... «... ?? ?????? ??? ??? ? ???????? ??????? ???????????. We're playing for a year and have achieved good results. ????? ?????? ????? ???? ?? ???????? ? ?????? ????? ????? ???????. Almost every month we give to the concert and brought a whole army of fans. - ???????????? ?????????? ?????.» - Says guitarist Sherin. »

?? ????? ????????? ????????????? 22 ??????? ?????????? ?????????? ??? ?? ????? ??????????? ?????? «Zamalek's El Sawy», ??????? ????????? ???????? ???????? ???? ?????????. ????? ??????????? ? ???????????? ???????, «Mascara» ????????????? ?? ??????? ??????????. Her words were fully confirmed on Feb. 22 show an unusually intense in the arena of cultural center «Zamalek's El Sawy», which has attracted the attention of viewers of all ages. Begin by acoustic numbers, «Mascara» switch on heavy tracks. ????? ?????? ???????? ????? ? ???????? ????? 'El Shams', ???????? ?????????? ???????? ?? ????? ???? ? ?????, ????? ???????? - http://www.guitaristka.ru/zapad-heroine.shtml


This may be one of the most exotic bands that will ever enter a stage during Sweden Rock Festival. Mascara is the first female hard rock band ever to come from Egypt, and they will now make their first appearance in Europe. Their music is a fusion of the West's heavy metal and the East's lovely melodies, where distorted guitars meets beautiful violins. The band won three prices during the 2006 International Music Competition. - http://indysc7.multiply.com/journal/item/270/Sweden_Rock_Fest.....Rocks


1. Why did you choose a name like „Massive Scar Era“, that is strongly connected to the word „Mascara“?



We wanted a name that describes what sort of time we're living in and at the same time shows that we're girls :) .



2. On the photo you seem to be really young. What are you doing in your „normal lifes“? What does it mean for you, to play in a Melodic Metal Band?



We're currently 4 members :



Sherine (which is me :), guitarist/vocalist): I'm a college student

in my last term (i study business management) and i work in a DSL company as a customer service in the evening.



Nancy (the violinist): She is a student in Tourism college and she works for a Cable company at the evening.



Perry (the bassist): She is currently doing editing for movies and study more on her own film editing and directing.



Hadeel (the drummer): She is the youngest, she is still in school, second year in the IGCSE.



3. I red on your profile, that you won some music-prices in an international contest. On what do you remember, when you think back on this competition?



It was the biggest thing that happened to us, because it gave us a push to create and continue what we were doing. In this competition were big bands from Egypt and wining a price among them meant the world for us.



4. How is the daily work in your band? How do you create new songs?



We jam twice a week or once... whenever we have days off. Sometimes we jam and a song comes up from the improvisation and sometimes i could be sitting in my room, playing the guitar influenced by a certain idea or mood and VOILA!! a song is born :) .



5. Where do you get your ideas for the creative process from? What are your main influences?



It's mainly when we get into a certain emotional state of mind. Anything that touches our feelings pushes us to create and express.



6. What are your lyrics about? Do you sing only in english or also in arabic?



We have lyrics about wars, about the influence of western civilization on our country. About how we feel as girls. About us :) .



7. I remember just one other arabic Metal-Band, were all the members were woman. They were from Morocco and there name was „Mystic Moods“ (R.I.P.). It is also really rare, that woman play in bands together with men. What do you think about the situation for woman in arabic Alternative/ Metal-bands? Does other parts in these music-scenes exist, where women are more involved?



Actually we're the only Egyptian girls band and i dont know why!!!!!

I dont really advice that girls play with guys in bands in our community. From where i see it, we're not a very open minded community and guys really take advantage of girls ... to create music the member should be realllly involved with each other ... got this bond to create something unique, expressive and tight. I dont think that in our community such bonds could be created without crossing the limits of "band mates" and if two members got feeling for each other and then they broke up ... the whole band will be influenced ... and the process of making music by then would‘nt be easy at all. This is my opinion :) .



Metal for some reason is to be considered as "manly" music and i also dont know why. I think that music does‘nt have a sex genre and it was a little hard for us to prove, that we can give a unique harsh output.



8. How does the male side of your audience react on you?



Musicians: most of them don‘t really support us ... they think for some reason that we have got fans just for the fact that we're girls. Audiences who are into hardcore and metalcore enjoy our music. I think :) .



9. Do you have any chance to do your music professional?



We're trying to study more music and to attend music workshops (unlike many other bands). We 're trying to learn to be professional in every possible way. Sometimes we travel to other cities for workshops and believe me, it's not easy at all to convince the parents.



10. What future do you dream of?



Our dreams are to play in other countries... in other festivals and tour around the world, sharing our music and beliefs with other cultures.



Interview done by Gunter Meinhardt



www.myspace.com/massivescarera - http://www.regiomusik.de/alternative/interviews/nachgefragt-interview-with-massive-scar-era-egyptian


The Middle East is a hotbed for many things -- conflict of the political and religious kind tends to dominate the news -- but culturally, the area is more alive and fearless than ever, especially when it comes to music.

From indie rock to metal to EDM, artists are melding traditional sounds (ethnic music in Arab and Israeli culture are more alike than different) with pop song structures and offering a cultural step forward. Several of these acts -- from Tel-Aviv band SKYROADS to Egyptian metal outfit Massive Scar Era to the nine-piece collective Diwan Saz of Galilee -- will be hitting Austin this week for South By Southwest.

Skyroads

On Skyroads' double A-side single "1, 2 Steps," the Tel Aviv five-piece blends a sound that evokes Architecture in Helsinki's melodic brand of indie-electro pop and The Pains of Being Pure At Heart's plaintive vocals. The two-year-old band's synths and frenetic, dancefloor-ready beats will satisfy purists and dance obsessives.



March 17: The Iron Bear
March 18: Culture Collide's Showcase at The Container Bar
March 18: OY VEY! SXSW Showcase at Javelina Bar

Massive Scar Era

The description as an "Egyptian metal band" hits hard, but the fact that this group is an all-female outfit from the ancient seaside city of Alexandria only intensifies their presence. Massive Scar Era, shortened as "Mascara," are like a punch in the mouth -- their music starts loud and rarely lets down the volume. Since arriving on the scene in 2005, they've made a few changes by adding a male percussionist, touring the world and morphing from metal-core to folk metal. They riff righteously and sound utterly vindictive thanks to frontwoman Sherine Amr, whose signature scream feels like coarse grains of salt stinging with each line. After touring America briefly in 2011 and making their SXSW debut two years later, they return to Austin with an arsenal of three EPs.



March 21: 720 Club Patio

Diwan Saz - סאזדיוואן- ديوان ساز

Crisscrossing through multiple musical genres is one thing, fusing together religions is another, but the members of Diwan Saz share one goal: to use music as a tool to promote peace. The name suits their purpose: 'Diwan' is a place where people from different religions and cultures come together, and 'Saz' is a group of musical instruments. Frontman Yohai Barak leads the multitalented group of Israeli artists, who have performed across Israel, Europe, India, the U.S. and Canada. With a Turkish kanun-player, Iranian flutist, and a Rabbi vocalist in the mix, Diwan Saz's musical experimentation, penetrating lyrical insight (via five languages) and overall presence make the group a powerful and important ambassador for Middle Eastern music today. - Billboard Magazine


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Egyptian melodic post hardcore band, based in Vancouver BC.

Started as an all girls band in 2005 due to families' restrictions and by the time the members grew up, in 2009, the band managed to change the rules for the favor of the music ...

throughout the past years, the band pleased to open for /share stage/share festival with amazing big bands like Dream Theater , inflames , ZZ TOP , HEAVEN AND HELL , IMMORTAL , THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA, MOTOR HEAD , AUGUST BURNS RED, ONWARD TO OLYMPAS , FOR TODAY, THE CHARIOT

biggest international performances :
Sweden Rock 2009
Cornerstone festival ( USA ) 2010
Cornerstone Festival 2011
LA's famous " Whiskey A GO GO " 2011
" Sorry We Don't Speak the Language" summer tour in Poland, Czech Republic and Germany 2012
SXSW 2013, USA
Inferno Metal Festival -  Norway 2014
Total Metal Festival - Italy 2014

SXSW 2015, USA

Biggest press releases :
Rolling Stone Magazine ( India )
Time Magazine 2010
"Dagens Nyheter", sweden 2012
" The New Yorker", 2013

Biggest Theater appearance :
the Dubai Film (2010) Festival's best editor award movie " Microphone "

Releases:
Unfamiliar Territory EP 2010
Precautionary measures Ep 2011
Comes Around You EP 2012

Band Members