Music is the Enemy
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Music is the Enemy

Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States | SELF

Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States | SELF
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"Music is the Enemy - Mr. Murdoch... We're Ready For Our Target Audience"

If Dillinger Escape Plan are varsity, then these guys are JV. I'd use the term 'post' or something with 'core' in it, if it weren't for this band's total lack of respect for sound and performance. There's even a touch of 'bad-boy metal' to this, which we at the Sssk offices love to play for the neighbors. This ain't for everyone, but name me one release on this label that is! Dammit! - Sicksicksick Distro, by Raven Chacon


"Vertigo"

The poster for Alfred Hitchcock’s 1958 classic thriller now serves as the announcement of a New Year’s Eve party at Dad’s House. Gusher, Great White Buffalo, Fart House, Music is the Enemy and Sputniq play beginning at 9 p.m. - Weekly Alibi - by Jessica Cassyle Carr


"MITEy Covers"

Following in the footsteps of myriad pop stars, anti-band Music Is The Enemy releases the token covers album. The aptly titled "Covers EP" contains three songs including Cee Lo Green's funky and bitter anthem "Fuck You"; The Mountain Goats' folksy, self-loathing divorce ballad "No Children"; and the Wu Tang Clan's classic hip-hop tale about inner city poverty "C.R.E.A.M." Physical copies of the album are limited to 60, while the digital release is free. Get it at midnight on Saturday, March 26, via beta.projectrodney.com/musicistheenemy. The all-ages show happens at Amped Performance Center on Saturday, while the drinky release happens on Saturday, April 9, at Burt's Tiki Lounge. (Jessica Cassyle Carr)
Amped Performance Center · 7 p.m. · $5 · ALL-AGES! - The Weekly Alibi, by Jessica Cassyle Carr


"Best Anything We Forgot 2010 (Additional LIst to Best of the Burque)"

Best Band Merch Table: Music Is The Enemy - The Weekly Alibi


"Cut and Paste"

Never, ever underestimate the power of scissors and glue sticks. This geometrically exciting flyer announces a rock performance by ROO—which is getting back together—along with Ahniwake, Then Eats Them and Music is the Enemy. The all-ages show happens of Wednesday, Dec. 22, from 7 to 10 p.m. Admission is $5, or whatever you can pay, and it all takes place at Winning Coffee Co. (111 Harvard SE). (Jessica Cassyle Carr) - The Weekly Alibi, by Jessica Cassyle Carr


"Taxi A&R Complimentary Feedback on "She Works Her Body Like Supply And Demand So I Guess That Makes Her An Economist.""

I felt the musicianship and delivery was pretty solid. Lyrically, you do a good job of creating an atmosphere, however by giving more dimension to the story, message, etc it can help to pull the listener in and keep them involved. Structurally you might consider using an ABA form and develop more definite melodic and harmonic content for each section to help keep the listener engaged. I liked the energy in your music.

In response: "... ABBA is the enemy." - Taxi Listener ID #299


"Local Hardcore Band Music Is The Enemy Break New Ground With Debut Album"

The grinding cacophony of overhead bombers, the rapid fire detonations of a million nuclear bombs exploding in succession, the subsonic rumble of a bass-heavy earthquake, and the madcap screams of a soldier caught in the middle; indeed, the sound of a war-torn World War III battleground and the sound of Albuquerque post-hardcore band Music is the Enemy are one and the same.

Music is the Enemy is one of many bands gaining notoriety in the local Albuquerque music scene. The city has a healthy abundance of talented punk bands and metal bands. Music is the Enemy manages to capture the best of both worlds, delivering extreme punk speed and crushing metal intensity.

The Albuquerque music scene has been criticized by the uninformed (and those too lazy to search) as bland and talentless. Music is the Enemy's vocalist, ***** (identity omitted), on the other hand, sees it as a scene with great potential. "[There's] never a lack of talent; most of the time a lack of motiviation, and every once and a while, something in between," ***** said about the scene.

The band is quite unique in their presentation and promotion, creating a parallel universe in which they perpetuate the role of an underground resistance fighting against the fovernment, represented by "music." They refer to their shows as "protests" and "demonstrations," making their website and news updates entertaining and thought-provoking to read.

"[The purpose of Music is the Enemy is] to educate a new generation of the twisted entity that they have learned to take for granted, to expose all the lies that music has delicately shoved down our throats. We will bathe in the foundations of music; the power of fame, the allure of desperately clinging to insecurity and calling it love, and the perfect poetic despair. We will martyr ourselves and document every second so that it cannot be questioned how vile we have all become," said band's vocalist, *****.

This brand of twisted sarcasm and social commentary is in full force on the band's debut full length album, "Mr. Murdoch... We Are Ready For Our Target Audience", which was unleashed upon the world on September 25th. The album is characterized by the band's trademark manic, technical guitar playing and precise, aggressive drumming.

The mad man vocal delivery and dissonant musical themes intertwining with metallic breakdowns are highly reminiscent of international successes in the same vein such as the Dillinger Escape Plan and Converge.

The album plays out like on of their news updates, called "line transmissions." It opens with radio cycling and increasing amounts of static until a female voice can be heard, telling the listener that she is hacking through the signal to allow Music is the Enemy to deliver their transmission. As the static and feedback builds tension, ***** screams to end the suspense, "I'm running out of important things to say"; the first lines of the opening song. Then, the listener is taken through an audial battery that breaks ground on many levels.

The unique style image is perpetuated through song titles that manage to be off-the-wall while still preserving the meaning of the song; "I Haven't Been Punk Rock Since '86," "I Sold Out The First Time I Picked Up A Guitar," and "She Works Her Body Like Supply And Demand So I Guess That Makes Her An Economist" are standout examples.

News, information, and merchandise can be acquired at the band's website, www.musickillsrockstars.com

- Printed Paws (Manzano High School), by David Jio


"Best Local Band Headed For Stardom 2010"

Music is the Enemy is deconstructing music and the music business. by continually rejecting all traditional forms of band-ness, the band is gaining local fame as a conceptual group that denies its very existence. It calls performances "protests." It says music is a "plague." The songs defy the Top-40 trends, and the band works to avoid hooks, and even discernable lyrics. Instead, the message of MITE is that music is the enemy, that the music business does more harm than good, and that its music is part of something greater. Its shows are a destructive force of nature. - Albuquerque The Magazine, by Dan Mayfield


"Bridge Nine Records A&R Review"

Music Is The Enemy’s newest record Mr.Murdoch… is a great example of the passion and hard work that still exists around the country and in the hearts of metal fans. The gritty vocals and technical rhythm embody bands such as The Dillinger Escape Plan and Every Time I Die. The hardcore influence is visible in songs such as “Daryl Palumbo Is Forever On My Shit List” with a Suicide File shout out from the song “2003” and also in “Mr. President The Challenger Has Failed” with the southern metal break down. Music Is The Enemy is doing a great job at resurrecting a style of metal that has flown under the radar for years with an exception to a few bands. Music like this actually takes talent, which these guys surly have. For being their first album, it’s pretty impressive for some guys and girl from New Mexico. - Chris Hayslett, A&R Bridge Nine Records


"Fueled By Ramen Records A&R Review"

This is some good shit. Music Is The Enemy is like a swift kick to the face. All out mayhem at times and something very melodic and beautiful at others. Chug chug breakdowns mixed with some shredding riffs call for constant attention.The swagger of Every Time I Die and heaviness of Dillinger Escape Plan. Get ready to get the shit kicked out of you. - Johnny Minardi, A&R Fueled By Ramen Records


"Sonic Reducer: Music is the Enemy Mr. Murdoch ... We're Ready for Our Target Audience (Sicksicksick)"

This album begins with sounds of static as radio stations are being tuned, preparing you for a mishmash of metal, punk and even slam poetry. There’s distortion, hard-edged drum beats and loud, fast guitars. The vocals, as aggressive as the guitars, are mainly yelled/shouted and are at times muddled by the instruments. The singer drifts in and out of singing and talking, a style reminiscent of Suicidal Tendencies. Music is the Enemy accomplishes what it intended, smashing sounds to create a hardcore hybrid. Best song on album is “Dead Scene Meets Zombie Apocalypse.” - The Weekly Alibi, By Diego E. Montoya


"Raar!"

How hard is it to look at this flyer without an 8-bit tune manifesting in your head like it’s the ’80s and a younger you is in the midst of a restless, Nintendo dream-pestered slumber? Must. Save. The Princess.

This vintage video game-inspired advert notifies New Mexicans that Music Is The Enemy, Zagadka and Hollow Lines shall play a few ditties at Burt’s Tiki Lounge on Friday beginning at 10 p.m. The 21-and-over show is free. (Jessica Cassyle Carr) - The Weekly Alibi, By Jessica Cassyle Carr


"Song Roulette"

***** is the front man for the local heaviness that is Music is the Enemy. ***** declines to be named because of the subversive nature of his music project, which releases its first album at an all-ages Treehouse show this Saturday, and a 21-and-over Burt’s Tiki Lounge show on Oct. 2 (next Saturday). Below you’ll find five random tracks that he likes ... whoever he is.

1) “12/23/93” • Poison The Well • The Opposite of December

"Poison The Well taught me that a double kick is the only instrument you ever really need. Without this band I probably wouldn't still be listening to shitty punk rock. I'd probably be jamming Coldplay."

2) “Mommy's At The Grocery Store” • Sick Lipstick • Sting Sting Sting

"Perfect music to clear out a party. Chances are you’re not getting laid, though. Unless she’s into that sort of thing. In that case you’re in for a weird night. I wouldn't know. I still have both my kidneys."

3) “In The Yard Behind The Church” • Eels • Blinking Lights And Other Revelations

"The Eels are simple. They have a song called ‘I Like Birds.’ And really, who doesn't? What's not to like? I mean come on, the dodo was so cool it was limited edition."

4) “Mere Your Pathetique Light” • Mono • Walking Cloud and Deep Red Sky, Flag Fluttered and the Sun Shined

"What I remember most about Mono is the live show. At times it’s so quiet you can hear the person next to you shift their weight then all of a sudden is so loud you're pretty sure your going to crap yourself. But you know that if you just let loose right there you'll be in for some sad times, so you hold it and it builds and builds. Then finally you reach a safe place and you feel most triumphant. I'd say that's a pretty accurate analogy."

5) “Plutonium” • Sole • Selling Live Water

"Sole is my favorite musician that will play a show in mustard-stained sweat pants. He may not be a pretty man but he did give me the best advice I've ever heard, ‘Look out for the white girl suicide bombers.’ Seriously, they’re coming. You will be able to hear them from miles away, but at that point it's probably too late." - The Weekly Alibi, by Jessica Cassyle Carr


"Song Roulette"

***** is the front man for the local heaviness that is Music is the Enemy. ***** declines to be named because of the subversive nature of his music project, which releases its first album at an all-ages Treehouse show this Saturday, and a 21-and-over Burt’s Tiki Lounge show on Oct. 2 (next Saturday). Below you’ll find five random tracks that he likes ... whoever he is.

1) “12/23/93” • Poison The Well • The Opposite of December

"Poison The Well taught me that a double kick is the only instrument you ever really need. Without this band I probably wouldn't still be listening to shitty punk rock. I'd probably be jamming Coldplay."

2) “Mommy's At The Grocery Store” • Sick Lipstick • Sting Sting Sting

"Perfect music to clear out a party. Chances are you’re not getting laid, though. Unless she’s into that sort of thing. In that case you’re in for a weird night. I wouldn't know. I still have both my kidneys."

3) “In The Yard Behind The Church” • Eels • Blinking Lights And Other Revelations

"The Eels are simple. They have a song called ‘I Like Birds.’ And really, who doesn't? What's not to like? I mean come on, the dodo was so cool it was limited edition."

4) “Mere Your Pathetique Light” • Mono • Walking Cloud and Deep Red Sky, Flag Fluttered and the Sun Shined

"What I remember most about Mono is the live show. At times it’s so quiet you can hear the person next to you shift their weight then all of a sudden is so loud you're pretty sure your going to crap yourself. But you know that if you just let loose right there you'll be in for some sad times, so you hold it and it builds and builds. Then finally you reach a safe place and you feel most triumphant. I'd say that's a pretty accurate analogy."

5) “Plutonium” • Sole • Selling Live Water

"Sole is my favorite musician that will play a show in mustard-stained sweat pants. He may not be a pretty man but he did give me the best advice I've ever heard, ‘Look out for the white girl suicide bombers.’ Seriously, they’re coming. You will be able to hear them from miles away, but at that point it's probably too late." - The Weekly Alibi, by Jessica Cassyle Carr


"Albuquerque band mixes melody and metal"

Despite having a great name, I really didn’t think I was going to like Music is the Enemy.

Take any random track from the band’s new CD, Mr. Murdoch … We’re Ready For Our Target Audience, and the first thing that assaults your ears is a wall of death-metal sound. But the more you listen to the music, the more an unexpected melodic element presents itself.

The band builds from a hardcore-punk or thrash-metal groundwork, apparently influenced by punk pioneers like Agnostic Front or Suicidal Tendencies. The songs are characterized by heavy distortion, double-bass drumming and an overall fast-hard-loud aesthetic. This traditional hardcore foundation is interspersed with slower, melodic breakdowns that provide a counterpoint to the more thrashy stuff, keeping the music interesting instead of being a simple all-out attack.

Having attempted to play the drums a couple times myself, I must admit to being impressed by the double-bass drumming. The band doesn’t really break any new ground in this area, but it’s still amazing to me that the anonymous drummer (“all names are omitted to protect the innocent,” they say) can play god knows how many beats per minute and still keep time.

Music is the Enemy is saved from being classified as death metal (or maybe “melodic death metal”) by the fact that you can actually understand what the lead singer/screamer is saying. The lyrics contain too much profanity to be printable in this paper, but for an idea of MITE’s sense of humor, consider the song title “Miles Davis Would Have Hated This S**t.” There’s also one called “She Works Her Body Like Supply And Demand So I Guess That Makes Her An Economist.”

For many listeners, this kind of thing may be a bit much. It’s easy to imagine, too, that many people will be turned off by the death-metal side of the band. But with a little bit of perseverance, its melodic charms shine through. The band members also get points for their worldview, I think.

MITE’s members have set some lofty goals for their band. According to their press release, “The band wages war on music with unrelenting fury … The 10 tracks on Mr. Murdoch… We’re Ready For Our Target Audience explore the myth of music as a saving grace and expose its true nature as an addiction that enslaves and makes us profoundly unhappy.”
It’s hard to judge what they mean by that, so let’s just say it was a joke.
- The Daily Lobo, by Andy Beale


"Dead Sound"

Music is the Enemy came to be two years ago with one guy writing crappy songs in a dark room. Now a five-piece (whose members wish to conceal their identities) that plays “fast, violent punk rock” in the loosest sense of the term, the band is taking a stand against music with an auditory manifesto titled Mr. Murdoch ... We're Ready For Our Target Audience. “We're trying to end music, basically," says *****. “You could consider it a parody. It's a parody that's real though." Find out what the annihilation of music sounds like, and score a free CD, at the band’s all-ages album protest on Saturday, Sept. 25 at the Tree House—one of the space’s final shows. Tenderizor, Epiphany, The Balcony Scene and Spring-Loaded Hot Dog provide opening chaos beginning at 8 p.m. More about the belles of this ball at musickillsrockstars.com. - The Weekly Alibi, Jessica Cassyle Carr


"5/7/10 - Prison of Sound, Music is the Enemy, Reference Man, and Bone Dance @ the Coalmine"

Music Is The Enemy was just flat out fun and we all got more than we expected when the singer single-handedly (well maybe with a little help from the audience) destroyed the place. Spit and beer spewed on the floor, people were bulldozed into, things were tossed across the room (thank god it was only a pillow and cardboard box), and the touring band’s merch table got completely annihilated as the singer fell over it. Jesus! And I don’t know if he was intently conscience about it or if it was just my sheer luck, but he never once rammed into me and my camera even though he came too close for my comfort several times after seeing the damage he was capable of!

All that, and the music was great! The drummer was wickedly insane on that kit, hitting us with killing blow after final killing blow, all while the guitar player pretty much stayed in one place with an occasional (and extremely odd) tip-toe stance, but mostly just sticking to the goddamn formula.

Give these freaks a budget and they’ll make us a killer live DVD that's more punk than any we've seen from CBGBs.
- Jamie Drummond, ABQ local Music Journalist


"01/02/2010 Burt's Tiki Lounge Show Review"

Before Music Is the Enemy began their set, I tried spinning their fortune wheel at the merchandise table. If you signed onto their mailing list, you could get a chance at winning everything from beard rubs to psychic readings. I gave it a spin, and got the psychic reading. Suddenly, this dude who turned out to be the drummer in the band jumps off the stage, grabs me and begins shaking. He then informs me convincingly that I may one day have an apple orchard and shove it up someone’s pee-hole. Sounds good to me, I say. You never know what you’re gonna get in life.

Oh, and props to the Goosebumps table cover! Very much rock and roll spirit.

Music Is the Enemy had a very raw, prog-rock sound. The guitar tone was raw and sloppy, while still being technical at the same time, which made for a nice balance. The drummer played super-fast speed metal rhythms, and was somehow miraculously almost always on time, even despite lacking a bass guitarist. The singer ran around the stage like a crazed lunatic, and you got the idea that this was the destruction of music as we know it, all witnessed onstage.
- Jeff Commissaris, ABQ local Musician


"Battle of the Bands ends in toe-tapping tie"

Other stand-outs from the day include “Music is the Enemy,” a post-punk hardcore band that captured the audience’s attention with lead singer Miles B’s onstage antics. All throughout the act he spat Gatorade and swung the microphone in wide arcs.

“They’re a little bit of a different genre, and it’s more of an acquired taste, but they really brought the stage presence if nothing else,” Lewis said. “They were energetic up there, having a good time.” - UNM's Daily Lobo, by Chris Quintana


Discography

Fucking Demo :: 06/2009 (self-released)

Mr. Murdoch... We're Ready For Our Target Audience :: 09/2010 (2010 SADnotHAPPY Recordings/SickSickSick Distro)

Covers EP :: 05/2011 (2011 SADnotHAPPY) (Limited to 60 physical copies with 14"x14" tapestry. Get it for free at our website)

Hollywood Finally :: Tentative release spring 2012

Photos

Bio

This is a movement against years of lies, years of pain, years of chasing a fantasy that will never be lived. Against a disease that alienates, deforms, and eventually devours everything held dear. This plague is music. It has seeped into every facet of our commercial culture, or is it our commercial about culture? I keep forgetting. Almost every minute of everyday we are bombarded with generic rock stars, over-polished sex symbols, and new ‘n’ improved versions of the same shit our parents claimed was the saving grace of a generation. We think this is the way things should be. These songs mean everything to us, and we crave them. We use them to express and define the most profound experiences of our lives. In the process we’ve become addicts. Filthy and begging--giving anything to anyone just to have that song that seems to explain everything. We honestly believe that there are some thoughts, emotions, and states of being that can only be described in music. But the problem is that we aren’t very good historians. We fail to realize that these ideas aren’t something that only music can capture and express. They are in fact constructs of music. The addicting element of sound. The added ingredient to make you come back on your knees. It’s fake. They’re lies. It has to be stopped.

Music is a lie. It has made us believe in a reality that keeps us gripped in fear, and inadequacy. Music needs us. It needs us to keep coming back. It alters minds so that people are in a constant state of un-fulfillment while at the same time dangling hope in front of them. The collective consciousness has grown complacent truly believing that it is sick, and that salvation is three chords away. We now can see them as the silhouette of a parasite. We must dismantle the paradigm that we once believed held us together.

Fame. Music wants you to believe that you can be famous. Being famous means you never fuck gently, you do a little too much cocaine, and you are never seen with a girl without make-up. Fame means freedom. You can do anything you want as long as it's entertaining. In fact, people will love you for it. But just like when your mother said you could be an astronaut, it’s all lies. You can’t be that kind of famous, no one is. What we call fame is really just a national pastime called celebrity. Music not only tells us we can one day be players, it manipulates us into believing that playing is actually the only way to be happy. If you’re not famous then you shouldn’t be happy. Only famous people say important things. Only famous people will be remembered. Only famous people fall in love. Even some small-time acquired fame around town, at work, or even at school is better than nothing. It doesn’t matter what you’re famous for. That’s the brilliance of it. It allows everyone to believe they should be famous for whatever reason they can come up with. And we all struggle everyday to try to reach the mirage where we too can be loved by millions of our peers, greasy with money, and stinking of sex.

Love is a myth. It’s an idea no one can quite define but we’re all very sure we want it and we are absolutely nothing without it. If you think about it, two people can spend their whole lives together and they can fuck and they can even enjoy each others company, but they will never feel as perfect as one of a thousand love songs. So what is love really? Love is another illusion manifested by music. Love is music’s way of making sure you’re unhappy by giving you a goal you can never attain. Then it draws you in with songs about how love will find you and when it does you will be free from loneliness and heartache. Maybe when you’re famous you will find love. What’s hidden is that you were free of those things all along without music.

Musicians seem like the villian, but no life is destroyed more than that of a musician when he or she slowly realizes the dehumanizing nature of their life’s work. The musician will one day abruptly realize the error in what he or she once sacrificed and fought for. It was all for not. It wasn’t expression. It wasn't art. It was a cataloged unit to subsidize evil. At the end of the day--music has done its damage. It will have gutted the musician of everything that made them proud and replace it with nothing. Without the music the musician will die. While we cannot blame anyone in particular for the existence of this disease we can declare war on the pushers that cash in on this parasite: The stations, the networks, the labels, the middlemen selling the 15’s and 30’s, NASA, Pfizer, and the Canadian National Railway to name a few. These groups and corporations create an endless market for music to prey upon the musician, and the infected alike. We must rise up, protest, inspire, and destroy in the name of self-preservation.

http://www.youtube.com/user/MusicistheEnemy