Nicolas Pellerin et les Grands Hurleurs
Gig Seeker Pro

Nicolas Pellerin et les Grands Hurleurs

Montréal, Quebec, Canada | INDIE

Montréal, Quebec, Canada | INDIE
Band Folk World

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


NICOLAS PELLERIN ET LES GRANDS HURLEURS

By Tony Montague

Nicolas Pellerin et les Grands Hurleurs [the Big Howlers] may be the busiest folk band in Quebec these days. Since coming together in 2009 they’ve toured relentlessly across North America and made regular forays to Europe, revitalizing old songs and tunes from their homeland with verve and flair.

Fiddler and singer Pellerin, guitarist Simon Marion, and bassist Simon Lepage are sonic adventurers who bring elements of classical, world music, jazz, and electro-funk to their intelligent arrangements of traditional texts and original melodies. Pellerin does most of the composing, and adds the occasional new lyric.

“The way I see our tradition it’s not something fixed, or frozen in a particular time, but in constant evolution,” he says, from across the table of a Montreal café, with a suitably howling wind outside. “It’s natural to want to give the music your own colour, to add to the repertoire rather than trying to reproduce what people were doing 100 years ago. Having said that, before you start mixing things it’s important to know your sources well and tap the spirit behind it all - where the material comes from, who sang and played it, how it developed, whether it was for dancing or accompaniment.”

Pellerin’s own roots lie deep in the village of St Elie-de-Caxton where he still lives, midway between Montreal and Quebec City. “When I was a kid there were big parties at my grandmother’s house, with family members and local old-timers singing or telling stories round the piano. They left a lasting impression, and by good fortune much of it was preserved - my grandmother hid a tape recorder behind the piano, without anyone knowing!”

Eventually Pellerin inherited 42 tapes, including over 900 songs - a wellspring from which he continues to draw inspiration. He began as a singer, then learned some guitar and percussion, but was 19 before he picked up a fiddle for the first time. “It was the 26th of December 1999, at 12.15,” Pellerin recalls with exactitude. “I’d been to a show by Le Rêve du Diable the previous day and spent that evening singing with the musicians. The fiddler suggested I try playing a violin, so I did. It was like being struck by a thunderbolt.”

Putting aside his ambitions as a high-flying maths student, Pellerin devoted himself to the instrument, madly practising a minimum of eight hours a day for several years to make up for lost time, and performing with the band Les Langues Fourchues. Soon his vigorous, fluent fiddle style caught the ear of Yves Lambert, La Bottine Souriante’s former frontman, who enlisted Pellerin for his own quintet.

Then in 2007, as a side-project, Nicolas put out an album of traditional music with his older brother Fred, a hugely popular storyteller less well known as a talented singer and musician. Though the siblings never toured to promote the disc - Fred et Nicolas Pellerin - they still managed to sell an amazing 50,000 copies and bagged a Félix, Quebec’s top music award. Buoyed by this success Nicolas went on to form Les Grands Hurleurs. “We chose the name to represent the energy and character of our sound. Howling for me is a cry from the heart, something that’s deep and true – and connects.”

Within a few months the band was recording a self-titled debut, which also won a Félix. Among its many highlights is a powerful rendition of the lengthy naval ballad “Corsaire” that brings out the story’s drama through drones and strings, and a shift of key mid-song.

2011’s Petit Grain d’Or finds the trio tighter and even more imaginative in its treatment of folk material, with all the melodies new. The album hits the ground running with the Breton song “Trégate”, Lepage’s bubbling bass and Pellerin’s cájon percussion teaming up with a classical string quartet to carve a propulsive, resonant groove. The title-track is a lullaby and children’s song recast in minor key, with Pellerin’s clear and penetrating voice set off by cello, viola, fiddle, piano, and guitar in the funky, spacious arrangement.

“Among other things I use my fiddle like a ukulele, and create chords as if it was a mandolin. We’re always looking for new sonic textures rather than just using regular chords. We want to draw out the distinctive character of each piece, always keeping things varied and unusual. That’s also why we have more guests on this album - like Martin Lizotte, an exceptionally creative musician who plays piano, Hammond B3 organ, synthesizer, and ‘prepared piano’, with pieces of metal placed under the strings to give a unique sound.”

It may seem a long way from the singarounds in St Elie, but Pellerin sees that the music’s survival as a genuinely popular form depends on its openness to integrating new influences, and its presentation in new settings. “I’d love to have our shows become more like happenings or spectacles, so it’s not just a band playing its songs and tunes but a multi-facetted event – w - Penguin eggs


NICOLAS PELLERIN ET LES GRANDS HURLEURS By Tony Montague
Nicolas Pellerin can remember the precise moment when he started to play fiddle. It was a quarter past midnight on the 26 December of 1999. Pellerin was 19 at the time - a relatively late age to pick up the instrument - and studying maths at university. So began a beautiful obsession that has led him to become one of the hottest performers on the trad-based scene in Quebec
“When I got back to school after the holidays all I could think about was playing fiddle,” he recalls with a quick laugh. “I really got hooked. It wasn't long before I left college and devoted myself completely to the instrument to make up for lost time. I played eight hours a day every day, for years and years.”
Pellerin is a powerful fiddler, with fire in his fingers, but he also possesses a keen musical intelligence and sensitivity to the nuances of a tune. He played for a while in the young trad band Les Langues Fourchues, whose line-up includes Evelyne Gélinas of Galant tu perds ton temps. Then Yves Lambert, former frontman of La Bottine Souriante, hired Pellerin to be a member of his Bébert Orchestra and word of his prowess spread.
In 2007 Nicolas teamed up with his older sibling Fred – a hugely popular storyteller in Quebec - to make an album. Even though they didn't do any shows together the brothers sold an astonishing 45,000 copies of Fred et Nicolas Pellerin, and bagged a Felix Award [Quebec's equivalent of the Junos]. Spurred by this achievement Nicolas decided to leave the Bébert Orchestra and strike out in his own direction, forming Nicolas Pellerin et les Grands Hurleurs with guitarist Simon Marion and bassist Simon Lepage.
Les Grands Hurleurs [the Big Howlers] take their name from an ill-fated French warship that's the protagonist of the old naval ballad “Corsaire” [buccaneer], one of the highlights of the trio's self-titled debut. “We called the band Les Grands Hurleurs because we wanted something that represented the energy and character of our sound. Howling for me is a cry from the heart, something that's deep and true - and transmits.”
Pellerin's approach to folk is not purist. The arrangements of old songs like “Rossignolet and “Malmariée” draw on jazz and funk to give them new vitality.
“Corsaire” is brilliantly re-imagined musically, with changes of instrumentation and shifts of tempo maintaining interest and adding to the intensity of the lengthy and gripping narrative. As on the album's other songs Pellerin sings the lead, with a strong and penetrating voice that has a nasal resonance, evoking maritime traditions from western France and Brittany.
Nicolas Pellerin et les Grands Hurleurs also garnered a Félix, and the three musicians began touring internationally. They're currently in the studio working on their second album. “The success of the first recording has created a good kind of pressure on us to deliver something special. All of the instrumental tunes will be original, written by me or by the two Simons. The songs are still traditional in their texts, but while we're anchored in that repertoire the music is moving further away from the old structures, and we're using things like string quartets. It will be readily accessible, but at the same time pretty wild and out-there for a folk album.” - Penguin eggs


Le Soleil de Châteauguay - 7 avril 2010
Culture > Arts de la scène
Certains l'ont peut-être remarqué
en première partie du spectacle de
son frère conteur Fred Pellerin
vendredi dernier au Pavillon de l'île.
Nicolas Pellerin revient cette
semaine présenter son propre
spectacle de musique traditionnelle
en compagnie de ses deux acolytes
les Grands Hurleurs.
Nicolas Pellerin et les Grands Hurleurs, composé de Simon Lepage et Simon
Marion, viennent à peine de célébrer le premier anniversaire de la formation
du groupe qu'ils se promènent partout au Québec pour présenter leur
matériel musical. Le trio reprend des vieux textes traditionnels et tente d'y
donner une saveur plus moderne. Selon Nicolas Pellerin, c'est ce qui
expliquerait le succès rapide que connait le groupe. «Musicalement, on sort
des sentiers battus. C'est de la musique traditionnelle, mais on peut trouver
quelques passages électros. On a un laptop sur scène», explique Nicolas
Pellerin. Il avoue d'ailleurs être très fier d'avoir la chance de jouer au
Québec car de nombreux groupes traditionnels sont très populaires à
l'étranger, mais le sont peu dans la province.
L'album qu'il a publié en 2007 avec son frère Fred Pellerin l'a également fait
connaître du grand public, bien qu'il roulait sa bosse dans ce domaine
depuis un certain temps.
La musique fait partie intégrante de son milieu familial depuis son tout
jeune âge, c'est pourquoi il s'est rapidement intéressé au style de musique
traditionnel. «Ma grand-mère enregistrait tous les réveillons de Noël en
cachette, raconte le violoniste et chanteur. On a encore les cassettes dans
le banc de piano. On peut m'entendre chanter quand j'étais petit.»
C'est pourtant seulement à l'âge de 20 ans qu'il s'est intéressé au violon.«
C'est à l'université que je me suis dit que je pourrais devenir violoniste. Je
fais huit heures de violon par jour pendant 10 ans», raconte-t-il.
Il assure que dans les réveillons d'aujourd'hui son frère et lui sont loin de
prendre toute la place. «Fred ne conte pas. Il écoute les histoires de
mon'oncle et de ma'tante. Ce n'est pas nous qui prenons le plancher de
danse.»
Saint-Élie-de-Caxton tatoué sur le coeur
Nicolas Pellerin demeure toujours au village de Saint-Élie-de-Caxton, rendu
célèbre grâce à son frère. Toutefois, contrairement à Fred, Nicolas n'entend
pas faire de son village un cheval de bataille. « Dans le spectacle, on fait
attention pour ne pas aller là-dedans. Je veux que les gens découvrent ma
musique pas mon village.» Il respecte énormément ce que son frère fait,
mais n'entend pas aller dans la même direction que lui à ce sujet.
Le spectacle de Nicolas Pellerin et les Grands Hurleurs sera présenté le
vendredi 9 avril à la salle Jean-Pierre-Houde du Centre culturel Vanier de
Châteauguay à 20 h. Pour plus d'informations, contacter le 450.698.3100.
- Le Soleil de Châteauguay


(Saint-Élie-de Caxton) Au fil de la
dernière décennie, Nicolas Pellerin
est monté sur des scènes en
Europe, aux États-Unis, au Québec
et dans les autres provinces
canadiennes mais il n'a encore
jamais foulé les planches de
Saint-Élie comme il le fera dimanche
soir aux Bizouneries de son patelin.
Une seule fois, il y a quelques
années, il avait donné un spectacle
en compagnie d'Yves Lambert sur le
perron de l'église du village mais il y
était accompagnateur seulement.
Cette fois-ci, il se produit en trio
avec les Grands Hurleurs, les
musiciens Simon Lepage et Simon
Marion. «Avec mon propre projet, ce sera vraiment une première fois à Saint-Élie et ça en rajoute un peu», avoue-t-il. «J'adore faire des shows, j'en ferais sept soirs et je serais content mais à Saint-Élie, il y a une espèce d'adrénaline, une excitation différente. Il y aura comme une petite gêne à casser.» Nicolas Pellerin se réjouit d'y présenter un spectacle bien rodé et a hâte d'y faire planer les ambiances multiples
qui donnent de nouvelles textures à la musique traditionnelle. En 2009 seulement, le trio a donné une centaine de représentations, auxquelles on ajoute une trentaine de shows déjà en 2010, ce qui en fait l'un des groupes de musique traditionnelle qui tourne le plus actuellement. Jusqu'à ce jour, le trio a adapté son spectacle pour les salles avec du matériel plus nuancé, et lui a donné des notes plus endiablées en fonction des festivals cet été. Dimanche ce sera un mélange des deux, indique Nicolas. Mais d'abord et avant tout, ce sera une soirée sous le thème de la nouveauté. Peu enclin à demeurer dans sa zone de confort, Nicolas Pellerin se réjouit de présenter à Saint-Élie de nouvelles pièces fraîchement créées, dont il est particulièrement fier. Les trois musiciens présenteront en fait l'ensemble de leur premier album, sorti il y a huit mois; feront deux pièces de l'album issu de la complicité des deux frères Pellerin; et visiteront les nouvelles, dont l'une «sur des grooves africains où l'on se lâche vraiment lousse», dit le chanteur et violoniste. On y découvrira une autre pièce complètement différente, «un très beau texte qui relate la vie d'un ivrogne en quatre couplets, que l'on fait plus rock acoustique», donne-t-il encore en exemple, en plus de la pièce Le monde a bien changé, «une chanson d'amour que l'on fait moins traditionnelle, plus contemporaine, plus poppy à la limite.»


Autre nouveauté, Nicolas et les Grands Hurleurs livreront sur scène une reprise de Dans mon beau pays, pièce de Willie Lamothe qu'ils ont revisitée pour servir une publicité de Honda. «On se l'est fait beaucoup demander celle-là. Dimanche soir on va la faire», dit-il. «La soirée sera bien particulière parce qu'on aura beaucoup de nouveau répertoire. Notre spectacle a pris une coche de plus.» Nicolas se produit devant des spectateurs aux âges variés et n'est certes pas mécontent de la chose. Des mélomanes y apprécient une musique élaborée, des spectateurs plus âgés aiment y retrouver des chansons traditionnelles, et les plus jeunes se joignent à eux de plus en plus, en découvrant des rythmes au goût du jour. Sur scène comme en création, Pellerin et ses deux complices aiment approfondir leur matière. «On prend vraiment le temps de le faire», observe-t-il. «Disons qu'on est loin du fast food musical et loin des rigodons du temps des fêtes. Les gens sont toujours surpris.» D'ailleurs sur les planches, Nicolas Pellerin se révèle plus extraverti que dans la vie, remarque-t-il lui-même. «Dans la vie, je ne suis pas un grand parleur et je ne prends pas beaucoup de place», sourit-il. «Sur scène, c'est moi qui a le rôle de communiquer avec les gens et je n'haïs pas ça. J'aime beaucoup faire des shows, je suis fier de ce qu'on fait et je sais que le monde va triper.» Pour ceux qui veulent s'adonner à l'expérience, le spectacle est à 20 h dimanche soir aux Bizouneries Caxton, pour deux heures d'ambiances les plus diverses, promet-on. - Le Nouvelliste


NICOLAS PELLERIN et LES GRANDS HURLEURS

Quebec ens sorprèn de nou amb la magnitud de la seva escena neo-folk i tradicional contemporània. Nicolas Pellerin et Les Grands Hurleurs en són els seus representants més guardonats al 2010. Tres vocalistes i multi-instrumentistes àvids de repertoris originals i d'arranjaments ingeniosos que, depassant standards i explorant camins possibles, presenten la seva aportació musical esquitxada d'influències, matitzada, subtil i captivadora.

Una música pensada per eclosionar en directe. Obstinats sempre en captivar l'audiència i guanyar nous còmplices a cada concert, omplen l'escenari de groove i rics ambients per forçar les cordes a explorar els seus límits i fan malabarismes a tres bandes amb una llarga instrumentació: veus, violí, guitarres, mandolina, baix, contrabaix, concertina, loops, synthes, percussió amb els peus, cajón¿

Per primer cop de gira al nostre país, des de la seva creació al 2009 la formació ha recorregut Canadà, USA i Europa i ha rebut recentment el Prix Felix de l'ADISQ de Quebec al millor álbum de música tradicional. Nicollas Pellerin i el seu projecte paral.lel Fred et Nicolas Pellerin han vengut més de 45.000 exemplars del seu darrer cd.

Nicolas Pellerin : veu, violí, concertina, cajón, peus.
Simon Marion: veu, guitarra, mandolina.
Simon Lepage: veu, baix, contrabaix, synthes, loop.


http://www.nicolaspellerin.com
http://www.myspace.com/nicolaspellerin
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=nicolas+pellerin
- atiza.com




Quebec ens sorprèn de nou amb la magnitud de la seva escena neo-folk i tradicional contemporània. Nicolas Pellerin et Les Grands Hurleurs en són els seus representants més guardonats al 2010. Tres vocalistes i multi-instrumentistes àvids de repertoris originals i d'arranjaments ingeniosos que, depassant standards i explorant camins possibles, presenten la seva aportació musical esquitxada d'influències, matitzada, subtil i captivadora.

Una música pensada per eclosionar en directe. Obstinats sempre en captivar l'audiència i guanyar nous còmplices a cada concert, omplen l'escenari de groove i rics ambients per forçar les cordes a explorar els seus límits i fan malabarismes a tres bandes amb una llarga instrumentació: veus, violí, guitarres, mandolina, baix, contrabaix, concertina, loops, synthes, percussió amb els peus, cajón¿

Per primer cop de gira al nostre país, des de la seva creació al 2009 la formació ha recorregut Canadà, USA i Europa i ha rebut recentment el Prix Felix de l'ADISQ de Quebec al millor álbum de música tradicional. Nicollas Pellerin i el seu projecte paral.lel Fred et Nicolas Pellerin han vengut més de 45.000 exemplars del seu darrer cd.

Nicolas Pellerin : veu, violí, concertina, cajón, peus.

Simon Marion: veu, guitarra, mandolina.

Simon Lepage: veu, baix, contrabaix, synthes, loop. - kedin.es


Discography

Fred et Nicolas Pellerin (2007)
Nicolas Pellerin et les Grands Hurleurs (2009)
Petit grain d'or (2011)

Photos

Bio

A new sound! Three musicians deeply attached to traditional repertoire with ingenious arrangements. With Nicolas’s two sidekicks, Simon Lepage and Simon Mario, it is the promise of an original music where soft atmosphere meets groove mingles with all the craziness included.

Nicolas’s vitality, rhythmic rigor, his dedication to his roots and his unique style in both foot-tapping and violin are some of the many qualities that puts him on the top of the list in folk music.

Simon Lepage and Simon Marion have both jazz backgrounds and played in many groups that allowed them to coloured the last album with amazing touch of jazz, percussions and world sound.

Not only the band won the Quebec music award for the best traditional album of the year for their first album but they just got a second award this year for their new album! They are also in nomination for the best folk album of the year at the Canadian Folk music award.