New Machines
Gig Seeker Pro

New Machines

Loveland, Ohio, United States | Established. Jan 01, 1999 | INDIE

Loveland, Ohio, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 1999
Band Rock Jazz

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Mar
25
New Machines @ District Anchor

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

Jun
24
New Machines @ The Village Idiot

Maumee, Ohio, United States

Maumee, Ohio, United States

Jun
05
New Machines @ South Park Tavern

Dayton, Ohio, United States

Dayton, Ohio, United States

Mar
28
New Machines @ The Southgate House Revival

Newport, Kentucky, United States

Newport, Kentucky, United States

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


I’ve said for a long time that the only differences between punk and jazz are precision and intent. Each is a valid musically revolutionary genre, freely breaking rules without thought of consequence. Jazz is a precise attack, where as punk is its more reckless brother. The philosophy of the New Machines doesn’t differ much from mine. A hybrid of ‘70s-style punk and jazz fusion, with a pop music icing, this near-ten year old band grew out of Toledo and quickly spread to making regional appearances from Kentucky to Chicago. The band’s music has been distributed internationally and received airplay across the United States and Eastern Europe since 2000. Recently, New Machines’ single “Metropolis,” from its 2005 Welcome to Metropolis album, was featured on the soundtrack for last year’s PBS TV series Roadtrip Nation, along with the likes of indie rockers Of Montreal. The New Machines play their first local show in a while this weekend with the eccentric, quirky Pink Floyd tribute band, Polka Floyd.
- Ryan Bunch - Toledo City paper


New Machines take a new approach to punk rock, complimenting the often simplified genre with saxophones. Formed in Toledo in 1998 by Eric Bair and Sam Krall, the band has seen widespread success, undoubtedly due to their unusual use of three chord progressions mixed with jazzy horns. Influenced by a variety of genres, New Machines sound has elements of '70s punk, '80s rock, along with blues, bebop, and jazz. Despite the distance between its members, New Machines keep swinging away, and they never miss a beat.
- Emily Rippe March 2010 - Toledo City Paper


The singer has his 80s handbook out because he really is in tune with the sound of that period. But don’t take as an insult or a jab at not being fresh because they are fresher and more original than most everyone out there. I’d venture to guess that they alone have hoisted the Toledo, OH music scene upon their shoulders, if not then the scenesters there are stupid. They’ve actually played with a couple of my favorite indie bands—Hilltop Distillery and Silo the Husky. Their songs consist of jazzy saxophone, quirky guitar riffs, and smooth bass while the drums keep time. The result is an emetic polar opposite of jazz-inspired city folk-rock that knows how to groove and discuss the possibilities of the glass being “half-full”.
J-Sin

- Smother.net


"The group is refreshingly open-ended but never unwieldy or excessivley meandering, drawn back to it's core by Eric Bair's unique songwriting...The group's solid rhythm section is incredibly adaptable and their versitility provides a backbone more musical than most time keepers...a truly original band that operates in its own creative universe, devoid of trend-hopping and blatant homage to their influences."
-Mike Breen - Cincinnati City Beat 2006


New Machines is a force to be reckoned with and so is Eric Bair as a solo artist. - Gary Allen - drummer for Charlie Daniels Band and J.J. Cale


Three years ago I dubbed their last album an "Editor's Pick" due to their great groove and intriguing jazz moments. "Welcome to Metropolis" is in the same vein with folksy rock tunes and jazzy brass elements. Vocally the band is just a cosmonaut without a space program-inspirational and one of a kind yet without the proper production and promotional dollars to garner this band the attention they so deserve. Also I love that the saxophone part on the introduction track "Outta my Skin" seems almost like it was pulled straight from "The Family Feud" theme song. Awesome.

- J. Sin - Smother.net


"Great, intricate melodies that you can still pump your fist to" - Toledo City Paper


The American band New Machines showed on this 26-minute long CD what it means not to be a genre slave. Here the sound is based on guitar alternative rock from the first half of the '80s mixed with a calm atmosphere which dominates the album. 8 songs were recorded in a home studio on only 4 channels. So considering all of that - the sound and production are great! - Branko Rogosic - Rock Express


The New Machines debut album provides a slightly uneven set of songs, but as each track is dissected for its individual merit, you realize that songwriter Eric Blair is onto something that's comforting in its familiarity, yet completely original as well. Sugar-soaked 1960s British pop lends itself to "I Love My Machine," while the swirling space of "Enigmatic" sees guitar experimentation reach new peaks as classical lines interject with psychedelic colors. As for Blair's music bed for the song "Anesthetize Me," it would have fit nicely along with one of the other country-flavored forays on the Beatles' Let It Be. Saxophonist Sam Krall is even given space to pen the frantically paced "Blah, Blah, Blah," which seems to pay homage to new wave artists Devo. Although the songs may not fit together that well stylistically, this album should not be overlooked for its creative spirit.
-Steven Howell - All Music Guide


Like Morphine meets The Hives, New Machines blend fuzzy, melodic guitars with sax-heavy grooves for a funky new brand of rock 'n soul. The charm and originality of a classic rock band back when it was just plain rock music. - Toledo City Paper


The New Machines hail from Ohio and their new album, Welcome to Metropolis, features a jazzy, laid-back rock vibe that’s fun and hip. Sam Krall’s saxophone playing is an integral part of their sound and the band might remind listeners of Morphine, though New Machines’ music is also laden with guitar parts that really get rhythmic and rocking, jamming at times, but always with the proper restraint.

The album’s production is decent, if flat and somewhat across the map, as a few of the tracks was recorded live.  The album’s opener, “Outta My Skin,” is a quirky styling reminiscent of something David Byrne might write.  Many of the other tunes are a bit eclectic, but also catchy, such as “Little Girl, Big Head.”

Favorite Track: Track 10, “Pillhead”



www.onlinerock.com

- Online Rock (2006)


Discography

1999 - "New Machines"
2001 - Garagetapes Sonic Imbalance compilation - contains the single "Eyeballs Of The World"
2002 - "729 Tecumseh"
2005 - "Welcome To Metropolis"
2007 - PBS series Roadtrip Nation soundtrack - contains the single "Metropolis"

Photos

Bio

In 1998 guitarist Eric Bair AKA Blair wrote a song entitled I Love My Machine. This song would later be the inspiration for the the jazz/punk/pop hybrid New Machines. Eric was influenced by jazz artists John Coltrane and Miles Davis and punk rockers like The Stooges and Television. Eric recruited saxophonist Sam Krall and drummer Jayant Thomas soon after, and the band began playing live shows in and around Toledo, OH in 2000. The bands blend of jazz, punk, and pop influences caught the attention of other bands around the Midwest and soon resulted in gigs in Chicago, Ann Arbor, and Columbus in 2001. By 2007, New Machines single Metropolis was featured on the soundtrack for the PBS TV series Roadtrip Nation along with artists Of Montreal and Brett Dennen. The band made an appearance on the cable TV network FUSE a few years later, and their instrumental track Shielded was featured on PBS and the Turner Superstation cable network in 2009. New Machines has played with a wide variety of artists such as Steve Conte, guitarist for the reformed punk/glam rockers New York Dolls and indie rockers Wussy. Having played mostly clubs and several music festivals during its tenure, the band ventured beyond traditional venues to play Chicagolands Six Flags theme park in 2011. New Machines has been rockin' for over a decade and looks forward to new musical opportunities for years to come.

Band Members