Mojo Fury
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Mojo Fury

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Mojo Fury's debut album Visiting Hours of a Travelling Circus has been a long time in the making, but finally this incredible band from Ireland are ready to make their impact on the current rock scene. And what an impact it is. Recent singles The Mann and Colour of the Bear showcase a hungry, fiery band sprinting out of the gate at full speed, with jagged, angular bursts of distorted power chords. Deep Fish Tank is another song along the same lines, with dirty, psychotic riffs and a pounding performance on the drums.
Mojo Fury are in no way a one trick pony however. Bones (maybe the best thing on the album, although with so many great songs, that's a tough call to make), is more anthemic and has more of a pop sensibility before breaking into a galloping end section which includes the sound of a piano falling down the stairs for good measure.
Next to these full on rock belters of course are the more sedate moments, like the electro-tinged We Should Just Run Away, which is a million miles away from the previously released acoustic version. Album closer Electric Sea adds an almost Radiohead-esque touch to proceedings. It is the album's quietest and most sparse moment, but it fits perfectly.
On Visiting Hours of a Travelling Circus there is so much going on, and so many great moments crammed inside the ten songs on offer that after a couple of listens it is difficult to take in and appreciate everything on offer here. Perseverance is the order of the day: Stick with Mojo Fury and you will be rewarded with one of the finest rock albums of the year. Hopefully a follow up won't be too long in the making.
Ben Walton
- Contact Music


Mojo Fury's debut album Visiting Hours of a Travelling Circus has been a long time in the making, but finally this incredible band from Ireland are ready to make their impact on the current rock scene. And what an impact it is. Recent singles The Mann and Colour of the Bear showcase a hungry, fiery band sprinting out of the gate at full speed, with jagged, angular bursts of distorted power chords. Deep Fish Tank is another song along the same lines, with dirty, psychotic riffs and a pounding performance on the drums.
Mojo Fury are in no way a one trick pony however. Bones (maybe the best thing on the album, although with so many great songs, that's a tough call to make), is more anthemic and has more of a pop sensibility before breaking into a galloping end section which includes the sound of a piano falling down the stairs for good measure.
Next to these full on rock belters of course are the more sedate moments, like the electro-tinged We Should Just Run Away, which is a million miles away from the previously released acoustic version. Album closer Electric Sea adds an almost Radiohead-esque touch to proceedings. It is the album's quietest and most sparse moment, but it fits perfectly.
On Visiting Hours of a Travelling Circus there is so much going on, and so many great moments crammed inside the ten songs on offer that after a couple of listens it is difficult to take in and appreciate everything on offer here. Perseverance is the order of the day: Stick with Mojo Fury and you will be rewarded with one of the finest rock albums of the year. Hopefully a follow up won't be too long in the making.
Ben Walton
- Contact Music


Mojo Fury have released a video for The Difference Between, the title track from their upcoming second album. View it below.

Classic Rock liked the Irish band’s previous outing Visiting Hours Of A Travelling Circus. And if you like their latest material, you can help bring it to the rest of the world.

Frontman Michael Mormecha explains: “Do you remember when you were a kid finishing a picture or making a model and you ran in to show it to your to your ma, da or friend?

“In my head I’m running towards the world holding Mojo Fury’s second album shouting, ‘Look what we made!’ Unfortunately the world can’t just stick it on the fridge door. There’s recording, mixing, mastering, duplication, marketing and touring involved – and that’s where we need your help.

Pledge Music is about interaction and involvement so we have come up with ideas that will hopefully interest you. Use your imagination, let us be your puppets and let’s have some fun together.”
- Classic Rock


Mojo Fury have released a video for The Difference Between, the title track from their upcoming second album. View it below.

Classic Rock liked the Irish band’s previous outing Visiting Hours Of A Travelling Circus. And if you like their latest material, you can help bring it to the rest of the world.

Frontman Michael Mormecha explains: “Do you remember when you were a kid finishing a picture or making a model and you ran in to show it to your to your ma, da or friend?

“In my head I’m running towards the world holding Mojo Fury’s second album shouting, ‘Look what we made!’ Unfortunately the world can’t just stick it on the fridge door. There’s recording, mixing, mastering, duplication, marketing and touring involved – and that’s where we need your help.

Pledge Music is about interaction and involvement so we have come up with ideas that will hopefully interest you. Use your imagination, let us be your puppets and let’s have some fun together.”
- Classic Rock


Mojo Fury are exclusively premiering their new video for The Difference Between on Kerrang.com. The track is taken from the band's upcoming album second album, which is due for release in October this year. The band are funding the album via a Pledge Music campaign starting from today.
- Kerrang


Mojo Fury are exclusively premiering their new video for The Difference Between on Kerrang.com. The track is taken from the band's upcoming album second album, which is due for release in October this year. The band are funding the album via a Pledge Music campaign starting from today.
- Kerrang


MMojo Fury are streaming new track 'Iris Influential' as their Pledge campaign gets under way.

Once again, Northern Ireland is in the news for all the wrong reasons. For a country blessed with such magnificent people, it's always a shame that a few incidents spoil the area's reputation.

Especially when its music scene is on the rise. There's a new energy within the Northern Irish music community, an ambition which has been missing for a while now.

Mojo Fury fuse rock with electro beats, and have managed to build up a devoted following. Launching a Pledge campaign for their second album the band wrote:

"I’m sure you’ve heard people saying that the music industry is changing, well, this is it: we are a real band who create real music, and luckily we don’t have a major label wasting thousands of pounds in fancy studios or on flashy videos. We just wanna get the music out there because we believe in it."

Ahead of this, Mojo Fury have placed new track 'Iris Influential' online. A calm, sedate, electronic-heavy track it's a curious return which should whet your appetite before their proposed second album. - Clash Music


MMojo Fury are streaming new track 'Iris Influential' as their Pledge campaign gets under way.

Once again, Northern Ireland is in the news for all the wrong reasons. For a country blessed with such magnificent people, it's always a shame that a few incidents spoil the area's reputation.

Especially when its music scene is on the rise. There's a new energy within the Northern Irish music community, an ambition which has been missing for a while now.

Mojo Fury fuse rock with electro beats, and have managed to build up a devoted following. Launching a Pledge campaign for their second album the band wrote:

"I’m sure you’ve heard people saying that the music industry is changing, well, this is it: we are a real band who create real music, and luckily we don’t have a major label wasting thousands of pounds in fancy studios or on flashy videos. We just wanna get the music out there because we believe in it."

Ahead of this, Mojo Fury have placed new track 'Iris Influential' online. A calm, sedate, electronic-heavy track it's a curious return which should whet your appetite before their proposed second album. - Clash Music


What do you think is that's unique or unusual about Gary Numan's music?

I think the sounds he uses, the edgy, moody melodies and his well pronounced and very English singing voice gives him his unique style. You know a Numan track when you hear it - and that's something all artists strive for but few achieve.

Is there a particular track that has inspired you?

I was familiar with the NIN cover of 'Metal', but when I heard Numan's original after that I fell in love even more with the track. I love the pounding drums and rhythm of the bass.




Which albums do you feel have been particularly influential?

The Pleasure Principle and The Fury - of course!

Why do you think Numan has ''crossed'' generations so that he's arguably a bigger icon in 2012 than he was in 1980?

Certain tracks have stood the test of time, but also you can see and hear that so many artists have been inspired by a sound started by Numan - and what's more, people know where it came from too.

Do you think it's the darker, atmospheric side of his music that still gives him a credible, underground appeal in 2012?

Yeah, the non-conformist attitude gives him credibility - but his desire to experiment while maintaining his identity is appealing to both his fans and to other artists. - Artrocker


What do you think is that's unique or unusual about Gary Numan's music?

I think the sounds he uses, the edgy, moody melodies and his well pronounced and very English singing voice gives him his unique style. You know a Numan track when you hear it - and that's something all artists strive for but few achieve.

Is there a particular track that has inspired you?

I was familiar with the NIN cover of 'Metal', but when I heard Numan's original after that I fell in love even more with the track. I love the pounding drums and rhythm of the bass.




Which albums do you feel have been particularly influential?

The Pleasure Principle and The Fury - of course!

Why do you think Numan has ''crossed'' generations so that he's arguably a bigger icon in 2012 than he was in 1980?

Certain tracks have stood the test of time, but also you can see and hear that so many artists have been inspired by a sound started by Numan - and what's more, people know where it came from too.

Do you think it's the darker, atmospheric side of his music that still gives him a credible, underground appeal in 2012?

Yeah, the non-conformist attitude gives him credibility - but his desire to experiment while maintaining his identity is appealing to both his fans and to other artists. - Artrocker


Flourishing out between short-lived wails of of a guitar backed by vicious drum fills. 'The Mann' opens up Belfast's own Mojo Fury's debut album 'Visiting Hours of a Travelling Circus'. 'The Mann' manages to hit you so hard that you feel reluctant to listen to the next track incase it disappoints, it doesn't. 'Bones' features a synthesized backdrop crushed by some crunchy rock and roll guitars that give off a true AC/DC vibe and just when you feel as if everything has resolved, the track comes crashing back down during the chorus.

'Colour of the Bear' gives off a math-rock vibe that could be found on a Hold Your Horse Is song, the song really comes together full circle when the chorus hits and the sudden change in dynamic whilst this is paralleled in 'We Should Just Run Away' which is a glitchy synth based song which leads into a huge hook-laden chorus.

Straying away from their usual formula is 'What a Secret' which is a bustling crescendo which turns into one of the heaviest songs on the album. Personal highlight is 'Electric Sea' which shows a different side of the band, straying into completely different territory with a softer song. Michael Mormecha's vocals are a lot softer on this track and shows off his vocal range.

For a debut album, Mojo Fury present an impressive unique blend of indie rock alongside a backdrop of alternative/post-rock to the brim with catchy but passionate vocal hooks mixed in with a reinforced wall of sound. - Alter The Press


Flourishing out between short-lived wails of of a guitar backed by vicious drum fills. 'The Mann' opens up Belfast's own Mojo Fury's debut album 'Visiting Hours of a Travelling Circus'. 'The Mann' manages to hit you so hard that you feel reluctant to listen to the next track incase it disappoints, it doesn't. 'Bones' features a synthesized backdrop crushed by some crunchy rock and roll guitars that give off a true AC/DC vibe and just when you feel as if everything has resolved, the track comes crashing back down during the chorus.

'Colour of the Bear' gives off a math-rock vibe that could be found on a Hold Your Horse Is song, the song really comes together full circle when the chorus hits and the sudden change in dynamic whilst this is paralleled in 'We Should Just Run Away' which is a glitchy synth based song which leads into a huge hook-laden chorus.

Straying away from their usual formula is 'What a Secret' which is a bustling crescendo which turns into one of the heaviest songs on the album. Personal highlight is 'Electric Sea' which shows a different side of the band, straying into completely different territory with a softer song. Michael Mormecha's vocals are a lot softer on this track and shows off his vocal range.

For a debut album, Mojo Fury present an impressive unique blend of indie rock alongside a backdrop of alternative/post-rock to the brim with catchy but passionate vocal hooks mixed in with a reinforced wall of sound. - Alter The Press


With a title such as this, you might reasonably expect the debut album from Belfast’s Mojo Fury to be an industrial grade irritant. Thankfully, despite beating a decidedly left-field path, the band’s awkward nature is tempered by the occasional urge to rock the fuck out. With Micke Mormecha’s omnipresent, woozily melodic vocals, a remarkable command of how to create predominantly delicate music that does not suck, and a grab bag of unusual accoutrements to pluck from – Vaudeville piano? Why not! – Mojo Fury ensure that there’s far more to ‘Visiting Hours…’ than ‘We Should Just Run Away’’s blatant plagiarism of Nine Inch Nails. - Rock Sound


With a title such as this, you might reasonably expect the debut album from Belfast’s Mojo Fury to be an industrial grade irritant. Thankfully, despite beating a decidedly left-field path, the band’s awkward nature is tempered by the occasional urge to rock the fuck out. With Micke Mormecha’s omnipresent, woozily melodic vocals, a remarkable command of how to create predominantly delicate music that does not suck, and a grab bag of unusual accoutrements to pluck from – Vaudeville piano? Why not! – Mojo Fury ensure that there’s far more to ‘Visiting Hours…’ than ‘We Should Just Run Away’’s blatant plagiarism of Nine Inch Nails. - Rock Sound


Belfast quartet Mojo Fury have been busy. Since the end of 2010, they’ve toured with the likes of And So I Watch You From Afar and Oceansize, having previously opened for Biffy Clyro. Critics have been impressed: splendid write-ups from rock mags and online ‘zines alike have brought the band to the position of a potential breakthrough proper. But does their debut album point the way to the Radio 1 playlist, like Pulled Apart By Horses managed, or is their 15 minutes up already?
Some from A, and some from B. There’s nothing here that’s going to set hearts truly racing, the band lacking pronounced individuality to set them apart from so many others doing similar songs with different accents: from Scotland there’s Twin Atlantic, for instance. But their commitment to the live scene has helped to hone the four-piece as performers, and everything here is delivered with unquestionable commitment and ability. So, while it’s not going to win any awards for originality, Visiting Hours of a Travelling Circus is a most enjoyable, energetic listen that will appeal as easily to fans of lower-league rockers like Castrovalva and Hold Your Horse Is – Mojo Fury have toured with both – as it will big-hitters like Foo Fighters and the aforementioned Biff. Indeed, it’s invigorating enough for a few cries of "Mon the Mojo".
Highlights, the record has its share. Deep Fish Tank (Factory Settings) is almost grunge in its design, albeit more Alice in Chains snarl than Mudhoney silliness. The Mann is all whisper, EXPLODE, then quiet again dynamics, very much a Northern Irish cousin of PABH’s crunching pop-rock, call-and-response vocals in the verses pointing the way to a holler-yourself-hoarse chorus. Lyrically, there are parallels to be drawn with the playfulness of Mclusky/Future of the Left’s Andy Falkous, and compositionally Bones seems to take a few (albeit slowed-down) cues from the former’s evergreen scream-along Lightsabre C***sucking Blues. Slower moments like What a Secret undoubtedly work better live though, to allow the crowd to take a breather – here, they stall the momentum that the album’s more dramatic cuts promote.
Wearing their influences on their sleeves, Mojo Fury aren’t an act to pin all of your hopes on in 2011. But they’re a great distraction until your personal favourites return with new releases; and should they be your favourite band, you can feel satisfied that they’ve delivered a very decent first album and have at least 10 of those 15 yet to use up. - BBC


Discography

"Visiting Hours of a Travelling Circus" - album released May 2011.

"The Difference Between" - album released October 2013.

Photos

Bio

MOJO FURY are a rock band formed in Belfast, Northern Ireland. They live in Lisburn, just south of Belfast, in their home studio – a converted farmhouse that has allowed them the time and freedom to write and record their second album, The Difference Between.

The band met in Bangor whilst studying at music college, and despite being somewhat “out in the sticks” on the global music map, Northern Ireland has had a fair crack of the whip over the past few years. Friends and contemporaries like And So I Watch You From Afar and Two Door Cinema Club have shown that it’s possible to break out of the country’s borders, whilst labels like Derry’s Smalltown America and their flagship band Jetplane Landing have added credence to this being a region thriving on the wider musical landscape thanks to there being more than just something in the water.

When Mojo Fury’s debut album Visiting Hours of a Travelling Circus landed in 2011, it had already had a gestation period of nearly five years, with the first song ideas starting as crudely as could be expected from teens cutting their teeth. That’s the problem with being “out in the sticks” – when the tree falls, there might not be anyone there to hear it. The finished album, however, was far from crude: an intelligent collection of songs ranging from filthy, almost post-hardcore slices like The Mann to the pumping groove that underpins the synth-laden anthem We Should Just Run Away. Throw in Electric Sea, drenched in heart and harmony, and the honky-tonk piano that drops into the agitated, pure fun of Bones and… well, you’ve got an album that bewitched some people and baffled just as many. Those who were charmed wore their heart on their sleeves:

“They’re ferocious, they’re exciting, they’re challenging, on top of being effortlessly cool; they’re just a brilliant band” - BBC Radio 1

Onwards into 2013, and there’s a band that Artrocker crowned “New Blood” band of the year in 2011 who have a lot to live up to. They’ve matured and in some ways they’ve mellowed; the angst-ridden tone of much of their debut hasn’t found its way so prominently into album two. That’s not to say that they’ve no longer got the bit between the teeth – title track The Difference Between was launched by Kerrang and Classic Rock to announce the album, and recalls Led Zeppelin loaded at their most vibrantly excessive. Alongside this, however, the band released Iris Influential, a song built on melting melodies, a lilting piano refrain and electronic beats; Clash Music launching the track gave an indication as to the new territories that Mojo Fury are heading towards.

New single Origami Bird immediately displays one key element that Mojo Fury will never lose – their fun side. This is about as close to a pop song as they’re going to make; it might even show the band’s love of Prince creeping into their sound. It’s part of an album that is at turns epic, heavy, subtle and certainly danceable. The balance of Mojo Fury’s sound is found and tempered on The Difference Between by its personnel in the studio – mixed by Catherine Marks (Foals, Death Cab For Cutie, The Vaccines) and mastered by Nick Watson (Faith No More, Therapy?, Gary Numan), it’s an album that has been guided by trusted voices.

The Difference Between is released on Friday 18th October via Pledge Music. Chosen to allow them to interact with their fans as part of the process of the album’s release, the band are offering a number of exclusive incentives to encourage people to get involved in a record that is undoubtedly a document of a band ploughing their own furrow.

*****

Activity for the band includes:

• Festival appearances at Eurosonic, Sonisphere, 2000 Trees, The Great Escape and Beautiful Days
• BBC Radio 1 Live Session broadcast
• MTV Rocks (formerly MTV2) video spot plays
• iTunes ‘Single of the Week’
• Kerrang! Radio Playlist/ Live Session
• Kerrang! TV Playlist
• Kerrang! Magazine feature/ playlist
• NME website ‘Top 5 new bands you must see at Sonisphere’
• NME magazine ‘Top Tracks of the Week’
• NME TV playlist
• Sub TV playlist
• Rock Sound magazine feature/ cover mount CD
• Rock Sound website ‘Band of the Week’
• Artrocker ‘Album of the Month’
• Artrocker ‘Single of the Month’ twice
• Radio support from BBC R1, XFM, Absolute, Total Rock, NME
• Classic Rock website ‘Track of the Day’
• Big Cheese magazine feature

Selected press:

"They're ferocious, they're exciting, they're challenging, on top of being effortlessly cool; they're just a brilliant band"
- BBC Radio 1

““I think this band are gonna be big”
- Kerrang Radio

"Similarly to Nirvana, they combine heaviness with an emotional connection - the head bang is tinged with all the lights in your head being turned on at once"
- 5/5, Album of the Month, Artrocker

"The band's awkward nature is tempered by the occasional urge to rock the fuck out"
- 7/10, Rock Sound

"This is quite the grand entrance for newcomers Mojo Fu