Moon Furies
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Moon Furies

Brooklyn, New York, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2014

Brooklyn, New York, United States
Established on Jan, 2014
Band Rock Electro

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Saturday nights in Williamsburg are like a busy fashion show curated by Alexa Chung, with the runway leading straight to cheap bars and multiple venues. Everyone is stoked to be there from old dudes to young girls alike, so as you can imagine, spirits are high. The scene at Glasslands this past weekend was no exception. Bushwick-based trio Moon Furies brought the clamor of the Williamsburg evening into the venue and to the crowd, with their upbeat and frenzied performance. Comprised of Andy Kiel on guitar and Jim Wittman on bass (both shared vocals and synth duties), as well as drummer Sammy Clark keeping the beat to their spasmodic display. Running around, changing instruments and sweating profusely, this youthful band pushed out a heady string of dance tunes carefully crafted for us to shake along with them. Wittman’s intensity was enough to wake up the crowd as he periodically beckoned us to join him. At one point, working as one cohesive unit they gathered around Clark’s drum set in a synth based tribal percussion segment. If you need light hearted, fun and catchy dance beats look no further than Moon Furies, whose sole intent is to get you out of your head and into their world. - XO Magazine


input one is almost overwhelmed by the sound of this song. With dark drums, the electric body and muted chords could be here just as easily be the soundtrack to the apocalypse. Sonically, the piece gradually brightens and recalls in atavisms closest to The Faint. Middle intone shrill synthesizer sounds. Before the second half of the track begins, there is a musical break, a - a little misplaced - organ introduces the. Then transforms itself "La Cabeza" in a dramatic tinged, faded pop song. In today's free download, there are many beautiful moments, the dark mood can be maintained over the entire period. So offset one electronic audacity of the title in trance-like moods. La Cabeza in German means simply "The Head". The question remains why this slip into Spanish. The line "You got my head" are indeed English. The three musicians to Moon Furies see in Brooklyn, New York City, is home. The assumption is that such person has turned the heads of the guys probably a little too much when there already is severely disrupted. - Rolling Stone


Download and stream the excellent electro harmonies of Moon Furies' "La Cabeza."

Artist: Moon Furies
Hail From: Brooklyn, N.Y.
Song: 'La Cabeza'
Album: (Single) [iTunes] [Amazon]
Sounds Like: Fischerspooner, The Faint

In Their Words: "Listening to 'La Cabeza' is sort of like going trick-or-treating. During the duration of this song you could be anything from a giant robot with green socks to a skinny Michelin Man or just a bearded skeleton with no pants, in any case you eat four pounds of free small candy bars, that companies call "fun-sized", and you walk around seeing other people in the same situation with the same blissful smile. For those couple minutes, it's like Morgan Freeman is your grandfather. That's what we wanted to convey, especially in the Lyric Video." -- Singer Andy Kiel - Spinner (AOL)


Moon Furies have relocated to Brooklyn, but they can still feel the Chicago love. The trio is releasing a new single, "La Cabeza" on October 30th. This is the band's follow-up their ep Not Earth which was released over the summer. - The Deli


We've posted a lot of synth pop goodness over the past few months. It's hot stuff right now, I guess. This, however, is not synth pop. This is synth ROCK! Introducing Moon Furies and their blistering new single "La Cabeza"! We love those urgent switches between full-on rock 'n' roll ear-assault and the almost tropical waves of calm before the build-up. Everything sorta hits mind-blown territory at the 3:45 mark. Wait for it... - A Media Mindset


Moon Furies is a Brooklyn/Chicago band (hell of a band practice commute, right?) that made some noise this past summer during their epic "100 Gigs in 100-ish Days" march. I was skeptical at first, but damn, they pulled it out. Gigs happened whereever, whenever, with a healthy amount of streetside busking filling out the days between shows at regular venues. Crazy. Plus, the 100th show was an opening spot for Peter, Bjorn, and John. Pretty sweet.

Of course, I haven't mentioned the most important point: that the "100 Gigs" donated all proceeds to cancer research. Maybe Guns & Roses will donate the proceeds of their next tour to cancer research too? Maybe? Maybe not? God bless indie rock.
Stream the 80s montage flavored indietronic track "Survival" below & visit Moon Furies at their site & Facebook & download the track at Bandcamp. Peace! - QRO


Based in Brooklyn via Chicago, electronic trio Moon Furies is picking up steam after opening for compatible artists like Peter Bjorn and John, Chairlift and Nite Jewel. The band already released 2 singles in 2012 and is putting the final touches on their debut EP, scheduled for a 2012 release and entitled "Not Earth". The twosome’s dark electro-pop reinterprets the dark electronic sound of the early 80s in a personal direction involving - among other things - real drums and a sweeping electric guitar. - Chelsea Eriksen - The Deli


Moon Furies have released the second single from their upcoming ep "Not Earth". The track is called "Skyy".

You can catch Moon Furies on March 30th at Empty Bottle opening for Nite Jewel and Chairlift. - The Deli


Moon Furies caught our attention last year when they played a bunch of shows to raise money for cancer research. Back then, the part Brooklynite, part Chicagoan electro-pop trio was fairly new to the scene and had recently released its debut album, Mercury. Now, the band is preparing for the release of a new EP, Not Earth, and hitting the road for a brief tour, which includes a show at the Empty Bottle later this week.
The guys recently released the upcoming EP’s latest single, “Skyy,” which is further proof of their retro-futuristic sound—heavy synth, danceable beats, and borderline maudlin lyrics like “You are wearing me thin/Like a cold winter night” or “Now I’m told that you’re gone and I should move on/But I don’t think I agree.” Download the new track for a price of your choosing (including free) over at Moon Furies' Bandcamp page.
We mentioned that Moon Furies will be stopping by the Empty Bottle this Friday, opening for Chairlift and Nite Jewel. Advance tickets have been sold out until this afternoon, but the Bottle just released more, so get 'em while they're hot. And take a look at this video for “Look At Me”: - Chicagoist


Moon Furies
Where: Arlene's Grocery, 95 Stanton Street; (212) 358-1633
When: Friday, 8:30PM
Price: $10
The electronic-synth championing band returns from their adventures at SXSW for a night of frenzy in the Lower East Side. Moon Furies, led by best friend duo Jim Wittmann and Andy Kiel, invite you to celebrate the band's EP Not Earth and their latest single "Skyy," which can be streamed below. The band's addicting tunes are a surefire way to pack in your weekend dose of revelry with dancing and an electrifying show. - Huffington Post


On the one year anniversary of the release of Moon Furies' debut album Mercury, the band has released a new track called "Survival". The track comes from their new ep Not Earth which will be released later this year. - The Deli


Trio made in New York et Chicago, les Moon Furies ne se soucient guère de la notion de bon goût. Leur dernier single, “Mercury 13”, pourrait bien en énerver plus d’un, avec ces sons flirtant avec le pire de l’euro dance. Sauf qu’on aime quand même. Que leur album, sorti il y a un an, mérite une écoute approfondie. Et qu’après tout, le bon goût, ça ne sert pas à grand chose. - Dirrty Music


Moon Furies is going to make you move tonight at Arlene’s Grocery, as part of our monthly No Pulp Music Night extravaganza! The show kicks off at 8PM, and Moon Furies will hit the stage at 10PM.

The band has definitely taken the country by storm, performing with acts such as Peter Bjorn and John and Dot Dot Dot. Not to mention, they recently took part in 100 Shows in 100 Days where all proceeds went directly to cancer research.

Moon Furies is led by Andy Kiel and Jim Wittmann—best friends since they were 4—and the live performance they deliver has been described by Windy City Rock as “Muppets on crack.” Needless to say, this group brings the fun!

What you can expect is head bobbing beats, some in your face synth, and some sway-worthy “echo-y” vocals. Standing silently in the back of the room will not cut it for this one, so come ready to dance and party! - No Pulp


The very talented Brooklyn-based rock band, Moon Furies, just released this video for their single “Mercury 13” and we had to share it!

Don’t miss them performing at our next No Pulp Music Night at Arlene’s Grocery on January 25th! They hit the stage at 10pm. You’ll thank us later! - No Pulp


The very talented Brooklyn-based rock band, Moon Furies, just released this video for their single “Mercury 13” and we had to share it!

Don’t miss them performing at our next No Pulp Music Night at Arlene’s Grocery on January 25th! They hit the stage at 10pm. You’ll thank us later! - No Pulp


Mercury 13 music video for Chicago Band, Moon Furies. The Moon Furies are: Jim Wittman (Vocals, Bass, Keyboard, Trumpet) Andy Kiel (Vocals, Guitar, Keyboard) Patrick McAvena/Andrew Hertzberg (Drums) www.moonfuries.com Music Video by Kris Wade-Matthews www.worldofkris.com With Jess Joy as the Girlfriend - Frequency TV


Our friends Moon Furies just released their music video Mercury 13, check it out! You will see myself (Chelsea) and Lauren in the video as well. We had such a great time being in it! If you are in the NYC, you should check out their next show at Arlene's Grocery on Jan. 25. - Stic-of-the-Week


What do you get when you combine members of Moon Furies with members of Earth Program add roller blades and synchronized dancing? The new video for "Mercury 13" by Moon Furies. - The Deli


Chicago electro-poppers Moon Furies‘ new video for “Mercury 13? rehashes that same classic story: Boy lives with girl; girl breaks up with boy and moves to New York; boy chases after girl and has a dance party in a vacant lot. I just don’t know when bands are going to get some original ideas already. For bonus fun: see if you can spot the Chicago neighborhoods featured in the video: - Loud Loop Press


Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem got nothing on this. Once called “Muppets on crack who were born to be rock stars” by Windy City Rock, the “starry eyed synth rockers” of Moon Furies are receiving plenty of good words for their electro pop debut Mercury. “Sun Burnt Love” has the energy of a top-40 pop tune with new wave lyrics fusing darkness of subject matter with joy. “Look at Me” echoes the sound of despair juxtaposed with sunny tones and bouncy synth tracking. Gloomy like shoegaze but poppy at the same time, Moon Furies have figured out a formula that outwits the competition — making these Chicago/Brooklyn rockers leaders at something that has been tried and failed by many others before them: a futuristic take on a retro sound. Thoughtfully, Moon Furies also donated proceeds from recent concerts to cancer research. (Appearing at Double Door on December 2) –text: Jyn Radakovits - The Examiner


Former Chicago residents/current Brooklynites Moon Furies returned home Friday night for the first time since completing their 100 Shows in 100 Days charity marathon this past summer. Armed with a new drummer and a batch of fresh songs, not to mention matching turquoise pants, the band looked... snug. Energy was abundant from the get-go as the trio blasted off with "Way Down," from their 2011 release Mercury. The track found vocalists Andy Kiel and Jim Wittmann snapping trundling rhymes at each other over fizzing synth lines while gyrating to dance beats.

Moon Furies have never been short on catchy hooks, and the new material played Saturday proved that their load was not blown on record one. The first such cut found more of Kiel's flow snaking around a curvy synthesizer lead and clattering drum work by aforementioned newcomer Pat McAvena. Later, it was Kiel's guitar that took center stage on a new tune, slapping a zaftig crunch on some shadowbox percussion. A bit more bite than what I'd come to expect from Moon Furies, and something that a less confident group might have botched. Smooth electro-pop bands can get themselves into trouble when they drop the slick and get a little dirty, but here it worked, and with the right production it could be damned refreshing on a record.


Despite a joke about the song's subject (a "bitch"), "Look At Me" stood out as being the urgent feeling song of the night, a result of a desperate-to-celebratory vocal turn and McAvena's mountainous crashing and thumping. The audio orgasm came courtesy of Wittmann, who dropped to his knees and wailed on his trumpet like he was trying to punch a hole in the roof with pure sound. "Sun Burnt Love" provided a nice moment, and proved that all breakups aren't ugly, as the band invited former drummer Andrew Hertzberg onstage to jam. The song benefited from the dual percussion, as well as Wittmann's raspy vocals. As if determined to blow his lungs out, he picked the horn up again and wandered through the Double Door, whirling out the opening notes of "Fallen" before springing back on the stage. Watching he and Kiel boogie through the set, I couldn't help but wonder if a part of them wished they could opt out of Moon Furies as well, at least for a night, so that they could spend more time dancing with the audience.

That unasked question was answered at the close of the set, when the band debuted their video for "Mercury 13" and played along with it. Its slow build exploded into what I've previously praised as being their most euphonic hook, making the song both undeniable danceable and emotionally gripping. All three members of Moon Furies looked to be on cloud nine during the it, which is probably only a few million miles lower than where they're aiming. Most of the crowd bopped along blissfully as Kiel and Wittmann harmonized on the line we cannot lose/ we were born to win. Well, they almost got it right. I'm thinking that this band is what they were born to do. Here's to winning. - Windy City Rock


Former Chicago residents/current Brooklynites Moon Furies returned home Friday night for the first time since completing their 100 Shows in 100 Days charity marathon this past summer. Armed with a new drummer and a batch of fresh songs, not to mention matching turquoise pants, the band looked... snug. Energy was abundant from the get-go as the trio blasted off with "Way Down," from their 2011 release Mercury. The track found vocalists Andy Kiel and Jim Wittmann snapping trundling rhymes at each other over fizzing synth lines while gyrating to dance beats.

Moon Furies have never been short on catchy hooks, and the new material played Saturday proved that their load was not blown on record one. The first such cut found more of Kiel's flow snaking around a curvy synthesizer lead and clattering drum work by aforementioned newcomer Pat McAvena. Later, it was Kiel's guitar that took center stage on a new tune, slapping a zaftig crunch on some shadowbox percussion. A bit more bite than what I'd come to expect from Moon Furies, and something that a less confident group might have botched. Smooth electro-pop bands can get themselves into trouble when they drop the slick and get a little dirty, but here it worked, and with the right production it could be damned refreshing on a record.


Despite a joke about the song's subject (a "bitch"), "Look At Me" stood out as being the urgent feeling song of the night, a result of a desperate-to-celebratory vocal turn and McAvena's mountainous crashing and thumping. The audio orgasm came courtesy of Wittmann, who dropped to his knees and wailed on his trumpet like he was trying to punch a hole in the roof with pure sound. "Sun Burnt Love" provided a nice moment, and proved that all breakups aren't ugly, as the band invited former drummer Andrew Hertzberg onstage to jam. The song benefited from the dual percussion, as well as Wittmann's raspy vocals. As if determined to blow his lungs out, he picked the horn up again and wandered through the Double Door, whirling out the opening notes of "Fallen" before springing back on the stage. Watching he and Kiel boogie through the set, I couldn't help but wonder if a part of them wished they could opt out of Moon Furies as well, at least for a night, so that they could spend more time dancing with the audience.

That unasked question was answered at the close of the set, when the band debuted their video for "Mercury 13" and played along with it. Its slow build exploded into what I've previously praised as being their most euphonic hook, making the song both undeniable danceable and emotionally gripping. All three members of Moon Furies looked to be on cloud nine during the it, which is probably only a few million miles lower than where they're aiming. Most of the crowd bopped along blissfully as Kiel and Wittmann harmonized on the line we cannot lose/ we were born to win. Well, they almost got it right. I'm thinking that this band is what they were born to do. Here's to winning. - Windy City Rock


Chicago-based band Moon Furies have been raising money for the Kellogg Cancer Center since May, reaching their goal of playing 100 shows in 100 days at the end of August. As shown in the picture above, they were able to raise $3,670.02!

They'll play the Double Door tonight (12/2), with support from GhostHouse, Eight Bit Tiger, and DJ Sam Padrul. Tickets are still available. If you can't make it out, the show will also be streaming live via Gigity.TV. - Brooklyn Vegan


In the words of Windy City Rock:

"Moon Furies, is opening for Peter Bjorn and John this Wednesday night, August 24th, at the Empty Bottle! If you haven't seen Moon Furies yet, know that their show is a crazy good time. Combined with PB&J, the night is bound to be one epic explosion of fun.

Making it an even bigger deal, Moon Furies will be celebrating the final show in their "100 shows in 100 days" adventure that began in May, which found them playing venues, street corners and pretty much anywhere else you could think of from then until now to raise money for cancer research at the Kellogg Cancer Center."

Tonight's show (8/24) is sold out, but Windy City Rock says "word is that 100 more are being released at the door", AND Moon Furies are offering two tickets to whoever "pledges the highest amount to the Kellogg Cancer Center by 5 PM."

Tonight's show is one of four this week for Peter Bjorn & John who also play Lincoln Hall and Schubas (twice). All four are now sold out. ALL PB&J dates, with openers, listed below... - Brooklyn Vegan


They did it! After 100 shows in 100 days, Moon Furies are done with their ambitious project, which earned $3,670 for cancer research. And honestly it’s quite remarkable how much drive the local dance rockers have to not only see the project through it’s completion but keep the focus on it’s charity aspect. Moon Furies ended in style with their 100th show coming last week at the Empty Bottle opening for Peter, Bjorn and John, and there’s footage! Check out this video from the show featuring both the band’s disco-guitar and melodic, synthy material: - Loud Loop Press


Moon Furies capped off their 100 shows in 100 days project in style, playing to a sold out crowd at The Empty Bottle and opening for Peter Bjorn & John. The group had their trademark charisma and enthusiasm working overtime from the start, evidenced by the fact that bassist Jim Wittmann waited all of thirty seconds before launching himself off the stage to dance with the crowd. An inspired version of "Way Down," from the band's debut album Mercury, mashed together tandem vocals from Wittmann and guitar player Andy Kiel over a wiggling synth line that evokes the same party atmosphere as Salt-n-Pepa's classic "Push It." Some of the crowd, I'm assuming those at The Bottle specifically for PB&J, seemed a bit bewildered by Moon Furies at first, curious about what nonsense was interrupting their conversation or waiting for something to whistle along to. By the time Wittmann produced a trumpet to bellow out the finale of "Look At Me," those same people had turned the crowd into a dance club. Kiel joined his bass player in the crowd during the intro to "Logan Square," leaving drummer and Windy City Rock writer Andrew Hertzberg alone on stage. The song's fist-pumping melody trampolined around Hertzberg's snappy drumming, giving every bead of sweat the audience had worked up something to groove to. Just in case anyone in the back was feeling a bit disconnected, Wittmann meandered towards the bar wailing on his trumpet during "Fallen."

Kiel and Hertzberg
Playing 100 shows in 100 days is likely to do one of two things (maybe both?) to a band: dramatically hone their skills or drive them totally insane. The former is certainly true of Moon Furies, who played the last gig of their marathon like it was their last gig on earth. The set ended with the group's strongest tune, "Mercury 13," a song that takes everything great about the band and rolls it into 5 minutes of bliss. It opened with an airy hum before being yanked upwards by soaring vocals and thumping percussion. Slower verses bled into ultra catchy synth squeaks, rising and falling while maintaining ultimate danceability. The song/show's dramatic crescendo found Kiel melting on the stage with his guitar while Wittmann perched himself on the bass drum, armed again with his trumpet. Hertzberg rolled and crashed on his kit while a trumpet solo softly faded out, ending the set.

P&B
Playing the first of four scheduled Chicago shows on their All You Can Eat Tour, Peter Bjorn and John took the stage to a worked up and enthusiastic crowd. The group leaned heavily on Björn Yttling's catchy bass licks and some fluttery vocal work, lulling the audience into blithe head-nodding. "Let's Call It Off," from 2006's Writer's Block, tantalized with moments of Clash-like swagger before dipping back into dreamier jangling. More satisfying was "Dig A Little Deeper" from PB&J's recently released album, Gimme Some. The song's combination of quasi-tribal percussion and crunch-and-rattle riffs make it a great summer party song. The band played a few internet requests, including a slower, harmonica-twinged jam and a cover of The Strokes' "Is This It." Of course, the song that ultimately drew the biggest pop from the crowd was "Young Folks." It's an easy, cool song to listen to, though without Victoria Bergsman's vocals it loses a little something- something that can't be replaced by drunk whistling. Tragically, the tune-challenged imbibers behind me didn't get that memo. Regardless, song's don't often explode the way that one did back in '06 unless they've got pizzazz, and that came through in PB&J's performance. - Windy City Rock


[Video] Playing 100 shows in 100 days, the electronic pop-rock band Moon Furies is in the midst of a cancer crusade, raising money for the Kellogg Cancer Center. - WCIU - The U


Chicago electro-pop/rock trio Moon Furies are about to take on something big. Starting on Tuesday, May 17th at Subterranean, the band will perform 100 shows in 100 days. Crazy, right? That's a pretty impressive endeavor by itself, but what makes it even more admirable is that the band will be donating all proceeds to the Kellogg Cancer Center to aid in cancer research. I'm happy to be able to say that as Moon Furies' drummer, Windy City Rock's very own Andrew Hertzberg is one of the guys behind this. Watch the video below to hear Andrew and his bandmates Jim and Andy explain the project in more detail, and help them make money for a great cause by heading out to the shows! - Windy City Rock


When a band claims they are better then "The Beatles" who them selves have said they are more popular then Jesus, Moon Furies are worth listening to. The heavy synth band got together young and started in middle school. Jim, Andy and Andrew started Moon Furies " To get hot girl friends." which they had accomplished. The relationships only lasted a week sadly. The Moon Furies inspirations are Daft Punk, Michael Jackson and The Beatles. The Moon Furies discussed about their new new album "Mercury" and how their indie, dance, experimental sound comes from the love of the synthesizer.

[Click the link to listen to the interview] - Vocalo


Another Six Pack, another awesome Chicago band. Moon Furies is relatively new to the local music landscape, but they’ve already got the city dancing. Young and ambitious, this dance-rock outfit is getting ready to embark on a journey some might call crazy, some might call suicidal, but no doubt will be a blast: 100 shows in 100 days. And no, this isn’t just a booty-shakin’ booze-fueled bacchanal. Andy, Jim and Andrew are undertaking this daunting task in an effort to create awareness and raise funds to aid cancer research at the locally-based Kellogg Cancer Center.

Six questions from yours truly, six answers from Moon Furies guitarist Andy Kiel. Here we go…



Ok Andy, How did Moon Furies get together? And where’d the name come from?

While Moon Furies is a bit of a newer band, our history reaches back over 150 years. Jim and I first met when we were a mere four years old. We shared a common bond in our love of finding new ways to destroy our Crash Dummies — a totally sick toy from our childhood. Ever since, our imaginations have been running wild and we’ve been constantly creating; from petty kid games to childhood record labels to our former band, Relativity (an alternative-rock band). When college came around, Jim and I went our separate ways in hopes of finding the answer to life – which was quite fortunate, because it was at this time that I met Andrew. Jim moved to Chicago a few years later, and of course, we couldn’t help but start writing music again. After spending a bit of time shaping our new ideas, which were more electronic-based than anything we had previously done, Jim and I began experimenting with different drummers. The moment we saw Andrew’s tattoo of the number 42, we knew it was perfect fit.

As all bands do in their early phase, we threw around what seemed like millions of ideas for band names, but of course none of them had quite the right touch. Out of nowhere though, the ’70s cult film “The Warriors” showed up on our doorstep. I don’t know who came up with the names for the gangs in that movie, but they must have been on some ill drugs or a genius. “Moon Furies” is a fusion of the “Moon Runners” and “The Baseball Furies” gangs.



Playing dance music in Chicago means facing audiences notorious for not dancing at shows. Do our crowds deserve that reputation?

I think in some instances Chicago crowds are more hesitant to dance than crowds in other cities, but that doesn’t mean they don’t dance. At our shows, it’s a bit like “flash dancing”. Once it gets going, everyone in sight takes off their pants and starts dancing like Tom Cruise in “Risky Business.”

If you look at Chicago’s trending music scene, there are DJs and there are more traditional rock bands. When you want to dance, you go to a dance club. When you want to listen to music, you go to a rock venue. Why not fuse them? Are they really so different? It’s for this reason I’m especially excited about our upcoming performance at Debonair on June 9.



How would you say the city has influenced your music, or you as a musician?

I came from a smaller city in Wisconsin where cows were common, and they made lifetime supplies of toilet paper. It’s also the manhole capitol of the world. Holla Neenah, WI. Seriously though, next time you’re going over a manhole cover look down. I bet it will say it’s from Neenah, WI.

Exploration of an artistic soul can be very different in a city such as Chicago, because there simply isn’t the same type of community support where I grew up in Wisconsin. It wasn’t until I moved here that I felt free to fully let go of my barriers and try to explore who I really am and what I have to offer to this world. This continual experience defines who I strive to be as a musician. I’m always trying innovate and cross new boundaries.



So, Moon Furies is getting ready to play 100 shows in 100 days. Where are you most excited to play? Imagine a world with no limitations — where in Chicago do you play your 100th show?

I’m honestly most excited to play on the streets. I’ve always wanted to see what this would be like. It’s such a raw means to share your passion with the world and such a unique opportunity to spontaneously interact with so many different people from across the world. Sure, there will be cold or rainy days, and I imagine we will inevitably have plenty of people walk right by, completely ignoring us. However, the individuals whose attention we will catch will make it all worth it for me.

My most pressing goal in life is to be the first musician to perform on the moon, so that would be pretty awesome (Yo, Richard Branson, hit me up). However, for this project it would really mean most to me to end our adventure by playing anywhere with Andrew’s mom present. Whether it be the Pritzker Pavilion or Andrew’s parent’s backyard.



Speaking of shows, got a favorite local band to see live? To play with?

Those are both extremely hard questions. - Up Chicago


Three my-tennis-game-although-not-good-was-not-as-terrible-as-anticipated reasons to strap on that headband and the head over to the Fireside Bowl tonight…

1. That’s right, you, the Fireside Bowl! Older Chicago punk rockers are quite familiar, but maybe you young kids just know the lore. Well, it’s alive again and tonight is hosting a little something that seems at times out of character. You think gritty when you think Fireside, right? Punk rock, honky tonk, things seedy to match the decor. Moon Furies are none of those things. Instead, they will make the night that 80's bowling alley dance party you’ve always wanted.

2. Drums and guitars exist in the world Noise FM, so that’s already a step towards the Fireside’s comfort zone. There’s something decidedly 90's going on here. The Foo Fighters immediately come to mind, but with a hint of that early 2000's Killers like dance vibe? It’s certainly big and ready for public consumption.

3. Denver’s Photo Atlas play what we in the music biz call angular music. What that means is not important but what it means is that there’s a jagged quality that might make your dancing quite hurky and jerky. Fugazi and At The Drive-In are name dropped on their Myspace, but only if those bands were more interested in making you dance. I don’t think they are, but Photo Atlas wouldn’t mind. It’s all in that drum beat. Opener Sunken Ships are where it’s at. This is the sound of 90's Chicago indie rock. Think Seam. Please. Not enough folks think Seam. It all sounds so simple now, slowly building songs with laconic vocals and that clean jangle of the guitar, but when it is done right, Sunken Ships style, it still feels like what you want to hear.


8:00 p.m. Tuesday, 7/12. Fireside Bowl. 17+. $8. - Loud Loop Press


Moon Furries are a mission with a solid cause behind it. The band is almost a third of the way through a 100 shows in a 100 days tour this summer. They are doing this to help support cancer research because one of the band member's mother is currently battling cancer.

Moon Furries released their latest ep Mercury back in January and you can pay what you like for it here. Moon Furries will be performing at Obbity Fest on July 3rd along with many other great local bands. - The Deli


Andy Kiel, Jim Wittmann, and Andrew Hertzberg aren’t homeless or begging for money to waste on wretched addictions. Instead they’ve been performing on the streets, at festivals, radio stations, and venues under the stellar moniker Moon Furies for an important cause. On May 17th, the trio commenced their mission to raise money and perform 100 shows in 100 days for cancer research, specifically to support Andrew’s mother after she was diagnosed with throat cancer. Their musical output is a blend of starry-eyed synths and celestial harmonies, but while playing in the streets, the band is forced to strip back to acoustics and impromptu verses. With one LP under their belt, the trio intends to name each album after our solar system’s planetary arrangement (They really dig space). You can grab their debut Mercury here.

Veoba hung out with Moon Furies during day 35 of their charitable venture. We talked over some local Mexican food about their current project, the hoppin’ street spots, and their lunar dreams that’ll hopefully be funded by Virgin’s Richard Branson. Despite the shithole that Memories provided, Moon Furies put on a momentous electronic performance, and apparently their acoustic street appearances draw a crowd of natives, toursits, kids and dancing pets alike. Check out the our conversation below and stay tuned for the band’s first music video in the coming month.

Give us a brief explanation of the current project.

Jim: It’s kinda like this salsa. It’s very spicy and there’s a lot of different things in it.

Andy: We decided to go ahead and do 100 shows in 100 days. Andrew’s mom was diagnosed with throat cancer so we decided to have all the proceeds go to throat cancer and we’re really trying to help her out and support her with everything she’s going through.

Jim: The money is going to the doctor that is treating Andrew’s mother. It’s going directly towards his research to help further it.

Andrew: At first we thought to just donate to the Kellog Cancer Research center in North Shore, then they directed us specifically to him. So it’s not really a general thing.

And how’s it going so far?

Andy: It’s been a lot of fun. It’s crazy.

Jim: We’ve seen a lot of stuff. We’ve seen people puke in front of us, cops have caught us and been pissed. We played a party where people were so drunk they were destroying our instruments and we had to stop.

How did you all meet?

Jim: (Andy) and I met when we were 4 years old. In preschool we were playing with this blue and silver airplane. It was seriously the best toy we had in preschool. No joke. Until we both brought in crash dummy toys. We had a love for them and that’s how we started bonding. Ever since, we’ve been best friends and roommates and bandmates.

Andrew: I met them through college. We went to Columbia together.

Andy: I was looking for some jazz music one night for a radio short. Andrew’s roommate told me he had some really cheesy stuff, so he hooked me up.

Andrew: That was 5 years ago. After we graduated we kept running into each other at bars or concerts and after a couple drinks I’d be like “hey, we should jam tomorrow!” Then finally after 4 or 5 times we actually did it.

Andy: Can I tell you a secret? When I was a freshman or sophomore I already knew that you played drums. I had you on my drummer list. I kept track of drummers. You don’t find many cool ones, a lot of them are total douchebags.

Andrew: And some just hide their douchebag well.

Jim: Anyways, now were the 3 musketeers and we all love each other and we see each other every single day and we don’t hate each other. Which is surprising.

How does playing in the streets compare to playing in a venue or bar atmosphere?

Andy: We had never played in the streets. It’s a totally different experience. We’re doing a lot of street shows because we want to make sure that we can pace out venue shows and promote them and get adequate draw. But we don’t do a lot of heavy promotion. We do it with more with the expectation to just meet people in the streets and interact with them. It’s interesting because you’re going out to an environment that they’re not there to watch you, they’re not asking for you. You’re just going there and giving yourself. There’s not a sound man making sure you can hear everything okay, there’s not somebody else projecting it. It’s such a raw state. Like there’s a street pole here, this is gonna be my drum for the day or I see this person walking by, I’m gonna change my verse to something they’re doing. We really like bringing people together; it’s one of our goals to help unite people in some sense.

What determines the location for street performances?

Andrew: We usually try to anticipate a place with the most foot traffic. The obvious one is Michigan Avenue but that sort of sucks because people are doing their own thing, they’re all shopping or whatever and there are so many other musicians around; it’s oversaturated in a w - Veoba


One of Windy City Rock's own, Andrew Hertzberg, also happens to be one-third of local electro-rock outfit Moon Furies. This Wednesday, February 2nd, you can see Andrew and the band in action as part of a great lineup at Subterranean, which also features Future Ghosts, Leah Stargazing and the Ridgelands. Come out, hear some quality tunes and say hello! The show starts at 8 p.m. and $8 tickets are available here.

To prepare for the show, check out the debut Moon Furies record Mercury, available on Bandcamp. The band are letting the first 200 downloaders name their price. Listen to two tracks, "Way Down" and "Sun Burnt Love," below: - Windy City Rock


It may be April Fool’s, but I pity tha fool who stays home this weekend. See what I did there? Chicago is ALIVE with the sound of music. (OK I’ll stop) There’s a bevy of big name acts passing through our fair (and rainy) city like Queens of the Stone Age at The Rivieria tonight or the reunited Sebadoh occupying Lincoln Hall on Sunday. Rest assured there is plenty of sexy, vivacious and completely awesome local acts hanging around town to brighten your weekend days. So let’s quit all the cliches and get on with the rock.

FRIDAY

J MASCIS
I shouldn’t have to but I’ll talk up this J Mascis fellow. You may know him from his stint as lead guitarist, mumbler, sometimes drummer and sometimes bassist for Dinosaur Jr. Well, here he is flying solo in support of his mostly acoustic new record, Several Shades Of Why. This is the album I wanted to hear in the late 90's but I’ll take it now. Opener, Kurt Vile just released Smoke Ring For My Halo, which finally brings all of his strengths together in one consistent record. There’s still that lo-fi vibe but the songs sound fuller and more focused. Pretty cool stuff. (Ross Meyerson)

10:00 p.m. Friday, 4/1. Subterranean. 17+. $18.

THE EARTH PROGRAM
Yes, yes, we do write about the Earth Program. How could we not with their rambunctious and youthful energy that’s made interesting with an odd fascination with all things sci-fi. No doubt it comes out in their music. Well, the band just returned from a Northeastern tour, so welcome them back, Chicago, as the Earth Program hits Panchos tonight. Joining them are ear-blistering duo Death Valley, electro-dance whack-a-moless Moon Furies and ’60s guitar throwbackers The Black Tape. I fear for people’s safety if they don’t attend this SUPER AWESOME show. (Richard Giraldi)

9:00 p.m. Friday, 4/1. Panchos. 21+. $5. - Loud Loop Press


Obbityfest, the brainchild of local psych-rockers The Earth Program, is set to return this July 4th weekend on Friday, July 1 through Sunday, July 3.

The second edition of the festival not only expands to three days of local music but will take place at a new location, The New Rock Theater at 3933 N. Elston Ave, near North Central Park Avenue.

In addition to planning Obbityfest, The Earth Program will play the festival along with Moon Furies (who are attempting to play 100 shows in 100 days), The (Glorious) Tea Party, The Lone Gun Society, Swimsuit Addition and dozens of others.

If you wanted a crash course in Chicago’s music scene and beyond, Obbityfest will deliver. Admission is $5 and a three-day pass is $10.

Get the entire three-day Obbityfest lineup after the jump. - Loud Loop Press


Chicago band Moon Furies kicks off an adventure to play 100 shows in 100 days, with all of the proceeds going to cancer research at Kellogg Cancer Center. - Metromix


Dance rockers Moon Furies are serious about raising money for cancer research. The synth-loving trio will play 100 shows in 100 days to benefit the Chicago-based Kellogg Cancer Center.

The inspiration for this ambitious project came from Moon Furies’ own drummer Andrew Hertzberg, whose mother is battling a throat tumor. Hertzberg shares his story accompanied by family home movies in the band’s video explaining the project. Watch it after the jump below.

Moon Furies will kick off the 100 shows in 100 days project at Subterranean on Tuesday, May 17. No other shows have been announced, but stay tuned to MoonFuries.com for more project updates. Stream Moon Furies debut album Mercury at their bandcamp page. - Loud Loop Press


With the John Hancock Building as a backdrop, the three members of the band Moon Furies sang over the din of Michigan Avenue traffic Tuesday morning.

A little girl danced to the music; bassist Jim Wittmann ran into the street in a fit of excitement.

The band members’ enthusiasm was not just for their music — it also was for their cause. The three 23-year-old graduates of Columbia College Chicago are more than halfway through a mission to play 100 shows in 100 days and raise money for the NorthShore University HealthSystem Kellogg Cancer Center.

The idea play a relentless string of gigs came after drummer and Glenview native Andrew Hertzberg’s mother, Diane, was diagnosed with throat cancer earlier this year.

“Pretty much when we started was when she was going to start doing her chemotherapy and radiation,” Andrew Hertzberg said.

Hertzberg said he was in New York when he called home and received the news from his father. Diane Hertzberg, who still lives in Glenview, had been experiencing a persistent sore throat and decided to see a doctor.

That was in January, around the time the band got together. After recording an album and playing some shows, the musicians were looking for a way to hone their skills, said guitarist Andy Kiel.

Taking a cue from The Beatles in their early days, the members of Moon Furies decided to play shows every day, wherever possible: Clubs, bars, homes, even on the street.

But instead of playing for profit, the musicians decided to play to support Hertzberg’s mother and other cancer patients.

“She doesn’t get a day off of cancer; we don’t get a day off from this,” Wittmann said.

The announcement came a pleasant surprise to Diane Hertzberg, who was frequently hospitalized during chemotherapy and radiation.

“It was a Mothers Day gift,” she said. “He told me to check my email … and it was a video of him telling me what the band was going to be doing. I just couldn’t believe it.”

Although her treatment ended about three weeks ago, her throat is still sore and voice still hoarse. Kellogg Cancer Center Medical Director Dr. Bruce Brockstein, who diagnosed Diane Hertzberg, said her cancer was “locally advanced” — far enough along to be serious, but still treatable.

The goal, he said, was to treat the cancer without surgery, which could have meant removing portions of her tongue.

Radiation and chemotherapy have their own side effects, though. In addition to being hospitalized for fever and infection, Diane Hertzberg also has had trouble swallowing food and had to receive nutrients through a tube, Brockstein said.

“She’s a solid person in terms of how she’s gotten through this,” he said. “She’s the type of person who’s very strong, very stoic — a pleasure to work with in that sense. She’s doing her part 100 percent and has a positive attitude.”

Andrew Hertzberg said receiving the news about his mother’s cancer was tough. People don’t think something like that will ever touch their lives. But like her doctor, he said she has been resilient, and the family has “no reason to fear the worst.”

“I’ve never seen her exhibit any despair or pessimism about it,” he said.

Since receiving the news, Andrew Hertzberg said he has made more frequent trips from Chicago to Glenview to visit his family. He said he’s looking forward to spending more time with his mother, who loves to cook, going out to eat.

“It was difficult (for him),” Diane Hertzberg said. “He didn’t show how upset I think he was.

Both Andrew Hertzberg and his mother also said playing with Moon Furies has helped keep him focused and his mind off the cancer. The band members said the crowds have not only enjoyed the music, they also have been receptive to the cause.

“So many people come up to us and start telling us about their experiences,” Kiel said.

Halfway through their endeavor, Moon Furies had raised nearly $2,700 for the Kellogg Cancer Center.

“If people want to give 3 cents, they can; if they want to give $100, they can,” Wittmann said.

Because of the side effects of her treatment, Diane Hertzberg has not yet been able to attend any of the Moon Furies shows. But, she said, she was hoping to attend one Tuesday night at the Fireside Bowl in Chicago.

Knowing her son is supporting her has helped her through the ordeal, as well, she said.

“I started to find something to be grateful for every day. … Even the smallest things.”

For more information on the band and upcoming shows, go to facebook.com/MoonFuries. To donate to Moon Furies’ fund raising campaign, visit PayPal.com and donate to 100Shows100Days@moonfuries.com, or call 920-284-8036. - Chicago Tribune


Admittedly, “Moon Furies” is a much less striking band name than “Moon Furries,” as we first misread it. But we still give them props for their upcoming endeavor; the band will venture to play 100 shows in 100 days and will donate all the proceeds to Chicago’s own Kellogg Cancer Center and its research efforts.

It’s a pretty hefty undertaking for a band with only one album under its belt. Released earlier this year, Mercury is plain and simple a dance-pop album, and it rarely strays from its genre. But that’s not to say it isn’t a strong debut effort. These guys certainly know how to create some throbbing, retro-futuristic dance beats. For example, “Wild Side” presents a catchy, synth-driven melody full of flavorful sound effects, contrasted by flat, robotic vocals. The full album is available to download through Moon Furies’ Bandcamp for a price of your choosing.

The 100 show project kicks off next Tuesday at Subterranean. The lineup will feature Moon Furies sandwiched between headliners The Foot (Denver) and openers Big Wig Mechanic (Chicago). After that, who knows? The band is still working out the details and booking shows. The dashing, young fellows of Moon Furies explain their inspiration for the project in this video: - The Chicagoist


Rock and roll is full of clichés -- from musicians, writers and fans alike. We all cringe when we see them, and we're all no doubt guilty of contributing to them. Such was my night at Memories on the 20th of June. Before you think I'm slamming the bands that night, hold on, I'm not. The blame for the cliché moment rests solely at my own feet as three, yes, three times I turned to the guy next to me and said "Man, I wouldn't want to have to follow those guys." Each time I said it about a different band. First up was Man Your Horse[... ...]And so it happened for the first time. "I wouldn't want to have to follow those guys." Luckily, local synth-poppers Moon Furies were up to the task. The group, currently somewhere in the first half of an ultra ambitious 100 shows in 100 days, appeared onstage no worse for the wear. Their entire set carried a bubblegum electricity that made it damn near impossible not to like them, though I don't know why you'd try. If Man Your Horse had my eyes wide, then Moon Furies had me grinning like an idiot and bobbing my head. Not content to let the audience have all the fun, vocalist Jim Wittmann ran around Memories like a Muppet on speed. This is the kind of guy who was probably born to be a rockstar, so it's a good thing he's talented. Otherwise he'd be like, I don't know, the most energetic barber ever? Guitarist Andy Kiel seemed to pick his spots a little more, waiting until the Nintendo-synths of "Logan Square" were in full swing before jumping off stage to stalk Wittmann around the bar. "Look At Me" best showcased the band collectively, giving them a chance to show off some striking harmonized vocals before Wittmann produced a trumpet and wailed over drummer Andrew Hertzberg's dance beats. Hertzberg seemed happy to let his bandmates soak up the attention, playing with a bit of a Stuart Sutcliffe smirk. Guess that'll happen when you're the one providing the beats that booties are shaking to. After announcing that the last song was "about astronauts" and getting an enthusiastic "fuck yeah" from the back of the bar, Moon Furies closed out their set with "Mercury 13." The song takes a few moments to build tension before launching into the group's catchiest hook, a squeaky synth line that dances over Hertzberg's water balloon splashy rhythm. The whole thing ended with an appropriate crescendo: stuttered drums, rising guitars, more trumpet and the line "we cannot lose, we were born to win." And so I uttered it a second time. - Windy City Rock


If you’re looking to dance the night away, look no further than Chicago’s Moon Furies.

The electro-pop trio, consisting of Andy Kiel, Jim Wittmann and Andrew Hertzberg who also moonlights as a contributor at WindyCityRock.net, just released their debut album, Mercury.

One track from the record we especially dig is “Logan Square,” named after the neighborhood I’m sure we’ve all found ourselves drinking into the early hours of the morning. Anyway, the song’s head-bobbing beat, wild synths and echo-y vocals reminiscent of Tears For Fears will no doubt keep the party going. Check out the song to the left.

And if you want to get your groove on, be sure to catch the Moon Furies this Friday, February 11, at Reggie’s Music Joint with DFM and Rabbit Children. - Loud Loop Press


Chicago’s Andy Kiel and Jim Wittman make up the electronica duo behind Moon Furies. They “use catchy synths, groovy beats, sizzlin’ guitar work, and harmonies that will blow your pants off.” Their song “Way Down” is pretty damn catchy with interesting vocals. You should become their friend on MySpace and follow them on Twitter to keep updated with their unique musical style. It’s good to see that sometimes not all of the electronic talent comes out of Brooklyn. Chicago has a burgeoning music scene that is worth following. - GigMaven


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Moon Furies. They're real. Moon Furies. They're electric. Moon Furies. They're Future Rock.

They've tour experience Peter Bjorn and John and Chairlift. They've played SXSW. They've played CMJ. Twice. They've held residencies throughout New York City. They've played 100 shows in 100 days for cancer research. They've even received studio time from the shoe company, Converse.

The only thing Andy Kiel, Dave D'Amico and Jim Wittmann (Moon Furies) haven't done is play on the Moon.

"Excellent Electro-Harmonies" - Spinner

"The band's addicting tunes are a surefire way to pack in your weekend dose of revelry with dancing and an electrifying show" - Huffington Post