Mideau
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Mideau

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"Local favorite Libbie Linton part of new 'transcontinental band'"

For the band Mideau, their Logan debut was a homecoming of sorts. Libbie Linton, half of the new two-member band, is a Cache Valley native who started her musical career in Logan.

“I’ve played a lot of shows in Logan,” says Linton, who went to Logan High School, attended USU and currently resides in Salt Lake City. “Logan is where I really got used to the idea of playing music in front of people. …It’s kind of a home base.”

Spencer Harrison, the other half of Mideau (pronounced “mid-oh”) currently resides in Washington, D.C.

The two met through mutual friends and have jammed together, but Mideau is their first official collaboration. They performed at Why Sound on Thursday night.

“We started singing together… started writing together and that turned into this project here,” Linton says.

“We didn’t really realize it would do this,” Harrison continues. “It just started working out so well, especially through the writing and recording process, it just required so much more. The songs wanted more attention, so we’re just trying to give them as much as we possibly can.”

Currently Mideau is in the process of making their first album, which is slated for release in spring. Because of the distance, the two have had to innovate when it comes to putting together songs, coming up with material and recording.

“We’re a transcontinental band,” Linton says. “We work on things in a pretty unique way… sending files back and forth and getting input from each other.”

The distance, and the fact their Logan debut was only their second live show, make their performance at Why Sound all the more impressive. The place was packed, and the two (along with drummer Aaron Anderson of Fictionist) seemed to be in sync as they played songs including “Hold Up the Sky,” which reminds Linton of Logan.

“It was really innovative, they used a lot of different sounds,” says Chris Larsen. “You know, it’s not a typical guitar, bass, drum set-up. They involved a lot of other electronic sounds and samples. I really enjoyed it.” Another fan, Whitney Ferwerda, feels similarly. “I loved it. I thought they were fabulous.”

In between songs Harrison and Linton also performed well, bantering with each other and the audience.

As well as showcasing their talent, the show was part of an effort to get the word out about their upcoming album and the Kickstarter.com campaign they’ve started to fund it. The campaign allows people to contribute any amount of money and pre-order the album, and offers perks for those who contribute. One such perk includes an invitation to a listening party in Logan or Provo.

“The plan is to have an event where we basically play the record from start to finish and give people the first opportunity to hear it because the album won’t be for sale at that point. It’ll be pre-CD release,” Linton says. “(That way) people can get an entire run-through of it before they buy it. It’s kind of a unique opportunity to be there with us and hear the album.”
Some fans have already jumped on the Kickstarter wagon.

“I like that there are a bunch (different levels of contribution),” David Matthew Stewart says. “I’m saving up for a certain level and get paid Friday, so I’m pretty excited for it.”

So far, Mideau has raised just over half of their $10,000 Kickstarter goal — though there is a caveat: If they don’t raise all the money by their deadline Jan. 12, 2013, they don’t get any of the money.

“Kickstarter is all or nothing,” Harrison explains. “We’re so grateful for what we’ve received.” - The Herald Journal


"Local favorite Libbie Linton part of new 'transcontinental band'"

For the band Mideau, their Logan debut was a homecoming of sorts. Libbie Linton, half of the new two-member band, is a Cache Valley native who started her musical career in Logan.

“I’ve played a lot of shows in Logan,” says Linton, who went to Logan High School, attended USU and currently resides in Salt Lake City. “Logan is where I really got used to the idea of playing music in front of people. …It’s kind of a home base.”

Spencer Harrison, the other half of Mideau (pronounced “mid-oh”) currently resides in Washington, D.C.

The two met through mutual friends and have jammed together, but Mideau is their first official collaboration. They performed at Why Sound on Thursday night.

“We started singing together… started writing together and that turned into this project here,” Linton says.

“We didn’t really realize it would do this,” Harrison continues. “It just started working out so well, especially through the writing and recording process, it just required so much more. The songs wanted more attention, so we’re just trying to give them as much as we possibly can.”

Currently Mideau is in the process of making their first album, which is slated for release in spring. Because of the distance, the two have had to innovate when it comes to putting together songs, coming up with material and recording.

“We’re a transcontinental band,” Linton says. “We work on things in a pretty unique way… sending files back and forth and getting input from each other.”

The distance, and the fact their Logan debut was only their second live show, make their performance at Why Sound all the more impressive. The place was packed, and the two (along with drummer Aaron Anderson of Fictionist) seemed to be in sync as they played songs including “Hold Up the Sky,” which reminds Linton of Logan.

“It was really innovative, they used a lot of different sounds,” says Chris Larsen. “You know, it’s not a typical guitar, bass, drum set-up. They involved a lot of other electronic sounds and samples. I really enjoyed it.” Another fan, Whitney Ferwerda, feels similarly. “I loved it. I thought they were fabulous.”

In between songs Harrison and Linton also performed well, bantering with each other and the audience.

As well as showcasing their talent, the show was part of an effort to get the word out about their upcoming album and the Kickstarter.com campaign they’ve started to fund it. The campaign allows people to contribute any amount of money and pre-order the album, and offers perks for those who contribute. One such perk includes an invitation to a listening party in Logan or Provo.

“The plan is to have an event where we basically play the record from start to finish and give people the first opportunity to hear it because the album won’t be for sale at that point. It’ll be pre-CD release,” Linton says. “(That way) people can get an entire run-through of it before they buy it. It’s kind of a unique opportunity to be there with us and hear the album.”
Some fans have already jumped on the Kickstarter wagon.

“I like that there are a bunch (different levels of contribution),” David Matthew Stewart says. “I’m saving up for a certain level and get paid Friday, so I’m pretty excited for it.”

So far, Mideau has raised just over half of their $10,000 Kickstarter goal — though there is a caveat: If they don’t raise all the money by their deadline Jan. 12, 2013, they don’t get any of the money.

“Kickstarter is all or nothing,” Harrison explains. “We’re so grateful for what we’ve received.” - The Herald Journal


"Mideau pushes aside other projects to work together"

A new folk-pop duo has just entered the Salt Lake music scene, and one member, Libbie Linton, has a master's degree in biological engineering.

But, more important, when it comes to music, Linton is a singer-songwriter who plays guitar as well as ukulele, banjo, mandolin, keyboards and bass with Salt Lake City-raised Spencer Harrison.

Together, they are Mideau (pronounced "Mid-oh") and the first time most Utah audiences saw them together was when Linton and Harrison opened for prominent Utah County singer-songwriter Mindy Gledhill at Provo's Velour on Nov. 30. (As a solo artist, Linton opened for the Doobie Brothers at a 2010 Red Butte Garden concert.)

The two began a Kickstarter campaign to raise $10,000 to make their first album and raised $11,891 from 337 backers.

The new album, produced by Nate Pyfer, Linton's friend from Logan High School, will be released soon.

Harrison and Linton answered questions about goals, inspirations and what they would name Princess Kate's child:

How are you inspired?

We draw inspirations from everything. Science and discovery, literature and current events. All these things seem to show up in our work. At a macro level, we draw most inspiration from personal experiences, the people around us, nostalgia, and the progression from young and innocent to older and more complex.

What's the goal for your forthcoming album?

We would like this album to be a shock to people in a "why haven't I heard about this already?" kind of way. We've worked for it to be a strong, unique blend of music, and we certainly hope for it to reach ears far and wide.

What are your most memorable experiences in music?

Linton • In my backyard growing up, we had cut down a huge pine tree and laid sections of the stump upright. I remember as a 5-year-old leaping from one stump to the next while singing "Tonight You Belong to Me." I still sing that song at shows and think about my youth every time. That is especially strong when I have had the chance to play at large shows like at Red Butte Garden. My 5-year-old self would think that singing that song to thousands of people is awesome and terrifying.

Harrison • On a few choice occasions, I have been the music to sing people to calm and then sleep. It's not so much being the soundtrack to sleep I love, but the moments where my voice has been what allows someone to disconnect from whatever troubles them. At least enough to relax.

If you could list one or two things on a tour rider that must be backstage at a show, what would they be?

If we were being good and thinking ahead, some blend of lemon-citrus tea with licorice root, and if not, Cinnamon Toast Crunch.

What is the most musical thing in the world?

Justin Timberlake.

If you could perform one song for President Barack Obama, what would it be?

We'd sing whatever he wanted us to sing. Without a request, we'd play one of the songs off the new record so we could have a possible chance to brag to people that President Obama tapped his foot to a song we wrote.

What are your plans for 2013?

We want to keep pushing ourselves and working to create new songs and sounds in 2013. Releasing the record, and then supporting it with touring and content, is a big activity for 2013.

What would you name Princess Kate Middleton's child, and why?

Orange. It's unique, unrhymable, and apparently famous Brits have a thing for naming children after lunchbox fruit. Either that or Anne.

So, the world didn't end on Dec. 22. What are you most thankful for?

Family and friends who support and criticize. Who love enough to tear down and push to new heights. The experience of learning something fresh, seeing a new sight, joking about the way things are and hoping for the way things might be. And other forms of art that express the human experience, and help us cope with times when things are unstable, and conversely that become the backdrop to joyful memories. We'll also be thankful that the world didn't end before we got a chance to have people hear the new album.

dburger@sltrib.com

Facebook.com/davidlouisburger

Twitter: @davidburger —

Mideau with Polytype and Lake Island

When • Friday, Feb. 1, at 8 p.m.

Where • Velour Live Music Gallery, 135 N. University Ave., Provo

Tickets • $8 at door

Also •To listen to Mideau, go to http://www.facebook.com/MideauMusic - The Salt Lake Tribune


"Mideau pushes aside other projects to work together"

A new folk-pop duo has just entered the Salt Lake music scene, and one member, Libbie Linton, has a master's degree in biological engineering.

But, more important, when it comes to music, Linton is a singer-songwriter who plays guitar as well as ukulele, banjo, mandolin, keyboards and bass with Salt Lake City-raised Spencer Harrison.

Together, they are Mideau (pronounced "Mid-oh") and the first time most Utah audiences saw them together was when Linton and Harrison opened for prominent Utah County singer-songwriter Mindy Gledhill at Provo's Velour on Nov. 30. (As a solo artist, Linton opened for the Doobie Brothers at a 2010 Red Butte Garden concert.)

The two began a Kickstarter campaign to raise $10,000 to make their first album and raised $11,891 from 337 backers.

The new album, produced by Nate Pyfer, Linton's friend from Logan High School, will be released soon.

Harrison and Linton answered questions about goals, inspirations and what they would name Princess Kate's child:

How are you inspired?

We draw inspirations from everything. Science and discovery, literature and current events. All these things seem to show up in our work. At a macro level, we draw most inspiration from personal experiences, the people around us, nostalgia, and the progression from young and innocent to older and more complex.

What's the goal for your forthcoming album?

We would like this album to be a shock to people in a "why haven't I heard about this already?" kind of way. We've worked for it to be a strong, unique blend of music, and we certainly hope for it to reach ears far and wide.

What are your most memorable experiences in music?

Linton • In my backyard growing up, we had cut down a huge pine tree and laid sections of the stump upright. I remember as a 5-year-old leaping from one stump to the next while singing "Tonight You Belong to Me." I still sing that song at shows and think about my youth every time. That is especially strong when I have had the chance to play at large shows like at Red Butte Garden. My 5-year-old self would think that singing that song to thousands of people is awesome and terrifying.

Harrison • On a few choice occasions, I have been the music to sing people to calm and then sleep. It's not so much being the soundtrack to sleep I love, but the moments where my voice has been what allows someone to disconnect from whatever troubles them. At least enough to relax.

If you could list one or two things on a tour rider that must be backstage at a show, what would they be?

If we were being good and thinking ahead, some blend of lemon-citrus tea with licorice root, and if not, Cinnamon Toast Crunch.

What is the most musical thing in the world?

Justin Timberlake.

If you could perform one song for President Barack Obama, what would it be?

We'd sing whatever he wanted us to sing. Without a request, we'd play one of the songs off the new record so we could have a possible chance to brag to people that President Obama tapped his foot to a song we wrote.

What are your plans for 2013?

We want to keep pushing ourselves and working to create new songs and sounds in 2013. Releasing the record, and then supporting it with touring and content, is a big activity for 2013.

What would you name Princess Kate Middleton's child, and why?

Orange. It's unique, unrhymable, and apparently famous Brits have a thing for naming children after lunchbox fruit. Either that or Anne.

So, the world didn't end on Dec. 22. What are you most thankful for?

Family and friends who support and criticize. Who love enough to tear down and push to new heights. The experience of learning something fresh, seeing a new sight, joking about the way things are and hoping for the way things might be. And other forms of art that express the human experience, and help us cope with times when things are unstable, and conversely that become the backdrop to joyful memories. We'll also be thankful that the world didn't end before we got a chance to have people hear the new album.

dburger@sltrib.com

Facebook.com/davidlouisburger

Twitter: @davidburger —

Mideau with Polytype and Lake Island

When • Friday, Feb. 1, at 8 p.m.

Where • Velour Live Music Gallery, 135 N. University Ave., Provo

Tickets • $8 at door

Also •To listen to Mideau, go to http://www.facebook.com/MideauMusic - The Salt Lake Tribune


Discography

Mideau - 2013 (to be released)

Photos

Bio

Mideau (pronounced ‘MID-Oh’) is an American Indie Pop duo based out of Provo, UT. The band formed in late 2012 with members Libbie Linton (guitar, keys, vocals) and Spencer Harrison (bass, keys, vocals). Their sound involves traditional and electronic instruments and has been likened to Beach House, Vampire Weekend, the xx, and Mama Cass.

Linton and Harrison initially met while both were preoccupied with other projects. After graduate studies and living abroad, the two unexpectedly reunited and began creating music, forming Mideau.

Though a young project, Mideau has sold out their first six shows, and used short snippets of unfinished tracks and live recordings to successfully raise nearly $12,000 using crowdsourcing. Mideau is currently working on a debut album with producer Nate Pyfer (Kaskade, The Moth & The Flame) and Scott Wiley (Neon Trees, Phoenix), which is set to release in early Fall 2013.

"Mideau is undoubtedly one of the best bands playing in Utah right now, despite the fact that they have yet to put out a full-length LP." - Benjamin Bombard, City Weekly and KUER

"I've heard early recordings and it is some of the most refreshing and creative music I've heard in years" - Corey Fox, Velour Live Music Gallery