No Loves
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No Loves

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | Established. Jan 01, 1996 | INDIE

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | INDIE
Established on Jan, 1996
Band Rock Punk

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This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

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"Artist Of The Day: No Loves"

The No Loves are a crunchy, heavily compressed, hi-octane punk band that delivers a sonic assault rendering all UV meters helplessly slammed in the red. The aural assailants are. Jim Putney on vocals and guitar, Curtis McCall on guitar, Steve Merkel on bass, and Chuck Wood on drums.

On Friday, the No Loves will release a 12-song LP at the Local 662 in St. Petersburg. The show, with Doll Parts and Hot Mouth, is at 8:30 p.m. We sat down with Putney to talk about the upcoming release.

How long have the No Loves been together?

I’ve been playin’ in bands around here since I was a kid. When I was 17 or 18 I started playing with my best friend. We ended up being in a band together named Pull. We did a seven-inch for Stiff Pole Records in the early ’90s. I (musically) come from the early ’80s late ’70s scene, first wave, all those bands. So, right about ’96 or so, we put the No Loves together.

’96?!

(Laughs) Yeah, we went from ’96 to ’99, played some decent shoes, opened for New Bomb Turks at the State Theatre. Probably the biggest thing we did back then. Typical stuff: the guys weren’t getting along, so we parted ways around ’99. I ended up putting a band together that would eventually become the Redliners. When that ran its course, we decided to play together again. Ever since 2003, we’ve been back at it. We didn’t even realize we were gonna call it the No Loves. It was just one of those things. We started playing a lot of the old songs, and it seemed really natural to call it the No Loves. The band name already had some recognition — not a lot, granted, but a lot of people in the same circles we hang out in recognize the name, so it was a little easier to slide back into it.

Where do you see the No Loves in the pantheon of the Tampa St. Pete scene?

The funny thing about it is, people that I know outside this music scene, if I tell ’em we’re a punk rock band, that doesn’t really do it justice, because we do take the listener to different places than just that. People have these preconceived ideas of what a punk rock band is. They picture someone shouting and screaming and everything like that. But we are musical. First and foremost, we are a rock and roll band. When you tell somebody I play rock and roll music, we’re at a point in music now where there’s so many sub-genres, that people don’t really know what you mean when you say that. We’re not trying to reinvent the wheel necessarily.We fall into the punk rock category, but we can play and hang with other bands you wouldn’t really consider punk rock bands. I look at us as a diverse kind of act that’s rock n roll based. You can call it punk and roll. We can appeal to the hot-rod culture kids that go out to see rockabilly and psychobilly shows. And at the same time, we can play with heavier more traditional hardcore bands and with bands that have more pop sensibilities. Even though our stuff is really heavy, melody is really important to me. I really go out of my way to make things catchy.

Now you’ve taken these ideas into the studio.

Yeah, we finally got around to recording a full-length record. We started in April 2010, at Zen Recording Studios in Pinellas Park. Our attitude was, instead of trying to sell our band to a label based on our demos, we decided to make the record we wanna make, and sell the record to whoever is interested enough to do it. Granted, that means we’re taking the responsibility of spending all the money on it, but doing it our way, and having it sound the way we want it to sound. We always knew all along that if we were happy with it, if we were making the music that we would want to listen to, that there was some label around that would feel the same way. That’s where Stiff Pole comes in, the same label that we put the 7-inch on years and years ago.

It’s come around full circle.

Its unbelievable how time flies by. The older I get, I realize that you have to take your opportunities. You’re only young once. You only live once. It doesn’t bother me one bit how much money we spent. It did go over budget a lot, but we’re happy. Now that we have this release, it gives us ground to stand on for what ever the next thing is. It’s a lifelong journey. We’re not gonna fool ourselves into thinking that putting this record out is suddenly gonna lead to big time success. We’re realistic about it and we try to keep a balance between being ambitious, and doing it for the love of it, the fun of it, the camaraderie of it. To me, the fact that I’m able to do it and play with guys that I enjoy playing with is success for me.

-- Aaron Lepley, tbt*
- Tampa Bay Times


"Artist Of The Day: No Loves"

The No Loves are a crunchy, heavily compressed, hi-octane punk band that delivers a sonic assault rendering all UV meters helplessly slammed in the red. The aural assailants are. Jim Putney on vocals and guitar, Curtis McCall on guitar, Steve Merkel on bass, and Chuck Wood on drums.

On Friday, the No Loves will release a 12-song LP at the Local 662 in St. Petersburg. The show, with Doll Parts and Hot Mouth, is at 8:30 p.m. We sat down with Putney to talk about the upcoming release.

How long have the No Loves been together?

I’ve been playin’ in bands around here since I was a kid. When I was 17 or 18 I started playing with my best friend. We ended up being in a band together named Pull. We did a seven-inch for Stiff Pole Records in the early ’90s. I (musically) come from the early ’80s late ’70s scene, first wave, all those bands. So, right about ’96 or so, we put the No Loves together.

’96?!

(Laughs) Yeah, we went from ’96 to ’99, played some decent shoes, opened for New Bomb Turks at the State Theatre. Probably the biggest thing we did back then. Typical stuff: the guys weren’t getting along, so we parted ways around ’99. I ended up putting a band together that would eventually become the Redliners. When that ran its course, we decided to play together again. Ever since 2003, we’ve been back at it. We didn’t even realize we were gonna call it the No Loves. It was just one of those things. We started playing a lot of the old songs, and it seemed really natural to call it the No Loves. The band name already had some recognition — not a lot, granted, but a lot of people in the same circles we hang out in recognize the name, so it was a little easier to slide back into it.

Where do you see the No Loves in the pantheon of the Tampa St. Pete scene?

The funny thing about it is, people that I know outside this music scene, if I tell ’em we’re a punk rock band, that doesn’t really do it justice, because we do take the listener to different places than just that. People have these preconceived ideas of what a punk rock band is. They picture someone shouting and screaming and everything like that. But we are musical. First and foremost, we are a rock and roll band. When you tell somebody I play rock and roll music, we’re at a point in music now where there’s so many sub-genres, that people don’t really know what you mean when you say that. We’re not trying to reinvent the wheel necessarily.We fall into the punk rock category, but we can play and hang with other bands you wouldn’t really consider punk rock bands. I look at us as a diverse kind of act that’s rock n roll based. You can call it punk and roll. We can appeal to the hot-rod culture kids that go out to see rockabilly and psychobilly shows. And at the same time, we can play with heavier more traditional hardcore bands and with bands that have more pop sensibilities. Even though our stuff is really heavy, melody is really important to me. I really go out of my way to make things catchy.

Now you’ve taken these ideas into the studio.

Yeah, we finally got around to recording a full-length record. We started in April 2010, at Zen Recording Studios in Pinellas Park. Our attitude was, instead of trying to sell our band to a label based on our demos, we decided to make the record we wanna make, and sell the record to whoever is interested enough to do it. Granted, that means we’re taking the responsibility of spending all the money on it, but doing it our way, and having it sound the way we want it to sound. We always knew all along that if we were happy with it, if we were making the music that we would want to listen to, that there was some label around that would feel the same way. That’s where Stiff Pole comes in, the same label that we put the 7-inch on years and years ago.

It’s come around full circle.

Its unbelievable how time flies by. The older I get, I realize that you have to take your opportunities. You’re only young once. You only live once. It doesn’t bother me one bit how much money we spent. It did go over budget a lot, but we’re happy. Now that we have this release, it gives us ground to stand on for what ever the next thing is. It’s a lifelong journey. We’re not gonna fool ourselves into thinking that putting this record out is suddenly gonna lead to big time success. We’re realistic about it and we try to keep a balance between being ambitious, and doing it for the love of it, the fun of it, the camaraderie of it. To me, the fact that I’m able to do it and play with guys that I enjoy playing with is success for me.

-- Aaron Lepley, tbt*
- Tampa Bay Times


"No Loves' Jim Putney Talks Stiff Pole Records, Rock 'N' Roll America and Churchill's Pub"

We may not have known it then. But Florida in the 1990s was a bonafide punk rock factory.

Down in South Florida, labels like Starcrunch, 4 and Half Finger Records, and Far Out were pressing soon-to-be classics by the Stun Guns, Chickenhead, and the Crumbs. Our not-too-distant neighbors in Tampa Bay delivered the goods via Stiff Pole Records, home of the Pink Lincolns, the Gotohells, and a noisy outfit called Pull.

Long after our labels folded, the folks at Stiff Pole continued to carry the everlasting flame -- until founder Richard "Stiff" Konwinski suddenly died in 2010. Fortunately, his business partner Tim Hubbard has decided to keep the label going and the label's latest release will be by St. Petersburg's No Loves.

Frontman Jim Putney and crew promise to always keep the spirit of road-burning punk rock that made Florida infamous. And while their debut record isn't exactly street legal yet, you can stream it at reverbnation.com/noloves. It's a drag race of an album. The songs are fast and heavy. The hooks are catchy. The guitars are blazing. And these unloved ones are hauling ass to Churchill's Pub this Friday. So we got a chance to talk to Putney about his label, the band, and their new record.

Crossfade: How did you guys get involved with Stiff Pole?
Jim Putney: I was in a band called Pull in the late '90s that did a seven-inch for them. I had always thought we'd approach them about our record, and he passed while we were working on it. And of course, that thinking goes out the window when I got the news. It's pretty sad. We had a big tribute show at the State Theater. Then I heard through the grapevine, Tim was going to keep it going. It'll be the first release since Stiff's passing -- along with a Pink Lincolns retrospective.

When did you start the No Loves?
We put this band together around '96. That lasted till '99. Then back around 2003, we started playing together again. Little bit of lineup changes throughout the years. We always wanted to put out a full length. We spent a lot more than we expected on it. In the end, it exceeded our expectations.
- New Times


"No Loves' Jim Putney Talks Stiff Pole Records, Rock 'N' Roll America and Churchill's Pub"

We may not have known it then. But Florida in the 1990s was a bonafide punk rock factory.

Down in South Florida, labels like Starcrunch, 4 and Half Finger Records, and Far Out were pressing soon-to-be classics by the Stun Guns, Chickenhead, and the Crumbs. Our not-too-distant neighbors in Tampa Bay delivered the goods via Stiff Pole Records, home of the Pink Lincolns, the Gotohells, and a noisy outfit called Pull.

Long after our labels folded, the folks at Stiff Pole continued to carry the everlasting flame -- until founder Richard "Stiff" Konwinski suddenly died in 2010. Fortunately, his business partner Tim Hubbard has decided to keep the label going and the label's latest release will be by St. Petersburg's No Loves.

Frontman Jim Putney and crew promise to always keep the spirit of road-burning punk rock that made Florida infamous. And while their debut record isn't exactly street legal yet, you can stream it at reverbnation.com/noloves. It's a drag race of an album. The songs are fast and heavy. The hooks are catchy. The guitars are blazing. And these unloved ones are hauling ass to Churchill's Pub this Friday. So we got a chance to talk to Putney about his label, the band, and their new record.

Crossfade: How did you guys get involved with Stiff Pole?
Jim Putney: I was in a band called Pull in the late '90s that did a seven-inch for them. I had always thought we'd approach them about our record, and he passed while we were working on it. And of course, that thinking goes out the window when I got the news. It's pretty sad. We had a big tribute show at the State Theater. Then I heard through the grapevine, Tim was going to keep it going. It'll be the first release since Stiff's passing -- along with a Pink Lincolns retrospective.

When did you start the No Loves?
We put this band together around '96. That lasted till '99. Then back around 2003, we started playing together again. Little bit of lineup changes throughout the years. We always wanted to put out a full length. We spent a lot more than we expected on it. In the end, it exceeded our expectations.
- New Times


"Live and Local Spotlight/CD Review: No Loves, Fully Loaded"

High-octane punk 'n' roll outfit the No Loves' roots in the St. Pete scene are about a decade deep — guitarist/vocalist Jim Putney and drummer Mike Hobbs were violating noise ordinances under the name back when no one was sure whether or not shows at the Emerald would pan out. The co-founders have been through multiple lineups and even wholly different bands since then. They never could get the definitive sound and attitude of the No Loves out of their blood, though, and that's a good thing for fans of good old straight-up fastrawk. Fully Loaded is the first album to feature the logo of legendary Pinellas-born label Stiff Pole Records since founder Richard "Big Stiff" Konwinski passed away in July of 2010, and is both celebration and continuation of that roster's high-volume legacy.

Fully Loaded's stylish, so-hip-it-hurts cover art — courtesy of former Nutrajet frontman Greg "Stainboy" Reinel, whose Hot Mouth shares Friday’s album release bill — lets you know exactly what you're going to get. Putney, Hobbs, guitarist Curtis McCall and bassist Steve Merkel are clearly fans of the streetwise swagger of Supersuckers and New Bomb Turks. But the lengthy process that led to this years-in-the-making debut allowed the No Loves to develop their own identity and sidestep cookie-cutter sameness. "So Long" is melodic and countrified; tracks like "Perfect Rock Plan," "45" and "Faces on the Wall" show a surprising emotional compulsion, while touches of harmonica, piano and pedal steel (the latter from producer Steve Connelly) lend depth without compromising the band's quick, loud and dirty essence. All of these tunes were obviously built to kill it live, but there's an exceptional balance of energy and maturity here that makes Fully Loaded a deeply satisfying listen.
- Creative Loafing


"Live and Local Spotlight/CD Review: No Loves, Fully Loaded"

High-octane punk 'n' roll outfit the No Loves' roots in the St. Pete scene are about a decade deep — guitarist/vocalist Jim Putney and drummer Mike Hobbs were violating noise ordinances under the name back when no one was sure whether or not shows at the Emerald would pan out. The co-founders have been through multiple lineups and even wholly different bands since then. They never could get the definitive sound and attitude of the No Loves out of their blood, though, and that's a good thing for fans of good old straight-up fastrawk. Fully Loaded is the first album to feature the logo of legendary Pinellas-born label Stiff Pole Records since founder Richard "Big Stiff" Konwinski passed away in July of 2010, and is both celebration and continuation of that roster's high-volume legacy.

Fully Loaded's stylish, so-hip-it-hurts cover art — courtesy of former Nutrajet frontman Greg "Stainboy" Reinel, whose Hot Mouth shares Friday’s album release bill — lets you know exactly what you're going to get. Putney, Hobbs, guitarist Curtis McCall and bassist Steve Merkel are clearly fans of the streetwise swagger of Supersuckers and New Bomb Turks. But the lengthy process that led to this years-in-the-making debut allowed the No Loves to develop their own identity and sidestep cookie-cutter sameness. "So Long" is melodic and countrified; tracks like "Perfect Rock Plan," "45" and "Faces on the Wall" show a surprising emotional compulsion, while touches of harmonica, piano and pedal steel (the latter from producer Steve Connelly) lend depth without compromising the band's quick, loud and dirty essence. All of these tunes were obviously built to kill it live, but there's an exceptional balance of energy and maturity here that makes Fully Loaded a deeply satisfying listen.
- Creative Loafing


Discography

"Fully Loaded", 12 song debut album out now on Stiff Pole Records and available on itunes.

Photos

Bio

No Loves formed in 1996. They are originally from St Petersburg, FL but have resided in Nashville, TN since 2014. Most of the material is written by founding singer/guitarist, Jim Putney. From the backwoods of North Carolina, Curtis McCall has played lead guitar with the band since 2007 and Bassist, Steve Merkel has played two stints in the band in each state they've been based in. Drummer, Bo Dinski from Columbia, TN is on the new record but now plays for the band in a fill in role.  Nashville punk rock veteran, Marc Gould is now the bands full time drummer as of April, 2017. Thier sound is melodic yet aggressive and based on early blues based Rock 'n' Roll and Old School Punk. Their secord full length release, 'Plum Crazy' is available now in purple vinyl on Stiff Pole Records and features cover art by Greg "Stain Boy" Reinel.  Some of their past achievements include an east coast tour in from Florida to Maine, opening for national acts such as Nashville Pussy, Supersuckers, and New Bomb Turks, two music videos, and playing live on Tampa Bay community radio station, WMNF 88.5 (Surface Noise show). They've had songs featured as 'local buzz cut of the week' twice on 102.5 The Buzz in Nashville. They tour regionally throughout the year and have ambitions to play overseas.

Band Members