NICK and the Ovorols
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NICK and the Ovorols

Chicago, Illinois, United States | SELF

Chicago, Illinois, United States | SELF
Band Americana Rock

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"CD Review - Telegraph Taboo"

"And the first song is one raw piece of electric blues. “Take the V Train” uses a guitar pattern that repeats and then layers over a heavy ride cymbal and kick drum with Lewis hammering out a basic bass part. Despite the great guitar sounds, Nick’s voice is the star here. He comes off like a harder-edged Paul Rodgers, which is a good thing. The lyrics are simple with no frills, which is something you will find throughout the album. - Blues Blast Magazine


"CD Review - Live @ Kingston Mines"

They open the show with the Mack Rice tune "Cadillac Assembly Line," injecting one of the funkiest rhythm guitar grooves along with one of the most electrifying guitar performances I have ever heard in a live show. -Rick Davis - Crossroads Blues Society newsletter


"CD Review - Telegraph Taboo (Belgium)"

NICK AND THE OVOROLS – TELEGRAPH TABOO
For artists a fresh wind to blow through a traditional genre like the blues, we have always had a soft spot. However it is not easy today to be in a music where everything has been tried and seems to be played, even with an original sound from the corner to come. Some bands succeed here anyway, and here you can without blushing from Chicago, the hometown of the electric blues operating Nick And The Ovorols catalog. With a hypnotic mix of often heavy distortion on driving guitars, spiced with some psychedelics know this foursome of frontman, vocalist - guitarist Nick Peraino, guitarist Carlos Showers, bassist Vic Jackson and drummer Lance Lewis blues rock a distinctive sound to give . Their ten songs depicting debut album "Telegraph Taboo" is a very catchy album that especially reminiscent of bands with an inventive look at the blues, drenched in swampy Southern spheres where Gov't Mule or the Allman Brothers Band wallow. But many Led Zeppelin or ZZ Top fan of the first hour will be attracted by this album. One thing is absolutely certain: Nick And The Ovorols be like no other tripping atmosphere that not many notes or words needed, but you have to know the right place to hit.

Frontman singer - guitarist Nick Peraino is a bluesman at heart. Born in New England in 1998, he moved to Chicago to be with a passion for the blues, jazz guitar studies at DePaul University. With his roots rock band Blue Moon Risin 'crossed after his studies in 2003-2004 by the Mid-West and wrote and produced their debut album "Noisy Picks And Humbars". In 2005 he began to perform with Chicago blues legend Joanna Connor and accompanied her as a member of The Joanna Connor Band on its national tours. Also, Grammy Award winner and harmonica legend Sugar Blue was captivated by the virtuoso guitar playing of Nick and invited him on his European tour in 2009, including a memorable passage in the Southern Blues Night in Heerlen. Moreover, Nick co-owner of Dr. Fret Good Inc.., A Chicago-based firm that builds custom amps and he fixes it, designs, and builds. Speaking about talents, courage from your misfortune is another nice feature that adorns Nick. 2011 could be the turning point in the musical career of Nick Peraino, when he had a different outlook on life was given to him after an emergency admission with Crohn's disease was found. He decided to take a step forward and as a band leader to try, successfully anyway. Not only the inventive guitar playing of Nick is a revelation, but his soulful voice edged grabs you by the scruff of the neck. Last year there was already recorded a live CD of Nick And The Ovorols at Chicago's renowned blues club Kingston Mines, a club where the band occurs every week.
Their first studio album "Telegraph Taboo" let a band that clearly attuned to one another and with total empathy finds the right mood. So the album kicks off with the sultry sauntering "Take The Q Train" that tripping pulls and drags on a short, repetitive text, animated by the haunting vocals of frontman Nick Peraino, two striking dueling guitars and a super tight percussion. The sequel "Chitown via Greyhound" shoots in an intro of a minute by the blues history, starting on a tin Old Time dobro sound and hand percussion, and then using an electric slide literally audible click on the amplifier to a deep, dark distorted tone, handsome contrasting with the splitting voice of Nick, a haunting tambourine and cymbals and a clean sole ran slide guitar. Such a heavy swampy sound even do a Bob Log III or the heaviest Texas blues rockers pale, but Peraino holds the reins nice tight despite the heavy guitar work and build numbers each attractively on, based on a catchy repetitive reef which then perfectly supported by its fellow musicians. Most of the songs float on a stomping slow or midtempo trance rhythm that you inexorably draws in a very personal style guitar. You shall have the link to the Allman Brothers Band and Gov't Mule, in songs such as the Hammond inspired by "Heed The Words I Say" or the soulful and funky "Half Of Two", graced with a lovely guitar and backing vocals, but also hear the Black Keys hinted at the roller lumbar bass and mysterious echoing vocals of the seductive "Mojo A Go-Go" or the Texas rockers ZZ Top resound in the guitar solos of the violent rocking "Honey Please". The album closes in beauty with the heavenly wegdromende instrumental "Soundtrack Of Life", a film, in two subtle guitars floating song again emphasizes the versatility of this band.

Nick And The Ovorols with their debut album "Telegraph Taboo" a worthy place in the blues rock landscape captured with a particularly rough own sound. These guys feel at home on stage throughout the whole album is clearly audible and makes it extra enjoy the perfect interaction between voice and instruments. Innovative, intoxicating and original, such nobility, few blues bands for a decision. - Yvo fibers - Rootstime.be


"CD Review - Telegraph Taboo (Belgium)"

NICK AND THE OVOROLS – TELEGRAPH TABOO
For artists a fresh wind to blow through a traditional genre like the blues, we have always had a soft spot. However it is not easy today to be in a music where everything has been tried and seems to be played, even with an original sound from the corner to come. Some bands succeed here anyway, and here you can without blushing from Chicago, the hometown of the electric blues operating Nick And The Ovorols catalog. With a hypnotic mix of often heavy distortion on driving guitars, spiced with some psychedelics know this foursome of frontman, vocalist - guitarist Nick Peraino, guitarist Carlos Showers, bassist Vic Jackson and drummer Lance Lewis blues rock a distinctive sound to give . Their ten songs depicting debut album "Telegraph Taboo" is a very catchy album that especially reminiscent of bands with an inventive look at the blues, drenched in swampy Southern spheres where Gov't Mule or the Allman Brothers Band wallow. But many Led Zeppelin or ZZ Top fan of the first hour will be attracted by this album. One thing is absolutely certain: Nick And The Ovorols be like no other tripping atmosphere that not many notes or words needed, but you have to know the right place to hit.

Frontman singer - guitarist Nick Peraino is a bluesman at heart. Born in New England in 1998, he moved to Chicago to be with a passion for the blues, jazz guitar studies at DePaul University. With his roots rock band Blue Moon Risin 'crossed after his studies in 2003-2004 by the Mid-West and wrote and produced their debut album "Noisy Picks And Humbars". In 2005 he began to perform with Chicago blues legend Joanna Connor and accompanied her as a member of The Joanna Connor Band on its national tours. Also, Grammy Award winner and harmonica legend Sugar Blue was captivated by the virtuoso guitar playing of Nick and invited him on his European tour in 2009, including a memorable passage in the Southern Blues Night in Heerlen. Moreover, Nick co-owner of Dr. Fret Good Inc.., A Chicago-based firm that builds custom amps and he fixes it, designs, and builds. Speaking about talents, courage from your misfortune is another nice feature that adorns Nick. 2011 could be the turning point in the musical career of Nick Peraino, when he had a different outlook on life was given to him after an emergency admission with Crohn's disease was found. He decided to take a step forward and as a band leader to try, successfully anyway. Not only the inventive guitar playing of Nick is a revelation, but his soulful voice edged grabs you by the scruff of the neck. Last year there was already recorded a live CD of Nick And The Ovorols at Chicago's renowned blues club Kingston Mines, a club where the band occurs every week.
Their first studio album "Telegraph Taboo" let a band that clearly attuned to one another and with total empathy finds the right mood. So the album kicks off with the sultry sauntering "Take The Q Train" that tripping pulls and drags on a short, repetitive text, animated by the haunting vocals of frontman Nick Peraino, two striking dueling guitars and a super tight percussion. The sequel "Chitown via Greyhound" shoots in an intro of a minute by the blues history, starting on a tin Old Time dobro sound and hand percussion, and then using an electric slide literally audible click on the amplifier to a deep, dark distorted tone, handsome contrasting with the splitting voice of Nick, a haunting tambourine and cymbals and a clean sole ran slide guitar. Such a heavy swampy sound even do a Bob Log III or the heaviest Texas blues rockers pale, but Peraino holds the reins nice tight despite the heavy guitar work and build numbers each attractively on, based on a catchy repetitive reef which then perfectly supported by its fellow musicians. Most of the songs float on a stomping slow or midtempo trance rhythm that you inexorably draws in a very personal style guitar. You shall have the link to the Allman Brothers Band and Gov't Mule, in songs such as the Hammond inspired by "Heed The Words I Say" or the soulful and funky "Half Of Two", graced with a lovely guitar and backing vocals, but also hear the Black Keys hinted at the roller lumbar bass and mysterious echoing vocals of the seductive "Mojo A Go-Go" or the Texas rockers ZZ Top resound in the guitar solos of the violent rocking "Honey Please". The album closes in beauty with the heavenly wegdromende instrumental "Soundtrack Of Life", a film, in two subtle guitars floating song again emphasizes the versatility of this band.

Nick And The Ovorols with their debut album "Telegraph Taboo" a worthy place in the blues rock landscape captured with a particularly rough own sound. These guys feel at home on stage throughout the whole album is clearly audible and makes it extra enjoy the perfect interaction between voice and instruments. Innovative, intoxicating and original, such nobility, few blues bands for a decision. - Yvo fibers - Rootstime.be


"Live in Studio - Fearless Radio"

Jan 23rd. Live in studio performance and interview in support of new release - Telegraph Taboo. - Fearless Radio Chicago


"Live in Studio - WWOZ"

Live in studio performance and interview in support of new release - Telegraph Taboo - WWOZ New Orleans


"CD Review - Telegraph Taboo"

So, I was in the mood for some blues and whoosh – blues appeared.

Other people get coupons, bills and news updates in the mail while I get blues music. Cool new blues music in the form of the debut release Telegraph Taboo from the Chicago-based band Nick and the Ovorols.

This is not a pretty album. The vocals on a few tracks come in a bit low, there’s some distortion in a few places (okay - lots of distortion) and extra grit and fuzz in the guitars. All those imperfections combine to give the album a raw, almost live sound. It’s loud and messy and grungy and so very, very good.

My favorite is the screaming, pounding, rocking Honey, Please -

You said boy I’ll make you happy
Oh just give me one good chance
I told you once before
I ain’t gonna do this dance -

I also like Take the V Train with it’s heavy guitars and Bad Company feel, and the blues-y Heed My Words:

The only track I didn’t really care for was Hey, Mr President but I’ll be honest and say my dislike stems from political reasons, not musicial ones.

Taken as a whole Telegraph Taboo is a solid debut and worth buying. If you all need to hear a bit more you can stream the album from the bands’ website, from amazon or from itunes. - Words Music and Baseball


"CD Review - Telegraph Taboo"

Nick and the Ovorols is Nick Peraino (vocals, guitar), Carlos Showers (guitar), Vic Jackson (bass) and Lance Lewis (drums) and they are a smoking hot blues-rock band. On parts of Telegraph Taboo, I am fondly reminded of ZZ Top's Deguello - one of my favorite blues albums. And Peraino's very strong, expressive voice is a bit reminiscent of Warren Haynes'. In fact, if you're a fan of the blues-influenced rock of bands like Govt Mule and Haynes' latter-day work with the Allmans, you will do well to give this a try.

From the upbeat stuff like "Take the V Train" and "Chitown Via Greyhound" to the beautifully-played slow instrumental "Soundtrack to Life" with its twin guitar meanderings, the electric guitars (stinging lead or slide, or both) are at the center of the show... although the rhythm section of Jackson and Lewis have no trouble keeping up and even, on songs like "Honey Please", leading the way.
- When You Motor Away Blog


"Show Preview"

Nick and The Ovorols, A?Chicago based band touring in advance of their debut studio LP (Telegraph Taboo), and the Boston based Ryan Montbleau Band will both play highly anticipated no-cover gigs at The Happy Harbor Mothership on Marina Rd. in Orange Beach this month.
The Ovorols, led by vocalist and guitarist Nick Peraino, will play on Saturday, Jan. 19, and the Montbleau Band returns to The Mothership’s intimate stage on Jan 11. Both shows are listed for 7 p.m. first sets.
Peraino, a native New Englander, moved to Chicago in ’98 to study jazz guitar at DePaul. His strong passion for blues music only intensified while in that mecca for the genre, and he eventually began playing alongside local Chicago underground blues legend Joanna Connor. That led to a European tour with Grammy Award winning harmonica player Sugar Blue.
Diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease in February of 2011, Peraino used that bad turn in his life to gain new confidence in his ability to lead his own band.
“It was a life-is-short kind of realization,’’ Peraino said. “I had been playing as a sideman, but I decided that I wanted to be a band leader. I don’t know if I had the confidence to do that before. But I realized that we all could die at any moment, so, I better act on it.’’
Shortly thereafter, Peraino formed The Ovorols and started a five-month residency at Chicago’s Kingston Mines, recording a live album to document the run. The band has since played with the likes of Buddy Guy, Taj Mahal, Jimmy Herring and Stanton Moore of Galactic.
“This is the first time we are going on road with the new band. It’s going to be a lot of un,’’ Peraino said. “We’ll play most of the songs on the new album. Some Blues. Some Rolling Stones and Allman Brothers. I guess you could call us Americana.’’
The Ovorols connection to the Alabama Gulf Coast is through management connections with another band that has played memorable gigs at The Mothership, The Revivalists.
“I became friends with the Revivalists when I sat in with them at a crawfish boil in New Orleans,’’ Peraino said. “I’ve never been to Alabama. But if it’s anything like New Orleans, then it’s a place where fans like to get out and support live music, and the bands all encourage each other. I can’t say the same thing about Chicago. It’s more cut throat here.’’ - The Mullet Wrapper


"CD Review - Live @ Kingston Mines"

Nick And The Ovorols manages to escape the trap insufferable live albums fall into: failing to translate the heat of the night captured in perpetuity. Live From Kingston Mines wags a taunting finger as if to say, “Bet you wish you were here,” like a postcard flaunting sunshine and sandy beaches to the snowed-in. The colorful hour-long set never bores even when the guitar noodling passes the 10-minute mark on “Dust My Broom/Heed The Words I Say.” It’s one thing to see frontman Nick Peraino grimace while he’s wailing away, fingers floating over frets, but extended jams without the visual component tend to drag. Barry White’s deep growl be damned – the shoulder-pumping funk of “It’s Ecstasy When You Lay Down Next To Me” sounds like an audition for an opening slot on Soulive’s next tour while a chugging rendering of Sam Cooke’s “Somebody Have Mercy” wipes out any trace of Peraino’s New England upbringing. (nickandtheovorols.com)
– Janine Schaults - Illinois Entertainer


"CD Review - Telegraph Taboo"

There's really only thing you can say after spinning Nick and the Ovorols' debut album, Telegraph Taboo. And that thing is "damn."

Nick Peraino's red-hot blues guitar (yes, I wrote that, and no, I only feel a little badly about it) smokes through track after track on the band's debut album. Peraino's passion for blues guitar is matched only by his backing band's intensity.

If you like your music down and dirty and filled with life, you'll enjoy Telegraph Taboo. Peraino's hooks are irresistible and his excitement about his music is infectious. You can practically feel the steam heat rising off the band. - Adobe and Teardrops Blog


"CD Review - Live @ Kingston Mines"

Kingston Mines MC Frank Pellegrino is calling Nick Peraino “one of the best young, up and coming talents.”

It is important to mention not just how skillfully Nick plays his guitar throughout the album, but also how he uses his equipment. By listening to the tracks one may hear Nick’s true artistry and realize that he is knowledgeable and aware of how to use his equipment correctly. This could be because he is co-owner of Dr. Fretgood Inc. in Chicago, where he repairs, designs and builds custom guitar amplifiers.

Nick and the Ovorols’ Live At Kingston Mines opens with, “Cadillac Assembly Line,” originally by Albert King. This is a hip-shakin’, funky blues tune that makes for a fun first song to get the crowd moving. Nicks plays the song somewhat differently then Albert King by speeding up the tempo. He utilizes jazz chords and perfectly forms a solo over them.

Nick doesn’t just have a blues background, he also studied jazz guitar at DePaul University when he moved to Chicago in 1998. A strong passion for blues music was a deciding factor for Nick to attend college in Chicago.

In “Chitown Via Greyhound”, his original song, Nick shows a different skill by using slide guitar. At first Nick’s guitar may bring to mind Muddy Waters’ “Rollin and Tumblin’ ”; as the song picks up steam, Nick enters into ZZ Top territory with his grungy tone and progressively heavy ending. Again he shows how to work the neck during his riffs, as if he is “one” with the guitar. The listener may escape reality during Nick’s shredding and imagine becoming part of the crowd at this live show!

The next jam is a two part track. In “Dust My Broom” Nick uses a standard blues shuffle just like Robert Johnson and Elmore James intended. It’s great to hear Nick’s take on Delta blues mainly because of this song’s history and meaning. (A fun fact that the listener may not know is that this tune has been filling dance floors for more than 60 years and has been adapted to piano, accordion, acoustic, and electric guitar. The meaning goes as far back as the 1800s. Such implications are: to leave in a hurry, leaving for good, or to clean out and start over.)

“Dust My Broom” flows into Part 2 of the medley, “Heed The Words I Say,” another Peraino original -- a slower jam on which Nick uses wah effects throughout his lead. He makes sure to stop on the one-chord so everyone is really listening to the words he is saying, which shows how Nick likes to work the crowd. The other guitarist in the band, Carlos Showers flows throughout the tune by utilizing his wah pedal as well. This is the only song Carlos solos in, and he makes sure it is memorable.

“It’s Ecstasy When You Lay Next To Me” steers away from the blues as it is a Barry White cover. Nick demonstrates his jazzy rhythm again and shows a different tone in his singing -- perhaps in an effort to resemble White’s distinctive bass voice. During this song the listener may drift off into a different time and place -- the disco-era. There is a second part to this track, “Dreams”, originally by Greg Allman. Nick creates a very soothing atmosphere for the crowd by not only playing his guitar, but playing through his custom amplifier. The tone that flows out of the amp is so crisp it can’t help but be heard. Allman Brothers fans will appreciate this groovin’ extended jam.

The song “People Get Ready” was originally written by Curtis Mayfield for the Impressions. “People get ready, there’s a train a comin’/ you don’t need no baggage, you just get on board/ all you need is faith to hear the diesels hummin’/ you don’t need no ticket you just thank the Lord.” The listener may sit and analyze this song more in depth than the other tunes. Maybe that is why it has been covered by artists like The Rolling Stones, Bob Marley, Rod Stewart with Jeff Beck, and Aretha Franklin to name a few. Nick seems to be moved just as much as these other artists and does a fine job putting his own twist on the song. Nick shows vulnerability throughout this track by not only singing the heartfelt lyrics, but by displaying pure emotion through his guitar. He is a bold musician who takes risks.

T-Bone Walker’s “Tbone Boogie” is given a contemporary funky treatment by Nick and the band. The listener may not be compelled to analyze this tune like the last, but instead will just have fun listening and dancing to it. The live track sends off the vibe that Nick feels the same in his playing by saying, “There ain't nothing in the world that a Tbone Boogie won’t cure!”

Sam Cooke’s soulful “Somebody Have Mercy” is a standard shuffle ending with a classic turnaround. The lyrics paint the blues: “Oh somebody have mercy, tell me what is wrong with me?/ I don’t know how I stand the things this woman do to me/ when I think about how she treats me/ tears fall down like rain.” Nick shows off his skills by covering some of the great Otis Rush’s riffs throughout the tune. This entire song demonstrates Nick’s true passion and - ChicagoBluesGuide.com


"CD Review - Telegraph Taboo"

Nick And The Ovorols waste no time in getting down to the nitty, gritty, greasy bizness on their debut studio album Telegraph Taboo. After a second or two of frontman Nick Peraino’s guitar clearing its throat, “Take The V Train” fires up and gets underway, lurching like a half-drunk brontosaurus. When Peraino lets fly with his vocal, it’s easy to imagine a Free-era Paul Rodgers leading Led Zep through a slow and raunchy one-chord blues crawl. Drummer Lance Lewis (the one player on this album who is in the current touring lineup of the Ovorols) chases his own walloping Bonzo beats with a grunting bass line; Peraino fires off layers off snarling, growling, moaning guitar lines from all different directions. Distortion? Man, this is Hell on Earth for those poor little 12AX7 and 6V6 amp tubes. By the time “Take The V Train” bumps and grinds its way to a halt, the air is reeking of brimstone and smoldering diesel. World, meet Nick And The Ovorols.If you thought Gary Clark Jr.’s “Bright Lights” nailed the midnight blues vibe, Nick And The Ovorols’ “Heed The Words I Say” takes things even deeper into the darkness and bumps up the tension another notch; “Hey, Mr. President” is cut from the same cool, dark cloth. Lewis drives “Honey, Please” with a slamming beat; “Chitown Via Greyhound” chugs along like vintage ZZ Top, buzzsaw guitar and all; and “Day To Day” sounds like Peraino and his guitar were sitting in a church. (At least until the weird sonics start around 1:50 … is that a … banjo? And an accordion? No. Yes. Jesus …)“Half Of Two” is a little bit funky and a whole lotta soul, thanks to Marcin Fahmy’s waves of keys and the gorgeous vocals of Erica Lewis-Albright and Hope Lewis-Singleton. (Peraino’s guitar tone on “Half Of Two” fluctuates in that space between candy-cane sweet and total nasty-assed). “Mojo A Go-Go” is as cool as its name and a neat example of the sort of sound texturing Peraino and co-studio wizard Erik Sraga pulled off during the sessions for Telegraph Taboo. And if “Take The V Train” was the perfect opener, “Soundtrack To Life” proves that Nick And The Ovorols are responsible enough to land you gently and safely at the end of it all: nothing says goodbye quite like some mournful slide work nestled against another guitar that sounds like Ronnie Wood’s Zemaitis on The Faces’ “Debris”. Nice.Don’t expect a slug of flashy full-page ads in the glossies and such to announce the arrival of Telegraph Taboo – but the lack of major-label backing has no bearing on what’s to be found on this little beast of an album. These folks can play.

*****

Brian Robbins keeps a few spare 12AX7 tubes (and his overalls) over at www.brian-robbins.com - Jambands.com (Relix Magazine)


"New record reaches #2"

Nick and the Ovorols' new release Telegraph Taboo hit #2 on Connecticut's WCNI radio Jan. 17th. - WCNI radio


"WXRT Radio"

Nick and the ovorols' record "Live at Kingston Mines" has been aired on WXRT's Bluesbreakers with host Tom Marker. - WXRT Radio


"Best Young Americana Artist - Frank Pellegrino (Emcee @ Kingston Mines)"

Nick and the Ovorols are one of the best young up and coming Chicago artists. - Frank Pellegrino (Kingston Mines Emcee)


"Best Young Americana Artist - Frank Pellegrino (Emcee @ Kingston Mines)"

Nick and the Ovorols are one of the best young up and coming Chicago artists. - Frank Pellegrino (Kingston Mines Emcee)


"Legends of the hidden venue: The Blues edition"

"Some history: Kingston Mines first opened in 1968 as a coffee house that featured folk and bluegrass music, but when Blues music became a better match for big city lifestyles, Kingston Mines set the tone as the first club to bring live Blues to the north side of Chicago. First owned by Doc Pellegrino, you can now find his son and current club owner Frank there, perhaps making you laugh or reminding you to tip your bartender as the M.C. for the night...
Give Wednesday nights a try, especially if NICK and the Ovorols and Carl Weathersby are performing. Starting at 9:30 P.M., witness what happens when you mix a young and talented guitar player and singer with top-notch seasoned Chicago Blues rhythm musicians. NICK and the Ovorols is a bit like Little Feat fused with The Allman Bros. (with the occasional Daddy Wayne move on the side). See up close some good quality shredding of electric guitars in front of an audience of heads bobbling to the drum and bass rhythms. It's the perfect hump day fix.

The hyper soul sounds of Blues fused with Americana may send you a telepathic invitation to dance here any night of the week..."

Entire Article :
http://www.examiner.com/concerts-in-chicago/legends-of-the-hidden-venue-the-blues-edition#ixzz1pEbnYSNY - Examiner.com


Discography

4/4/12
Live at Kingston Mines

1/22/13
Telegraph Taboo

Photos

Bio

Anchored by music since 1986, Nick Peraino has considered a lifestyle with easier, predictable, or more lucrative paths absent of music on many occasions, but he has always been drawn back to it. Originally inspired to play classical piano by his fathers performances of Chopins nocturnes, Nick was grasped by true musical addiction when his brother started a band and brought home Stevie Ray Vaughans Live at El Mocambo, then a VHS release. With great obsession Nick learned the performance note for note, wearing out the rewind button on the VCR. Copping SRVs guitar style so diligently rocketed Nicks skills on guitar, and far faster than anything hed learned on the piano. It was this vein-pumping, retina-dilating excitement that got Nick hookedhe became a lifer. Years later Nick realized the importance of honing his own unique style and sound, and began listening to a wider variety of guitarists, singers and songwriters.

Nick cut his teeth performing on the world-renowned Chicago Blues circuit, what Nick refers to as music boot camp. "The clubs always had bodies filling them, tourists from all over the world. There was and is a standard on that scene that one must live up to. And that genre commands a specific musical language; one which I feel can only be learned through speaking (playing) it in a live setting, in front of an audience. So all these people came to see THAT, and you must give it to them. And for me this was with Joanna Connor on an average of 3 hours a night and 4 nights a week for 6 years."

In 2011 Nicks shift from sideman to frontman was realized through new perspective. A seemingly bad turn of events led to a positive shift in consciousness. An unfortunate visit to the emergency room in February of 2011 led to a diagnosis of Crohns Disease. With a newfound now or never attitude, he gained confidence and satisfied a burning desire to become a band leader. He could now write and arrange the material and take his musical vision in a direction true to his heart.

Twenty years after those initial transcriptions on guitar, and five self-produced CDs later, Nick is not only a frontman for Nick and the Ovorols, but also a producer, songwriter, singer, and guitarist. His music has a strong balance in all areas, not favoring one over the other. "Guitar solos can get old after awhile; there needs to be MORE going on to engage an audience: lyrics, passionate singing, fun or moving songs." Peraino - once a mono-faceted blues/rock guitar soloist - has adopted a less exclusive approach to music, taking into account all the important aspects for an engaging record or concert. "This does not mean I've lost my passion for guitar playing, don't get me wrong, I love to play guitar, and I'd like to believe that I play with a style I can call my own, but I don't feel that it's my one and only strong suit. It's most important to me that people get into the songs, vocals, lyrics and the groove. I do however allow myself to be more adventurous on guitar in a live setting and feel that the guitar aspect can lend to a more energetic show. There is a tendency for someone in my genre to be pegged as a guitarist and only a guitarist. It's my goal to catch people off guard. I think fans will find over time that all my records have a different vibe to them. I don't just go in the studio with the band and record live takes of tunes. The studio is a playground to me and I like to find different timbres and experiment with things during the songwriting process. I find this helps me think outside the box when arranging a song and can really shape the end result in a unique fresh way."

Nick and the Ovorols kicked off 2013 in style with a new record titled Telegraph Taboo and a Gulf Coast tour with stops in Nashville, TN. They have since made this route a routine. They continue to build their following playing around Chicago and are planning to tour every month or two for the rest of the year. Aside from critical acclaim on their recent indie record release, they continue to gain recognition and are slowly and consistently building their following and industry network. They realize that bringing their music to as many people as they would like requires dedication, hard work and perseverance. But the journey doesn't have to be an arduous means to an end and the band makes a conscious effort to enjoy the journey thru bringing fiery, energetic, and emotional performances to their audiences.

Band Members