G.B. Parker
Gig Seeker Pro

G.B. Parker

| SELF

| SELF
Band Americana Folk

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Oct
28
G.B. Parker @ DC9

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Aug
22
G.B. Parker @ Ebenezer's

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Jul
19
G.B. Parker @ Ebenezer's

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

Music

Press


As someone who despises modern country, but adores the '40s and '50s stuff, I have some time for Knoxville, TN's Mr. Parker. He's got no Stetson, and he doesn't dress the part either--in fact, with his upturned quiff, he looks a lot like a young Morrissey in the Smiths days--but there's no mistaking his homespun, old-style country heart. "You think you broke my will/You broke my heart/That's just a start/So get in line Caroline/I'm gonna show you how it feels/Wasting time, wasting time/On a love that isn't real" is the kind of sweet, saddened, knowing lyric sung with a breaking croon that is full and slightly twangy but never corny and always quite persuasive--in fact, he blows away Tritt, McGraw, Keith, Hill, Brooks, Twain, Tucker, Black, and all their miserable ilk, with just his vibrant voice alone. His delectable songs are simple, like my favorite George Jones tunes, but the guitars ring and pick perfectly like a Buck Owens ditty ("Disaster Waiting to Happen"), and "A Heart is a Terrible Thing to Break" could be a Patsy Cline, early Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, or Hank Williams song. And just to show he can, the closing "Kathleen" is more of a honky tonk C&W blues-country stomp. I didn't expect to like this, and you might not either. We'll both be surprised then. - Big Takeover


As someone who despises modern country, but adores the '40s and '50s stuff, I have some time for Knoxville, TN's Mr. Parker. He's got no Stetson, and he doesn't dress the part either--in fact, with his upturned quiff, he looks a lot like a young Morrissey in the Smiths days--but there's no mistaking his homespun, old-style country heart. "You think you broke my will/You broke my heart/That's just a start/So get in line Caroline/I'm gonna show you how it feels/Wasting time, wasting time/On a love that isn't real" is the kind of sweet, saddened, knowing lyric sung with a breaking croon that is full and slightly twangy but never corny and always quite persuasive--in fact, he blows away Tritt, McGraw, Keith, Hill, Brooks, Twain, Tucker, Black, and all their miserable ilk, with just his vibrant voice alone. His delectable songs are simple, like my favorite George Jones tunes, but the guitars ring and pick perfectly like a Buck Owens ditty ("Disaster Waiting to Happen"), and "A Heart is a Terrible Thing to Break" could be a Patsy Cline, early Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, or Hank Williams song. And just to show he can, the closing "Kathleen" is more of a honky tonk C&W blues-country stomp. I didn't expect to like this, and you might not either. We'll both be surprised then. - Big Takeover


"In a business where jadedness and cynicism often creeps in wordlessly, Parker's passion for his music is refreshing and infectious. He has the looks of a heartbreaker and the soul of a songwriter. The vocals are effortless, the inflections expressive, youthful and energy driven, and the music admirably uncluttered. This five song EP is a noteworthy introduction to a talent that's on the brink." - Take Country Back


"In a business where jadedness and cynicism often creeps in wordlessly, Parker's passion for his music is refreshing and infectious. He has the looks of a heartbreaker and the soul of a songwriter. The vocals are effortless, the inflections expressive, youthful and energy driven, and the music admirably uncluttered. This five song EP is a noteworthy introduction to a talent that's on the brink." - Take Country Back


If I had to sum up Greg Parker's debut EP On The Break in one word or less, it would be sincere. Parker's twangy country twang makes it quite clear that he grew up on good ole Country & Western, but he's not retro. He's got a style that will remind you why Dwight Yoakam's early records are really undervalued by today's 'hip' scene. Throw in a little bit o' Hank Senior, and you'll pretty much have an understanding of where he's coming from. The songs are mellow but not lazy, his voice is twangy but not annoying, and his band is swinging. "Get In Line Caroline" and "A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break" are really good slower dance numbers, too. He's got a strong yet sensitive singing voice, which makes these sad-eyed songs even better. When he rocks out on "Disaster Waiting to Happen" and "Kathleen," he's fabulous, and he proves his music isn't caught in some retro country act. On The Break is just a fun country gem from a talent who will most likely deliver a really great debut album, but as it stands, this EP is a really great record on its own, which makes me think that the debut album's gonna be a cinch--and probably a hit! - Mundane Sounds


If I had to sum up Greg Parker's debut EP On The Break in one word or less, it would be sincere. Parker's twangy country twang makes it quite clear that he grew up on good ole Country & Western, but he's not retro. He's got a style that will remind you why Dwight Yoakam's early records are really undervalued by today's 'hip' scene. Throw in a little bit o' Hank Senior, and you'll pretty much have an understanding of where he's coming from. The songs are mellow but not lazy, his voice is twangy but not annoying, and his band is swinging. "Get In Line Caroline" and "A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break" are really good slower dance numbers, too. He's got a strong yet sensitive singing voice, which makes these sad-eyed songs even better. When he rocks out on "Disaster Waiting to Happen" and "Kathleen," he's fabulous, and he proves his music isn't caught in some retro country act. On The Break is just a fun country gem from a talent who will most likely deliver a really great debut album, but as it stands, this EP is a really great record on its own, which makes me think that the debut album's gonna be a cinch--and probably a hit! - Mundane Sounds


“I write according to the mood I'm in”, says singer/songwriter Greg Parker. “Sometimes I'm in a country mood, other times I'm in a blues mood, a soul mood, or a ballad mood. Then other times I'm just in a mood. Oftentimes that's when I write my best songs.” Which, on the strength of this five track EP, can only lead me to believe that beneath that be-quiffed angelic face, Mr. Parker is one bad tempered mofo and not the young Cliff Richard he resembles. I say this because there are some really good songs here, and this is coming from someone who, with the notable exception of Hank Williams, is never, ever in a country mood!

On The Break opens strongly with Get In Line Caroline, a lovely little number that doesn’t so much take you down those country roads as lead you to some mythical 50’s utopia. It’s as old-fashioned as, well, Windows 95, but it’s still a great song with beautiful vocals and big echo-ey guitars. The jaunty Disaster Waiting To Happen follows with its skiffle-like beat. But, for all its apparent chirpiness, a closer listen to the lyrics tell a different story. “I’ve never known that kind of pain”, he sings. He mightn’t have done before, but you believe he has now.

A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break is slower, similar in mood to Chris Isaak’s Wicked Game until a last minute build-up. Subsequently, Molly Dear opens with a delicious finger picking guitar intro, before Greg tells us how much he wants Molly to be his. He wants to take Molly to Memphis, to the river, to… well you get the feeling that the place isn’t important. I’m sure Greg would take her to the pet food section of the local supermarket as long as he could sneak a few private moments with her. Yet, despite him making it plain that his intentions are honourable by offering to take her to the local Justice of the Peace, you get the impression that Molly is always going to remain outside Parker’s reach. Indeed, for all his good looks, I can imagine Parker making a career out of telling us he’s always unlucky in love. He does it so well.

On The Break closes with Kathleen, which is undoubtedly the finest song here. Although the most up-tempo track on the EP, it’s as heartfelt as ever, except this time Parker’s yearnings and tasty falsetto "ooohhhs" are augmented by altogether more thrashy guitars.

So if, like me, you think that country music is all about blokes in cowboy hats telling us that he caught his loved one in bed with his best friend and all he’s got left in his life is his dog (or is the other way around?), then let me assure you there’s none of that silliness here. And if you’re still unsure about purchasing On The Break, then why not buy a copy for your country loving aunt and uncle, give it a sneaky listen and then keep it for yourself? Or better still, buy another, because these are quality songs performed by an exceptional singer. Long may his bad moods continue! - Evilsponge.com


“I write according to the mood I'm in”, says singer/songwriter Greg Parker. “Sometimes I'm in a country mood, other times I'm in a blues mood, a soul mood, or a ballad mood. Then other times I'm just in a mood. Oftentimes that's when I write my best songs.” Which, on the strength of this five track EP, can only lead me to believe that beneath that be-quiffed angelic face, Mr. Parker is one bad tempered mofo and not the young Cliff Richard he resembles. I say this because there are some really good songs here, and this is coming from someone who, with the notable exception of Hank Williams, is never, ever in a country mood!

On The Break opens strongly with Get In Line Caroline, a lovely little number that doesn’t so much take you down those country roads as lead you to some mythical 50’s utopia. It’s as old-fashioned as, well, Windows 95, but it’s still a great song with beautiful vocals and big echo-ey guitars. The jaunty Disaster Waiting To Happen follows with its skiffle-like beat. But, for all its apparent chirpiness, a closer listen to the lyrics tell a different story. “I’ve never known that kind of pain”, he sings. He mightn’t have done before, but you believe he has now.

A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break is slower, similar in mood to Chris Isaak’s Wicked Game until a last minute build-up. Subsequently, Molly Dear opens with a delicious finger picking guitar intro, before Greg tells us how much he wants Molly to be his. He wants to take Molly to Memphis, to the river, to… well you get the feeling that the place isn’t important. I’m sure Greg would take her to the pet food section of the local supermarket as long as he could sneak a few private moments with her. Yet, despite him making it plain that his intentions are honourable by offering to take her to the local Justice of the Peace, you get the impression that Molly is always going to remain outside Parker’s reach. Indeed, for all his good looks, I can imagine Parker making a career out of telling us he’s always unlucky in love. He does it so well.

On The Break closes with Kathleen, which is undoubtedly the finest song here. Although the most up-tempo track on the EP, it’s as heartfelt as ever, except this time Parker’s yearnings and tasty falsetto "ooohhhs" are augmented by altogether more thrashy guitars.

So if, like me, you think that country music is all about blokes in cowboy hats telling us that he caught his loved one in bed with his best friend and all he’s got left in his life is his dog (or is the other way around?), then let me assure you there’s none of that silliness here. And if you’re still unsure about purchasing On The Break, then why not buy a copy for your country loving aunt and uncle, give it a sneaky listen and then keep it for yourself? Or better still, buy another, because these are quality songs performed by an exceptional singer. Long may his bad moods continue! - Evilsponge.com


Greg Parker woos all the ladies on his EP "On the Break" as he croons, essentially as a one-man band, to songs that have that vintage, early rock n roll sound, when it was closer to its country roots. Full of feeling, Parker retains the traditional air of innocence as he sings about respectable things, such as breaking hearts.

Slowly shimmering guitar chords complete the authentic 50s feel of "Get In Line Caroline." The tapping, up tempo rhythm of "Disaster Waiting To Happen" is accented by harmonica while there is an understated guitar solo on the slow to mid tempo country rock saunter "A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break." "Molly Dear" is a gentle acoustic song that makes you listen closer before the upbeat, up tempo rockabilly of "Kathleen."

Parker's likable sound might not be completely unique, but it is a refreshing change of pace. His straightforward delivery with the solid instrumentation sound refined, not overdone. Parker shows a promising future with his "On The Break" EP. - Pluginmusic.com


Greg Parker woos all the ladies on his EP "On the Break" as he croons, essentially as a one-man band, to songs that have that vintage, early rock n roll sound, when it was closer to its country roots. Full of feeling, Parker retains the traditional air of innocence as he sings about respectable things, such as breaking hearts.

Slowly shimmering guitar chords complete the authentic 50s feel of "Get In Line Caroline." The tapping, up tempo rhythm of "Disaster Waiting To Happen" is accented by harmonica while there is an understated guitar solo on the slow to mid tempo country rock saunter "A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break." "Molly Dear" is a gentle acoustic song that makes you listen closer before the upbeat, up tempo rockabilly of "Kathleen."

Parker's likable sound might not be completely unique, but it is a refreshing change of pace. His straightforward delivery with the solid instrumentation sound refined, not overdone. Parker shows a promising future with his "On The Break" EP. - Pluginmusic.com


Sometimes great things come in small doses, and that's the case with Nashvillian Greg Parker's EP On The Break (Whitehall). Though he only does five songs, none of them as long as four minutes, Parker's spirit, verve and energy turns each one into a memorable, joyous statement. "Get In Line Caroline" has the kind of spunk and fire similar to '50s rockabilly, while "Disaster Waiting To Happen" and "A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break" are riveting heartache and pain numbers, songs you normally only hear these days on classic country stations or specialty shows. Parker not only did most of the writing and all the vocals, he also produced and arranged everything except for some nice electric guitar lines provided on "A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break" by Adam Hill. Though he recorded and mixed it in his home studio, the sonic quality is more than acceptable. However, it's the performances that make this EP a highlight. On The Break deserves support and attention from everyone claiming to enjoy undiluted country. - Nashville City Paper


Sometimes great things come in small doses, and that's the case with Nashvillian Greg Parker's EP On The Break (Whitehall). Though he only does five songs, none of them as long as four minutes, Parker's spirit, verve and energy turns each one into a memorable, joyous statement. "Get In Line Caroline" has the kind of spunk and fire similar to '50s rockabilly, while "Disaster Waiting To Happen" and "A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break" are riveting heartache and pain numbers, songs you normally only hear these days on classic country stations or specialty shows. Parker not only did most of the writing and all the vocals, he also produced and arranged everything except for some nice electric guitar lines provided on "A Heart Is A Terrible Thing To Break" by Adam Hill. Though he recorded and mixed it in his home studio, the sonic quality is more than acceptable. However, it's the performances that make this EP a highlight. On The Break deserves support and attention from everyone claiming to enjoy undiluted country. - Nashville City Paper


"With modern country becoming nearly indistinguishable from bad pop rock, it's refreshing when someone like Greg Parker comes along. Blessed with a rich, tremulous twang, Parker's musical sensibilities are rooted firmly in vintage country with an electric twist. It's like hearing Hank Williams or the Statler Brothers play the House of Blues -- not a bad way to spend a night. Because the disc clocks in at just under fifteen minutes, it makes for almost compulsive use of your disc player's 'repeat' button. More, please." - Splendid


Imagine if Scott Miller got drunk with Hank Williams (the elder one, not the Bocephus one), then called up Lyle Lovett to come over for a nightcap and some White Castles. That's a start on what to expect from the EP On the Break from Knoxville's Greg Parker.
Parker's style recalls what country was back in the 1950s; it's as far removed from commercialism and the pop-country of today as anything called a country album could be. Parker's heartbroken longing comes out in subtle tones, his wan voice giving us just enough emotion to let us know he's really feeling all the heartbreak he's singing about.
"Get in Line Caroline" kicks off the EP and uses gradually building twangy guitar strokes that one could almost consider purposely overdone. Nevertheless, the effect is brilliant. My favorite tune on the album is "Disaster Waiting to Happen," a s**t-kickin' romp about a heartbreaker of a girl whom he'll continue to follow no matter how badly she beats him down.
That three of the five songs contain female names (see also "Molly Dear" and "Kathleen") speaks volumes; this is an old-time crooner at work, a guy who still thinks music is more than just a way to make a buck. When sincerity meets a guitar, the result is usually something worth keeping. And when you've got songs that sound like a slow train chugging along with a title like "A Heart is a Terrible Thing to Break," you know you're getting something real. - Louisville Music News


Imagine if Scott Miller got drunk with Hank Williams (the elder one, not the Bocephus one), then called up Lyle Lovett to come over for a nightcap and some White Castles. That's a start on what to expect from the EP On the Break from Knoxville's Greg Parker.
Parker's style recalls what country was back in the 1950s; it's as far removed from commercialism and the pop-country of today as anything called a country album could be. Parker's heartbroken longing comes out in subtle tones, his wan voice giving us just enough emotion to let us know he's really feeling all the heartbreak he's singing about.
"Get in Line Caroline" kicks off the EP and uses gradually building twangy guitar strokes that one could almost consider purposely overdone. Nevertheless, the effect is brilliant. My favorite tune on the album is "Disaster Waiting to Happen," a s**t-kickin' romp about a heartbreaker of a girl whom he'll continue to follow no matter how badly she beats him down.
That three of the five songs contain female names (see also "Molly Dear" and "Kathleen") speaks volumes; this is an old-time crooner at work, a guy who still thinks music is more than just a way to make a buck. When sincerity meets a guitar, the result is usually something worth keeping. And when you've got songs that sound like a slow train chugging along with a title like "A Heart is a Terrible Thing to Break," you know you're getting something real. - Louisville Music News


In the world of music, New York gave birth to Punk, Chicago developed Garage, Motown was named for Detroit. But none of these fine cities are ever as arrogant about their music as Nashville is about its - Country. And while most of it is fodder for a different kind of herd, Nashville artists like Greg Parker make me wish I knew more about country music - a helluva lot more.

Parker's basic musical style (good ol' fashioned honky tonk) and his home state (Tennessee, for those of you who ain't so good at that there reading comprehension) aren't the only things he shares with Mr. Elvis Presley. Apparently, his stunning baritone is paired up with either unfailing charisma or an endearing sense of humor, because according to his press kit, he garners quite a bit of attention from the young ladies. With three out of five songs named for women, and throngs of them regularly attending his gigs, it should be quite obvious he possesses both, God bless him.

Because Parker's swagger (not the drunken kind) on his debut EP, On The Break, is so utterly convincing, I had to check to make sure he wrote all those gosh darn songs all by his lonesome. And, in fact, he did. Well, except for the outstandingly brash "Get In Line Caroline", which he co- authored with his cohort Adam Hill. And though the influence of Roger Miller and Hank Williams is crystal clear on songs like "Molly Dear", what ultimately sets Parker apart is the sense of ownership he exudes over his music. These aren't just conventional, rehashed country hits. Rather, Parker takes what made Music City USA so great back in the day and modernizes it in a fully meaningful way.

Now, go on, git out of here, and git yourself some Parker-style integrity. - Sellout Magazine


In the world of music, New York gave birth to Punk, Chicago developed Garage, Motown was named for Detroit. But none of these fine cities are ever as arrogant about their music as Nashville is about its - Country. And while most of it is fodder for a different kind of herd, Nashville artists like Greg Parker make me wish I knew more about country music - a helluva lot more.

Parker's basic musical style (good ol' fashioned honky tonk) and his home state (Tennessee, for those of you who ain't so good at that there reading comprehension) aren't the only things he shares with Mr. Elvis Presley. Apparently, his stunning baritone is paired up with either unfailing charisma or an endearing sense of humor, because according to his press kit, he garners quite a bit of attention from the young ladies. With three out of five songs named for women, and throngs of them regularly attending his gigs, it should be quite obvious he possesses both, God bless him.

Because Parker's swagger (not the drunken kind) on his debut EP, On The Break, is so utterly convincing, I had to check to make sure he wrote all those gosh darn songs all by his lonesome. And, in fact, he did. Well, except for the outstandingly brash "Get In Line Caroline", which he co- authored with his cohort Adam Hill. And though the influence of Roger Miller and Hank Williams is crystal clear on songs like "Molly Dear", what ultimately sets Parker apart is the sense of ownership he exudes over his music. These aren't just conventional, rehashed country hits. Rather, Parker takes what made Music City USA so great back in the day and modernizes it in a fully meaningful way.

Now, go on, git out of here, and git yourself some Parker-style integrity. - Sellout Magazine


Discography

"More," April 2014
"On The Break" EP, 2004

Photos

Bio

I was born in Leslie County, Kentucky and raised in Knoxville, Tennessee, and I've lived to tell about it. I've been writing songs since I was nine, and my music is deeply influenced by the folk, country, bluegrass, and gospel music I grew up with.

From 2002 through 2009 I lived in Nashville, where I performed under the name Greg Parker. I toured the region and played regularly in Nashville during this period, headlining shows at the 5 Spot (Nashville), the Down Home (Johnson City, Tenn.), Preservation Pub (Knoxville, Tenn.), and The Garage (Winston-Salem, N.C.), and sharing bills with some amazing folks, including Of Montreal, Jon Langford (Mekons, Waco Brothers), Elizabeth Cook, Nikki Sudden, the Farewell Drifters, the everybodyfields, and Chelle Rose.

In 2004 I self-released my debut EP, On The Break. It won positive reviews in The Big Takeover, the Nashville City Paper, Roctober, and several other media outlets.

I relocated to Washington, D.C., in 2009, because that's what idealistic, unemployed people did in 2009, and I still live there today. My new songs often deal with the one-step-forward, two-steps-back direction of our country and my Appalachian homeland.

I recorded at The Bomb Shelter back in Nashville in January 2013 with an incredible cast: Dave Roe (Johnny Cash, Dwight Yoakam) on upright bass; Chris Scruggs (BR-549, M. Ward) on steel guitar; Micah Hulscher (Wanda Jackson) on piano and organ; and Matt Combs (Ray Price, Elizabeth Cook) on fiddle, mandolin, and banjo.

Andrija Tokic, who engineered the Alabama Shakes' debut album at this studio, recorded these live sessions to tape. Ten of these songs now compose the More album, which is available here for a small fee. (More will be officially released in April 2014.) The album was mixed by Don Zientara at the legendary Inner Ear Studios in Arlington, Va.

I still live in D.C. and now perform under the name G.B. Parker because there are just too darn many Greg Parkers out there.