MELIA
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MELIA

Rochester, New York, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2010 | SELF

Rochester, New York, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2010
Band Rock Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Sep
12
MELIA @ Evening Star Concert Hall

Niagara Falls, NY

Niagara Falls, NY

Aug
12
MELIA @ The Empire Concert Club & Bar

Akron, OH

Akron, OH

Jul
08
MELIA @ Women's Right To Rock Festival

Seneca Falls, NY

Seneca Falls, NY

Jun
17
MELIA @ The House of Guitars Inc

Rochester, NY

Rochester, NY

May
21
MELIA @ Jersey Shore Festival

Seaside Heights, NJ

Seaside Heights, NJ

May
21
MELIA @ Jersey Shore Festival

Seaside Heights, NJ

Seaside Heights, NJ

May
18
MELIA @ Bitter End

New York, NY

New York, NY

May
16
MELIA @ The Montage Music Hall

Rochester, NY

Rochester, NY

Sep
23
MELIA @ Water Street Music Hall

Rochester, New York, USA

Rochester, New York, USA

Jul
08
MELIA @ Dubland Underground

Rochester, New York, USA

Rochester, New York, USA

May
26
MELIA @ WBNY 91.3

Buffalo, New York, USA

Buffalo, New York, USA

May
14
MELIA @ The Jukebox

Spencerport, New York, USA

Spencerport, New York, USA

May
01
MELIA @ California Brew Haus

Rochester, New York, USA

Rochester, New York, USA

Apr
16
MELIA @ Montage Music Hall

None, New York, USA

None, New York, USA

Mar
30
MELIA @ The Bug Jar

Rochester, New York, USA

Rochester, New York, USA

Feb
04
MELIA @ Montage Music Hall

None, New York, USA

None, New York, USA

Feb
03
MELIA @ Lovin' Cup

Rochester, New York, USA

Rochester, New York, USA

Dec
31
MELIA @ A-Pub Live

Rochester, New York, USA

Rochester, New York, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


While some artists set out purposefully to sell lots of records, for others, popularity is an added bonus. The latter seek self-respect not fans; they follow hearts not trends. One suspects that Rochester native Melia Maccarone is such an artist, happy to rock out in her own favoured genre, despite the snobbery that can often surround it. Melia (vocals, guitar) and her band – Tim Latus (bass) and Dominic Ciaccia (drums) – play alternative rock music; or pop-rock, if you’re willing to blank out the negative connotations of such a term.


It’s true that fans of Kelly Clarkson and Ana Johnsson’s rockier moments will find much to like about Melia, the big chorus setups making such comparisons unavoidable. It would be highly inaccurate to suggest there wasn’t a great deal more to Melia however, and her determination to forge out a career in music is as good a place as any to start explaining why. Having wanted to learn guitar at fourteen, it wasn’t until two years later that she was allowed to start learning her craft, by which time most would have lost their passion and moved onto something else.

Not Melia however, and merely a further three years on, she is already a mightily impressive guitarist. Daily eight hour practices have surely helped, but there is also a natural intelligence to each aspect of her music; her guitar playing no exception. The flourishes are superb but modest in duration, slotting nicely into the structure of a song rather than casting a boastful shadow over the rest of proceedings. They’re allowed to do so by some impressive songwriting. It may not be revolutionary, but it really doesn’t need to be. Melia seemingly understands the intricacies of song construction, not just what works but also why, she doesn’t just produce big stand-out choruses, she capably builds around them. When showing off her softer side, her sound becomes very much like the now split British rock group, Che, which those who have heard ‘Try This’ will recognise as a very good thing indeed.

No matter how impressive and well implemented the guitar playing, nor how competent the songwriting, the vocals could make or break Melia as a front-woman. Fortunately, she succeeds in this respect too, sounding a little like the aforementioned Johnsson and Clarkson but possessing an intense rawness that is lacking in both, the occasional snarl creeping into her authoritative, personal delivery.

Melia is a lead-guitarist and vocalist, but most importantly of all, she is a genuine artist, able to combine her individual talents by writing great songs. I don’t doubt that some will dismiss her on the basis that her take on rock is catchy and accessible, but hopefully she will stick to her guns and just produce the music that feels right to her. Those prepared to give Melia a chance could very well be hearing a rock-star in the making.

Watch out for Melia’s debut EP, tentatively scheduled for a June/July release.

SoundSense Online’s recommended starting point – Checking Out

Alternative Selection – Just A Bride

- Soundsense Online


Melia Maccarone always liked to sing, but for a long time, "I was afraid to do it in front of people," says the 18-year-old Gates resident. And even though she started playing guitar in the 11th grade, she didn't play in public.

But after graduating from Spencerport High School in 2009, she became serious about pursuing music. "My determination finally broke the fear, and I advanced quickly because I wanted to make up for lost time," says Maccarone, who has since performed her alternative rock set at several local bars.

Her next gig is on Friday, April 30, at Damian's Pub on Marshall Street at Monroe Avenue, where she'll play a mix of covers and original tunes. For more, go to www.myspace.com/meliamac or http://facebook.com/melia rocks

What are you listening to now? Joan Jett's "(I'm Gonna) Run Away" from the album I Love Rock N' Roll. I've always liked her, but when I saw The Runaways, it totally got me in the mood to listen to her stuff.

Top 5 CDs ever?
1. Nevermind, by Nirvana
2. Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge, by My Chemical Romance
3. Tragic Kingdom, by No Doubt
4. Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, by Smashing Pumpkins
5. Dookie, by Green Day

What's the best show on TV? Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew. It's very raw and real. It shows people what drugs can do to you. It's not like one of those dumb love reality shows that have no meaning.

What's the last movie you saw? The Runaways. I saw it three times (and) it was great, I think because I can relate to being that "female rock chick."

Top 5 movies ever?
1. The Runaways
2. Forrest Gump
3. Tommy Boy
4. Girl, Interrupted
5. The Mothman Prophecies

- Insider



(Credit: Jeff Gerew) New shows, hot tickets
Elton John is coming to Blue Cross Arena in April
.Melia Maccarone was a bit of an outcast in high school. While most of the other girls were into gossip, boys and pop music, Maccarone wanted to rock like the guys in her favorite bands — Nirvana, Soundgarden and Green Day.

"I never really related to anybody my own age, and I definitely didn't feel like I fit in a lot (in high school)," says Maccarone, now 19, during a recent phone interview.

She was 14 when she decided she wanted to play guitar. Her inspiration: seeing Green Day in concert — especially after the band pulled an audience member onstage to play guitar during a song. So she went to work on her parents, trying to persuade them to let her take lessons. Two years later they agreed, and before long she was practicing 10 hours a day.

She vowed to her mother, who had been with her at the Green Day show, "The next time they come to town, I'm gonna be the one pulled onstage." Several years later — in 2009, Maccarone went to see Green Day play in Albany. Only this time she brought a sign reading "Pick a girl to play guitar" — which she held up from her fourth-row seat — and they did.

The coolest part about getting to sit in on "Jesus of Suburbia," says the Spencerport resident, was being told by Billie Joe Armstrong that she "was one of the best guitar players they'd had onstage, and that's when I freaked out for a minute.

"He's, like, my idol, the reason I started playing, so it was cool ... definitely the best experience of my life." Maccarone (who plays The Montage Music Hall on Friday, Feb. 4) continues to gain confidence as a musician and songwriter. Another performance that helped her come into her own happened last October at Hollywood's legendary Viper Room.

"I have never been more stoked for a show," she says. But because Maccarone isn't old enough to drink, she was kicked out of the club between sound check and show time. "It was freezing outside, but I had to just wait there until I went onstage. And I did jumping jacks before I went on because I was so nervous, anxious and excited."

Maccarone says she "flips a switch" when she walks onstage now and becomes "a different person." And she has learned that the songwriting process can be very therapeutic when it centers on real-life experiences and emotions.

That's not to say that stepping into the spotlight as a female lead guitarist is always easy for her. "A lot of people don't believe I can play until they see me, and I think that's completely different from when a man says he can play — everyone just believes him," she says. "A lot of times I really have to prove myself to people, and I think that's just because there's not a lot of female lead guitarists, which is another reason I wanted to do lead. It bugged me that a lot of girls were always playing bass."

Maccarone will have the chance to prove herself again on an upcoming seven-song EP (as yet untitled), which should be out in the spring. The recording will include the three songs from Melia, her debut EP released last year, and four new singles, which she's working on with drummer Dominic Ciaccia, 26, and bassist Tim Latus, 23, at Red Booth Recording in Pittsford.

The songs' distorted guitars and angst-filled lyrics reflect the influence of Maccarone's favorite '90s grunge bands. Grinding guitar solos are never far behind, and the sound is aggressive. "Everything is very in-your-face," as Maccarone puts it.

Fans should get to hear some of the new tunes at the Montage show, along with classic grunge and neo-punk covers. Maccarone's excited about the show, having spent so much time in the studio recently. But no matter where she's playing, she's having a blast.

"Nothing's better than following your dreams," she says.

- Insider



(Credit: Jeff Gerew) New shows, hot tickets
Elton John is coming to Blue Cross Arena in April
.Melia Maccarone was a bit of an outcast in high school. While most of the other girls were into gossip, boys and pop music, Maccarone wanted to rock like the guys in her favorite bands — Nirvana, Soundgarden and Green Day.

"I never really related to anybody my own age, and I definitely didn't feel like I fit in a lot (in high school)," says Maccarone, now 19, during a recent phone interview.

She was 14 when she decided she wanted to play guitar. Her inspiration: seeing Green Day in concert — especially after the band pulled an audience member onstage to play guitar during a song. So she went to work on her parents, trying to persuade them to let her take lessons. Two years later they agreed, and before long she was practicing 10 hours a day.

She vowed to her mother, who had been with her at the Green Day show, "The next time they come to town, I'm gonna be the one pulled onstage." Several years later — in 2009, Maccarone went to see Green Day play in Albany. Only this time she brought a sign reading "Pick a girl to play guitar" — which she held up from her fourth-row seat — and they did.

The coolest part about getting to sit in on "Jesus of Suburbia," says the Spencerport resident, was being told by Billie Joe Armstrong that she "was one of the best guitar players they'd had onstage, and that's when I freaked out for a minute.

"He's, like, my idol, the reason I started playing, so it was cool ... definitely the best experience of my life." Maccarone (who plays The Montage Music Hall on Friday, Feb. 4) continues to gain confidence as a musician and songwriter. Another performance that helped her come into her own happened last October at Hollywood's legendary Viper Room.

"I have never been more stoked for a show," she says. But because Maccarone isn't old enough to drink, she was kicked out of the club between sound check and show time. "It was freezing outside, but I had to just wait there until I went onstage. And I did jumping jacks before I went on because I was so nervous, anxious and excited."

Maccarone says she "flips a switch" when she walks onstage now and becomes "a different person." And she has learned that the songwriting process can be very therapeutic when it centers on real-life experiences and emotions.

That's not to say that stepping into the spotlight as a female lead guitarist is always easy for her. "A lot of people don't believe I can play until they see me, and I think that's completely different from when a man says he can play — everyone just believes him," she says. "A lot of times I really have to prove myself to people, and I think that's just because there's not a lot of female lead guitarists, which is another reason I wanted to do lead. It bugged me that a lot of girls were always playing bass."

Maccarone will have the chance to prove herself again on an upcoming seven-song EP (as yet untitled), which should be out in the spring. The recording will include the three songs from Melia, her debut EP released last year, and four new singles, which she's working on with drummer Dominic Ciaccia, 26, and bassist Tim Latus, 23, at Red Booth Recording in Pittsford.

The songs' distorted guitars and angst-filled lyrics reflect the influence of Maccarone's favorite '90s grunge bands. Grinding guitar solos are never far behind, and the sound is aggressive. "Everything is very in-your-face," as Maccarone puts it.

Fans should get to hear some of the new tunes at the Montage show, along with classic grunge and neo-punk covers. Maccarone's excited about the show, having spent so much time in the studio recently. But no matter where she's playing, she's having a blast.

"Nothing's better than following your dreams," she says.

- Insider


About five years back, while most tweens were starting to scream their heads off for Hannah Montana, a young Melia Maccarone was screaming her own off at a Green Day show. During its "American Idiot" tour the band was known for pulling kids up on stage to play - for better or for worse - with the band. Maccarone saw the light.

"I remember he [Billie Joe Armstrong] pulled a kid up on stage," Maccarone says. "And that was one of the first times I was like, ‘Mom I want to play guitar.' She was like, 'Yeah, yeah' - she kind of blew it off. And I said, ‘Next time I go see them I'm going to be on stage with them, watch.'"

Maccarone and her mom caught the band again last year in Albany, where she held up a sign that said "Pick a girl." Armstrong pulled her up and she played his guitar for the entirety of the tune "Jesus Of Suburbia," which she had only just learned the night before. Armstrong told the crowd that Maccarone was the best guitar player they had ever brought up on stage. Maccarone was so excited she took a running leap off the catwalk into the crowd.

"It was the worst stage dive ever," she says. "I literally went feet first. There was so much space between the edge of the stage and the crowd..."

Now 19 years old, this Rochester musician is an incredible guitar player, despite the fact she's only been at it for three years. After the initial Green Day epiphany, mom and dad still made her wait two more years before letting her take up the instrument, just to be sure.

"I think that's what made me so motivated," she says. "I think I was just so motivated to make up for lost time. I worked at it really hard. My guitar teacher told my dad I was a natural, and that inspired me even more and I started playing three to four hours a day. In the summer I'd play six to eight hours a day."

The practicing hasn't tapered off. "Now I do four hours of guitar and four hours of vocals," Maccarone says.

Guitar wasn't Maccarone's first instrument. She had played flute when she was younger, but says she shied away from it. "Just being in band wasn't very cool," she says. "Being a band nerd... Once I got in high school I stopped caring."

She formed her first band, Medula, at Spencerport High School. It was with that band that she took her first stab at songwriting.

"I had always written lyrics and poetry," Maccarone says. "So that part came easily to me. But as far as music, I really didn't know how to write."

But as quickly as she figured out the guitar, it started raining songs for Maccarone. The downpour continues even now.

"Some I'll write in a day," she says. "Some will take two months. I find some of my catchier songs are the ones I wrote quickly. ‘Counter Clockwise' was the first song I've ever written. When we recorded it, it all came together like I had imagined it in my head. I think my writing is better now, but I still love that song."

Maccarone's music is as colorful as her purple-streaked hair, and could very easily be called melodic pop if it there wasn't so much rock in it. Her guitar playing hangs with a structured savvy around well-worn riffs in uncharted waters. Though her music is guitar-driven, it's not to the point where it dominates or crowds the compositions. She moves effortlessly from a thick rhythmic chug to harmonic tapping. It's serious and seriously good. The cherry on top is her voice; plaintive and strong, breaking where needed, and laced with attitude and moxie.

Maccarone is currently in GFI Studios banging out her first long-player in between an increasing number of gigs locally and nationally. The vocals will be laid down at the studio of her vocal coach, Richard Fink. And thanks to Rochester ex-pat Kevin Briggs (Molly Gunner, S.A.F. Project), Maccarone has two showcase gigs in Los Angeles, one at the House Of Blues and one at The Libertine. A mutual friend brought Maccarone and Briggs together.

"He and I have been writing together back and forth," she says. "I'm going out there to record what we've written so he got the gigs for me."

Drummer Dominick Ciaccia will be along for the ride. He's Maccarone's only stable band mate at this point. "Bass players come and go," she says. "The thing about me and Dom is we hit it off right away. The first time we played together it just made sense."

Maccarone appears to be well on her way, musically speaking. And that's a good thing, because aside from her self-described perfectionism in her chosen field, she says she's in trouble.

"I basically suck at everything but music," she says.

- Rochester City Newspaper


Discography

"Soundproof Walls" EP - 2011

"Skeletal Remains" EP - 2015 

Engineered and Produced by Grammy winning Kevin Killen (Peter Gabriel, Shakira, David Bowie - Blackstar) Recorded at the legendary Magic Shop, NYC

Photos

Bio

Melia has become known as one of the top female indie rock artists on the music scene today. The winner of 3 awards, including "Best Female Rock Artist", as well as "Best Rock Song" and “Song of the Year” (“Just A Bride”) at the 2012 Indie Music Channel Awards held at the House of Blues in Hollywood, again in 2013 “Best Female Rock Artist” and once again “Best Female Rock Artist” and “Best Rock Song” (“Charge Like A Bull”) in 2016. Melia’s first EP “Soundproof Walls” as well as her most recent ep “Skeletal Remains” has received rave reviews.

Skeletal Remains" was released in December of 2015. The ep was recorded in NYC at The Magic Shop and was engineered and produced by Grammy winning Kevin Killen (Peter Gabriel, Shakira).

Melia began her music career as a guitarist at the age of 16. She had been trying to get her parents to let her take guitar lessons after going to her first Green Day show during its “American Idiot” tour two years earlier. They made her wait two years before taking up lessons, which she feels propelled her motivation. She excelled at guitar very quickly, practicing 6-8 hours a day and within eight months of taking up the instrument had formed her first band with a couple of high school friends.  Although she had always written poems and lyrics while with her first band she also began writing her own music and lyrics and started playing some of that original music at shows. She took on the role of vocalist in her first band as well and wanting to sing to her fullest potential she began taking vocal lessons.

After graduation she became serious about pursuing her musical career. During that summer after graduation she had the experience of a lifetime when she attended another Green Day concert and was chosen by lead singer, Billie Joe Armstrong, to play guitar for the song “Jesus of Suburbia”.

She is still splitting her practice each day between guitar and vocals, in addition to becoming a guitar teacher. She is now playing with some excellent backing musicians for her live shows. The music is a guitar-driven alternative rock style with message-laden lyrics that come from her personal experiences or of those close to her.

Melia has played with The Offspring, Eve 6, Gaslight Anthem, Our Lady Peace, Walk The Moon, Oberhofer, The Tea Party, Thousand Foot Krutch, Love and Death, Big Wreck, Steve Vai, Twenty One Pilots, New Politics, Fuel, Sick Puppies, Black Star Riders, Asia, Chevelle, Lacuna Coil, The Misfits, Buckcherry, Drowning Pool, Saliva, Otep, Adam Gontier, Chris Daughtry and Halestorm.

Band Members