overzealous
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overzealous

| INDIE

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Band Rock Pop

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Aug
01
overzealous @ Orange County Fair - The Hangar

Costa Mesa, California, USA

Costa Mesa, California, USA

Jul
08
overzealous @ Hard Rock Cafe

Nashville, Tennessee, USA

Nashville, Tennessee, USA

Jul
05
overzealous @ Radio Free Nashville - ON AIR Interview

Nashville, Tennessee, USA

Nashville, Tennessee, USA

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Music

Press


Over the whir of blenders in the MTSU Walker Library coffee shop, Crittenden and Sellers sit and talk about Overzealous and why they have both stuck with the music for so long.

"I dont really recall," says Brad Crittenden vaguely, thinking about how the name came to be for the band he has been a consistent part of for almost 10 years with band mate Dustin Sellers.

Both guys are quiet and vaguely bookish, seeming almost too polite for the sound that they have spent the last decade sculpting. Since forming in 2000, they have burned through drummers who could not quite commit, gone from a two-piece band to a three-piece to four-piece and back to two.

They have interchanged instruments, Sellers used to play drums on recordings with Crittenden on lead guitar.

Amidst constant morphing in the bands assemblage, Overzealous has stumbled upon a lot of random opportunity along the way. After winning a Battle of the Bands in Murfreesboro, the guys received a bit of free studio time, which was used to record a collection of songs simply titled EP.

They released an assortment of small compilations, most with little formality but all packing a lot of punch. But now Overzealous has been whittled back down to just Crittenden, who took up bass, and Sellers, on guitar. Both play piano, and both are vocalists.

Writing and narrowing down the vision has been easier, Sellers says of being a two-piece band again.

Still, the search for a permanent drummer has occupied much of the bands time when Crittenden and Sellers are not promoting their brand new release.

Yellow Jr. is a five-track EP with a quirky name landed upon by a lot of underlying shit and a yellow sort of mood, Sellers says.

He and Crittenden have been playing shows in Knoxville and Murfreesboro in the past two weeks to break out the upbeat but still lyrically complex Yellow Jr., which is possibly the bands most pronounced and relevant release to date.

They came across sufficiently and honestly, says Crittenden of the five songs. Not too much pizzazz, but enough force to present themselves.

Force describes it well. Yellow Jr. is confident and the guitars are blazing in a Foo Fighters-type way that is laid-back but does not lack finesse.

And Overzealous seems happy with the relevancy the album has compared to previous EPs, which were pieced together on others timeframes so that the material was somewhat outdated by the time it surfaced.

It seems to be a reflection of the moment, Crittenden says.

Most of what Overzealous does seems to be of the moment, seizing projects spontaneously and approaching them head-on. In 2005, the band starred in Novem, an independent film about a college band that meets a sudden death after a week of recording in the summer of 1973.

The type of role that the guys were to have in the film, however, came as a shock to the band.

\We thought we were signing up to write songs, but we were trying out for parts, Crittenden says.

Overzealous took the roles anyway, and continues to dive headlong into whatever opportunities present themselves.

At 22, we were like, Yeah, well play music. Where do we go? Crittenden says.

Though he and Sellers are both 27 now, they have hardly curbed the enthusiasm for the band, their music often sticking out like a sore thumb, but in a positive sense, as Sellers puts it.

The name Overzealous probably has more meaning now than it did at the time, Sellers says. Here we are 10 years later, just me and Brad still, pushing the same thing. I feel like when our work does come out, its overzealous.

In addition to pushing Yellow Jr. wherever it can, the bands next endeavor may possibly be another release of songs recorded live in New York. If the New York recordings, should they see the light of day, have any of the energy of Yellow Jr., it will be worth a listen.

Weve taken a lot of opportunities that were hit or miss, Sellers says. If you dont try and test the waters, youll just be sitting around waiting for something to come.
- MTSU SIDELINES


Four relatively young (I daresay) gentlemen- Dustin Sellers (singer/guitar/piano), Josh Gifford (bass), Brad Crittenden (guitar), Eric Hill (drums)- put on suits and ties and form a creative force which highly resembles emo-favourites Weezer...just without as much happy pop. Don't get me wrong, the pop is still there. Overzealous just barely misses the mark of falling entirely under the head-bopping, green-shirt-wearing emo label. "Dark Weezer" is the first thing in my head when I popped these guys in.

I was extremely impressed by the full-out, although obvious DIY, press kit they sent me. It included article print outs, a photo, their self-titled EP, and a remarkable .mpg EPK (Electronic Press Kit) for the PC. The .mpg was well-made, very informative, gave a clear feel of the types of guys these cats are, and reiterated time and again their "overzealous" feelings towards music, and the need to be making it no matter what, when, or where...

The guys share influences, which include The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Silverchair, Phantom Planet, Rooney, David Bowie, etc. These influences are highly audible, and help to neatly tie together their songs, despite the fact that they are each written by different members. Each band member is very active in the writing process, which gives each tune it's own character, yet the sound flows in the same vein.

They are very catchy, poppy, and have really good harmonies. I would even say that, despite how I don't listen to the radio anymore, they are radio material-though they would like for all to know that this does not mean they are cheesy. In fact, that's the furthest thing from my mind. Sometimes lyrics will come out and you will roll your eyes and be thankful that the song itself has just saved the band from that sour lyrical blunder. Luckily, Overzealous doesn't need the backup of the song to help them out. They are a well-rounded, good band. Period. And based on their EPK, I would be interested to meet the guys just to hang out for a drink or two, cos they seem like good guys. That's always a winning combo-great band + great guys = o.k. in my book!

Trivia: Overzealous starred in a 2004 indie documentary-type film called "Novem", which will hopefully make a debut at the Sundance Film Festival. The band also wrote and recorded most of the songs for the movie's soundtrack. The band plays a 70s band who gets killed in an accident, but their music gets discovered after they are gone, and it goes from there. You can check out the "Novem" songs at novemsongs.com

- Lynda (SugarBuzz Magazine) ATL Correspondent


Overzealous is a group that hearkens back what is now uncommon in rock music: they produce songs, not a lamentation on negative feelings that seems to prevail in today’s world. Their music is hard but feels good. Their sound can in some ways be seen as an homage to the pedigree of Knoxville, their hometown: one of their major influences is Superdrag, another fine band from the South. They even draw their music from groups like the Beatles and especially John Lennon’s music in particular. However, ultimately Overzealous has its own, unique sound; one that is dedicated to a catchy, melodiously infused music.
“Apples and Girls” is a tune that is extremely memorable. The guitar riff sets up a wonderful entrance while the drums and bass set up a properly party-like atmosphere for the lead singer.

“This Old Man” channels Led Zeppelin in its hard-hitting yet tuneful sensation. It seems to be a expression of grief over old age but is presented in such a cheerful, jovial way that it almost becomes an affirmation that old age is just as enjoyable as young life.

“Big City Postcards” most reminds one of John Lennon’s later music with a little Nirvana thrown in. Listening to the song is just like receiving a postcard from any big city; the guitar solo at the end somehow radiates how relaxing and yet angst-ridden it may be to come home to an apartment in downtown anywhere and attempt to unwind while the world outside bustles with life. - oz


Discography

overzealous (self titled full-length 2001
overzealous EP 2003
Novem Soundtrack 2004
overzealous Turn To Clear Vision 2006
overzealous EP (Sony Sessions) Releasing in 2009

Photos

Bio

Overzealous is a group that hearkens back what is now uncommon in rock music: they produce songs, not a lamentation on negative feelings that seems to prevail in today’s world. Their music is hard but feels good. Their sound can in some ways be seen as an homage to the pedigree of Knoxville, their hometown: one of their major influences is Superdrag, another fine band from the South. They even draw their music from groups like the Beatles and especially John Lennon’s music in particular. However, ultimately Overzealous has its own, unique sound; one that is dedicated to a catchy, melodiously infused music.

“Apples and Girls” is a tune that is extremely memorable. The guitar riff sets up a wonderful entrance while the drums and bass set up a properly party-like atmosphere for the lead singer.

“This Old Man” channels Led Zeppelin in its hard-hitting yet tuneful sensation. It seems to be a expression of grief over old age but is presented in such a cheerful, jovial way that it almost becomes an affirmation that old age is just as enjoyable as young life.

“Big City Postcards” most reminds one of John Lennon’s later music with a little Nirvana thrown in. Listening to the song is just like receiving a postcard from any big city; the guitar solo at the end somehow radiates how relaxing and yet angst-ridden it may be to come home to an apartment in downtown anywhere and attempt to unwind while the world outside bustles with life.