Orange Television
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Orange Television

Northampton, Massachusetts, United States | SELF

Northampton, Massachusetts, United States | SELF
Band Rock Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Aug
31
Orange Television @ Run of the Mill Brew Pub

Saco, Maine, USA

Saco, Maine, USA

Aug
30
Orange Television @ Furys Public House

Dover, New Hampshire, USA

Dover, New Hampshire, USA

Aug
24
Orange Television @ Barnaby's

Brattleboro, Vermont, USA

Brattleboro, Vermont, USA

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Music

Press


Howie Feibusch gets a kick out of announcing the name of his band - Orange Television - at performances. And with a name like that, he can usually count on getting a few puzzled looks from the audience.

There's no story behind the band's name, Feibusch says. He just likes the visual image the words "television" and "orange" can bring to mind.

"I feel like any color stimulates an image in your head. When you think of Orange Television, you automatically have a picture in your head."

Then, at those gigs, as Feibusch lets the name simmer and sink in, he and the other members of the self-described psychedelic-folk-funk-rock band, known as OTV, catapult into the first numbers of the night - mostly original music with sounds akin to Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and Pearl Jam. He says the group has been compared to those hard rockers quite often - and it's a comparison he savors.

When Feibusch was 11 (he's 23 now), he saw a kid strumming the popular Pearl Jam song "Alive" on his electric guitar. He remembers thinking how much he wanted to be able to play that song. So, on his 12th birthday, his mom bought him his first guitar, and he has been playing ever since.

"I took some lessons, but I consider myself self-taught because you learn more from practicing than from a teacher. At least I did," he said.

When Feibusch formed OTV two and a half years ago, he played with bassist Myles Heffernan and drummer Alex Lombardi. Since then there have been a couple of personnel changes - in April 2010, Monte Arnstam replaced Lombardi as drummer, and guitarist and vocalist Nate Martel came on board a couple of months ago.

Feibusch, who lives in Amherst, said the current crew is the most formidable yet. A winner of the 2011 Cannabis Reform Coalition Battle of the Bands at UMass, the group has been in demand. It will wrap up a busy month on April 28 with a performance in Sunderland.

When Feibusch, who studied painting at UMass, was a junior, he met Heffernan, then a sophomore majoring in math. At the time, Feibusch says, he was looking to start a band and needed a bassist.

"The first time we jammed; I remember thinking, 'Damn, this is my guy,' " Feibusch said.

Heffernan, 22, hails from Worcester, but currently lives in Amherst. He started playing guitar seven years ago, while in high school. Then, when a local band he played for needed a bass player, Heffernan switched instruments. He didn't mind, he says. He just wanted to play.

"I've always liked listening to music, so I started playing. It really drew me in," he said. It's really about whether it was fun or rewarding and if it kept you going."

As for Arnstam, a 20-year-old Brattleboro, Vt., native, he's been beating on just about anything he could get his hands on since elementary school, when his mom used to give him pots and pans to pound on.

"You know, the typical drummer story," he said.

By the time he was in middle school, he had his first drum set, then he "played a little bit in a band and got addicted," he said. "Music has always done something to me inside that I don't know how to explain. It's always touched my life in some way so I figured I might as well keep it as close to my soul as I can."

He says he remembers people asking him to "play this song" or "play that song," but he wasn't interested in others telling him what to play.

"I wanted to jam out and do my own thing," Arnstam said.

Martel came on board after OTV members heard him rehearsing with another band and invited the 26-year-old Sunderland resident to play with them for a couple of hours.

"I jammed with them and it's been magic ever since," he said.

While the band performs mainly rock, the members say they are open to playing almost anything under the general rock umbrella - from acoustic, Americana-sounding songs, to heavier ones, like "Untitled," off their second LP, "Welcome to the Pink House."

The band's play-anything style comes in part from stark differences in the members' musical influence. Heffernan, for example, says he enjoys Pink Floyd, but is also inspired by bassists Les Claypool of Primus and the late Jaco Pastorius, whom he calls "the Hendrix of bass."

Meanwhile, Feibusch cites the likes of Neil Young and Jack White as his inspiration.

"I love the heaviness of Neil Young's acoustic and how melodic he can be and Jack White just completely explodes," he said. He is especially inspired, he says, by former lead vocalist Shannon Hoon of the Rock band Blind Melon.

"We're not necessarily going for one sound," Arnstam said.

The group's eclectic playing style keeps audiences on their feet as much as their motto (Yup, they've got a motto) - "Orange Television is like a television, only orange."

"It's like a double take because you have to stop and think about the name for a second. ... It kind of describes what we are," Feibusch said. "I like people doing a double take to everything we do." - The Daily Hampshire Gazette


Howie Feibusch gets a kick out of announcing the name of his band - Orange Television - at performances. And with a name like that, he can usually count on getting a few puzzled looks from the audience.

There's no story behind the band's name, Feibusch says. He just likes the visual image the words "television" and "orange" can bring to mind.

"I feel like any color stimulates an image in your head. When you think of Orange Television, you automatically have a picture in your head."

Then, at those gigs, as Feibusch lets the name simmer and sink in, he and the other members of the self-described psychedelic-folk-funk-rock band, known as OTV, catapult into the first numbers of the night - mostly original music with sounds akin to Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and Pearl Jam. He says the group has been compared to those hard rockers quite often - and it's a comparison he savors.

When Feibusch was 11 (he's 23 now), he saw a kid strumming the popular Pearl Jam song "Alive" on his electric guitar. He remembers thinking how much he wanted to be able to play that song. So, on his 12th birthday, his mom bought him his first guitar, and he has been playing ever since.

"I took some lessons, but I consider myself self-taught because you learn more from practicing than from a teacher. At least I did," he said.

When Feibusch formed OTV two and a half years ago, he played with bassist Myles Heffernan and drummer Alex Lombardi. Since then there have been a couple of personnel changes - in April 2010, Monte Arnstam replaced Lombardi as drummer, and guitarist and vocalist Nate Martel came on board a couple of months ago.

Feibusch, who lives in Amherst, said the current crew is the most formidable yet. A winner of the 2011 Cannabis Reform Coalition Battle of the Bands at UMass, the group has been in demand. It will wrap up a busy month on April 28 with a performance in Sunderland.

When Feibusch, who studied painting at UMass, was a junior, he met Heffernan, then a sophomore majoring in math. At the time, Feibusch says, he was looking to start a band and needed a bassist.

"The first time we jammed; I remember thinking, 'Damn, this is my guy,' " Feibusch said.

Heffernan, 22, hails from Worcester, but currently lives in Amherst. He started playing guitar seven years ago, while in high school. Then, when a local band he played for needed a bass player, Heffernan switched instruments. He didn't mind, he says. He just wanted to play.

"I've always liked listening to music, so I started playing. It really drew me in," he said. It's really about whether it was fun or rewarding and if it kept you going."

As for Arnstam, a 20-year-old Brattleboro, Vt., native, he's been beating on just about anything he could get his hands on since elementary school, when his mom used to give him pots and pans to pound on.

"You know, the typical drummer story," he said.

By the time he was in middle school, he had his first drum set, then he "played a little bit in a band and got addicted," he said. "Music has always done something to me inside that I don't know how to explain. It's always touched my life in some way so I figured I might as well keep it as close to my soul as I can."

He says he remembers people asking him to "play this song" or "play that song," but he wasn't interested in others telling him what to play.

"I wanted to jam out and do my own thing," Arnstam said.

Martel came on board after OTV members heard him rehearsing with another band and invited the 26-year-old Sunderland resident to play with them for a couple of hours.

"I jammed with them and it's been magic ever since," he said.

While the band performs mainly rock, the members say they are open to playing almost anything under the general rock umbrella - from acoustic, Americana-sounding songs, to heavier ones, like "Untitled," off their second LP, "Welcome to the Pink House."

The band's play-anything style comes in part from stark differences in the members' musical influence. Heffernan, for example, says he enjoys Pink Floyd, but is also inspired by bassists Les Claypool of Primus and the late Jaco Pastorius, whom he calls "the Hendrix of bass."

Meanwhile, Feibusch cites the likes of Neil Young and Jack White as his inspiration.

"I love the heaviness of Neil Young's acoustic and how melodic he can be and Jack White just completely explodes," he said. He is especially inspired, he says, by former lead vocalist Shannon Hoon of the Rock band Blind Melon.

"We're not necessarily going for one sound," Arnstam said.

The group's eclectic playing style keeps audiences on their feet as much as their motto (Yup, they've got a motto) - "Orange Television is like a television, only orange."

"It's like a double take because you have to stop and think about the name for a second. ... It kind of describes what we are," Feibusch said. "I like people doing a double take to everything we do." - The Daily Hampshire Gazette


When the bass player of any band walks onstage in sunglasses and a dress covered in gigantic orange flowers, you have to wonder, for at least a second, what you’ve gotten yourself into.

At the Iron Horse Music Hall in Northampton, MA, the four-piece Orange Television, composed of Nate Martel (guitar, vocals), Howard Jay Feibusch (guitar, vocals), Myles Thomas Hefferman (bass) and Robert Lamond Monte Arnstam (drums), manage to squeeze themselves, and at one point, two guest musicians for more than ninety minutes of music that ranges from the soft and soulful to the energetic and spunky.

Playing to crowds at the Iron Horse can’t be easy, since the interior has two distinct levels, a bar tucked away in the back, and a fairly narrow dance pit in front of the stage with most sitting areas located to one side and the back of the pit, but OTV takes it all in stride and gets right down to business after their sound check.

At first, they have an almost ambient, post-modern feel going, but within the first minute and a half they launch into a gritty, feel-it-in-your-bones guitar. Some impressive, nimble time signature changes early on showcases their talent well without being too overt – you can really feel okay admiring them: they’ve got a cool attitude that’s not aloof, including the audience in their vibe as they move through an almost seamless set list:

“Aisha”, off their new album Extended Play is in top form, with some increased reverb on their instruments that created an absolute wall of sound that fills the entire space. The kind of energy they give off is absolutely indescribable – while it’s not necessarily high-level, it completely envelops you.

Orange Television

Even on the balcony level, the audience that at first preferred to observe from afar, is urged to move. Throughout the rest of the show, OTV exhibits a tremendous amount of cross-genre capability: indie rock. Grunge punk. There’s even something that almost sounds like country (almost); all without missing a single beat.

Each member of the group is totally invested from start to finish. Myles has removed his sunglasses – though the dress made it all the way through. As they were nearing the end of their set, they whip out a cover of MGMT’s “Electric Feel”, which they have spiced up by adding swing to their guitar and a little more attitude to their vocals. It removed some of the ethereal quality that MGMT’s performance of the song had, but made it, in the end, a much better live performance.

They finish off the night with “Assembly Line”, much to the delight of the crowd, who has been calling out for them to play it all night. When they step off the stage, everyone in the room lingers, still enveloped. Not enough good things can be said about OTV’s live presence: they were talented, spellbinding, and downright unforgettable. - Angelica Music


When the bass player of any band walks onstage in sunglasses and a dress covered in gigantic orange flowers, you have to wonder, for at least a second, what you’ve gotten yourself into.

At the Iron Horse Music Hall in Northampton, MA, the four-piece Orange Television, composed of Nate Martel (guitar, vocals), Howard Jay Feibusch (guitar, vocals), Myles Thomas Hefferman (bass) and Robert Lamond Monte Arnstam (drums), manage to squeeze themselves, and at one point, two guest musicians for more than ninety minutes of music that ranges from the soft and soulful to the energetic and spunky.

Playing to crowds at the Iron Horse can’t be easy, since the interior has two distinct levels, a bar tucked away in the back, and a fairly narrow dance pit in front of the stage with most sitting areas located to one side and the back of the pit, but OTV takes it all in stride and gets right down to business after their sound check.

At first, they have an almost ambient, post-modern feel going, but within the first minute and a half they launch into a gritty, feel-it-in-your-bones guitar. Some impressive, nimble time signature changes early on showcases their talent well without being too overt – you can really feel okay admiring them: they’ve got a cool attitude that’s not aloof, including the audience in their vibe as they move through an almost seamless set list:

“Aisha”, off their new album Extended Play is in top form, with some increased reverb on their instruments that created an absolute wall of sound that fills the entire space. The kind of energy they give off is absolutely indescribable – while it’s not necessarily high-level, it completely envelops you.

Orange Television

Even on the balcony level, the audience that at first preferred to observe from afar, is urged to move. Throughout the rest of the show, OTV exhibits a tremendous amount of cross-genre capability: indie rock. Grunge punk. There’s even something that almost sounds like country (almost); all without missing a single beat.

Each member of the group is totally invested from start to finish. Myles has removed his sunglasses – though the dress made it all the way through. As they were nearing the end of their set, they whip out a cover of MGMT’s “Electric Feel”, which they have spiced up by adding swing to their guitar and a little more attitude to their vocals. It removed some of the ethereal quality that MGMT’s performance of the song had, but made it, in the end, a much better live performance.

They finish off the night with “Assembly Line”, much to the delight of the crowd, who has been calling out for them to play it all night. When they step off the stage, everyone in the room lingers, still enveloped. Not enough good things can be said about OTV’s live presence: they were talented, spellbinding, and downright unforgettable. - Angelica Music


Northampton's own Orange Television has ripened into a thing of beauty. In their Kumquat-esque formative years, Orange Television took on many shapes before maturing into the juiciest possible combination with the additions of drummer Monte Arnstam and later, guitar player and vocalist Nate Martel. OTV, as they are called by their fans, has been a Northampton staple since it's formation in 2009 by frontman Howard Feibusch and Bass player Myles Heffernan, who met as students at UMass Amherst. Orange Television started out as a prominent band on the Amherst party scene, and developed into a Pioneer Valley favorite as they began to gain a healthy following. They have since begun touring many hot-spots all over the Northeast, most recently in support of their October released EP, Extended Play. Last Saturday, Orange Television brought their music to new heights at their home court at the Iron Horse Music Hall in Northampton. Fans danced wildly, head-banged, clapped and sang along to OTV hits new and old, and even some awesomely executed covers.

The venue packed up as people swarmed in, shivering from waiting outside on a line that went around the corner. Luckily, Brattleboro-based 5-some Flabberghaster immediately took the stage, opening the show and getting the audience warmed up for the intense musical experience that is Orange Television. Dressed in obscure middle-eastern inspired garb, OTV took the stage with their usual pizzazz. The audience immediately started swaying as they opened the show with a brand new song that I later found out is called "The Stage."

As a UMass graduate who has seen this band over many years, I was really excited to hear them open with something completely unfamiliar, reaching into genres that they haven't previously explored. This song features post-rock style composition and instrumentals that haven't had huge presence in their sound up until this point. Eventually playing fan favorites such as "Aisha" and "Before I Part", the audience never stopped moving for a second. At a certain moment, I realized that it is not only the extreme talent of the guys in the band that makes Orange Television such an anomaly, but also the personalities behind their delivery. As they interacted with the audience between songs, it was obvious how many true fans OTV has gained through all their recent hard work. They went back into playing new songs, never for a second loosing the groove or the attention of the crowd.

The sound and vibe of the show got kicked up even another notch when OTV was joined on the stage by trumpet player Nick Borges of Primate Fiasco. They continued rocking out with Borges straight into a raging cover of Black Sabbath's "War Pigs" that had the crowd dancing madly. They were later joined by Steve Yarbro, also of Primate Fiasco for an awesome new tune called "King Jam." Orange Television continued to surprise and delight, changing up the vibe song to song and yet never missing a beat. The crowd got down and funky when they delivered a dancy cover of MGMT's "Electric Feel," and then debuted a brand new song called "Lose Your Shoes." They closed out the night in perfect fashion with a raw and heavy "Assembly Line" before riling up the crowd for one last hurrah with the punked out hyper-finale "Runaround."

One of the things I find most attractive about OTV's style is their ability to interchange seamlessly between genres without disrupting the groove or feeling of a jam. Last Saturday at the Iron Horse, they took this feature of their live performance to a whole new level. This Orange Television performance not only showcased where the band is currently, but also dislodged any notions fans might have been developing about what to expect from their live performance. What I have realized is that Orange Television can not be defined within one genre, and you certainly can't predict what they might do next. As an amalgamation of everything that has come before, they still manage to not quite sound like anything we've heard yet. I am intrigued and excited by what might come next from this on-the-rise band as they continue to elevate their music to new heights.

Set List

1. The Stage
2. Aisha
3. Before I Part
4. Lately
5. Fiona
6. Nate's Song (untitled, with Nick Borges on trumpet)
7. Warpigs (with Nick Borges on trumpet)
8. Celebrate
9. King Jam (with Nick Borges on trumpet and Steve Yarbro on sax)
10. Paper
11. Electric Feel
12. Lose Your shoes
13. Assembly Line
14. Runaround

- In Your Speakers


Northampton's own Orange Television has ripened into a thing of beauty. In their Kumquat-esque formative years, Orange Television took on many shapes before maturing into the juiciest possible combination with the additions of drummer Monte Arnstam and later, guitar player and vocalist Nate Martel. OTV, as they are called by their fans, has been a Northampton staple since it's formation in 2009 by frontman Howard Feibusch and Bass player Myles Heffernan, who met as students at UMass Amherst. Orange Television started out as a prominent band on the Amherst party scene, and developed into a Pioneer Valley favorite as they began to gain a healthy following. They have since begun touring many hot-spots all over the Northeast, most recently in support of their October released EP, Extended Play. Last Saturday, Orange Television brought their music to new heights at their home court at the Iron Horse Music Hall in Northampton. Fans danced wildly, head-banged, clapped and sang along to OTV hits new and old, and even some awesomely executed covers.

The venue packed up as people swarmed in, shivering from waiting outside on a line that went around the corner. Luckily, Brattleboro-based 5-some Flabberghaster immediately took the stage, opening the show and getting the audience warmed up for the intense musical experience that is Orange Television. Dressed in obscure middle-eastern inspired garb, OTV took the stage with their usual pizzazz. The audience immediately started swaying as they opened the show with a brand new song that I later found out is called "The Stage."

As a UMass graduate who has seen this band over many years, I was really excited to hear them open with something completely unfamiliar, reaching into genres that they haven't previously explored. This song features post-rock style composition and instrumentals that haven't had huge presence in their sound up until this point. Eventually playing fan favorites such as "Aisha" and "Before I Part", the audience never stopped moving for a second. At a certain moment, I realized that it is not only the extreme talent of the guys in the band that makes Orange Television such an anomaly, but also the personalities behind their delivery. As they interacted with the audience between songs, it was obvious how many true fans OTV has gained through all their recent hard work. They went back into playing new songs, never for a second loosing the groove or the attention of the crowd.

The sound and vibe of the show got kicked up even another notch when OTV was joined on the stage by trumpet player Nick Borges of Primate Fiasco. They continued rocking out with Borges straight into a raging cover of Black Sabbath's "War Pigs" that had the crowd dancing madly. They were later joined by Steve Yarbro, also of Primate Fiasco for an awesome new tune called "King Jam." Orange Television continued to surprise and delight, changing up the vibe song to song and yet never missing a beat. The crowd got down and funky when they delivered a dancy cover of MGMT's "Electric Feel," and then debuted a brand new song called "Lose Your Shoes." They closed out the night in perfect fashion with a raw and heavy "Assembly Line" before riling up the crowd for one last hurrah with the punked out hyper-finale "Runaround."

One of the things I find most attractive about OTV's style is their ability to interchange seamlessly between genres without disrupting the groove or feeling of a jam. Last Saturday at the Iron Horse, they took this feature of their live performance to a whole new level. This Orange Television performance not only showcased where the band is currently, but also dislodged any notions fans might have been developing about what to expect from their live performance. What I have realized is that Orange Television can not be defined within one genre, and you certainly can't predict what they might do next. As an amalgamation of everything that has come before, they still manage to not quite sound like anything we've heard yet. I am intrigued and excited by what might come next from this on-the-rise band as they continue to elevate their music to new heights.

Set List

1. The Stage
2. Aisha
3. Before I Part
4. Lately
5. Fiona
6. Nate's Song (untitled, with Nick Borges on trumpet)
7. Warpigs (with Nick Borges on trumpet)
8. Celebrate
9. King Jam (with Nick Borges on trumpet and Steve Yarbro on sax)
10. Paper
11. Electric Feel
12. Lose Your shoes
13. Assembly Line
14. Runaround

- In Your Speakers


Seattle Slew! How about Seattle Stew? On Friday, Feb. 24, ’90s rock will be on display when Seattle-style rockers (via Northampton) Orange Television return to Beatnik’s with Minions of Funk.

“We’re chums with [Beatnik’s] now,” says O-TV bass player and Worcester native, Myles Heffernan. “I like the room a lot. We love the bartenders, and it just seems like an up-andcoming, positive scene.”

Orange Television’s brand of heavy rock (Myles emphasizes “hard rock, but not heavy metal”) fits Beatnik’s laid-back, but often heavy rocking vibe to a T, with liberal seasoning of Alice in Chains, Temple of the Dog, and Pearl Jam, along with the obligatory Zeppelin influence that underpins all of these acts. The band’s self-identified genre includes psychedelia, which, in this case means black light, ’70s stoner rock more than day-glo jam band, twirling rock, though the instrumental “Bill Cosby,” from their summer 2011 release “Extended Play,” could find a home on a Phish set list, with its intricate, ironic changes and arrangement.

The rest of the album leans heavily on dark and eerie Lane Staley-ish harmonies, tight, in-the-pocket drums and bass, and white rock-funk—pioneered by Led Zeppelin and Aerosmith in the early ’70s—and frequently dodges into shadowy corners of loose, spacey “Seasons of Wither”-like modes. A couple of tunes even step out into more accessible pop, like “What To Do,” which dons a Coldplay suit with light percussion, Rhodes piano, delay-soaked and Wes Montgomery octave guitar, and heartwrenching lyrics about aging and regret.

The new CD is the culmination of several “iterations” of the band, whose lineup has settled into Nate Martel (guitar and vocals), Howie Jay (guitar, piano and vocals), Monte Arnstam (drums, percussion and vocals), and Myles (bass).

The eclectic but unified CD was recorded last year at a western Massachusetts studio run by a friend of the band and then really brought to fruition in the mixing stage under the direction of Alex Chakour, son of local musician Mitch Chakour.

Myles says that the band’s songwriting approach varies by song. “Paper,” he says – citing it as his favorite on the album – was written in about two minutes, after a period of writer’s block. “I had just come back from the bathroom and they were jamming on this cool little thing, and the band got it together,” he says, emphasizing the “band approach” to writing and recording, which seems to infuse their entire musical philosophy.

About the direction of the band, Myles says, “We want it to be anything, as long as we’re all into it. We just do it. It’s just fun, it’s freeing. It’s a fun band to be in.” This, Myles says, doesn’t undermine the band’s craft, however. “Professionalism is part of it,” he assures.

To Orange TV, though, professionalism isn’t about adapting hackneyed stage shtick, but rather getting better at presenting their vibe.

“We try to make our live show flow very well. We’ll play backup loops between songs.” These “pre-recorded, ambient” loops that they present live and similar sonic ear-candy that appears on the new album help to evoke the band’s taste for trippy textures and provide useful segues, too.

This professional attitude has helped the band to evolve quickly from the bass and guitar duet Myles started with Howie as UMass Amherst students in 2008 to the lean, tight and polished act playing throughout New England (and New York) today. It also helps the band to respond to ever-changing club designs, atmospheres and audiences. Myles says that the band likes to suit their material to the particular audience they’re faced with. So, while they may express a strong tendency toward moody, ambient gloom rock, Orange Television also understands a bar crowd’s desire to rock out and to hear familiar songs, and, as such, includes covers of songs by MGMT, Red Hot Chili Peppers (“Aeroplane”), Neil Young (“Down by the River”) and Led Zeppelin (“No Quarter”). (In fact, the band will cover “Houses of the Holy” in its entirety at Northampton’s Iron Horse this spring.) Though, Myles says, the band doesn’t exactly reinvent these covers, they are so close to the vibe of this band anyway that they should blend right in.

Come out and support Myles on his homecoming and what should be night of intense and often powerful rock in one of Worcester’s most live-music friendly venues. - Worcester Mag


Seattle Slew! How about Seattle Stew? On Friday, Feb. 24, ’90s rock will be on display when Seattle-style rockers (via Northampton) Orange Television return to Beatnik’s with Minions of Funk.

“We’re chums with [Beatnik’s] now,” says O-TV bass player and Worcester native, Myles Heffernan. “I like the room a lot. We love the bartenders, and it just seems like an up-andcoming, positive scene.”

Orange Television’s brand of heavy rock (Myles emphasizes “hard rock, but not heavy metal”) fits Beatnik’s laid-back, but often heavy rocking vibe to a T, with liberal seasoning of Alice in Chains, Temple of the Dog, and Pearl Jam, along with the obligatory Zeppelin influence that underpins all of these acts. The band’s self-identified genre includes psychedelia, which, in this case means black light, ’70s stoner rock more than day-glo jam band, twirling rock, though the instrumental “Bill Cosby,” from their summer 2011 release “Extended Play,” could find a home on a Phish set list, with its intricate, ironic changes and arrangement.

The rest of the album leans heavily on dark and eerie Lane Staley-ish harmonies, tight, in-the-pocket drums and bass, and white rock-funk—pioneered by Led Zeppelin and Aerosmith in the early ’70s—and frequently dodges into shadowy corners of loose, spacey “Seasons of Wither”-like modes. A couple of tunes even step out into more accessible pop, like “What To Do,” which dons a Coldplay suit with light percussion, Rhodes piano, delay-soaked and Wes Montgomery octave guitar, and heartwrenching lyrics about aging and regret.

The new CD is the culmination of several “iterations” of the band, whose lineup has settled into Nate Martel (guitar and vocals), Howie Jay (guitar, piano and vocals), Monte Arnstam (drums, percussion and vocals), and Myles (bass).

The eclectic but unified CD was recorded last year at a western Massachusetts studio run by a friend of the band and then really brought to fruition in the mixing stage under the direction of Alex Chakour, son of local musician Mitch Chakour.

Myles says that the band’s songwriting approach varies by song. “Paper,” he says – citing it as his favorite on the album – was written in about two minutes, after a period of writer’s block. “I had just come back from the bathroom and they were jamming on this cool little thing, and the band got it together,” he says, emphasizing the “band approach” to writing and recording, which seems to infuse their entire musical philosophy.

About the direction of the band, Myles says, “We want it to be anything, as long as we’re all into it. We just do it. It’s just fun, it’s freeing. It’s a fun band to be in.” This, Myles says, doesn’t undermine the band’s craft, however. “Professionalism is part of it,” he assures.

To Orange TV, though, professionalism isn’t about adapting hackneyed stage shtick, but rather getting better at presenting their vibe.

“We try to make our live show flow very well. We’ll play backup loops between songs.” These “pre-recorded, ambient” loops that they present live and similar sonic ear-candy that appears on the new album help to evoke the band’s taste for trippy textures and provide useful segues, too.

This professional attitude has helped the band to evolve quickly from the bass and guitar duet Myles started with Howie as UMass Amherst students in 2008 to the lean, tight and polished act playing throughout New England (and New York) today. It also helps the band to respond to ever-changing club designs, atmospheres and audiences. Myles says that the band likes to suit their material to the particular audience they’re faced with. So, while they may express a strong tendency toward moody, ambient gloom rock, Orange Television also understands a bar crowd’s desire to rock out and to hear familiar songs, and, as such, includes covers of songs by MGMT, Red Hot Chili Peppers (“Aeroplane”), Neil Young (“Down by the River”) and Led Zeppelin (“No Quarter”). (In fact, the band will cover “Houses of the Holy” in its entirety at Northampton’s Iron Horse this spring.) Though, Myles says, the band doesn’t exactly reinvent these covers, they are so close to the vibe of this band anyway that they should blend right in.

Come out and support Myles on his homecoming and what should be night of intense and often powerful rock in one of Worcester’s most live-music friendly venues. - Worcester Mag


????????????????????????????????????????70???Pink Floyd?????????·???????·??????????????????????????·??????????????????????????????????????????OTV?????·???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Howie??????????????????????????????????????????Roger Waters?David Gilmour??????????????????????Pink Floyd???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? - Motionwave.tv


????????????????????????????????????????70???Pink Floyd?????????·???????·??????????????????????????·??????????????????????????????????????????OTV?????·???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Howie??????????????????????????????????????????Roger Waters?David Gilmour??????????????????????Pink Floyd???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? - Motionwave.tv


Hundreds of fans were huddling outside the Pearl Street Ballroom on Saturday night, soggy and shivering under the pale light of street lamps coming through the fog. The crowd surged forward as the doors opened, clothing drenched through to the skin, desperate to get inside. The throng of high school and college-aged students poured in, peeling off dripping layers. Once the music started, though, the discomfort was forgotten.

“Thanks for comin’ out in the rain,” said Howie Feibusch, lead singer and guitarist of the University of Massachusetts’ own Orange Television. The crowd answered with a roar as they exploded into their second song of the opening set, “Slaves with Neon Blood.” Heads banged to the rhythm of the paint-splattered bass drum, as if nodding approvingly at the new sound. If no one knew who they were before the show, there was no question OTV made some new fans by their finish.

Feibusch’s unique vocals kept flow with the rest of the band, making it hard to believe that the trio has only been playing together since February. Myles Heffernan’s fingers plucked effortlessly on bass, and Alex Lombardi kept a flawless beat despite picking up a pair of drumsticks for the first time just 10 months ago. Citing influences from classic rock, funk, grunge, hip-hop, and jazz, their diverse sound was well received. As for how they got a gig with the rock veterans of Badfish, “By the hand of God,” Feibusch said, laughing.

After getting warmed up by OTV, the masses were ready for the punk inspired reggae vibes of Danny Pease and the Regulators. The South Hadley seven piece took over with vigor and brought the energy in the room to the next level with old school ska riffs and spirited vocals from Verbal Kenn and Phaze. Joe Grenier added a distinct percussion section, alternating from the bongos to the tambourine and maracas.

Animated guitarist Pease kept the crowd on their feet, jumping around the stage with Kenn and Phaze. Their set had an unmistakable sense of unity and pure fun, reminiscent of Operation Ivy. Fans sang along to covered reggae verses and gave an appreciative ovation as DPR handed it off to Scotty Don’t.

“While Badfish is busy gettin’ drunk, we’re gonna play some songs in the meantime,” said singer and guitarist Patrick Downes with a smirk.

Badfish’s alter egos took over with intensity and a host of original songs. The raw instrumental talent was complimented by Downes’ impressive vocals, the hard fast riffs giving the feel of a 90’s punk rock show. Bassist Joel Hanks had a perpetual smile on his face while drummer Scott Begin sang along with Downes. A few lucky fans caught the CDs that were tossed out, clutching them in their swaying hands and joining in while Scotty Don’t closed it out with the chorus of The Beatles’ “Hey Jude.”

While taking a few minutes to catch their breath after playing for over a half hour as Scotty Don’t, the crowd collectively sang along to Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” which the band is known for having on the speakers between sets. When the guys came back out for the main event, the kids went nuts.

A distinct smell filled the air as Badfish started it off with Sublime fan favorite “Smoke Two Joints,” and everyone was quickly reminded by the management of the no smoking policy. The reprimands did not seem to kill anyone’s buzz though, and soon Badfish was off and running, nailing cover after sweet cover. Downes’ voice was barely audible as the audience took over during “Wrong Way.”

As they played the songs they had so many times before, it was clear that, regardless of the repetition, the group performed with true emotion; particularly during “Badfish” and “Santeria.” Its unique way of putting its own spin on the familiar sounds of Sublime added to the energy of the set. After over 20 covers, Badfish left the stage for only a few moments before answering the chanting crowd.

“I f*ing love Pearl Street,” said Downes, adding, “Sublime’s cool too.” The satisfying three-song encore started off with “Caress Me Down.” “Doin’ Time” came next, and before going into “What I Got,” Downes asked the audience sincerely: “Keep Sublime alive, alright?” The answer was clear from the fans, as they sang every word. - The Daily Collegian


Hundreds of fans were huddling outside the Pearl Street Ballroom on Saturday night, soggy and shivering under the pale light of street lamps coming through the fog. The crowd surged forward as the doors opened, clothing drenched through to the skin, desperate to get inside. The throng of high school and college-aged students poured in, peeling off dripping layers. Once the music started, though, the discomfort was forgotten.

“Thanks for comin’ out in the rain,” said Howie Feibusch, lead singer and guitarist of the University of Massachusetts’ own Orange Television. The crowd answered with a roar as they exploded into their second song of the opening set, “Slaves with Neon Blood.” Heads banged to the rhythm of the paint-splattered bass drum, as if nodding approvingly at the new sound. If no one knew who they were before the show, there was no question OTV made some new fans by their finish.

Feibusch’s unique vocals kept flow with the rest of the band, making it hard to believe that the trio has only been playing together since February. Myles Heffernan’s fingers plucked effortlessly on bass, and Alex Lombardi kept a flawless beat despite picking up a pair of drumsticks for the first time just 10 months ago. Citing influences from classic rock, funk, grunge, hip-hop, and jazz, their diverse sound was well received. As for how they got a gig with the rock veterans of Badfish, “By the hand of God,” Feibusch said, laughing.

After getting warmed up by OTV, the masses were ready for the punk inspired reggae vibes of Danny Pease and the Regulators. The South Hadley seven piece took over with vigor and brought the energy in the room to the next level with old school ska riffs and spirited vocals from Verbal Kenn and Phaze. Joe Grenier added a distinct percussion section, alternating from the bongos to the tambourine and maracas.

Animated guitarist Pease kept the crowd on their feet, jumping around the stage with Kenn and Phaze. Their set had an unmistakable sense of unity and pure fun, reminiscent of Operation Ivy. Fans sang along to covered reggae verses and gave an appreciative ovation as DPR handed it off to Scotty Don’t.

“While Badfish is busy gettin’ drunk, we’re gonna play some songs in the meantime,” said singer and guitarist Patrick Downes with a smirk.

Badfish’s alter egos took over with intensity and a host of original songs. The raw instrumental talent was complimented by Downes’ impressive vocals, the hard fast riffs giving the feel of a 90’s punk rock show. Bassist Joel Hanks had a perpetual smile on his face while drummer Scott Begin sang along with Downes. A few lucky fans caught the CDs that were tossed out, clutching them in their swaying hands and joining in while Scotty Don’t closed it out with the chorus of The Beatles’ “Hey Jude.”

While taking a few minutes to catch their breath after playing for over a half hour as Scotty Don’t, the crowd collectively sang along to Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” which the band is known for having on the speakers between sets. When the guys came back out for the main event, the kids went nuts.

A distinct smell filled the air as Badfish started it off with Sublime fan favorite “Smoke Two Joints,” and everyone was quickly reminded by the management of the no smoking policy. The reprimands did not seem to kill anyone’s buzz though, and soon Badfish was off and running, nailing cover after sweet cover. Downes’ voice was barely audible as the audience took over during “Wrong Way.”

As they played the songs they had so many times before, it was clear that, regardless of the repetition, the group performed with true emotion; particularly during “Badfish” and “Santeria.” Its unique way of putting its own spin on the familiar sounds of Sublime added to the energy of the set. After over 20 covers, Badfish left the stage for only a few moments before answering the chanting crowd.

“I f*ing love Pearl Street,” said Downes, adding, “Sublime’s cool too.” The satisfying three-song encore started off with “Caress Me Down.” “Doin’ Time” came next, and before going into “What I Got,” Downes asked the audience sincerely: “Keep Sublime alive, alright?” The answer was clear from the fans, as they sang every word. - The Daily Collegian


The Iron Horse was abuzz with the sounds of The Breakfast on Thursday night as costumed fans waited outside for the show to begin. It was the 11th anniversary of both their annual Halloween inspired Fonghoulish Freakout Tour and the band’s creation. Opening for The Breakfast was UMass’ own funk/rock band, Orange Television.

Orange Television’s lead singer and guitarist Howie Feibusch, bassist Miles Heffernan and drummer Alex Lombardi tore up the stage with their funk/rock sound. The trio has only been playing together since earlier this year but has quickly advanced to the status of opening for shows such as Sublime tribute band Badfish and The Breakfast. Playing their own original songs as well as a cover of Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean,” they swayed the audience into a frenzy of dancing. They were the perfect opening band for The Breakfast, lulling the audience into a wonderful trance of funk-filled bliss.

As soon as The Breakfast set feet on stage, Tim Palmieri (guitar, vocals) modestly said, “It [The Breakfast] all started at UMass, in a dorm called Butterfield” to which a few assumed fellow Butterfielders whistled in approval. They then broke out into a hard-hitting, bass-driven jam. Keyboardist Jordan Giangreco joined in on the costume wearing by walking on stage with a blue afro wig, which was constantly moving throughout the show as he nodded and swayed his head to the music.

The Breakfast demonstrated their extreme talent through their ability to blend jazz, funk and psychedelic rock into various extended jams. They fit nicely into the jam band niche because they can stray from the song, fall into melodic and dreamlike playing styles and then bring it back to the original quick funk/jazz blend with which they had begun. Their effortless communication throughout their performance displayed the members’ talent and dedication to their music.

They were able to break away from their solid, classic songs and move into smooth, liquid jams. Building up their songs until a point that it doesn’t seem possible to go on before the height of the song was reached, they continued to play. This was unexpectedly but welcomingly done in one song which was suddenly merged into Jimi Hendrix’s “Voodoo Chile.”

Members of The Breakfast introduced a new song written by bassist Chris DeAngelis, entitled “Existential Funk.” It was a powerful bass-driven funk piece that was exquisitely executed through the collaboration of all band members.

Constantly smiling throughout the performance, it was clear that all of the members were having as great a time as the ecstatic, dancing audience was. The positivity of the performance was present both on stage as well as off, and it was apparent that the band is truly happy with what they are doing. DeAngelis, Palmieri, Giangreco and drummer Adrian Tramontano all appeared to be one with their instrument, effortlessly tossing solos back and forth between one another.

Soon returning the focus back to the importance of the Butterfield dormitory, where the band first came together 11 years ago, they decide to dedicate a song to it. “We had a lot of fun [there] in 1998,” said Chris DeAngelis. The song they played was just as high energy and funky as any other.

The Breakfast is just as famous for doing covers of entire albums at their shows as they are for creating their own form of music through fusing various genres together. At recent shows, they have played The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” The Doors’ “Morrison Hotel” and Phish’s “Lawn Boy.” They decided to end the show with The Doors’ “Peace Frog,” leaving the crowd in awe of their funk-influenced version of the classic song.

It was a tremendous show and demonstrated the talent UMass is capable of producing. The Breakfast will continue touring throughout New England to promote their new album, “Live As Is” until Jan 30th. Already together for 11 years, it appears that The Breakfast may in fact just be getting started rather than winding down, and it can only be assumed that they will continue on with their music just as successfully as they have been thus far. - The Daily Collegian


The Iron Horse was abuzz with the sounds of The Breakfast on Thursday night as costumed fans waited outside for the show to begin. It was the 11th anniversary of both their annual Halloween inspired Fonghoulish Freakout Tour and the band’s creation. Opening for The Breakfast was UMass’ own funk/rock band, Orange Television.

Orange Television’s lead singer and guitarist Howie Feibusch, bassist Miles Heffernan and drummer Alex Lombardi tore up the stage with their funk/rock sound. The trio has only been playing together since earlier this year but has quickly advanced to the status of opening for shows such as Sublime tribute band Badfish and The Breakfast. Playing their own original songs as well as a cover of Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean,” they swayed the audience into a frenzy of dancing. They were the perfect opening band for The Breakfast, lulling the audience into a wonderful trance of funk-filled bliss.

As soon as The Breakfast set feet on stage, Tim Palmieri (guitar, vocals) modestly said, “It [The Breakfast] all started at UMass, in a dorm called Butterfield” to which a few assumed fellow Butterfielders whistled in approval. They then broke out into a hard-hitting, bass-driven jam. Keyboardist Jordan Giangreco joined in on the costume wearing by walking on stage with a blue afro wig, which was constantly moving throughout the show as he nodded and swayed his head to the music.

The Breakfast demonstrated their extreme talent through their ability to blend jazz, funk and psychedelic rock into various extended jams. They fit nicely into the jam band niche because they can stray from the song, fall into melodic and dreamlike playing styles and then bring it back to the original quick funk/jazz blend with which they had begun. Their effortless communication throughout their performance displayed the members’ talent and dedication to their music.

They were able to break away from their solid, classic songs and move into smooth, liquid jams. Building up their songs until a point that it doesn’t seem possible to go on before the height of the song was reached, they continued to play. This was unexpectedly but welcomingly done in one song which was suddenly merged into Jimi Hendrix’s “Voodoo Chile.”

Members of The Breakfast introduced a new song written by bassist Chris DeAngelis, entitled “Existential Funk.” It was a powerful bass-driven funk piece that was exquisitely executed through the collaboration of all band members.

Constantly smiling throughout the performance, it was clear that all of the members were having as great a time as the ecstatic, dancing audience was. The positivity of the performance was present both on stage as well as off, and it was apparent that the band is truly happy with what they are doing. DeAngelis, Palmieri, Giangreco and drummer Adrian Tramontano all appeared to be one with their instrument, effortlessly tossing solos back and forth between one another.

Soon returning the focus back to the importance of the Butterfield dormitory, where the band first came together 11 years ago, they decide to dedicate a song to it. “We had a lot of fun [there] in 1998,” said Chris DeAngelis. The song they played was just as high energy and funky as any other.

The Breakfast is just as famous for doing covers of entire albums at their shows as they are for creating their own form of music through fusing various genres together. At recent shows, they have played The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” The Doors’ “Morrison Hotel” and Phish’s “Lawn Boy.” They decided to end the show with The Doors’ “Peace Frog,” leaving the crowd in awe of their funk-influenced version of the classic song.

It was a tremendous show and demonstrated the talent UMass is capable of producing. The Breakfast will continue touring throughout New England to promote their new album, “Live As Is” until Jan 30th. Already together for 11 years, it appears that The Breakfast may in fact just be getting started rather than winding down, and it can only be assumed that they will continue on with their music just as successfully as they have been thus far. - The Daily Collegian


Discography

Extended Play, Oct 2011 EP
Welcome to the Pink House, July 2010 EP
One Old Fashioned Doughnut, May 2009 EP

Photos

Bio

Pegged by The Boston Globe as "a darker blended rock," Orange Television is a three-piece from Northampton, Massachusetts. A fusion between the melodies and psychedelia of the 60's and 70's combined with an attitude of the 90's, gives this band their self-described sound of "pulp rock." Undeniably alternative, hypnotic and soulful, their show gives "a darker, experimental aspect that goes deeper, and serves to give their performance a milky, intellectual aesthetic blended with a sweet, and often frightening amalgam of flavors." 'OTV,' as their fans call them have been gaining popularity across the Northeast after a multitude of shows from New York up to Vermont, were named Jam-off Winner by Relix Magazine, and have played the Life is Good Festival with popular acts such as Dave Matthews and Sharon Jones.