Pamela Hart
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Pamela Hart

Austin, Texas, United States | Established. Jan 01, 1998 | SELF

Austin, Texas, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 1998
Band Jazz R&B

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"Senior Citizens Receive Christmas Love, December 2012"

Pamela Hart performed in the Boyd Vance Auditorium. She was accompanied by Dr. James Polk, Michael Stevens, and Brannen Temple, Jr. - The Villager Newpaper - Shirley A. Hammond


"Femmes For SIMS: A Night Of The Chanteuse, December 2012"

Recap: Femmes For SIMS: A Night Of The Chanteuse
BY Amanda Ivarra, December 6th, 2012

In a cabaret-style performance, Austin’s most well-known and influential musicians collaborated with the city’s most talented female vocalists for Femmes for SIMS: Night of the Chanteuse, a celebration of Austin’s women in music. The darkness and seduction of the event transformed the historic Scottish Rite Theater into a social lounge featuring Austin songstresses Jazz Mills, Nina Diaz and Pamela Hart and cabaret dance choreographer Sassy Delure. - Miss A - Charity Meets Style - Amanda Ivarra


"Texas Fests Round Up Local Talent, Pamela Hart, James Polk, October 2012"

Texas Fests Round Up Local Talent
Posted 11/6/2012

Even after international summer festivals have concluded elsewhere, Texas utilizes its warm-weather advantage to keep the music playing. The state’s wide variety of outdoor autumn jazz events focuses almost exclusively on native talent.

The centerpiece of these events was the three-day Texas Jazz Festival, which bills itself as one of the nation’s oldest free jazz festivals. Against the seaside backdrop of Corpus Christi, Texas, the festival, which drew 75,000 fans on Oct. 19–21, has become one of the state’s most expansive and enjoyable outdoor music events.

The 52nd annual edition of the festival was once again a polished, professional and personable production of more than 55 acts on three stages. The fest continued its mission of showcasing high-quality talent rarely heard outside the region, building its programs primarily around musicians from Corpus Christi, San Antonio, El Paso and the Rio Grande Valley.

Saxophonist Rene Sandoval, the festival’s traditional closing act, is rarely seen outside his South Texas home base, and his performance, full of fluid grace and effortless innovation, is always a major attraction. But it was Texas-born trumpeter Luis Gasca, now based in Mexico, who was the most exciting example of the local music concept in action. Gasca’s unique career accomplishments include working with Stan Kenton, Perez Prado and Janis Joplin, as well as a catalog of his own recordings featuring Joe Henderson, Carlos Santana and Herbie Hancock as sidemen. Powered by an encyclopedic knowledge and stunning command of both classic and contemporary Latin jazz stylings, Gasca’s set featured incisive soloing and enlightened ensemble interaction.

A special homecoming set by pianist Dr. James Polk, who headlined an earlier festival in Austin, was arguably the highlight of the festival. Polk, a Corpus Christi native who spent a decade working with Ray Charles before becoming the godfather of the modern Austin jazz scene, performed at the inaugural Texas Jazz Festival event. More than a half-century later, Polk led his sextet through a diverse, crowd-pleasing set of revised standards with guest vocalist Pam Hart earning a standing ovation for her compelling contributions. ................ - DownBeat - Michael Point


"Pamela Hart, Austin's Queen of Jazz"

Austin Woman Magazine - "Pamela Hart, Austin's Queen of Jazz", April 2012 - Austin Woman Magazine


""Pamela Hart, Austin's Queen of Jazz", April 2012"

Austin’s queen of Jazz / By Molly McManus / Photos by Rudy Arocha

Pamela Hart was five years old when she began singing. Her school didn’t start until the middle of the day, so in order to know when it was time for her to leave, she followed the same radio show each day, anticipating its close.

“This is Brad Pride, Jr. recording. … Have a ball!” This was the DJ’s sign-off, which led in to Nancy Wilson’s song I Hope You Had a Ball. The song was Hart’s signal to get to school, as she was the last one left in the house; her five older siblings were already in school and her mother was at work. Hart recalls listening to the wonderful jazz singer and trying to mimic Wilson’s melodies, phrasing and overall sound.

“I would really try to make my vocal chords do what hers did, in terms of texture, whether she was belting it out or singing high falsetto notes,” Hart says.

Her mother heard her singing in the house one day and began coaxing her to sing in front of guests when they would come to visit. Singing came naturally to Hart and, at that young age, she had no fear singing in front of others. She gave it everything she had, choreographing dances to go along with her performances. This, however, drastically changed in the years to come.

Growing up in Los Angeles, Hart had music connections everywhere. It was the ’70s, the music scene was booming and everybody was trying to get a slice of it. Hanging out in the city at various stores, Hart had friends and acquaintances trying to set her up with people who might be able to get her a record deal or singing gigs . When she was 13, an opportunity came her way.

“I remember being in front of someone who may have been able to make a difference in my life and it just couldn’t come out,” Hart reminisces about her voice.

She was so nervous that literally no sound came out. The opportunity—gone.

I had a very hard time believing this after seeing her perform last summer. This woman did not seem to have a nervous bone in her body. Performing at the Paramount Theatre in downtown Austin, it was like she was singing in her living room to close friends, intimately connecting with the audience, even in such a large venue. For those who have not had the opportunity to hear this amazing jazz musician, I’ll put it plain and simple for you: You are missing out, big time. Her voice is as smooth as velvet, as bold as dark roasted coffee and as luxurious as fine silk, and she sings in a way that appears effortless. She demands all your attention, not because of showy riffs or belting out high, loud notes, but because she has perfected her sound, style and delivery, keeping you excitedly anticipating her next musical move.

In a lot of ways, Hart has remained under the radar, mainly because she has a lot on her plate; it’s practically overflowing: She balances her time between her job, her family, her nonprofit and her singing. Hart’s “day job,” as she calls it, is working for the State of Texas as a manager in the application development section. I was lucky enough to catch her on her lunch break, meeting at her favorite South Austin restaurant, Enoteca, over spaghetti and meatballs.

This was not the woman I had seen in concert eight months prior. At her show, she filled the Paramount with her powerful sound. At the restaurant, Hart was soft-spoken, and a few times certain words were lost in the loud chatter surrounding us. At her show, she wore a billowy, bright peach-colored top that flowed over a tight black mini skirt, emphasizing her toned, slender legs, which ended in a pair of killer pumps. At the restaurant, she was modestly dressed in dark colors, coming from work. However, she was as fashionable and beautiful as I had remembered.

I honestly expected Hart to be a bit of a diva. On the contrary, she is far from it. She’s down to earth, extremely humble and an absolute pleasure to be with. Hart’s knowledge of jazz is impressive. (There were about 20 things I wanted to look up as we were talking.) She’s amiable and engaging, quick to laugh and very detailed in each story she tells, never one to brag about her accomplishments. I mean, the woman holds several degrees, including a master’s degree in business, sells out shows, had success with her debut album (May I Come In?), released in 1998, and has entertained audiences with some of jazz’s most esteemed performers. Furthermore, Hart started and runs the inclusive and much needed nonprofit Women in Jazz with her husband, Kevin. At its core, Women in Jazz provides exposure to female jazz performers andfosters the appreciation of jazz in Austin.

Hart was not always the jazz connoisseur she is today. While her mother played jazz at their house, Hart preferred folk music, listening to the likes of The Beatles, Carole King and Roberta Flack. It wasn’t until she moved to Austin that her appreciation of jazz began to blossom. At age 22, Hart packed up and left California after graduating from the University - Molly McManus - Austin Woman Magazine


"Our Voices, Ourselves Interviews Pamela Hart, August 2011"

Women in Jazz Association, Inc. was founded by Pamela and Kevin Hart to provide Women in Jazz Concert Series and Vocal Performance Workshops for performance opportunities and experiences of professional and amateur jazz vocalists in the Austin metropolitan area. Women in Jazz Association, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization.

Austin, Texas, "the live music capital of the world," can boast of very little live music that includes jazz vocals. Since the venues in Austin that consistently provide jazz music book vocalists much less than other musicians, jazz vocalists create their own entertainment venues in Austin. Women in Jazz Concert Series is the outgrowth of the need for a performance venue for women jazz vocalists.

Enjoy this wonderful interview and check out their schedule and activities at :http://www.womeninjazz.org/

http://traffic.libsyn.com/ovos/OVOS_women_in_jazz.mp3
- Our Voices, Ourselves


"KUT's Views and Brews: Women in the Jazz Conversation, July 7, 2011"

There are many ways to approach the topic of women in the jazz conversation. It would be easy to start with the great female jazz vocalists whose names are now synonymous with the genre, like Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald, but the truth is that women have never been strangers on the jazz stage in any element of performance. Think of saxophonists like Vi Burnside and Margaret Backstrom or, more recently, pianists like Hazel Scott and Eliane Elias.

At our Views and Brews discussion on the topic of Women in the Jazz Conversation our wonderful panel tried to hit all the right notes in an hour that flew by all too quickly. KUT’s Jay Trachtenberg and Laurie Gallardo were joined on stage by the incredible talents of singers Akina Adderley and Pamela Hart along with the amazing Dr. James Polk on keys for an evening of conversation and music that left everyone wanting more.

Dr. James Polk is both a master keyboardist and storyteller. He talked of Cab Calloway’s older sister Blanche, who actually was an accomplished bandleader before her younger brother Cab, who often credited her as his inspiration for entering show business. Cab become a jazz legend in part thanks to the jazz arrangements, “the book,” that Blanche used with her band. Dr. Polk also entertained the audience in the Cactus Cafe with his stories about the lessons he learned while playing for Marla Gibbs in Los Angeles.

Akina Adderley, grand-niece of the legendary Cannonball Adderly, told us of a conversation she had with a family friend by the name of Nancy Wilson, (yes! that Nancy Wilson) who told her that it wasn’t all that tough for her to break into the business as a jazz vocalist because “she just showed up and could play.” The point being, that in jazz it never seemed to be whether you were a woman or a man but whether or not you “could hang.”

Austin’s first lady of jazz, Pamela Hart, talked about her early days as a singer. Her inspirations, her challenges and her idols, and shared stories about learning how to talk the jazz language. It’s a language she now helps teach to other aspiring performers through her Women in Jazz Concert Series every year at the Paramount Theatre here in Austin. This year’s Summer Jam is coming up July 23rd.

The night of storytelling and conversation mixed with the breathtaking performances by both Akina and Pamela, who wowed the captivated crowd with Dr. Polk backing them brilliantly, was truly magical. As Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote:

“The millions, that around us are rushing into life, cannot always be fed on the sere remains of foreign harvests. Events, actions arise, that must be sung, that will sing themselves. Who can doubt, that poetry will revive and lead in a new age, as the star in the constellation Harp, which now flames in our zenith, astronomers announce, shall one day be the pole-star for a thousand years?”

It was a night to remember and if you couldn’t make it, you can listen to the full audio recording here. Be sure to check back to watch highlights of the event on video soon.

Coming up this month at Views and Brews we’ll touch on politics and Tennessee Williams and we have more of our jazz conversation series when rabbi Neil Blumofe returns in August with a look at the music of Miles Davis. Stay tuned!! - Rebecca McInroy, KUT 90.5 FM Austin, TX


"KUT's Views and Brews: Women in the Jazz Conversation, July 7, 2011"

There are many ways to approach the topic of women in the jazz conversation. It would be easy to start with the great female jazz vocalists whose names are now synonymous with the genre, like Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald, but the truth is that women have never been strangers on the jazz stage in any element of performance. Think of saxophonists like Vi Burnside and Margaret Backstrom or, more recently, pianists like Hazel Scott and Eliane Elias.

At our Views and Brews discussion on the topic of Women in the Jazz Conversation our wonderful panel tried to hit all the right notes in an hour that flew by all too quickly. KUT’s Jay Trachtenberg and Laurie Gallardo were joined on stage by the incredible talents of singers Akina Adderley and Pamela Hart along with the amazing Dr. James Polk on keys for an evening of conversation and music that left everyone wanting more.

Dr. James Polk is both a master keyboardist and storyteller. He talked of Cab Calloway’s older sister Blanche, who actually was an accomplished bandleader before her younger brother Cab, who often credited her as his inspiration for entering show business. Cab become a jazz legend in part thanks to the jazz arrangements, “the book,” that Blanche used with her band. Dr. Polk also entertained the audience in the Cactus Cafe with his stories about the lessons he learned while playing for Marla Gibbs in Los Angeles.

Akina Adderley, grand-niece of the legendary Cannonball Adderly, told us of a conversation she had with a family friend by the name of Nancy Wilson, (yes! that Nancy Wilson) who told her that it wasn’t all that tough for her to break into the business as a jazz vocalist because “she just showed up and could play.” The point being, that in jazz it never seemed to be whether you were a woman or a man but whether or not you “could hang.”

Austin’s first lady of jazz, Pamela Hart, talked about her early days as a singer. Her inspirations, her challenges and her idols, and shared stories about learning how to talk the jazz language. It’s a language she now helps teach to other aspiring performers through her Women in Jazz Concert Series every year at the Paramount Theatre here in Austin. This year’s Summer Jam is coming up July 23rd.

The night of storytelling and conversation mixed with the breathtaking performances by both Akina and Pamela, who wowed the captivated crowd with Dr. Polk backing them brilliantly, was truly magical. As Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote:

“The millions, that around us are rushing into life, cannot always be fed on the sere remains of foreign harvests. Events, actions arise, that must be sung, that will sing themselves. Who can doubt, that poetry will revive and lead in a new age, as the star in the constellation Harp, which now flames in our zenith, astronomers announce, shall one day be the pole-star for a thousand years?”

It was a night to remember and if you couldn’t make it, you can listen to the full audio recording here. Be sure to check back to watch highlights of the event on video soon.

Coming up this month at Views and Brews we’ll touch on politics and Tennessee Williams and we have more of our jazz conversation series when rabbi Neil Blumofe returns in August with a look at the music of Miles Davis. Stay tuned!! - Rebecca McInroy, KUT 90.5 FM Austin, TX


"A Change of Hart - Feb 1998"

Change of Hart

By Christopher Hess
http://weeklywire.com/ww/02-23-98/austin_music_feature1.html

FEBRUARY 23, 1998: Smooth jazz is the work of the devil. It is a ravenous creature, born of something real and pure, that now seeks to devour its progenitor - a beautiful, graceful animal that unwittingly crapped out a spore, which somehow, through bizarre genetic experimentation no doubt performed in a marketing boardroom in Pasadena, replicated its DNA. This twisted progeny mutated and mutated again, and in a dark spasm of punctuated equilibrium, assumed the form of the monster it is today. Ever hungry, the beast keeps growing. "New Adult Contemporary" (also called "Urban Contemporary" in another particularly meaningless example of ad copy) is more a radio format than a music. It's a format that grows by the minute, expanding over the course of a few short years from a handful of stations in huge markets like Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles to chase hot on the heels of the wildly successful AAA format (like our own KGSR) and have a pronounced presence in every major market. Today, there are well over 80 NAC stations in the US, and that number is rising. Fast.

"Smooth jazz" is, first and foremost, grossly misnamed. Technically speaking, it's not jazz at all. It embodies none of the elements that make jazz jazz. Improvisation, the heart of traditional jazz, is mostly non-existent with the exception of the same obligatory solo of any pop song. Syncopation and rubato modifications are also absent, though token elements of them may be used to give a song a "jazzy" feel.

Arrangements, as they apply to "smooth jazz," are closer to R&B and pop music, the main instrument creating more of a lyrical line than any sort of improvised melody. What lyricism and melody do exist within the form is usually built around the sounds of electric instruments; plucked and funky electric bass lines replace the fat (not phat) notes of the upright or double-bass, synthesizers and effects-laden keyboards fill the space usually reserved for piano, and drums are much more regularly timed and - horror of horrors - even programmed.

When speaking of "smooth jazz," names like Kenny G. and Yanni jump to mind and fill the mouth with a sinister bile. The genre does have its luminaries, artists worthy of respect for their compositions and technical expertise - musicians like Pat Metheny and David Sanborn - but for the most part, this is flaccid, easy-listening, mid-tempo music with a very short life span. Traditional jazz and "smooth jazz" enjoy separate existences on different frequencies and in different CD collections. Therefore, when the two come together in the close quarters of a single album, eyebrows will raise.

"I made the record kind of eclectic on purpose," says Pamela Hart, slowly beginning an explanation that she seemed prepared to make. "I didn't want to be labeled. I don't mind being labeled a jazz singer - that's what [the album] will be filed under - but a lot of the tunes are borderline, mostly for marketing purposes. I had to put a little commercialism in it to get airplay, because everything is smooth jazz these days. To get a foot in the door, I put some of that smooth jazz, that kind of pop jazz, on the CD."


photograph by Diane Watts


Hart is guardedly excited about May I Come In?, her self-released debut that's due out in time for the South by Southwest music conference, during which the local singer will have a showcase. It's a huge step for any musician to offer the public their first completed work representing his or her artistic ability and aesthetic vision. Once it's out there, once people start listening to it, a musical persona begins to form in the public mind, and that becomes identity.

Not that Hart doesn't already have a local identity. She has lived and performed in Austin for about 12 years, building a reputation as a compelling voice of traditional jazz. Her first gigs were indicative of the road she would follow. "When I started singing, doing some stuff for U.T., they had this Cotton Club review and I did a Billie Holiday thing," remembers Hart. "I was stuck on Billie Holiday for years."

Smiling at the recollection of her youthful devotion to Lady Day, Hart also lists Ella Fitzgerald and Nancy Wilson as foundation influences and performers who shaped her future. Moving to Texas in 1982 and later attending Southwest Texas University in San Marcos in pursuit of her MBA (which she received in '91), Hart decided to devote herself to singing. "I was gonna give myself two years to get serious," she recalls. "I thought I was serious at the time, but I didn't know enough about this business to be serious. I didn't know what it took."

Her first effort produced a four-song demo tape that, though far behind her now in vocal ability, showed the essence of Hart the jazz singer. On it, the power of her voice is readily apparent, so much so that it proved a driving force i - Christopher Hess - Austin Chronicle


"A Change of Hart - Feb 1998"

Change of Hart

By Christopher Hess
http://weeklywire.com/ww/02-23-98/austin_music_feature1.html

FEBRUARY 23, 1998: Smooth jazz is the work of the devil. It is a ravenous creature, born of something real and pure, that now seeks to devour its progenitor - a beautiful, graceful animal that unwittingly crapped out a spore, which somehow, through bizarre genetic experimentation no doubt performed in a marketing boardroom in Pasadena, replicated its DNA. This twisted progeny mutated and mutated again, and in a dark spasm of punctuated equilibrium, assumed the form of the monster it is today. Ever hungry, the beast keeps growing. "New Adult Contemporary" (also called "Urban Contemporary" in another particularly meaningless example of ad copy) is more a radio format than a music. It's a format that grows by the minute, expanding over the course of a few short years from a handful of stations in huge markets like Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles to chase hot on the heels of the wildly successful AAA format (like our own KGSR) and have a pronounced presence in every major market. Today, there are well over 80 NAC stations in the US, and that number is rising. Fast.

"Smooth jazz" is, first and foremost, grossly misnamed. Technically speaking, it's not jazz at all. It embodies none of the elements that make jazz jazz. Improvisation, the heart of traditional jazz, is mostly non-existent with the exception of the same obligatory solo of any pop song. Syncopation and rubato modifications are also absent, though token elements of them may be used to give a song a "jazzy" feel.

Arrangements, as they apply to "smooth jazz," are closer to R&B and pop music, the main instrument creating more of a lyrical line than any sort of improvised melody. What lyricism and melody do exist within the form is usually built around the sounds of electric instruments; plucked and funky electric bass lines replace the fat (not phat) notes of the upright or double-bass, synthesizers and effects-laden keyboards fill the space usually reserved for piano, and drums are much more regularly timed and - horror of horrors - even programmed.

When speaking of "smooth jazz," names like Kenny G. and Yanni jump to mind and fill the mouth with a sinister bile. The genre does have its luminaries, artists worthy of respect for their compositions and technical expertise - musicians like Pat Metheny and David Sanborn - but for the most part, this is flaccid, easy-listening, mid-tempo music with a very short life span. Traditional jazz and "smooth jazz" enjoy separate existences on different frequencies and in different CD collections. Therefore, when the two come together in the close quarters of a single album, eyebrows will raise.

"I made the record kind of eclectic on purpose," says Pamela Hart, slowly beginning an explanation that she seemed prepared to make. "I didn't want to be labeled. I don't mind being labeled a jazz singer - that's what [the album] will be filed under - but a lot of the tunes are borderline, mostly for marketing purposes. I had to put a little commercialism in it to get airplay, because everything is smooth jazz these days. To get a foot in the door, I put some of that smooth jazz, that kind of pop jazz, on the CD."


photograph by Diane Watts


Hart is guardedly excited about May I Come In?, her self-released debut that's due out in time for the South by Southwest music conference, during which the local singer will have a showcase. It's a huge step for any musician to offer the public their first completed work representing his or her artistic ability and aesthetic vision. Once it's out there, once people start listening to it, a musical persona begins to form in the public mind, and that becomes identity.

Not that Hart doesn't already have a local identity. She has lived and performed in Austin for about 12 years, building a reputation as a compelling voice of traditional jazz. Her first gigs were indicative of the road she would follow. "When I started singing, doing some stuff for U.T., they had this Cotton Club review and I did a Billie Holiday thing," remembers Hart. "I was stuck on Billie Holiday for years."

Smiling at the recollection of her youthful devotion to Lady Day, Hart also lists Ella Fitzgerald and Nancy Wilson as foundation influences and performers who shaped her future. Moving to Texas in 1982 and later attending Southwest Texas University in San Marcos in pursuit of her MBA (which she received in '91), Hart decided to devote herself to singing. "I was gonna give myself two years to get serious," she recalls. "I thought I was serious at the time, but I didn't know enough about this business to be serious. I didn't know what it took."

Her first effort produced a four-song demo tape that, though far behind her now in vocal ability, showed the essence of Hart the jazz singer. On it, the power of her voice is readily apparent, so much so that it proved a driving force i - Christopher Hess - Austin Chronicle


"AWTW Austinwoman Talks with Pamela Hart"

Austinwoman Magazing discusses Pamela Hart's singing career and her vision of the Women in Jazz Association, Inc. in its 14th year history. - Austinwoman Magazine


"Enjoy Life Magazine - Pamela Hart - Nov 15, 2008"

http://www.enjoylifenews.com/musicbox.htm

Interview with Pamela Hart published November 15, 2008 Written by Lakesha Woods

Pamela Hart was raised in a household that was very musical. Pamela says, "My household in my early life was very musical. My mother was very musical, if she wasn't singing while she was working she was playing music. She played Coltrane and Miles Davis but she loved the vocalist so she played Nancy Wilson, Sarah Vaughn and Dinah Washington. She recalls being 5 years old and learning Nancy Wilson's "I had a Ball". Pamela says once her mother heard her singing the song she encouraged her to sing whenever company would come around. She says that her talent was really developed by mimicking great singers. However, it wasn't until long after her teen years and school days that she realized singing would be her life. She rediscovered the burring desire for music after she moved to Austin, Texas at the age of 25. It was in Austin that she took an interest in a band and she wanted to work with them. Before hand many thoughts of pursuing the dream came and went but Pamela expresses that her urning to become a singer eventually out weighed years of contemplating and she was finally lead to her answer the called to Jazz. I asked Pamela if she considered Jazz as a way of life. Pamela said, It takes a certain intelligence to listen to jazz and it takes a person who get it. Jazz it chooses you". "With Jazz its a chemistry you plan on the music being correct but you can't plan on some breaks happening or jiving with somebody. You have to be willing to expose yourself so people can see who you are trying to be.


Her impact has been great on the city of Austin. So great that she carries an enormous title which follows her and has yet to be taken. She's known as "Austin's First Lady of Jazz". Pamela, is gracious about having such an honor but she didn't hesitate to give her self just a few kudos. She's opened for contemporary artist such as Kirk Whalum, and Nancy Wilson whom she sang a duet with in 2000. Pamela giggles and gets a little giddy at the mention of Ms. Wilson's name. She said, "Nancy Wilson is one of my favorite jazz singers and when I was on stage with her I felt like I was five years old all over again". Pamela went on to say that the experience was one that she will never forget and that Ms. Wilson made her feel very comfortable on the stage.

Amazing as she is as a Jazz singer she's also an amazing inspiration to aspiring women in the music industry. She inspires others to follow their dreams and to hone their crafts through an organization that call Women in Jazz. Pamela Hart established the Women in Jazz Project and along with her husband Kevin Hart they have been sponsoring the Women in Jazz Project since 1994. Each year, the producers of Women in Jazz conduct workshops that teach aspiring vocalist on how to master practical performance techniques. The workshops are very intimate and the class size is normally about the size of a grade school teacher's class (about 30 people).

I asked Pamela what would she like Enjoy Life Readers and her fans to know and she said, "I want them to know that I'm coming their way. It took years to get over some fears about getting out but I want them to know that Jazz is alive and well. I want them to hear how Pam Hart delivers".
- Lakesha Woods


"Pamela Hart: Austin's First Lady of Jazz"

"Pamela Hart's performances are the epitome of grace and style. From the minute she begins to sing, her perfect pitch and soothing, clear vocals transport her audience into a relaxed space where time and outside worries are forgotten. It is all about the music from that moment on."

--Deborah Hamilton-Lynne

http://www.pamelahart.com/press_files/AWM2005.pdf
- Austin Woman Magazine September 2005


"Austin's First Lady of Jazz Takes The Cover! Nov 2008"

Austin's First Lady of Jazz Takes The Cover!

http://www.jazzreview.com/article/review-6632.html

Recently, Austin's First Lady of Jazz, Ms. Pamela Hart had the wonderful pleasure to "sit down" with Ms. Lakesha S. Woods, Editor of Enjoy Life Magazine for an engaging and enlightening conversation. Ms. Woods was able to accurately and sincerely capture the essence of the amazing Pamela Hart and the results of the "sit down" are featured in the latest edition of Enjoy Life Magazine. We invite you to read Pamela's feature in the monthly Music Box Feature at http://www.enjoylifenews.com/musicbox.htm. Pamela said, It takes a certain intelligence to listen to jazz and it takes a person who get it. Jazz it chooses you". "With Jazz its a chemistry you plan on the music being correct but you can't plan on some breaks happening or jiving with somebody. You have to be willing to expose yourself so people can see who you are trying to be. After enjoying the Feature on Pamela, enjoy the other Features available in the Magazine (http://www.enjoylifenews.com/index.htm). With a title like “Enjoy Life Magazine” this automatically prepares the unconscious mind to expect entertainment! Enjoy Life certainly has that part covered with columns like “Music Box” which features celebrities. Unsigned Hype – featuring the aspiring artist. “Relate to Love” addresses relationship issues and offers solutions. Literary Box News delivers community events. “Poets Pad” and “Creatively Written” features poetry and short stories from aspiring writers. The magezine’s latest edition “Game Point” allows readers to transform into viewers by means of a media player which automatically updates and delivers Sports News from well established stations like NBC, FOX & CNN.

Visit other Official Websites dedicated to Pamela at www.PamelaHart.com, www.Myspace.com/PamelaHart and www.CDBaby.com/CD/PamelaHart.
Enjoy The Gift of Music! William Jackson W. Jackson & Associates, LLC Publicity for Ms. Pamela Hart P.O. Box 1307 Round Rock, TX 78680 512-786-2364 (CST) WJacksonAssociates@excite.com
- William Jackson


"Artist First World Radio Interview - June 2008 (link)"

Artist First World Radio - June 2008 (link to Audio byte.
http://66.49.193.35/Music_Special_2008-06-28_Pamela_Hart.mp3 - Scott


"Interview & Performance by Pamela Hart on METV - March 2008 (link)"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIjElvqabBg - Bevu


"Villager Newspaper Article - September 2005"

http://www.pamelahart.com/press_files/Vill2005.pdf - George Hardin


"Music That's Close to Hart's Heart - May 22, 2004"

Austin-American Statesman - 2004
http://www.pamelahart.com/press_files/AAS2004.pdf - Ginger Cowles - Austin American Stateman


"Pamela Hart Album Review"

Unlock Austin http://www.unlockaustin.com/Band/Pamela Hart - Unlock Austin


"Tribeza Magazine Article - February 2002"

Tribeza Magazine Article - February 2002
http://www.pamelahart.com/press_files/TRB2002.pdf - Chalda Maltoff - Tribeza Magazine Article


"Villager Newspaper Article - September 2005"

http://www.pamelahart.com/press_files/Vill2005.pdf - George Hardin


Discography

"May I Come In?" HartBeat - 1998 - (full CD)
"Pamela Hart In-Context" - PBS TV 2009 DVD
"Pamela Hart Live on Smooth" - ME TV 2008 DVD
"Pamela Hart Live - Great American Songbook 2004 HartBeat/AMN
"Merry Christmas" - 4-song Demo - HartBeat 2005
"The Sweetest Sound" 4-Song Demo- HartBeat 2004
"Women in Jazz" - Compilation CD - Jazziz 2000
"I'll Be Home For Kwanzaa - Complilation CD (Bagel Label) 1997
"Songs from the Hart" - 4-song Demo - (Hartbeat) 1993

Photos

Bio

Pamela Hart is highly regarded as Austin, Texas finest jazz vocalist. Noted by Austin Womens Magazine as Austins First Lady of Jazz, audiences rave about Pamelas excellent pitch, clarity and soothing vocal quality. Her warm, clear tones and meticulously controlled pitch carry an illusion of effortlessness--Tribeza Magazine. Her sultry rendition of classic jazz standards and contemporary music wins immediate acceptance by any audience. Born in Los Angeles, California, Pamela moved to Austin, Texas in 1982.

In addition to regular appearances at Austin clubs, restaurants, live music broadcasts, weddings, banquets/parties and festivals, Pamela and her husband Kevin Hart have produced (and she has performed in) the semi-annual Women in Jazz Concert Seriesthe greatest events for female jazz musicians in Texas1994 through 2013. The series also includes a Vocal Performance Workshop where Pamela and other professional vocalists and musicians share performance techniques, communicating with musicians and many other aspects of jazz singing. Pamela is a complete package, bringing excellent vocals, professionalism and a great attitude to her audience.

Throughout her singing career, Pamela has repeatedly opened shows for, and shared stages with, many popular artists including Miss Nancy Wilson (2000, 2001), David Fathead Newman (1997, 2008), Dianne Reeves (1999, 2001), Kirk Whalum (1998), Rachelle Ferrell (2005), Patrice Rushen and Teri Lyn Carrington (2007).

In addition to regular appearances in local venues, live music broadcasts, weddings, and banquets, Pamela and her husband Kevin Hart have produced (and she performed in) the annual Women in Jazz Concert Series in Austin, 1994-2012.

- September 2013, performed at the Riverbend Centre for the Arts in Austin, TX, as opening act for Sax And The City concert featuring Marion Meadows, Jessy J, and Paul Taylor.

- April 14, 2012, and April 5, 2013, performed at Stateside at the Paramount with the Jazz in Pink band, featuring Gail Johnson, Althea Rene and Karen Briggs. She produced the You Can Sing! Vocal Performance Workshop at the Stateside Theatre where Austin youth learned to perform with the James Polk Band, and produced their own concert. She also produced the Jazz in Motion Youth Concert at Reagan High School P.A.C. consisting of performances from youth age 9 to 24.

- July 23, 2011, performed at the Paramount Theatre as opening act for "Summer Jam featuring Norman Brown and Richard Elliot", in Austin, TX with Charmin Greene, Fredrick Sander, Nick Lewis, Kevin Scott, Jake Langley, Cynthia Lewis, and Shenice McKissick

- August 15, 2010, performed at the One World Theatre on June 13, 2010, "It's Ella: A Tribute to Ella Fitzgerald" in Austin, TX, with the William Menefield James Polk Quartert, Karan Chavis and Willie Nicholson.

- June 13, 2010, performed at the One World Theatre on June 13, 2010, "Lady Day: A Tribute to Billie Holiday" in Austin, TX, with the James Polk Sextet.

- June 2009, Pamela Hart performed in the "Sax, Strings, & Scats Concert", which also featured Joyce Cooling, Pamela Williams, and Althea Rene.

- June 2008, Pamela was featured in A Tribute to Damita Jo DeBlanc, a crowd-pleasing performance.

- May 2004, Pamela performed in another solo concert The Great American Songbook.

- May 2003 the Women in Jazz concert consisted of a solo performance by Pamela Hart of Blue Gardenia: A Tribute to Billie Holiday. In addition to singing an outstanding tribute to Billie Holiday, Pamela had them on their feet again in Encore Performances in September 2003.

- November 2008, Pamela opened the Jazz at St James Concert Series for David Fathead Newman, and had the audience raving after her performance, including a standing ovation after she sang Angelitos Negros in Spanish.

- July 2001, Pamela completed a European jazz festival tour, including the Montreaux, Vienne, and Juan des Pins Jazz festivals, with the Texas State University Jazz Band, directed by the legendary Dr. James Polk.

Pamela became a usual IAJE attendee and performer with the African American Jazz Caucus Band in New York City, Long Beach, CA, and Toronto, Canada. Earlier in her career, Pamela completed European jazz festival tours including the Montreaux, Vienne, and Juan des Pins Jazz festivals, with the Texas State University Jazz Band, directed by the legendary Dr. James Polk.

With her performances, the Women in Jazz Concerts and Vocal Performance Workshops, Pamela is making a difference in the jazz scene in Austin. Her debut CD, May I Come In? released under the HartBeat Productions label was reviewed in the June 1999 JAZZIZ Magazine. In addition, Ever Blue, a track from the CD is included on the JAZZIZ June 1999 CD and "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" on the July 2000 CD.

Pamela Hart is a beautiful woman who steals the heart of a

Band Members