Most Thieves
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Most Thieves

Las Vegas, Nevada, United States | SELF

Las Vegas, Nevada, United States | SELF
Band Rock Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Oct
29
Most Thieves @ Café Du Nord

San Francisco, California, USA

San Francisco, California, USA

Oct
27
Most Thieves @ Life is Beautiful Festival

None, Nevada, USA

None, Nevada, USA

Oct
24
Most Thieves @ Fox 5 Gibson Showcase

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Oct
24
Most Thieves @ Channel 13 Morning Blend

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Oct
19
Most Thieves @ The Studio at Webster Hall

New York City, New York, USA

New York City, New York, USA

Oct
19
Most Thieves @ Pianos

New York, New York, USA

New York, New York, USA

Oct
07
Most Thieves @ Zappo's Fremont East First Friday Stage

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Sep
29
Most Thieves @ The Bowery

London, None, United Kingdom

London, None, United Kingdom

Sep
28
Most Thieves @ scala

london, None, United Kingdom

london, None, United Kingdom

Sep
27
Most Thieves @ Monto Water Rats

London, None, United Kingdom

London, None, United Kingdom

Sep
26
Most Thieves @ Manchester Academy 3

Manchester, None, United Kingdom

Manchester, None, United Kingdom

Sep
24
Most Thieves @ The Arches

Glasgow, None, United Kingdom

Glasgow, None, United Kingdom

Sep
09
Most Thieves @ Bunkhouse Saloon

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Aug
19
Most Thieves @ Beauty Bar

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Aug
05
Most Thieves @ Rock N Roll Wine, LLC Presents: Rock ‘n Roll Wine Tasting Room & Sound Bar @ The Hostile Grape M Re

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Jul
21
Most Thieves @ The Satellite (formerly Spaceland)

Los Angeles, California, USA

Los Angeles, California, USA

Jul
20
Most Thieves @ Hard Rock Cafe (on The Strip)

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

Jul
19
Most Thieves @ The Palms Casino

Las Nevada, Nevada, USA

Las Nevada, Nevada, USA

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


Most Thieves took to the stage at the Sound Academy on Saturday night to open for fellow Las Vegas natives and friends, the Killers. The Medium chatted with lead singer Eric Koch about Most Thieves’ compelling new record, their big sound, and their plans for the future.



The Medium: The album, Unnecessary Maps, has a sound that’s kind of grand. It reminded me a little bit of Bruce Springsteen or Arcade Fire. What were some acts that you listened to growing up that inspired that big sound?



Eric Koch: Growing up, Bruce Springsteen was definitely around when I was a kid—at least, some. Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers was around all the time when I was a kid, and I think that in what I use as a benchmark for a good song, they’re probably the band.

But I remember this experience of being in orchestra as a kid and going to the local high school and getting to play in this very large basketball auditorium. And as soon as we started playing, this gigantic reverb started. And that moment made a really impactful impression on me. Because it was magical-sounding. It was overwhelming. I think my musical career has been an attempt to get back to that sound, in a lot of ways.



TM: What’s the story behind the album’s title?



EK: On the record, there’s a lot of historical reference to maps and paths. And in my head, they’re kind of two different things. A map is a plan. And when you’re planning a trip, you say, “I’m going to go from this point to this point.” On a map, everything in a journey seems perfect. But anybody who has gone on any sort of adventure knows that plan is not going to work out. Ever. And if it does, it’s not much of an adventure. But when you’re on a path, you’re just following it. You don’t necessarily know where it’s going. You can’t see what’s up ahead, but you’ve got to get there. The nice thing about a path is that you always know where your next footstep is going to land.

So, part of the story of the record is learning to follow paths instead of maps. The title kind of came up one day as a joke about something else, and it just immediately stuck. [Most Thieves drummer] Rob [Whited] and I just kind of looked at each other and said, “Wow, I think that’s the record.”



TM: It was just announced that Most Thieves will play two Vegas gigs with the Killers at the end of the year. How does it feel to have the chance to play with your friends in your hometown?



EK: You couldn’t ask for a better way to wrap up the year. And it’s been a pretty amazing year anyway. So to be able to walk on stage in a place that we really love and to kind of warm up a hometown crowd for our friends who have been so supportive—it’s an honour. I don’t think that we’re going to get a whole lot of sleep in the next few months. It kind of feels like this really extended Christmas Eve.
- The Medium


Best breakout hope

Most Thieves

As soon as I heard that two members served as techs for The Killers, I hastily branded their band as opportunists. But this quintet has done anything but ride Brandon Flowers’ peacock feathers, and its ethereal rock contrasts with the bombast of its employers. A budding British fan base portends a future one at home. (mostthieves.com) - NPR Desert Companion


Best breakout hope

Most Thieves

As soon as I heard that two members served as techs for The Killers, I hastily branded their band as opportunists. But this quintet has done anything but ride Brandon Flowers’ peacock feathers, and its ethereal rock contrasts with the bombast of its employers. A budding British fan base portends a future one at home. (mostthieves.com) - NPR Desert Companion


CINEMATIC ROCK

Most Thieves, Unnecessary Maps (Self-released)
With an enormous sound that could fill a hundred stadiums, this quintet keeps growing in popularity and momentum (they open for the Killers Dec. 28-29 at the Cosmopolitan). The Thieves’ debut is a majestic, if melancholy, 13-track affair. From the opener, string-laden “Salt Lake City,” in which singer Eric Koch asks, What is a life/without forgiveness?, to closing ballad “An Ocean Between Us,” with its bottomless layers of acoustic guitars and piano notes and an ambient outro, Maps stakes out a vast terrain most bands can’t even imagine. ?????
- Las Vegas Seven


Only the best Vegas bands are playing Neon Reverb this time around. There are three assemblies worth noting: First, at Beauty Bar at 8 p.m. March 21, alt-rockers Most Thieves, who a few weeks ago uploaded a couple of live HD videos from their set opening for the Killers at Chelsea Ballroom in December. The Thieves’ performances—”Muscle Memory,” “Prometheus”—are sweet. Once you check out these captures, you won’t want to miss this show. - Las Vegas Seven


During Most Thieves’ Thursday performance at Beauty Bar, I took a moment to close my eyes and soak up the Las Vegans’ melodic rock. They have an uncanny ability to mix powerful with laid-back, and I couldn’t help but sway along. –Chris Bitonti - Las Vegas Weekly


During Most Thieves’ Thursday performance at Beauty Bar, I took a moment to close my eyes and soak up the Las Vegans’ melodic rock. They have an uncanny ability to mix powerful with laid-back, and I couldn’t help but sway along. –Chris Bitonti - Las Vegas Weekly


Most Thieves
From: Las Vegas
Put them on a playlist with: Imagine Dragons, The Killers, Snow Patrol
Go because: The Killers have handpicked them to open shows in the U.S., U.K. and Canada, and polished songwriter Eric Koch writes the sorts of songs you could hear on the radio sometime soon.
When: Thursday, March 21, 11 p.m., Beauty Bar - Las Vegas Weekly


Next up is Most Thieves, a local band I’ve seen many times and have always enjoyed. It’s probably the act I’m anticipating most on this year’s Reverb lineup, and they do not disappoint. Their melodic waves seem to flow from the stage, while marching drums continually build and drive songs forward. This is the kind of band you can close your eyes and nod along to. Bright vibrations fill the room as bodies sway and folks share cigarettes while absorbing some of Vegas’ best local rock.
The venue clears out significantly when Most Thieves finishes after midnight and those who leave early miss out on LA-based gypsy-revival act The Herbert Bail Orchestra. - Las Vegas Weekly


Most Thieves, Unnecessary Maps

(self-released)

Unnecessary Maps should already be on your local music wish list, with driving, inspirational hooks not unlike Arcade Fire presented in a strikingly slick capacity, thanks to engineer (and keyboardist) Eric Rickey. Let’s put it this way: If you’re supposed to dress to impress, Unnecessary Maps is Most Thieves’ best suit. MAX PLENKE - Las Vegas CityLife


Vegas rockers Most Thieves assembled almost two years ago. Their impressive debut album ‘Unnecessary Maps’ was released last August.What I like most about this band are the positive and uplifting lyrics; each track gives me some hope to carry on (as corny as that sounds). One of my favorite songs from the album is “Muscle Memory”; come December when I see these guys in Las Vegas, I can see myself singing along to the catchy chorus and banging my head to the wailing guitars, can’t wait!
I would imagine ‘Prometheus’ is a crowd favorite as it starts out with a slow build with the lyrics “I don’t need a fire to keep this spark alive/I don’t need the darkness just to see the light.”, it then proceeds to explode in your face as the band proceeds to “rock out” in unison; beating drums by Rob Whited that seem to mimic my accelerated heart beat, guitar riffs by Bobby Lee Parker and Eric Rickey that never leave my memory, rumbling bass by Trevor Hurley that compliment the other instruments almost perfectly, and spine tingling vocals by Eric Koch; I can almost see the veins bulging from his neck as he sings his heart out to the lines “But I’ve got fire!/ I’ve got fire!/I’ve got fire that will burn until the day I die!/Oh Oh Ooooooh Oh Oh Oooh/Oh Oh Ooooooh Oh Oh Oooh”.
These guys are just starting to scrape the surface; which is scary, given how well crafted they already sound. I have a feeling this band is going to be making a lot of “noise” in the rock industry; be ahead of the bandwagon, and go purchase their album today.
Songs You Must Listen To: “A Heartbroken Hymn”, “Prometheus”, “Salt Lake City”, “Muscle Memory”, “Golden Webs”. - Bigger Than Sound


Vegas Seven named Most Thieves the Best (Local) Breakout Band last year for a reason: This stadium-ready indie-rock group kicks ass, and their debut full-length album Unnecessary Maps is brimming with soaring rock tunes—“Muscle Memory,” “An Ocean Between,” “Archimedes.” Put this one on your must-buy list. - Las Vegas Seven


Last Saturday evening Most Thieves, a new ensemble from Las Vegas, opened for the Killers at the Sound Academy.

Opening up for such a hard-hitting band is a tall order, and fortunately for both the audience and the band, Most Thieves did not disappoint. They were as good live as they are on record, if not better. Their sound was swelling and climactic and they held their own despite only playing a handful of songs. To add to the pressure on them, the show began almost half an hour late. There were more than a few irritated in the audience, but when the band stepped on the stage, they got the crowd going. - The Medium


By Mike Prevatt
The big news today is that The Killers have announced its local comeback shows: Dec. 28-29 at the Chelsea Ballroom at The Cosmopolitan.

But for local music fans, the news gets sweeter: our own Most Thieves will open the show (which will also feature Canadian duo Tegan & Sara).

The news should might come as little surprise of fans of either band. It's been recently announced that Most Thieves -- who have members who serve as instrument techs for The Killers, and have previously opened shows for Killers drummer Ronnie Vannucci's band, Big Talk -- will open for the multiplatinum quartet this Saturday in Toronto. But the Cosmo shows will be the biggest Vegas shows on Most Thieves' live-show resume thus far.

Standing-room only tickets are $86, with an $126 VIP option for those seeking open-bar access, and go on sale Friday.

Both Vegas bands have brand new albums to promote. The Killers will release its fourth studio album, Battle Born, tomorrow. (Our review here.) Most Thieves released Unnecessary Maps, its debut, last month. - Las Vegas CityLife


In recent years, Las Vegas has become a music industry focal point by continually turning out successful new artists. Well-known artists, who have come through this Nevada turnstile, include The Killers, Imagine Dragons, Panic! at the Disco, and Ne-Yo. Now, Las Vegas natives Most Thieves are on their way to being added to the list. This recently formed quintet is poised to be just as big, if not bigger, than many of their Nevada predecessors. Unlike most bands that struggle for years to find their sound, these five boys have been “radio ready” since they initially started playing together. After their short band-infancy period, and a couple of quick member changes, they quietly released their debut album, Unnecessary Maps, to rave reviews.
In support of this release, Most Thieves recently stopped by the House of Blues Foundation Room to steal the hearts of a few new fans. The room was packed, their performance flawless, and their mission successful as you could hear audience members asking other concert goers around them for more information about the band. The quick set ran through seven of the thirteen tracks from the new album almost effortlessly, minus the few minor technical bleeps that threatened to delay the show. Starting out with the action packed song “Salt Lake City” and ending with my personal favorite “Prometheus”, Most Thieves did not disappoint a single audience member.
This short concert was set to be a preview of what is to come over the next few months. Most Thieves is currently preparing to embark on their own west coast summer tour, which will certainly expose larger audiences to their anthemic sound. Most recently, the band shot a video for the track “Holy Wars” and they will soon release a digital live video/ED recorded this past December when they opened for The Killers, in Vegas.
If you don’t want to take my word for it, check out Unnecessary Maps on iTunes and I am sure you will quickly hear what so many others have already discovered – Most Thieves will soon be on their way up the charts. Keep an eye on their Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/MostThieves, for a concert near you and for the digital live video which is due out at the end of this month. Make sure to catch them while you can in a smaller venue, because these boys are definitely stadium-bound. - Rock World Magazine


by MAX PLENKE
After five flights, three bouts of jet lag, multiple equipment rentals and a couple hangovers, Most Thieves arrived in Toronto.. It’d been three weeks since they played together. The last time was in the U.K., during their second British tour in under a year. That night, in Canada, they’d support The Killers in front of at least 2,600 people. Stuart Morgan, who stood in for U2’s Adam Clayton when he was infamously too hungover to play the band’s 1993 Zoo TV gig in Sydney, was teching their bass. But that’s not the crazy part. A year and a half ago, Most Thieves didn’t even exist.

Eight days after the show, we’re sitting in Eric Rickey’s studio on West Sunset Road. That is, mostly. Singer Eric Koch, drummer Rob Whited and keyboardist Rickey are all in the flesh. Guitarist Bobby Lee Parker is in L.A.. Bassist Trevor Hurley is Skyping in from his home in England, where it’s about midnight.

We’re plowing through bullshitty, college-music-blog questions. Most Thieves started with longtime friends Whited and Koch a year and a half ago, slowly picking up and replacing members until arriving at the current quintet. Whited and Parker are both drum and guitar techs (respectively) for The Killers, which takes them to the United Kingdom all the time, which is why they met and hired Hurley.

I say bullshitty college-music-blog questions because it feels silly to be asking such rudimentary questions of a band that just got home from playing the support slot for one of the biggest bands of the global musical climate. A couple weeks before that, they played three gigs in England — less than a year after playing six U.K. dates, a couple of them as support for Killer drummer Ronnie Vannucci’s project Big Talk. So to be asking the same questions you might ask a fledgling group of 20-year-olds (which none of the Thieves are) almost seems insulting.

But it’s not. Because, based purely on musical ripeness, Most Thieves are still green. Even the first song they played together, “Prometheus,” is still in constant rotation. It’s even on their debut full-length, Unnecessary Maps, released in August. They had already hit the ground running before most of their hometown had any idea who they were.

Before you start thinking what we can’t blame you for thinking, the guys don’t deny Whited and Parker’s Killers relationship as a major tool in their new career. Vannucci took them along for their first-ever tour and, while doing sound tech for The Killers on a recent British tour, Most Thieves were offered that Toronto gig. When Whited describes it, it sounds like an intern getting offered a good assignment from his supervisor. “With the Big Talk stuff, [Vannucci] took us overseas and helped light the fire over there,” Whited says. “The mentoring Bobby and I get just from simple observation is significant. … You see how these guys operate and you understand why they’re there. It’s a huge combination to open the safe to that level of success.”

And the turns to open that safe have already started. Unnecessary Maps comes off like a sophomore or even junior effort, the slip-ups of a first release nonexistent. Though it has a big-deal publicist now, the team books its own shows and hustles its own flow. “The idea is to be a moving train,” Koch says. “We’re not waiting for a record [label] to say put out an album and go on tour.”

They already have an incredibly precise sound, anthemic and uplifting, the same reason you listen to Arcade Fire. It only sounds like The Killers on the tracks featuring Killers bassist Mark Stoermer. They’ve prepared for the next big thing.

When the questions have been asked, Rob chuckles, mentioning something about Most Thieves being a boring interview. And maybe they are. But it paints a picture of what’s really happening here. This isn’t a band with a biblically thick press-clipping scrapbook, finally getting their big break. This is a band from Las Vegas with international pedigree and, it looks like, staying power.

The Toronto set came and went in 25 minutes. Short and sweet, they called it. And it was the best show they’ve played to date. In two months, they’ll open again for The Killers at The Cosmopolitan. Twice. And in an amount of time Whited can’t divulge, they’ll play a major late-night television show. We wouldn’t be surprised if, before long, they head back across the pond, building their fan base in that curiously familiar way. “We could do a [West Coast tour],” Whited says. “And that’s cool. But let’s go to the U.K., go to the biggest little incubator in the country. It’s not easy, it’s not cheap, but it’s substantial. And that’s a fuckin’ story.”
- Las Vegas CityLife


Print Best Band on the Verge: Most Thieves
Las Vegas Weekly Staff
Thu, Jun 28, 2012 (midnight)

Photo: Corlene Byrd

They’ve got a radio-friendly sound. They’ve got a record coming out (Unnecessary Maps). They’ve got Killers connections. Oh yeah, and they’ve already got a street team of dedicated fans in the U.K. If they don’t blow up by this time next year, we’ll eat our 2013 Weekly Awards issue … or at least the cover. houseofblues.comfacebook.com/mostthieves.

- Las Vegas Weekly


Vegas Seven named Most Thieves the Best (Local) Breakout Band last year for a reason: This stadium-ready indie-rock group kicks ass, and their debut full-length album Unnecessary Maps is brimming with soaring rock tunes—“Muscle Memory,” “An Ocean Between,” “Archimedes.” Put this one on your must-buy list. - Vegas Seven



Bob Dylan
Battle Born, The Killers

Night Visions, Imagine Dragons

Unnecessary Maps, Most Thieves

Fall looks to be a huge month for major releases by Las Vegas bands. Already out is Most Thieves’ debut full-length, a swelling modern-rock effort with understated and occasionally subverted pomp. Our take on Vegas/L.A. quartet Imagine Dragons’ own premiere long-player can be found on page 18. And The Killers finally give birth to studio album No. 4, reports of which suggest a balance of the foursome’s signature glam with some bonafide rockers, a la 2005’s Sam’s Town. (Unnecessary Maps: out now. Night Visions: Sept. 4. Battle Born: Sept. 18)

- Las Vegas Citylife


Today is a big day for local band Most Thieves. The quintet officially releases on iTunes the anthemic rocker "Prometheus" (which has nothing to do with the summer blockbuster film), one of the highlights from last year's Primitive Maps EP and now the first single for its upcoming full-length debut, Unnecessary Maps, projected to come out in the fall once distribution is secured.

The song, like the other 11 that will accompany it on Unnecessary, was self-produced and recorded in keyboardist Eric Rickey's studio (which will be featured in this week's Local Music Issue). It also features The Killers' Mark Stoermer on bass; he reprises that role two other times on Unnecessary as well. CityLife listened to the album a couple of weeks ago at Rickey's studio, and while it's as arena-ready as any local release we've ever heard, the band didn't skimp on atmosphere and texture, adding to its evocation. With Unnecessary, Most Thieves remain on track to become the next Vegas breakthrough, as we've previously predicted.

The guys will follow the release with a summer European tour, its second since a successful run of dates last September, opening for Big Talk, the side project of Killers drummer Ronnie Vannucci (for whom drummer Rob Whited serves as drum tech). Plans over on this side of the Atlantic are still in the works. In the meantime, listen to "Prometheus" here.





- Las Vegas Citylife


He says he wants his songs to be the sound of someone walking away from a car crash.

"There's a level of survival to them," explains Erich Koch, singer-guitarist for ascendant Vegas rockers Most Thieves.

It's early on a recent Friday morning, and Koch has just sat down with some coffee and his guitar, ready to get back to work just a day after returning from a quick United Kingdom tour (more on that later).

Earlier in the week, Most Thieves dropped their debut, "Unnecessary Maps," roughly a year and a half after forming.

As Koch alluded to, it's an album posited on uplift, both in sentiment and sonics.

Nearly every tune is as stirring as the lyrics are meant to be, with themes of perseverance and hope brought to life musically in the form of grand crescendos of guitar, impassioned, heart-in-the-throat vocals and singalong choruses that radiate their surroundings like the sun suddenly peeking out from behind clouds.

It's an album meant to both invigorate and soothe, which can be harder to pull off than it sounds: Try too hard to inspire, and you risk numbing listeners with hang-in-there, you-can-do-it platitudes befitting of Hallmark cards and Tim Tebow postgame press conferences.

But, earnest and well-crafted, "Unnecessary Maps" registers more as a reassuring record than a maudlin one.

"I don't mind the mountains we climb," Koch sings on "Glacial Pace," and this album seems intended as a soundtrack for said journey, a series of life lessons set to a beat.

"A lot of these songs were written to my 7-year-old son," Koch says. "When you're trying to bring him up and make sure he turns into a good person, that kind of falls into the songwriting, too."

The release of "Maps" marks the culmination of a fast-paced year for this bunch. Last September, the band first toured the U.K. as the openers for Big Talk, the side project of Killers drummer Ronnie Vannucci. Most Thieves have several connections to the Killers: Drummer Jason Whited has served as Vannucci's drum tech, guitarist Bobby Lee Parker has worked for Killers guitarist Dave Keuning and Killers bassist Mark Stoermer plays on several tracks on "Maps."

Like the Killers, Most Thieves, rounded out by bassist Trevor Hurley and keyboardist Eric Rickey, have initially found as much favor among British fans as their American counterparts.

"England kind of has become a second home for us musically," Koch says. "Maybe there's a similarity in the way that a lot of those people think about music and the way that we think about it. It did seem to work right away over there."

Over here, it's working pretty well, too.

- Las Vegas Review Journal


Live video and interview from the Beauty Bar Las Vegas
http://www.fox5vegas.com/video?autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=6158616 - Fox 5 News


Live video and interview from the Beauty Bar Las Vegas
http://www.fox5vegas.com/video?autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=6158616 - Fox 5 News


While taking time from their rigorous schedule and recording sessions, Rob Whited and Eric Koch, members of buzz band Most Thieves, shared with us stories about their whole hearted determination, team work collaboration, and most importantly friendship that builds ideas into accomplishments. While sitting at Starkbucks and sharing stories, laughs, and listening to blenders we got to know how Most Thieves came to be…

Elle Vie: What’s the story behind Most thieves?

Eric: Here is the story; most of us have known each other for a very long time. Rob and I, I can’t really trace back to when we met but it’s been years and years. I really believe that I was about 19 years old. Back in December, I was meeting my girlfriend; at the Beat Coffee Shop we were meeting downtown to meet some of my closest friends (Crowd of Small Adventures). So as I am waiting in the coffee shop, Bobby who I hadn’t seen for a long time, walks in, and I said, “Bobby, what are you doing here?” and shortly after Rob and Steve walked in. So we all sat down and started drinking coffee and talking. About an hour later Rob looks over at me and asks me “who are you playing with?” I said that Sam and I talked about maybe starting something, and he asks “who’s your drummer?” And I said that we don’t have one. He said, “yes you do. Who’s your bass player?” And I said we don’t have one… and he looks over at Steve and say’s “let’s get him, he’s really good”. I looked over at Bobby and said “can we take Bobby too?” (laughs)

Rob: See how childish we are (laughs).

Eric: So that was exciting. These are guys who I have known forever, that I respect, who are phenomenal musicians. Rob is then texting me saying, “lets make this happen” and three days later we are in a room, with the band… so that’s how it all started. And a month later we were recording.

EV: I heard Most Thieves are about eight months old. How did you make this band grow so fast?

Eric: It was a chemical reaction when the five got in the room!

Rob: Very special and delicate equation to make it work. It’s really rare to find and make it collectively move very fast, especially when you go from having a four member band to a five member band. Things can potentially go wrong or right, so now we are working with five very diverse people, to form something very unique.

EV: Why did you guys decide to start this band now?

Eric: It’s a question we have been dying to ask the universe ourselves; I had actually given up on bands. I started writing a book. I spent a long time trying to find people who are like-minded and who want to do the kind of music I really want to do and that itself is a very tricky thing, especially with my taste. I grew up on a lot of different bands. I was playing classical music in school, listening to country western at my grandparents house, listening to punk with my sister, listening to Led Zeppelin with my dad, I had different sounds around me. To find a group of people that not only understood the mixture of it, but also understood how to do it, and could understand my odd vocabulary about it that isn’t technical in any sense.

[Rob makes to leave as he has a prior engagement to attend]

Eric: You have to go?

Rob: Yes, but you guys are in good hands.

EV: So are you [Eric] the songwriter? Or is it a contribution of everyone?

Eric: Well everything is done to a level, by the time it comes in. Usually there are lyrics and a structure of melodies; the arrangements are usually there. There’s been parts where I come in and I think it’s going one way and we can go to replacing the entire parts with the guys.

EV: What would you say your style of music is?

Eric: We just gotta like it! We never look at somebody else and say “we have to do that.” I can just pick up an instrument and I’ll be messing with it, and I can just start playing and hear something that will start to take shape. It just needs to catch my interest. Usually, I am always working on a melody, and sometimes a line will come up, and I will write it down.

EV: What inspires you?

Eric: Everything… A lot of things. I love all sorts of stuff; history, science. I know way more about Physics than I should probably admit in an interview about a rock band (laughs). I love learning things! I don’t necessarily think about what I’m writing sometimes, it can seem very plotted and sometimes it is, but not necessarily.

EV: How did you guys come up with the band name?

Eric: I basically stole a band (laughs). It’s Thieves for the appropriate reason (laughs). That’s actually why it was chosen. It was a joke band that was going to be started between my girlfriend and I. We have this game that we play, we would be talking through a conversation somebody will say a phrase and the other will say that’s the band name, it just becomes this joke, and we do it all the time.

EV: Do you guys have a name for your album?

Eric: There is a couple kind of floating around… it just depends - Elle Vie Blog


MOST THIEVES

Less than a year old, indie quintet Most Thieves already went to the United Kingdom for a five-show tour, three of them opening for Ronnie Vannucci's Big Talk. Days of missing flights, killer ferries and Japanese noodles went by in the blink of an eye. Drummer Rob Whited recounts the harrowing journey.

Sept 21, Dublin: Rob Whited, Bobby Parker and Sam Daniel land in Dublin. Jet lag ensues.

Sept 22, Dublin: Three-fifths of Most Thieves act as stand-in crew for Ronnie Vannucci and Big Talk at Arthur's Day celebrations in Dublin. The bus picks up Big Talk and three-fifths of Most Thieves and takes them overnight to Glasgow.

Sept 23, Glasgow/Edinburgh/Glasgow: In the early morning, the tour bus takes a ferry crossing the channel to Glasgow. Most Thieves and Big Talk get off the bus to take pictures and stay alive. "The buses and trucks are in the decks below, and the people are up top," Whited says. "By law you have to get off the bus because if the ship starts going down, they seal the lower decks and you're entombed. You're done. So we got the fuck off the bus at 6 a.m. and drank whiskey." They get into Glasgow, take the morning off for sight-seeing and take the train to Edinburgh for the first Most Thieves show of the tour. Eric Koch and Steve Bonacci miss their connecting flight. Most Thieves miss the first show of their tour.

Sept 24, Glasgow: The band gets up for coffee and visits The Arches, where the show will take place. "Real cool place underneath the train station," Whited says. "It's all brick caverns. It's awesome." The trio gets in at 2 p.m. to soundcheck. Eric and Steve turn up with suitcases and guitars and do an interview with a Scottish magazine ("I can't remember the name for the life of me," Whited says.) They do the gig, watch Big Talk and get on the bus for an overnight trip to Manchester.

Sept 25, Manchester: They arrive at their hotel in Manchester and take actual showers. The reunited band goes out for a sunny afternoon exploration of city. They go to John Ryland's library. They go to Wagamama Japanese noodle house. "It's not the greatest food in the world, by any stretch, but it's become comfort food for Bobby and I being over there so many times [as instrument techs for The Killers]," Whited says. "Food can be a little hit or miss here, especially when you don't know the good spots. But we love it. It's really consistent. It's like Starbucks." They take the night off, hang out with Big Talk and drink whiskey ("Common theme of the tour," Whited says).

Sept. 26, Manchester: Tonight's the show at Manchester Academy with Big Talk. Ronnie Vannucci decides to do a guerilla gig at a bar down the street. "We're rolling gear on road cases a block down the street at midnight in Manchester," Whited says. "There's no PA. Ron's singing at the top of his lungs. It was just awesome."

Sept. 27, London: Four hours later, the band arrives in London for a show that night at Monta Water Rats without Big Talk. "There's this band Cattle & Cane over there, along the lines of Mumford and Sons, but very much have their own thing," Whited says. "They were the headliner and we were the support. Because of that, we decided to wing it and play a power acoustic gig. No amps. It was great because some people came to every gig, whether they lived in London or Scotland. They followed us through all of the U.K."

Sept. 28, London: At 10 a.m., London is 90 degrees and sunny. There's a line of kids around the Scala club for that night's gig. Eric Koch grabs his guitar and sings to the kids in line. "I think it's cool," Whited says. "He takes an acoustic guitar and sings to these kids who talk to us on Twitter. There are double-decker buses going by behind us and the kids are dancing. It was incredible."

Sept. 29, London: After checking their sound at The Bowry at 5 p.m., the band drinks and plays six songs. "It may have been the best show," Whited says. "We were super tight because it was the fifth show, the room was really small, and when you realize you only have six songs, you tend to not budget your energy, so we just ripped loose and bled every song." The band bids Britain goodbye and takes an 11-hour flight home. "I got off the plane and went to another gig and played three hours straight," Whited says. "When my wife picked me up, I fell asleep as soon as I got in the car. It was the best time ever." MAX PLENKE
- City Life Las Vegas


Neon Reverb. The live-music lineup this fall is heavy on local bands—but what a great chance this is to see soon-to-be-breaking-big indie-rock group Most Thieves, hear the reunion of slam poet/lawyer Dayvid Figler’s ’90s quirk-punk posse Tippy Elvis and attend a CD-release party for the acclaimed Halloween Town. Headliners are legendary electro-punk act Atari Teenage Riot and Killers drummer Ronnie Vannucci’s new band, Big Talk. On top of such awesome sonic offerings (which take place all over, from Beauty Bar on Fremont Street to Gypsy Den in the Arts District to Royal Boutique Resort near the Strip), there are films, theater, poetry and stand-up comedy. If this twice-a-year fest isn’t too careful, it may become the next South by Southwest. Various times Sept. 8-11, multiple venues, NeonReverb.com, prices vary.

- Las Vegas Seven


Neon Reverb. The live-music lineup this fall is heavy on local bands—but what a great chance this is to see soon-to-be-breaking-big indie-rock group Most Thieves, hear the reunion of slam poet/lawyer Dayvid Figler’s ’90s quirk-punk posse Tippy Elvis and attend a CD-release party for the acclaimed Halloween Town. Headliners are legendary electro-punk act Atari Teenage Riot and Killers drummer Ronnie Vannucci’s new band, Big Talk. On top of such awesome sonic offerings (which take place all over, from Beauty Bar on Fremont Street to Gypsy Den in the Arts District to Royal Boutique Resort near the Strip), there are films, theater, poetry and stand-up comedy. If this twice-a-year fest isn’t too careful, it may become the next South by Southwest. Various times Sept. 8-11, multiple venues, NeonReverb.com, prices vary.

- Las Vegas Seven


Neon Reverb. The live-music lineup this fall is heavy on local bands—but what a great chance this is to see soon-to-be-breaking-big indie-rock group Most Thieves, hear the reunion of slam poet/lawyer Dayvid Figler’s ’90s quirk-punk posse Tippy Elvis and attend a CD-release party for the acclaimed Halloween Town. Headliners are legendary electro-punk act Atari Teenage Riot and Killers drummer Ronnie Vannucci’s new band, Big Talk. On top of such awesome sonic offerings (which take place all over, from Beauty Bar on Fremont Street to Gypsy Den in the Arts District to Royal Boutique Resort near the Strip), there are films, theater, poetry and stand-up comedy. If this twice-a-year fest isn’t too careful, it may become the next South by Southwest. Various times Sept. 8-11, multiple venues, NeonReverb.com, prices vary.

- Las Vegas Seven


Eric of Most Thieves doing an acoustic cover of Jeff Tweedy's song 'Not For The Season'. Filmed with the iphone 8mm app. www.youtube.com www.facebook.com twitter: @mostthieves
http://www.nme.com/nme-video/youtube/id/mRgZj9kQv30 - NME.com


It’s 1 a.m. at Beauty Bar, and Most Thieves’ first song has already captured the crowd’s attention. The newish local band’s layered guitars and breathy vocals—think U2 meets The Airborne Toxic Event—are especially resonating with the guy standing next to me. He’s been to all of Most Thieves’ Vegas gigs and assures me the group keeps getting better.
Eric Koch (vocals/guitar), Bobby Lee Parker (guitar), Rob Whited (drums), Steve Bonacci (bass) and Sam Daniel (keys/guitar/vocals) have only been together eight months, but they’ve already made a splash on the scene, even earning a rare local slot on the schedule at Cosmo’s Book & Stage lounge. The early success could have something to do with the pro musicians onboard; Parker and Whited have worked as guitar/drum techs for The Killers on two world tours, and the rest of the guys have been involved in a handful of their own music projects.
And if you think Most Thieves are moving fast now, they’re about to take off on a U.K. tour opening for Killers’ drummer Ronnie Vannucci’s new project, Big Talk. “We like to move really fast and we like to try to pull off stuff that sounds really uncanny,” Koch says. The guys have been working hard to record a full-length record, which Koch says should be out in September. More big news? Actress/singer Bijou Phillips is featured on the Most Thieves track “Empty Chambers,” available now on iTunes. - Las Vegas Weekly


It's been a while since I have been excited about a new band, but a recent trip to Las Vegas proved luckier than the slot machines. Rock World’s lead photographer, Diana Gualda, and I were invited to a local show at a small hotel we’d never heard of, off the Strip. To be honest, we were tired and fairly over Sin City, so we reluctantly determined to make our appearance then duck out after the first or second song. Amid a sparse art showing, tucked into the corner of a stage-less lobby, an indie-rock quintet named Most Thieves gave a room full of couch loungers the ultimate high.

We were hooked half way through the first song. A quick glance between Gualda and I made it obvious we'd struck platinum. It was decided - we'd only just begun our night! The show started out strong and the set held up through the very last song. The members of Most Thieves were tight and talented, and their music was original. Certain this was a seasoned band with years of history together, our already excellent impression of them exponentiated when we discovered they’ve been together for less than 12 months.

Although completely true to their own unique sound, you might catalogue them somewhere among Arcade Fire, The Killers, Airborne Toxic Event, U2, and possibly Kings of Leon and Snow Patrol. In reality though, their anthemic identity is in a class of its own. And unlike many of today’s bands who have been jaded or divided by the promise of success, it’s clear the members of Most Thieves actually like each other and enjoy playing together. Their stage presence in the unexceptional venue with no stage or lighting was more electrifying than several massive acts I’ve recently seen, and I found myself humming their song “Prometheus” for days after the show.

So why have we not heard them on the radio? Most Thieves recently released several songs on iTunes and, in between gigs, have been in the studio to lay down more tracks for their first full album. They are currently out on the road supporting Big Talk (fronted by Killers’ drummer Ronnie Vannucci Jr.) and are being well-received wherever they go. This is definitely a band to keep your ear out for.

We can’t encourage you strongly enough to visit www.mostthieves.com and get in on this treasure for yourselves before the national radio stations scoop them up!

- Rock World Magazine


Keep your eyes on Most Thieves, who served as Big Talk's opener last Wednesday and seemed to surprise most of the Killers fan base in attendance. Aside from the varied rhythms, influences and song structures heard, the band emotes assuredly. "If I could manage anyone in town, it would be them," said one prominent local music figure. - CityLife Las Vegas


“Seen Most Thieves?” is a common query in local-music chats, for good reason. This indie-rock quintet hits like a cross between Arcade Fire and U2 and knows its way around an anthemic pop tune. Sure, the Thieves essentially comprise the Killers’ road crew (Rob Whited is Ronnie Vannucci’s drum tech; Bobby Lee Parker is Dave Keuning’s guitar man). But they don’t steal from employers. Check out the rich guitar textures and singer Eric Koch’s heartfelt vocals on “Muscle Memory.” The Killers should be working for these guys!

- Seven Las Vegas


Most Thieves

Primitive Maps (self-released)

Max: My gushing over Last Call is only trumped by my gushing over Most Thieves' Primitive Maps.

Mike: I saw them open for Big Talk two weeks ago, and you could tell how surprised everyone was when they heard the band. Rob Whited is Ronnie Vannucci's drum tech. He's also formerly of Big Bad Zero, which put out an album on Universal in 1998. He knows how to align himself with great music projects, and with Most Thieves, his record remains unblemished.

Max: I got to listen to the record on a long drive and the first track, "Salt Lake City," reminded me of what would play in Friday Night Lights when they do a close-in shot of Tim Riggins while he has to make a tough decision.

Mike: Jesus, I totally thought of Friday Night Lights as I heard this.

Max: It's probably how much the guitar work sounded like that of Explosions in the Sky.

Mike: The singer/guitarist, Eric Koch, can wear his influences on his sleeve. That may be one criticism. Another is that his voice could use a little thickening, a little more gusto in places. Otherwise, he's impressed me here.

Max: Thought the same thing listening through "Prometheus."

Mike: I like the highwayman feel of "Empty Chambers." It lacks any self-consciousness, which is relatively uncharacteristic of modern rock bands these days. Very refreshing.

Max: I don't want to jinx them, but Most Thieves is probably my vote for the next Vegas band to break.

Mike: They just announced that they are opening for Big Talk on its U.K. tour. They're already on their way.
Last updated on Thursday, August 11, 2011 at 4:54 pm
- CityLife Las Vegas


Discography

"Unnecessary Maps"

Photos

Bio

Sometimes you have to steal your life back. Break out of the prison of expectations, walk deep into the forrest of doubt, light a match and burn it down. Our paths are littered with the doors of oppertunity. The trick is to pick the locks and open the doors.
For Most Thieves, that first door was a chance reunion of friends at a small coffee house in downtown Las Vegas. Eric Koch(singer/songwritter/guitarist) wasn't even supposed to be there when Rob Whitted(drums) and Bobby Lee Parker(guitar) walked in. He had planned to meet a friends band across the street to watch their sound check, but when they were delayed he found himself with time to kill. About an hour into the evening, Whitted turned his attention away from the larger group of friends that had amassed around several tables and on to Koch. He asked if Koch had been playing music with anyone.
"not really. The usual suspects i guess. I kinda stopped. I've been working on a book." came Koch's reply.
Music, and Whitted, would not release their hooks just yet.
"who's your drummer?" pressed Whitted.
" I don't have one."
"Yes you do. Who's our bass player?"
And so it began. The lock was picked.
Three days later the core of the group, now fully including Parker on guitar, was in a borrowed rehearsal space knocking out the first of what would become their signature ethereal rock songs. Over the next few months they released seven singles. The response was enthusiastic and widespread. They were quickly invited to play a three night residency at the Cosmoplitan's Book and Stage. They are to date the only Las Vegas natives to recieve that honor. It was over those three nights that their reverberated fuzz soaked passion plays of a live show began to take shape. two hours a night of bleeding, sweating, and pleading to the heavens to carry their sound waves as far as they could resonate. Soon after, long time friend Ronnie Vannucci of The Killers asked the Thieves to join his new band Big Talk for several shows in the Southwest and UK. The response over seas was so positive that the band would return a second time on their own within the year. Lock number two, sorted.
It was a fast paced humbling begining, but the real story here was the songs. More than sixty of them populated Koch's ever expanding notebooks. Soaring, powerful heartfelt songs delivered with dense lyrical concepts and passion of heart. Stories of being tethered to the past as you fight for the future. Stories of mistakes and forgiveness, fires and floods, ghosts and blood and the grasp of love. It was time to move beyond the rapid fire delivery of the singles and onto something more akin to the bands orchestral dynamic live shows. To help capture the bands essence in the recordings, Koch turned to friend and musician Eric Rickey. They started with a new song that had been finished in England,"The Only Map You Need". Lyricly quit fitting for how well the session would turn out. It was better than the band had dreamed. Within a week Rickey was not only asked to record the rest of the record but also to join the band on keyboard and third guitar duties. Another puzzle piece found it's place. Over the next five months Koch, Rickey, Whited and Parker maticulasly sculpted the songs that were to become "Unnecasary Maps". They chased down every sound and moment until it was right. They called in friends when help was needed. Mark Stromer(the Killers) and John Spiker(Tenacious D, Big Talk, Filter) picked up most of the bass guitar duties while the women of Las Vegas' Dusty Sunshine and Corlene Byrd of the Corlene Machine combined their voices with that of Koch and Rickey to create the choir that floats in and out of the record like a river. When all was said and done, twelve songs stood out like the tall trees in a deep forrest. Twelve stories of mistakes and forgiveness, fires and floods, ghosts and blood and the grasp of love. Door number three clicked open.
When it came time to release the record Most Thieves decided to return to England for a short tour culminating in a release party in Edinbourgh Scotland. Without an official bass player the band turned to friend and multi intrumentalist Trevor Hurley. Trevor lived in England and had loaned the guys equipment for their Big Talk tour. It seemed like a good oppertunity to connect and spend time with their talented friend. It took about 30 seconds into their first song to realize that the last puzzle peice had fallen into place. They had no idea how they would make it work but work it has.
Three weeks after the rest of the band had returned from England they recieved a phone call. They where asked to open for The Killers in Toronto in six days. The band reunited in Canada with no time to rehearse and walked on stage in front of three thousand people. It was the best set they had played to date. After that nights success it was announced that the band would again support the Killers, but this time in their mutual home town at the Cosmopo