Nam Le
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Nam Le

Allentown, Pennsylvania, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2013 | INDIE

Allentown, Pennsylvania, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 2013
Band Rock Punk

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"Number 65 best post-harcore record of 2013"

Check it out - Sputnik Music


"Number 7 Album of the Year 2013"

We were featured as number 7 best album of the year by Sputnik Music staff member Adam Downer. - SputnikMusic


"Number 7 Album of the Year 2013"

We were featured as number 7 best album of the year by Coke Machine Glow staff member Adam Downer. - Coke Machine Glow


"Free Music Friday (11/01/13)"

List of free music being release that week - Absolute Punk


"Unfamiliar Frequencies"

“I will admit they’ve shown me / how easy it is to be a changeling”: these wails set off “Raw Dog ABE 2012”, Nam Le’s shining moment on their excellent self-titled second release, and those words quite possibly put forth a mission-statement of sorts. Sure, they hop along the borders of post-hardcore, emo, and indie – but they do it with such reckless abandon and ease, expertly pummeling through a Slint-esque tune like “Chambered” into the aforementioned beautiful pandemonium of “Raw Dog ABE 2012”. Nam Le really do grow these riff-heavy rock journeys into multiple-movement tunes and still rarely crack the three-minute mark. It’s not so much how their uniqueness – though there’s a lot of it – but what they are able to do with the sum of their parts. This record was crafted with wholehearted love – you can hear it from the moment the drums drop on opener “Buried” – and Nam Le look to project these hearts of theirs upon us. At first the band can come off a tad abrasive, but there’s soot to remove, grit to dig through before that pristine glow is unearthed. The record will probably take a spin or two to sink in – it’s dirty, in the best possible way – but not lacking in effort or skill. This sounds like a band, forcefully constrained against the proverbial wall, yet instead of pressing back, Nam Le turn around and bust through the same fucking barrier. Instruments in hand, emotion in tow, they come crashing through in the form of something huge, and you would be wise to let them break that crack wide open and settle on into your skull. - See more at: http://www.by-volume.com/unfamiliar-frequencies-2/#sthash.cXRQ1NUy.dpuf - By-Volume UK


"True Blue - Nam Le Review"

“All of this sounds boring” are the first words uttered during “True Blue”, Nam Le’s contribution to an extremely solid split between them and buddies Stolen Houses. It is in this exact mindset that Nam Le thrives; this half broken, twenty-something, post-higher-education rut, wherein we grow up and find our place – whatever that means exactly. While this isn’t some groundbreaking realm to inhabit or a mysterious train of thought, Nam Le fit cohesively here. They could count themselves among the crop of musicians and lyricists that compliment this strange waiting period a good portion of us experience at some point or another, regardless really of social standing or geographical upbringing. Nam Le is about the free-for-all, but they make it sound so appealing. “True Blue” keeps this tone fervent. Yet at first it could seem that the band are drifting from the more spastic influences of their excellent debut in lieu of more melodic guitar tones and widescreen distortion. Think less post hardcore and more grunge, though the band sacrifice none of their emotional aptitude in exchange for melody. “True Blue” is certainly a more tempered tune from the band, but it is the expansive nature of the track that keeps it from dragging. Those chugging, heavy handed chords, that vocal harmonization, the wall of distorted buzz, and it all comes crashing down into one beautiful mess every time they reach “True Blue’s” invigorating refrain. - See more at: http://www.by-volume.com/nam-le-true-blue/#sthash.C1HyIv3k.dpuf - By-Volume UK


"#17 Most Popular Post-Hardcore band on Bandcamp"

We are ranked 17th most popular band using the post-hardcore tag. 08/05/13 - Bandcamp


"#17 Most Popular Post-Rock band on bandcamp"

We are the 17th most popular band using the post-rock tag on bandcamp 08/05/13 - bandcamp


"#8 Most Popular Math-Rock band on Bandcamp"

As of 8/01/13, Nam Le was the 8th most popular math-rock band on bandcamp.com - Bandcamp


"Nam Le - Nam Le review"

Who and What It Is: Nam Le - “Nam Le"; Self Released (2013)

What It Sounds Like: Post-hardcore, hardcore punk, emo; Title Fight, Tigers Jaw, Lifetime, Crash of Rhinos, Pianos Become the Teeth, Touche Amore, Run For Cover-core.

Review:

Nam Le is a four-piece post-hardcore band and, as many could have expected, another great act in the amazing Philadelphia music scene. Their eponymous debut LP is short but goddamn sweet, with seventeen minutes of energetic, pissed-off jams spread out over eight cohesive, yet structurally heterogeneous, tracks.

Track one of Nam Le begins with a catchy as hell, bass-heavy riff that works perfectly with the guitar to get the raw energy of this band flowing from the outset. Buried is one of the tracks on this album that really stands out for finding the perfect balance between being fun and engaging while maintaining a lyrical seriousness that keeps the listener aware of just how angsty this band can get. The third track, Alley Cat, starts out loud and hungry as hell and stays that way up until about the second chorus, when it actually gets more impressive. The vocals straighten out and rise above the instrumentation in a surprisingly gesture of vocal showmanship, before getting even more vicious as backup vocals come in at the end of the line: “What were you doing?/ The other night when I did’t pick up the phone."

As much as I enjoyed the Title Fight-esque post-hardcore jams that the first half of this LP delivered with consistency, the second half of this album really blew me away in how Nam Le were able to channel a diverse mix of sounds without falling victim to self-created sonic anonymity that many bands don’t realize they are approaching when they take the kind of chances that this band does when they try to play the math-rock card and the post-rock card and throw in some hardcore vocals AND do it all with some often-buried basslines that border more on pop punk than any of the previously mentioned genres. It’s a tough task, but these guys pulled it off ridiculously well considering this is really the first collection of music they’ve officially released. From the bouncy, math-rock influenced guitars that drive Acton-Boxboro, to the drums and guitar (and pretty much everything else) that are just begging for Touche Amore comparisons on the closing track, Shattered, the last four tracks are a sonically virtuous yet cogent, emotional adventure which many fans in the modern hardcore scene would struggle to not enjoy.

Overall Rating: 8.5/10
- Funeral Sounds (Label/Press)


"Featured Audio"

Nam Le is a group that consists of Vibhor Sharma, Colin Zelin, David Goodheart, and Michael Emmerich. “Great Times” is a song that was demoed this past March and recorded in August at Project 2 Studios in Manchester, NH by Connor Hayes. The track describes some of the experiences during the great bummer summer of 2012 that members of Nam Le had gone through. This one’s for all the 90's kids. Thanks for listening. check out their music here - Muhlenberg College's Popped!


"Promotion in Russia"

Hey try this band from Allentown, PA. This is the new album and I think it's pretty good ;) - Cute Unicorn: Music Promoter


"From the Valley: “Nam Le,” Nam Le."

In the last installment of From the Valley, I confessed my love for high-school garage bands.

College bands are a little dicier. The kids get older, they start reading European novels, they start wearing black, they start getting all serious. And somewhere along the line, they lose the jive.

Nam Le may be deadly earnest. And, they may use the impenetrable label “post-hardcore” to describe the noise they make.

But the Muhlenberg College quartet still lands on the right side of the divide with its self-titled album, which showed up on Bandcamp only two days ago.

On their eight tracks (seven, really — one song is an instrumental that lasts about as long as a cube of bouillon in a bowl of hot water), Nam Le rocks with power, energy and well-drilled musicianship.

Slamming in at 1:44, opening track “Buried” is one of the few songs I’ve heard in a while that actually made me wish it were longer.

“Chambered,” at 3:21, is the album’s longest song; and I could have stood some more of that one too, particularly the gentle, ringing, mesmeric sections that nicely offset the hardcore (sorry, post-hardcore) roar.

Just past the album’s halfway mark, on the curiously titled “Raw Dog ABE 2012? (I’m guessing it’s a reference to Lehigh Valley International Airport), hardcore-style screaming starts making its way into more and more of the vocals.

That’s where Nam Le lost me a little bit.

I’ve never liked the open-throated punk-scream style of singing. It wears thin quickly. It’s been done so often that it doesn’t really connote all that much energy. And, in some cases, I suspect it is an easy alternative to writing actual melodies — playing tennis with the net down, as it were.

Closing track “Shattered” opts for the wounded howl pretty much all the way through. I hesitate to criticize it — it is a matter of personal taste, after all, and the young man at the mic might be opening a vein — but “Shattered” is the one song on Nam Le I have trouble listening to.

Not every song goes that way. “Acton-Boxboro” (a school district in the northwest suburbs of Boston — given the lyrics about “leaving home,” I’m guessing it’s someone’s alma mater) ends with a group vocal, or perhaps a single singer overdubbed a couple times for a singalong effect. Close your eyes and you can almost imagine it’s an entire graduating class singing along. It works.

This is not music for 40-year-old men, and on a certain level I don’t connect with it; I feel like I listened to the whole thing through an invisible wall.

But that’s not particularly Nam Le’s fault. These guys are pretty good at what they do — good enough to make me come back for repeated listens. And that doesn’t happen often in this style of music.

(Whatever you choose to call it.) - Neck Pickup


"From the Valley: “Nam Le,” Nam Le."

In the last installment of From the Valley, I confessed my love for high-school garage bands.

College bands are a little dicier. The kids get older, they start reading European novels, they start wearing black, they start getting all serious. And somewhere along the line, they lose the jive.

Nam Le may be deadly earnest. And, they may use the impenetrable label “post-hardcore” to describe the noise they make.

But the Muhlenberg College quartet still lands on the right side of the divide with its self-titled album, which showed up on Bandcamp only two days ago.

On their eight tracks (seven, really — one song is an instrumental that lasts about as long as a cube of bouillon in a bowl of hot water), Nam Le rocks with power, energy and well-drilled musicianship.

Slamming in at 1:44, opening track “Buried” is one of the few songs I’ve heard in a while that actually made me wish it were longer.

“Chambered,” at 3:21, is the album’s longest song; and I could have stood some more of that one too, particularly the gentle, ringing, mesmeric sections that nicely offset the hardcore (sorry, post-hardcore) roar.

Just past the album’s halfway mark, on the curiously titled “Raw Dog ABE 2012? (I’m guessing it’s a reference to Lehigh Valley International Airport), hardcore-style screaming starts making its way into more and more of the vocals.

That’s where Nam Le lost me a little bit.

I’ve never liked the open-throated punk-scream style of singing. It wears thin quickly. It’s been done so often that it doesn’t really connote all that much energy. And, in some cases, I suspect it is an easy alternative to writing actual melodies — playing tennis with the net down, as it were.

Closing track “Shattered” opts for the wounded howl pretty much all the way through. I hesitate to criticize it — it is a matter of personal taste, after all, and the young man at the mic might be opening a vein — but “Shattered” is the one song on Nam Le I have trouble listening to.

Not every song goes that way. “Acton-Boxboro” (a school district in the northwest suburbs of Boston — given the lyrics about “leaving home,” I’m guessing it’s someone’s alma mater) ends with a group vocal, or perhaps a single singer overdubbed a couple times for a singalong effect. Close your eyes and you can almost imagine it’s an entire graduating class singing along. It works.

This is not music for 40-year-old men, and on a certain level I don’t connect with it; I feel like I listened to the whole thing through an invisible wall.

But that’s not particularly Nam Le’s fault. These guys are pretty good at what they do — good enough to make me come back for repeated listens. And that doesn’t happen often in this style of music.

(Whatever you choose to call it.) - Neck Pickup


"Free Music Friday (7/19/13)"

Best free music of the week! - AbsolutePunk.net


"Winter Compilation"

Best bands in the area - JL Booking


"Winter Compilation Pt 2"

Compilation of the best bands in this genre - JL Booking


"ALBUM STREAM | NAM LE ~ NAM LE"

This is exactly what we want from a new music column! We posted just one track from this brand new album from post-hardcore quartet Nam Le yesterday, and the reaction to it has been brilliant. So much so that we thought we’d better present the whole thing to you on a plate. So turn everything up and play it in full below. Big choppy riffs, vocals that drape an arm around your shoulder before pummeling you in the face, and all wrapped up in under twenty minutes. Consider us well and truly hooked. - GoldFlakePaint


"Ten New Releases This Week"

Below are ten new independent/unsigned music releases this week. Sit down, make a cup of tea and grab a biscuit while you listen to a compilation of great music. WARNING! you may become addicted… - Independent Music News UK


"Ten New Releases This Week"

Below are ten new independent/unsigned music releases this week. Sit down, make a cup of tea and grab a biscuit while you listen to a compilation of great music. WARNING! you may become addicted… - Independent Music News UK


"Nuevoh!"

There’s not too much to say about this duo from Allentown, other than they make stupidly good post-hardcore. Drums clatter, guitars are smashed and the vocals scream, beg and damn well demand your attention. Eight tracks. Seventeen minutes. Glorious, glorious noise: - GoldFlakePaint.uk


"Nuevoh!"

There’s not too much to say about this duo from Allentown, other than they make stupidly good post-hardcore. Drums clatter, guitars are smashed and the vocals scream, beg and damn well demand your attention. Eight tracks. Seventeen minutes. Glorious, glorious noise: - GoldFlakePaint.uk


Discography

Great Times (single) - 2012 Received radio play on 91.7 WMUH Allentown

Nam Le (LP) - July 15, 2013

Split with Stolen Houses - October 31st, 2013

Split with Shotgun No Blitz - March, 2014

Split with Greyscale - June 17th, 2014

Photos

Bio

Vibhor Sharma, Colin Zelin, and Mike Emmerich were all members of a pop/folk band at Muhlenberg College. All feeling somewhat unsatisfied with the direction the band was going in and the lack of new music being written, they decided to form a "side project" of stuff that they had been writing that was deemed "too heavy" for their previous act. After recording the song "Great Times" in the summer of 2012, the side project quickly became the focus of a lot of attention. Nam Le found themselves opening for bands that influenced a lot of the music they had been recording. Members of bands such as "Seahaven, Tigers Jaw, and Brave Bird" were impressed by the energetic live show.

Nam Le released their debut EP recorded by Matthew Klein (Algernon Cadwallader, Into It. Over It., Jet Set Sail) and mixed and mastered by Ryan Stack (TWIABPAIANLATD, Late Nite Wars, Humaana) in July 2013 in which it was met with critical acclaim including being listed as the 7th best record of 2013 by SputnikMusic staff member, Adam Downer.

Nam Le is set to release a new EP recorded by Ryan Stack in 2014 

Nam Le is set to release their debut EP recorded by Matthew Klein (Algernon Cadwallader, Into It. Over It., Jet Set Sail) and mixed and mastered by Ryan Stack (TWIABPAIANLATD, Late Nite Wars, Humaana) in July 2013

Band Members