Micah Dalton
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Micah Dalton

Utica, Michigan, United States

Utica, Michigan, United States
Band Blues Acoustic

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Oct
25
Micah Dalton @ 3rd & Lindsley

Nashville, Tennessee, USA

Nashville, Tennessee, USA

Oct
24
Micah Dalton @ Rhythm and Brews

Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA

Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA

Oct
23
Micah Dalton @ The Square Room

Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

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Music

Press


Micah's latest album, Blue Frontier, was featured on Out There Atlanta to remind their viewers of his recent work. The site has kept up a regular blog about him, his accomplishments, and ATL Collective with 9 entries so far (see link). - Out There Atlanta


You might know Micah Dalton from his performances with the ATL Collective, the most non-cover band cover band in the history of covering rock 'n roll. Or you could possibly know him from his solo work. There might even be a wee percentage of you who became familiar with Micah in stumbling upon his rather hilarious Kickstarter video. Well, to all of you and to those of you who have no idea who we're talking about, allow us to introduce him.

Micah Dalton has been toting his guitar around for a couple years now, happily straddling singer-songwriter genres that include Neil Young (according to him) and even a dash of Prince (according to Paste). He also plays with the ATL Collective, a collaborative group of local musicians who come together each month to give a live cover performance of a classic album (recent shows include the Beatles' Revolver, Van Morrison's Tupelo Honey, and Micah's personal favorite, Marvin Gaye's What's Going On). "It's about experiencing the album, understanding that there's a narrative with the album, and understanding that the album is an art form again."

Now, Micah's working toward a third studio album (which stars such players as Acoustic Contemplative Song, Bluesy Song, and Bearded Indie Melodrama) and is asking for help. His Kickstarter campaign is a few thousand dollars away from raising the funds he needs for engineers, mixers, print costs, and all the other trappings of putting out a good piece of music for your earholes to enjoy. Why should you help? Well, in addition to feeling good about yourself, giving a little boost to the local music scene, and seeing a piece of artwork come to fruition, there's also the prospect of wings. Chicken wings, that is. With the $1,000 pledge package including a trip to J.R. Crickets, where "Chicken is Chicken but the Wang is the Thang," we couldn't help but probe Micah for a little more information. "I just love J.R. Crickets," he said, cracking up. "I don't eat there that often, or else I'd have cardiac arrest, but I just love it and it has a special place in my heart. There's a true Atlanta experience there." - Scout Mob


You might know Micah Dalton from his performances with the ATL Collective, the most non-cover band cover band in the history of covering rock 'n roll. Or you could possibly know him from his solo work. There might even be a wee percentage of you who became familiar with Micah in stumbling upon his rather hilarious Kickstarter video. Well, to all of you and to those of you who have no idea who we're talking about, allow us to introduce him.

Micah Dalton has been toting his guitar around for a couple years now, happily straddling singer-songwriter genres that include Neil Young (according to him) and even a dash of Prince (according to Paste). He also plays with the ATL Collective, a collaborative group of local musicians who come together each month to give a live cover performance of a classic album (recent shows include the Beatles' Revolver, Van Morrison's Tupelo Honey, and Micah's personal favorite, Marvin Gaye's What's Going On). "It's about experiencing the album, understanding that there's a narrative with the album, and understanding that the album is an art form again."

Now, Micah's working toward a third studio album (which stars such players as Acoustic Contemplative Song, Bluesy Song, and Bearded Indie Melodrama) and is asking for help. His Kickstarter campaign is a few thousand dollars away from raising the funds he needs for engineers, mixers, print costs, and all the other trappings of putting out a good piece of music for your earholes to enjoy. Why should you help? Well, in addition to feeling good about yourself, giving a little boost to the local music scene, and seeing a piece of artwork come to fruition, there's also the prospect of wings. Chicken wings, that is. With the $1,000 pledge package including a trip to J.R. Crickets, where "Chicken is Chicken but the Wang is the Thang," we couldn't help but probe Micah for a little more information. "I just love J.R. Crickets," he said, cracking up. "I don't eat there that often, or else I'd have cardiac arrest, but I just love it and it has a special place in my heart. There's a true Atlanta experience there." - Scout Mob


Micah started a campaign on Kickstarter to help fund his album. Offering various prizes for various dollar amounts, he asked his fans to "Sponsor a Song" in the genre of their choice and ultimately raised enough funds to create his CD. - Kickstarter


In 2009, local musicians Micah Dalton and David Berkeley were driven to find a way to both foster community among Atlanta’s singer-songwriters and entertain the area’s fans of live music. Out of their long conversations while touring together, the ATL Collective was born.

About once a month a handful of local musicians come together and cover a classic album front-to-back. “In an age of downloading singles, we want to restore faith in the album as an art form and make sure that the history of these songs as a collection aren’t lost,” Micah told us. “There was a reason and a story behind why these specific songs were selected and put in that particular order. We want to keep that narrative alive and elevate local talent.”

In addition to paying homage to a significant album, the ATL Collective is a chance to see a rotating selection of up-and-coming and established artists. The performers divide up the album and each bring their own interpretations and style to the covered song. After the album is covered, the second half of the event features a mini-concert with one of the artists performing their own work.

A creative element to each show incorporates a food theme that ties in to the album and connects with a local businesses (Fox Bros provided mac and cheese for the Fleetwood Mac and Cheese performance).

In their first year they’ve covered classic albums including Johnny Cash’s At Folsom Prison, Paul Simon’s Graceland and Bob Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks. The ATL Collective’s next event will be a performance of The Beatles’ Abby Road at Sister Louisa’s Church (formerly Danneman’s) Oct 13 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 at the door, but get there early since the past few shows have sold out. - Bearings Guide


A video of Micah's performance was featured on the Paste Magazine's website in the "Paste Player." - Paste Magazine


In August, along with artists like Ed Sheeran and the Lumineers, Micah was named and Artist on the Rise by Amazon.com. - Amazon


In August, along with artists like Ed Sheeran and the Lumineers, Micah was named and Artist on the Rise by Amazon.com. - Amazon


Micah was listed as #2, alongside Barcelona, Ryan Adams, Tyler Lyle, and Kate Nash. - Amazon


After writing formulaic reviews for many publications, it gets tiring to achieve the same sort of goal in constructing a music review. Every once in a while, a writer needs to be set free. Micah Dalton’s ‘Pawn Shop’ is the perfect forum within which that can happen.

So a while ago, I got a message on facebook from this guy named Micah. He got a hold of me through the Burnside facebook group. He told me he was releasing an album on a smaller record label and asked me if I’d be interested in reviewing it. Having a penchant for new and upcoming artists, I said ‘heck yes’. A few weeks later, a package arrived in my mailbox…and a wild and fantastic journey ensued within my ears and mind.

There was a time when albums were more than just 10 tracks of 3 minute radio hits that featured 3 verses, a bridge of some sloppy nature and a chorus. Micah Dalton, however, is a songwriter and a storyteller with something substantial to say. Following an actual character named ‘Pawn Shop’ through the dusty streets of Georgia in 1965, the lyrics and tracks of the album chart a story of self-discovery and transfiguration. Songs like “I’ll Find You In Ohio” take the listener on (what has been self-described by Micah as) a ‘multi-sensory experience’. Crossing any and all borders of musical categorization, Micah’s style is somewhat similar to an early Prince in the sense that he weaves many different fabrics throughout each song. With an instrumental arsenal that is multi-pronged and many leagues deep, each song is a new page in the same, riveting book as you truly never know what you’ll get.

One really shouldn’t write reviews in the first person…but for the moment, I could care less. That’s right. Me. I said that. For the most part, I have a lot of issues with the music industry and that may never change.

Micah Dalton is a bright light of hope in a dark tunnel that lets me know that the real soul of music is in the roots of the songwriter.
End - Burnside Writers Collective


Micah Dalton Interview
Author: Kevan Breitinger
Published: August 10, 2006

After listening to Micah Dalton's "Advancement," I knew I wanted to talk to him, find out more about
what drives and moves this creative, expressive artist.
His alt soul sound is fresh and appealing, almost healing on a deeper level (See Suite review here). Our
conversation only sealed the deal: Micah Dalton's candid answers reveal a deep sincerity and an honest faith. I can't wait to see how the Lord advances and uses this artist's musical ministry.
You mention on your website that you played music as part of your role in the community development program in Chattanooga. Why was it songs from the church you were playing? How effective was music in impacting that program and its participants? (I'm somewhat fascinated by this concept!)
I think my experience at Hope was really important because it activated something that was already there, so to speak. I grew up in the area I now live in here in Atlanta. The area is called Grant Park and before it was on its way towards gentrification, it was a rougher area on the city, so I remember the people in this area and the musical surroundings pretty vividly. The musical surroundings were gospel based because of my dad's pastoring position at the local church. So working at Hope and having to learn the songs that the congregation was singing challenged me to articulate a lot of the musical tendencies I already had but was never challenged to put out.
Before this experience, I never knew how to express the urban side of what I deeply desired to communicate. So it's very educational how it worked. I "went to school" and integrated myself into a different group of people and societal differences. It became challenging and informational and turned out to be a cornerstone for my career. It was also refreshing spiritually which always directly affects what is created.
It seems that music played a huge role in drawing you to the Lord. Is this a part of what drives you creatively
today?
The creative process, to me, is really ambiguous. So, it's hard to say exactly what drives me to write and become
creative. Music did, in fact, play a gigantic role in drawing me to the person of Christ. I always thought that songs said a great deal more than sermons, booklets, and what not. For the first time, I saw that people were taking liberty to say what they really were thinking and feeling about spirituality and it made me think "No way, I think the same thing, I'm not alone"! I think that's what made me want write: my response to that liberty I saw in other artists.
I know that this still drives me to write...and revelation...I believe God is, obviously, more creative than anyone. So my dialogue and relation to Him directly affects what I do vocationally and creatively. A constant effort to write honestly is a challenge I've receivedsome serious poison.

Micah Dalton shows remarkable faith and guts in the second part of our conversation. It's a combo
that I love.

What is the most encouraging thing you've experienced as an indie artist?
Well, I've never been signed, so I might like that better! I think financially, it can be difficult for the type of music that I make. I would say the most encouraging thing is the people. People who let you stay at
their house and barely know you. People who really know and own your recordings. People who you can
enjoy when you're just being . . . . no questions asked . . . that's very encouraging.
What's been the hardest?
I think the hardest is living such an inconsistent, unorthodox lifestyle. That in itself leads to a group of other variables that are difficult to deal with. You know, I'll go months without seeing people I'm very close to. And it's crazy to think that I might have to have a family with a similar schedule.
It's also hard when you don't feel like your music is specifically relating to anybody. When you start to judge success by numbers and priorities are misconstrued. That leads to comparison, and you forget why you started writing in the first place. This could be a really long, excruciating list . . . the hard parts..ha.
How do you keep your focus on the Lord through the ups and downs of this industry?
Well, that's another hard part. The Lord has a way of drawing me in through a number of ways. You catch glimpses of Him through good friends and people you know and that know you, through an awareness of my own great need. I never feel too forced to try to align myself with God, it's always a pretty apparent need since I can be such a mess. Keep your eye on this alt soul artist, I think we will be hearing a lot more of him. - Suite 101 - Enter Curious


The stellar musical and packaging quality, as well as the significance of liner notes (this one contains a short story about a fictional character named Pawnshop), continues in Micah Dalton's full-length Rebuilt release, Pawn Shop. Dalton's agreeable, raspy voice compliments his laid-back acoustic vibe, ala a more bluesy Jack Johnson or a more acoustic John Legend. Standout tracks include the good-feelin' stroll, "We Could Take the Backroads," the porch-stompin' slider, "The Autobiography of Milton Burroughs," and the soulful thumper, "Down Down Put It Down." A gifted songwriter, Dalton's ear for poetry and melody is sure to catch the attention of more than a few critics.

Like the legendary I.R.S. or more modern Northern Records, and Tooth and Nail, Rebuilt Records is building a solid reputation for outstanding artists and albums. Quality releases like those mentioned above add to Rebuilt's growing profile. - The Phantom Tollbooth


Reviewed by Ben Martin

Atlanta.-based Micah is a rare breed, someone gifted with a soulful voice, strong musical gifting and lyrical ability but who is also able to put down his ideas in writing. In the case of 'Pawn Shop' this manifests itself in the form of a short story with each chapter referring to a song from the album; this is a daring move which has paid off immensely. Kicking off with the immediately catchy "We Could Take The Backroads", the soul and groove is not lost, and when the tempo is increased for "Rev Ramshack Run" the hooks just keep coming. Mellow or poppy, Micah never loses his soul, his flawless blending of genres creates arrangements which can only be described as beautiful to hear. Many of us only occasionally refer to liner notes for lyrics but in the case of 'Pawn Shop', Micah has substituted words for the short story and ink drawings which introduce us to the character "Pawn Shop" who is on a journey of self-discovery. All this allows the listener to explore the characters created by Micah which does not normally happen, even with some concept albums. 'Pawn Shop' will have you transfixed from beginning to end and beyond. With beautiful instrumentation, Micah has created an engrossing and hugely original sound. Highly recommended - 'Pawn Shop' will surprise, move and inspire. - Cross Rhythms


Micah Dalton has the ability to evoke Paul Simon, Marvin Gaye and Bob Dylan- all in the same song. The Atlanta based alternative soul musician harkens an era when music was a reaction rather than a product. His forthcoming third album Pawnshop is a work of rhythmic narrative that shakes off the casings of genre to travel through acoustic soul, slinky R & B and stomp your feet gospel infusions before charting its own course. Pawnshop will be on sale February 26, 2008 and can be previewed or preordered here.

5 Questions with Micah Dalton

1. Describe your sound in 10 words or less.

Southern pop statements with the blatant thievery of classic (60s/70s) soul/folk.

2. What is your own personal history with music?

I always looked to music for explanations. Most of those explanations were found in the church. In the Western church, there’s a difference in content and style depending on what specific denomination you land in. For me, I was split between two ends of the evangelical spectrum: Presbyterian and Pentecostal. I heard wild, fiery songs with emotional manipulation involved and I sat at the foot of epic melodies when my ears were introduced to the seemingly serene nature of hymns. This was every week.

I worked for a faith-based community development program that required me to lead volunteer groups in gospel songs. It was there that I began to fool around with a new musical vocabulary. That was when I came closest to honing in on a “sound”. I remember making imaginary bands in middle school but all I knew was the trumpet. I’ve always desired expression in interpersonal relationships and especially in musical contexts.

3. What is the album making process like for you?

Well, for me, I would liken it to marriage. Even though I’m not married, I’ve heard about it. You fall in love with the songs. Play them live (honeymoon phase), Pre-production: then you have to work with someone to translate a cohesive and strong representation of your voice.

That’s fun only when something arrangement oriented is expounded on. You then start second guessing like crazy. The whole vision is trash on some days. You wish there was some more objectivity, but it’s only you and the co-producer. Can you trust him? Can you trust yourself? Then record it. Then you love it more than ever. Then you just commit.

I’ve worked with my friend James Gregory on the last couple of projects. He is someone whose sensibilities I trust almost more than mine. It’s also like having a child, but I’ve bored you enough with my back door metaphors.

4. What are the largest struggles for an independent musician trying to make it?

For me, it’s finding a sense of place and direction. That’s powerful to have, especially on the road. It’s something that money can’t buy.

5. How can fans of your music best support your career?

I think there are tons of dangers in modernity, but one in particular is the seemingly slow decline of live music. Coming to shows is huge. In general, support live music. Go to local venues. It is a great way of supporting local businesses in a two fold way. - Moue Magazine


"He may sound like an earthier, cleverer Ben Harper, but musically Dalton suggests mid-'80s Prince in the way he defiantly straddles so many styles, requiring an enormous musical arsenal to get his point across. These juxtapositions of sounds and style rarely feel forced or even deliberate, courtesy of Dalton's soulful vocals and incisive songwriting."- PASTE MAGAZINE - Paste Magazine


Micah Dalton has the ability to evoke Paul Simon, Marvin Gaye and Bob Dylan- all in the same song. The Atlanta based alternative soul musician harkens an era when music was a reaction rather than a product. His forthcoming third album Pawnshop is a work of rhythmic narrative that shakes off the casings of genre to travel through acoustic soul, slinky R & B and stomp your feet gospel infusions before charting its own course. Pawnshop will be on sale February 26, 2008 and can be previewed or preordered here.

5 Questions with Micah Dalton

1. Describe your sound in 10 words or less.

Southern pop statements with the blatant thievery of classic (60s/70s) soul/folk.

2. What is your own personal history with music?

I always looked to music for explanations. Most of those explanations were found in the church. In the Western church, there’s a difference in content and style depending on what specific denomination you land in. For me, I was split between two ends of the evangelical spectrum: Presbyterian and Pentecostal. I heard wild, fiery songs with emotional manipulation involved and I sat at the foot of epic melodies when my ears were introduced to the seemingly serene nature of hymns. This was every week.

I worked for a faith-based community development program that required me to lead volunteer groups in gospel songs. It was there that I began to fool around with a new musical vocabulary. That was when I came closest to honing in on a “sound”. I remember making imaginary bands in middle school but all I knew was the trumpet. I’ve always desired expression in interpersonal relationships and especially in musical contexts.

3. What is the album making process like for you?

Well, for me, I would liken it to marriage. Even though I’m not married, I’ve heard about it. You fall in love with the songs. Play them live (honeymoon phase), Pre-production: then you have to work with someone to translate a cohesive and strong representation of your voice.

That’s fun only when something arrangement oriented is expounded on. You then start second guessing like crazy. The whole vision is trash on some days. You wish there was some more objectivity, but it’s only you and the co-producer. Can you trust him? Can you trust yourself? Then record it. Then you love it more than ever. Then you just commit.

I’ve worked with my friend James Gregory on the last couple of projects. He is someone whose sensibilities I trust almost more than mine. It’s also like having a child, but I’ve bored you enough with my back door metaphors.

4. What are the largest struggles for an independent musician trying to make it?

For me, it’s finding a sense of place and direction. That’s powerful to have, especially on the road. It’s something that money can’t buy.

5. How can fans of your music best support your career?

I think there are tons of dangers in modernity, but one in particular is the seemingly slow decline of live music. Coming to shows is huge. In general, support live music. Go to local venues. It is a great way of supporting local businesses in a two fold way. - Moue Magazine


"Though I have never met him personally, it is quite easy to tell that Micah Dalton is a risk-taker. Apart from the fact that his musical style is an appealingly intrepid mixture of folk, blues, soul, and R&B, Dalton has provided an extremely unique experience for the release of his third album, Pawn Shop."-OBSCURE SOUND


For complete review: http://obscuresound.com/?p=1822 - Obscuresound.com


“When you combine an earthy, easygoing songwriting style, the influence of Donny Hathaway and Paul Simon and a penchant for warm, understated instrumentation, there’s a good chance you’ll get ear-pleasing results. Micah Dalton has, and he calls it ‘alt. soul.’”-THE NASHVILLE SCENE - Nashville Scene


Living at the intersection of R&B, soul, Southern folk, country and blues is the music of Micah Dalton. The Atlanta artist is releasing his latest project, “Gathered ‘Round the Greasefire,” Sunday, May 23 at 7:30 p.m. at Eddie’s Attic.

We recently sat down with Micah to hear and talk about his new EP:

How is this recording different than previous projects?
In the past when I recorded I tried to take a production-based approach. This time I wanted it to be simpler and more song oriented so they stand on their own. Also, this project is very raw and the themes are more personal. While I was writing these songs my life experiences were dynamic and grimy. The music is influenced by difficulty and so I put more colored transparency in this project.

What does the title “Gathered ‘Round the Greasefire” mean?
I had this mental image of us symbolically standing around a campfire combined with the problem of a kitchen grease fire. The idea is that as we live in community with each other we stand there watching our houses catch on fire. We want everything to be fine but we aren’t putting out the fire. We’re standing next to each other ignoring the problem.

How are you evolving as an artist?
I’m more self aware of my art and music. You start out very ambitious and bring everything you can into your music. Now I’m learning to fine tune my music and carve out instead of adding on. Also, while soul music is still at my core I’m developing so it’s not derivative but it’s my own style and essence. My music is less a literal replication of influences like Neil Young, Willie Nelson, Paul Simon, and Linda Martell and more of who I am.

Why have you chosen to stay in Atlanta?
I grew up here and it’s where I’m comfortable. The structure of a big city sometimes makes it hard for people to connect but we are still the cultural epicenter of the South and Atlanta is a very satisfying creative outlet. With my multi-cultural background, it’s a good place to live with the tension between country and R&B and to be authentic to both folk and the black experience. In the spirit of the South we love the familiar but in a new way of integrating a lot of music elements that speak to people. - Bearings Guide


Soulful Micah Dalton hits UK

By Liza Goldenberg

With a sound that could be mistaken for a young Ben Harper, Micah Dalton is making waves with his blend of what he calls “soul driven folk music,” and he will be riding these waves into Lexington on April 21 for a performance at UK.

How ironic.

Why is his appearance at UK ironic, you ask? Well, Dalton’s foray into the music industry started with a semester off from school. As fate would have it, the musician who during his tenure in college only performed on weekends, was unable to return to school. With all the spare time, Dalton began to write music and really hone his talent. By the time the next semester rolled around, Dalton had abandoned his academic pursuits for a more musical future. In the year since then, Dalton has been touring throughout the country, with his entrancing blend of pop rock, folk and soul.

His soulful music really does have its roots in Dalton’s soul; a great deal of his music comes from pain and hardships in his life. “[My songs] are milestones of who I am,” Dalton explains. “The stronger the experience, the better the fruit [of the song].” He writes these songs by first imagining the music in his head and then piecing together otherwise random lyrics he has written.

With his instinct guiding him, Dalton is able to explore the human psyche in a number of different ways. He listens to a wide variety of music, and he lets the musicianship behind artists such as Herbie Hancock aide him in the songwriting process.

His show on Thursday is a definite best bet for live music this week. The second you hear his voice, you will understand why people can’t seem to get enough of this boy from Georgia.

What will come next for Micah Dalton, who knows, but it’s safe to assume that he has a bright future ahead of him, filled with the uncertainty and excitement that has led him to this point.

 

This article was originally posted on April 21, 2005 - Wildcat Weekly


When you combine an earthy, easygoing songwriting style, the influence of Donny Hathaway and Paul Simon and a penchant for warm, understated instrumentation, there’s a good chance you’ll get ear-pleasing results. Micah Dalton has done just that, and he calls it “alt. soul.” Earlier this year, the Atlanta singer-songwriter released an EP titled Advancement, the follow-up to 2004’s long player These Are the Roots. Advancement opens with the ultra-cool, ultra-smooth soul of “Just Stay (To Be With Her),” followed by the gospel-sweetened acoustic slow burn of “Jet Lag” and the psychedelic R&B of “Sharks Only Bite in the Water.” The second half of the record gently exhales with a handful of spare acoustic ballads. Dalton—a staple of colleges and coffeehouses throughout the eastern U.S.—often takes the stage armed only with his acoustic guitar and husky croon, but his sometime live band—featuring bassist James Gregory and vocalist Jason Eskridge—only enhances the alt. soul experience. The Basement —JEWLY HIGHT - Nashville Scene


Discography

Blue Frontier (2012)
Gathered 'Round the Greasefire (2010)
Pawn Shop (2008)
Advancement (2006)
These Are the Roots LP (2004)

Photos

Bio

Featured in Amazon MP3s Artists on the Rise 2012
Bad Blood features in Paste Magazines mPlayer 2012
Featured artist with American Airlines "Storyteller" Feature Summer 2010
Named "Next Big Thing" in Southern Living Magazine June 2010
Official showcase at SXSW 2008
Has shared the stage with acts such as Dave Barnes, Jon McLaughlin, Gym Class Heroes, Richard Julian, Shawn Mullins, and Rachel Lampa

NACA Showcases:
Mid Atlantic
Mid Atlantic Festival

He may sound like an earthier, cleverer Ben Harper, but musically Dalton suggests mid-'80s Prince in the way he defiantly straddles so many styles, requiring an enormous musical arsenal to get his point across. These juxtapositions of sounds and style rarely feel forced or even deliberate, courtesy of Dalton's soulful vocals and incisive songwriting."- PASTE MAGAZINE

When you combine an earthy, easygoing songwriting style, the influence of Donny Hathaway and Paul Simon and a penchant for warm, understated instrumentation, theres a good chance youll get ear-pleasing results. Micah Dalton has, and he calls it alt. soul.-THE NASHVILLE SCENE

Micah Dalton is a bright light of hope in a dark tunnel that lets me know that the real soul of music is in the roots of the songwriter.-BURNSIDE WRITER'S COLLECTIVE

"Though I have never met him personally, it is quite easy to tell that Micah Dalton is a risk-taker. Apart from the fact that his musical style is an appealingly intrepid mixture of folk, blues, soul, and R&B, Dalton has provided an extremely unique experience for the release of his third album, Pawn Shop."-OBSCURE SOUND

There was a time when an album didnt offer pleasures for the ears alone. Having a vinyl LP on the turntable and a cover sleeves vivid, larger-then-life artwork in hand made for a rich multi-sensory experience. But that long since became the stuff of tall tales. That is, until Micah Dalton decided to liquefy the boundaries between artistic media with Pawnshop.

On the third recording project of his career, the Atlanta, Ga.-based singer-songwriter summons the audio-visual album experience from the shadows of memory, and goes a step further still. Pawnshop is twelve spacious Southern pop statements; its a short story told in twelve vignettes; its twelve visceral, pen-and-ink images; its an artistic risk that pays off mightily, and nothing short of a radical re-imagining.

The idea of creating characters and running them through storylines is a lot more interesting than just an album, says Dalton. It is like going into a science lab and seeing what comes out. Using different creative media and seeing how they interact with one another and speak to people is always fun.

Dalton co-wrote four of the albums richly nuanced songs with Brooklyn-based pop songsmith Nate Campany and several others with longtime collaborator bassist/producer James Gregory. Dalton and Gregory put flesh on the song bones between January and August 2007, working out of Nashvilles Smoakstack Studios, Art Canvas (India.Arie, Mighty Clouds of Joy) and other locales, and enlisting the sensitive touch of multi-instrumentalist Paul Moak, guitarist Kenny Meeks (Sixpence None the Richer), keyboardist Ben Shive and others.

The tracks cover satisfying musical range, from the acoustic, soul-tinged warmth of Take the Backroads, We Came Alive Tonight and The Grandest Prize, to Down, Down Put It Downa snaking R&B number laced with sharp string runsand gospel-infused, loose-jointed, backwoods romps like I Am a Man (The Autobiography of Milton Burrows) and Reverend Ramshack Run.

The songs, stories and images dwell in the fertile space between autobiography and imagination. You could say theyre true and more-than-true at the same time. There are elements of Dalton in Pawnshopa restless soul sojourning through rural Georgia in 1965 and the albums central characterbut theyre not one and the same. Dalton ensured that the project would have plenty of captivating twists and turns by bringing other creative souls into the conversation, Jewly Hight to write a fictional story of desire taking hold and Jason Harwell to render the striking visuals. Theres enough there for the listener-reader-observer to get lost in over and over.

Dalton began erecting signposts to chart the course of his musical progression back in 2004 with his pop-inflected full-length debut, These Are the Roots. Next came 2006s seven-song Advancement EP, which displayed moments of kinship with Donny Hathaway and Marvin Gaye, but was anything but an exercise in imitation. In countless clubs, theatres, coffeehouses and colleges east of the Mississippi, Dalton has shared the stage with the likes of Jon McLaughlin, Mindy Smith, Dave Barnes and other lesser-known but no less talented folks. In 2007 he also signed on with unique Athens-based nonprofit indie Rebuilt Records.