Peter Karp and Sue Foley, He Said - She Said
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Peter Karp and Sue Foley, He Said - She Said

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | INDIE

Nashville, Tennessee, United States | INDIE
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"On He Said, She Said, we have fine singing, fine playing, heartfelt lyrics cast in really nice blues tunes and a narrative that contains depth and maturity."

Some background: When Peter Karp and Sue Foley, both accomplished roots and blues artists, began exchanging emails and letters, they were at first discussing the things they had in common: the loneliness of the road, being away from their homes and families and their love of music. Over a period of time, though, the correspondence grew into something quite different as the singers delved into more personal and deeper ideas. Finally, an album's worth of songs grew out of the correspondence. After road-testing the songs on tour, they went into the studio and made this duet album.

And, Lord, am I glad they did.

Although she made her reputation on a Telecaster, on this set Foley plays acoustic, using both nylon- and steel-stringed guitars, while Karp plays primarily electric and slide. On a couple of cuts, they play acoustic duets. Their styles, instrumentally and vocally, complement each other well, and they sound as if they've been playing together for years, which is not always the case when artists join up for a one-off project.

The writing? The songs leave the immediate situations that spawned them behind; there's no "isn't life on the road a bitch?" material here. Instead they seem to explore the emotions that grew out of the correspondence and a theme emerges: the fear of losing control and going into a situation that contains the promise of as much misery and loss as it does the potential for happiness.

In "Ready for Your Love," Karp sings:

I'm gonna lose everything and I don't give a damn.
You've never seen a happier man.
In a whisper I ask, can I really trust you?
In a whisper I ask, can you trust me too?
You whisper back, We'll see baby -- we'll see what we do.

Foley's reply comes in "I'm Scared:"

I'm scared
So very scared
For so long
Seems like forever
I've wished for you.

For someone who could relieve the doubt
Could straighten me out
Even though I feel you
And the love we have to share,
I'm scared.

This is honest writing and it's characteristic of the quality of the lyrics on this album. On He Said, She Said, we have fine singing, fine playing, heartfelt lyrics cast in really nice blues tunes and a narrative that contains depth and maturity.

Can't ask for more than that. - Rambles


"By the focused sound of this collaboration with singer-guitarist Peter Karp, Sue Foley has become much more her own woman, perfectly willing to share the spotlight with someone else...Long may she shine.""

Twenty years ago, Sue Foley took Austin by storm. The town that worships guitar players--and even has a backlash chapter tagged TMFG--didn't have many female members in its upper echelon. Foley blew in from Canada and threw the town into a tizzy. She got down with the Antone's blues crowd real quick, and looked like national prominence was right around the corner. Several albums and some regional success later, though, Foley pulled up stakes and moved on. By the focused sound of this collaboration with singer-guitarist Peter Karp, she has now sided with the concept of restraint, and that's a good thing. Sue Foley has become much more her own woman, perfectly willing to share the spotlight with someone else. And even if the best songs here are her originals "Danger Lurks" and "Baby Don't Go," that doesn't mean He Said She Said is lacking, because Karp brings his own sharp strengths to the table. When he gets down to the real nitty gritty near the end of the album on "Regret," the results can be devastating. And the last track, "Lost in You," is a gorgeous goodbye from Ms. Foley, her voice an emotional walk through the life she's led, and allows us to hear the opening call of a new star returning to the light. Long may she shine.
- Sonic Boomers


""He Said, She Said" is filled with both depth and charm, and I'll be surprised if it doesn't make a lot of critics' album-of-the-year lists."

Peter Karp and Sue Foley use their guitars and their vocals to flirt and fight their way through "Treat Me Right," a feisty blues tune on their new release, "He Said, She Said." They slink through "Mm Hmm," a jazzy blues with a film noir feel on which steam seeps from both their vocals and the accompanying horns. And they frolic through "Dear Girl," a rockin' love song with a healthy dose of twang.

In fact, Karp and Foley explore a variety of musical styles and emotions on the album. On some, they share the vocal duties. On others, they torch the songs alone. On the ballad "Ready for Your Love," for example, Karp happily wades through heartache and pain as he professes his love for a woman. Foley answers with "Lost in You," a beautiful romantic lullaby.

Even when they're not singing together, Karp and Foley sound as if they're conversing. As a result, "He Said, She Said" is filled with both depth and charm, and I'll be surprised if it doesn't make a lot of critics' album-of-the-year lists.
- Cahl's Juke Joint


"A risky and welcome recording that asks modern blues fans to suspend their preconceptions and listen to the music as it evolves in this new century, and an album to make those fed up with blues clichés hear something truly and beautifully different.""

He Said She Said is a blues album of an entirely different stripe. Guitarist and songwriter Peter Karp was in the midst of recording his excellent Shadows and Cracks. He’d written a duet, and his manager suggested Sue Foley to record the female part. The cut didn’t make the album, but it forged a friendship that was sustained by writing letters and thoughts across continents via email. Foley and Karp began to record individual records, but during a conversation, realized their letters were the basis of terrific songs, and were more relevant to their lives (personal and musical) at the moment, and so they decided to work together instead. The songs, while firmly rooted in the blues tradition, range widely, even though most of them are sung duets. There’s the uptempo, acoustic, quick-step, shuffling, country-blues of Karp’s “Hold on Baby,” with some of his brilliant slide that is an encouragement to a friend having a difficult time. Foley’s beautiful, countrified rag “So Far So Fast” is a love song confessed as secret longing that features her gorgeous fingerpicking, Nate Allen's upright bass, Mike Catapano's skittering snare, and Karp playing a rickety upright piano. There’s some electric material hereto: Karp’s rocking “Wait,” with a B-3 and an electric bassline, and the pair's guitars trading licks. “Scared” is Karp's beautiful, nocturnal, jazzy track with a horn section, with lead vocals by Foley. The sexy “Mm Hmmm” is a duet that could appear in an erotic thriller with its walking, upright bassline and sensual poetry. Foley’s closing “Lost in You” is a ballad of such tenderness and wonder, it seals the album with a kiss -- especially with her nylon-string guitar playing. This is a risky and welcome recording (kudos to Blind Pig for the vision to release it) that asks modern blues fans to suspend their preconceptions and listen to the music as it evolves in this new century, and an album to make those fed up with blues clichés hear something truly and beautifully different. - All Music Guide


"The pairing of Peter Karp and Sue Foley on Blind Pig's He Said She Said was very well conceived, their talent, style and tone are all a solid fit."

"The pairing of Peter Karp and Sue Foley on Blind Pig's He Said She Said was very well conceived, their talent, style and tone are all a solid fit. Peter sings solo on "Wait" with Sue adding some harmony and it is reminiscent of Dylan at his best. Between the slide guitar and Sue's vocals, "Rules of Engagement" sounds like something Bonnie Raitt would do and Peter's vocals are just the right touch."
(Aug 27, 2010) - Washington Blues Blog


""Put [Peter and Sue] together and you've got a great combination. Put them together on a CD titled "He Said She Said' (Blind Pig Records), and you've got one of the most intriguing album projects in a long time.""

I really like Peter Karp. I said so almost a couple years ago. He's a smart singer-songwriter-guitarist whose music pretty much defies categories. I guess it's American roots music with wordplay as primary instrument. I also like Sue Foley, her bluesy style, guitar work and enjoy the way she works a song.I haven't had the pleasure of seeing her live, but Karp turned up at the Pittsburgh Blues Festival a couple years ago with a sparkling set,

Put them together and you've got a great combination. Put them together on a CD titled "He Said She Said' (Blind Pig Records), and you've got one of the most intriguing album projects in a long time.

The album is a set of intimate songs, crafted by Karp and Foley, and based on months of correspondence the two shared while on the long and lonely road of musical touring. They sing them together and separately, in a crackling production, alternating moods and mindsets, but joined in a musical and soulful union to explore some of their most personal thoughts and feelings. That's where the "he said she said" comes in.

It might sound a little offbeat -- and of course it is -- but the thing is, it works. A word of caution, however. This isn't really a blues album, except in a spiritual way, so you won't get a traditional blues approach. Maybe that sounds a liitle too sweet. It's not a silly love song album. It's two perceptive musicians looking inward and crafting bright, sensitive lyrics that explore who they are, and in doing so, play a universal note that we can all hear.

I especially like the sharp lyrical work in Karp's "Wait," and Foley's "Rules of Engagement." And if you're looking for one fine little blues, try Karp's "Valentine's Day." Here's a sample:

And here's a video of the opening track, "Treat Me Right," in which Karp and Foley set the stage for all the musical intercourse that follows. - Pittsburgh Gazette


""The music on He Said, She Said is remarkable. The album goes beyond Blues, and incorporates elements of Jazz, Rock, Folk, Flamenco, and more. Peter Karp and Sue Foley have scored an absolute hit with this record,"

If you follow the Blues Radio Charts that I post in the News Section each Friday, you would have seen that this past Friday, Peter Karp and Sue Foley's He Said She Said was the number one album in the land. What that means is that Blues DJ's from around the country are playing that CD more than any other right now. And, I can tell you without an ounce of dishonesty that the album is worthy of that distinction.

Give a call to Blind Pig Records, too, for having the foresight and the courage to release He Said She Said, as well. Most record companies and artists are concerned with singles, nowadays. "Which songs can we push on radio?" and "How many singles can this album generate?" are questions often asked in this purchase and download a tune at a time world.

What Peter Karp and Sue Foley have crafted with He Said She Said is a concept album that deserves your time and attention, because they literally draw from what has happened in their lives for the songwriting material.

The story of how this album came to fruition is just as strong as the music that was created, here. Peter Karp and Sue Foley were musical aquaintances on their own career paths when they began to correspond via letters and e-mails. Those e-mails, along with the developing relationship between the two artists, grew into the songs found on He Said She Said, and we are all fortunate to be taken on the personal journey that Karp and Foley have walked over these last several years.

At first, you're struck by the album cover, something I never typically highlight in my reviews; but it features each of the two artists on their own, old-school postage stamp. It's a clever nod to the album's back story, and once you're made aware of the significance, you say to yourself "A-Ha!"

All 14 tracks are penned by Peter Karp and Sue Foley, with Karp writing eight of the tunes, and Foley taking credit for six. The pair also co-produced the record, along with Dae Bennett (who also handles harmony vocals and plays drums on "Mm Hmm" and "Valentine's Day.")
He Said She Said kicks off with the Rockin' Blues conversation piece "Treat Me Right," that features Karp and Foley simultaneously talking to both the listener and one another. The two trade guitar licks on several of the tunes on the CD, and this is one of them, with Foley picking her signature paisley Telecaster, while Karp lays down the slide. They also trade vocals on nearly all of the songs, with this being a fun example of Karp's slight growl and Foley's smooth edge complimenting one another perfectly.

"So Far So Fast" is the first of a few tracks that feature Sue Foley creating beautiful acoustic backdrops. Sue sings solo on the track, which is the first of her songwriting credits to appear on He Said She Said. The musical landscape behind her consists of her guitar, upright bass from Nate Allen, and Mike Catapano playing a sparse drum kit very well.

"Wait" is a songwriting juggernaut. Peter Karp winds around the tune with tongue-tying lyrics that make his vocal acrobatics even more impressive. Foley sings only background on the chorus, but it actually adds a depth to the tune. "Rules of Engagement" follows, and it's a swampy rollick with fantastic sounds layered on top of one another. There's a great drum beat from Catapano, Karp and Foley's dueling guitars, and Miles Terrat taking the electric bass for a stroll. At one point in the song, you can actually hear how much fun Peter and Sue are having!

"Hold On Baby" features Jason Ricci providing some terrific harp fills. It's Karp on acoustic and lead vocals, telling the song's subject that although they may be seemingly dealing with their troubles alone, patience and persistence will pay off in the end. Peter Karp has back-to-back songwriting credits twice on He Said She Said, and the first of these instances appears here on the disc. "Hold On Baby" is followed by another of Karp's tunes, the sensual "Mm Hmm." Jason Ricci is featured with a harmonica solo here. There's some great horn arrangements on the tune, as well, provided by Terry Gillespie. Horn players on He Said She Said consist of Willard Riley on trombone, Terry Owen on tenor sax, Rafa Postel on trumpet.

"Danger Lurks" is a beautiful composition by Sue Foley, with a dark undertone. Her vocals laying seductively over her acoustic, almost Spanish-esque, guitar. Gorgeous music from a gorgeous woman. That's followed by Peter Karp's "Ready For Your Love." This song is a personal favorite of mine from He Said She Said. It was also the first track I listened to on the CD. Karp's songwriting is really magical. It almost transcends "story-songs." It's almost like they're "movie-songs," by that I mean I can visualize scenes real or fictitious, that fit with the lyrics.

"Scared" is a Jazzy number with some killer trumpet by Postel. Sue Foley is masterful on the vocal track. "Valentine's Day" is an acoustic duet with some more of Bennett's sparse, but great, drumming behind the band. "Dear Girl" is another display of Peter Karp's lyrical fireworks. The tune is even more fast-paced than "Wait," which makes the job Karp does that much more impressive.

"Baby Don't Go" is a lament from Foley that features more of those amazing sonic layers that are present on several of the songs on He Said She Said. There's electric and acoustic guitar layers, Karp on piano, upright bass thumping, and more. It's like a Dagwood sandwich of sound. (chuckle)

"Regret" is the last tune on He Said She Said penned by Peter Karp. It's an emotional tune with an amazing build to it's heartbroken climax.

"Lost In You" is Sue Foley's last tune on He Said She Said. It's another pretty acoustic number that features Foley on guitar and lead vocals, backed by Peter Karp on blink-and-you've-missed-it piano. It's a great little feature that you have to listen for to pick up on. A beautiful closer.

The music on He Said She Said is remarkable. The album goes beyond Blues, and incorporates elements of Jazz, Rock, Folk, Flamenco, and more. Peter Karp and Sue Foley have scored an absolute hit with this record, and as I mentioned at the beginning of this review, He Said She Said certainly belongs at the top of the nation's collective playlist, right now.

Standout Tracks: Quite Honestly, All Of Them. This Album Is Amazing, And I Would Recommend Purchasing The Entire Disc. It Takes Away From The Personal Experience o Simply Pick And Choose Songs, Here, As Well. Do Yourself A Favor And Buy He Said She Said - Full Time Blues


""This is a great record, absolutely not to be missed. 14 tracks of some of the sexiest, steamiest, dramatic, and comedic tunes I have ever heard from two very different artists."


It’s been a long time since “He” (Peter Karp) left the surroundings of swampy New Jersey and the rural grit of Southern Alabama to take his equal parts “Yankee-Rebel juxtaposition”, as it states in his bio, to travel across the country, bringing his unique blend of roots rock, blues, and folk music to others. His songwriting has been compared to John Hiatt and John Prine and is regarded as one of the best guitarist-piano playing songwriters in the biz. His bio also claims, “Karp repeatedly transfixes his live audiences…with impressive guitar and slide licks infused by his love of Freddie King and Elmore James”.

It’s also been a long time since “She” (Sue Foley) has left the safe confines of small town Canada to come to Austin, Texas at the ripe young age of twenty-one. She quickly established herself amongst the elite blues guitarist in a blues guitarist saturated Austin. She has shared the stage with many masters of the blues and Americana or roots music; artists such as BB King, Buddy Guy, Lucinda Williams, and Tom Petty to name a few. Since then she has gone on to cultivate her own unique blend of the blues-rock genre. After moving back to Canada from Austin, she won the prestigious Juno award for her critically acclaimed CD “Love Coming Down”.

You put these two together and you get their wonderful new collaboration titled, “He Said-She Said” (Blind Pig Records).

This album is, in my opinion, a brilliant concept record, born from letters and emails the two had written to one another over a one-year period. The letters were turned into songs telling the story of their experiences on the road, expressing the loneliness and the difficulties caused by being separated from friends and family while on the road.

The result is a set of fourteen tracks of some of the sexiest, steamiest, dramatic, and comedic tunes I have ever heard from two very different artists. There is chemistry here that I did not know existed when the two were separate acts, which they still are. However, they are touring and performing this “He Said She Said” concept to audiences all over Canada and the states to rave reviews. And it’s no wonder. “He Said She Said” blends the styles of two very versatile performers who took two very different roads that brought them both to the same destination. It could have only been fate that these two were brought together.

The first track “Treat Me Right” is really all about a man and woman finding nothing but fault in the way the two treat each other, alternating back and forth treating the listener to a somewhat comedic argument between the two characters in the song –

“Well you broke down I don’t believe what you said/that’s what she said/Well you broke down I don’t believe what you said/She said it again/I said, Honey I might be dull as a junkman’s blade/I said, “Honey even a broke clock’s right twice a day/why do you treat me this way?”

I love the interaction between the two often alternating sentences, not necessarily exclusive to just verses.

The entire record is laid out just that way, drawing us into these very personal letters and emails set to music; and oh, what wonderful music it is! Both musicians are extremely talented and are considered amongst their peers, let alone their fans, as two of the best blues guitarists around. There is no shortage of blues here but it’s not limited to that. There is folk, twang, you name it, and it’s here.

For instance, the very steamy and sexy “Mm Hmm” has a very jazzy element to it continuing the alternating of the different verses. The lyrics are - well, see for yourself –

“Wouldn’t it be nice/to once or twice or even thrice/pick up where we left off to resume/Throwing each other around a room/Mm Hmm

“To hear your heavenly high pitched moans/followed by my grunts and groans/Closing our eyes and falling into the deep/with one eye open to watch each other sleep/Mm Hmm.”

I’d have to say it’s probably my favorite song of them all and not just because of the hot lyrics, but the entire arrangement itself. The addition of trombone and harmonica only add to the steaminess the tune already possesses, making it “hotter than a Georgia asphalt”, as Lula played by Laura Dern expresses to Sailor played by Nicolas Cage in David Lynch’s "Wild at Heart". It’s that steamy.

You get the picture. This is a great record, absolutely not to be missed. Now, I only wrote about a couple tracks here. This is a concept album meant to be heard in order, tracks one through fourteen. It’s all intertwined and meant to be heard just that way.

‘Rebel’ Rod says see for yourself and check it out. - No Depression


""Peter Karp and Sue Foley are turning the battle of the sexes into a duet. With Karp's lyrics and Sue's guitar, you wanna get your hands on this album.""

"Peter Karp and Sue Foley are turning the battle of the sexes into a duet. With Karp's lyrics and Sue's guitar, you wanna get your hands on this album." - House of Blues Mobile


""It's not a concept you see every day... Make those artists as gifted as Peter Karp and Sue Foley, and the results are as compelling as they are candid.""

It's not a concept you see every day - two artists chronicling their growing relationship in song. Make those artists as gifted as Peter Karp and Sue Foley, and the results are as compelling as they are candid.

Both Karp and Foley had already forged individual voices out of various roots elements - Karp as a New Jersey-by-way-of-Alabama troubadour with a roadhouse flair who excels on guitar and piano, and the Canadian Foley as a blues-guitar firebrand who made her name in the music hotbed of Austin, Texas.

On He Said, She Said, they duet and harmonize on several numbers, such as the playful, bluesy opener "Treat Me Right" and the acoustic ballad "Valentine's Day." They write separately, however, providing two perspectives on the relationship while maintaining a narrative thrust - note how Foley's "Danger Lurks" dovetails into Karp's "Ready for Your Love." And those perspectives don't gloss over rough patches, making their journey sound all the more real.

- Nick Cristiano - Philadelphia Inquirer


""This CD is refreshing. A remarkable collection between two gifted musicians.""


"This CD is refreshing. The music works well, as Karp's Americana tendencies mesh with Foley's bluesy guitar across a surprising veriety of styles. A remarkable collection between two gifted musicians."
- Jim Hynes, Elmore Magazine - Elmore Magazine


"The kind of cross-genre stew that the Robert Plant-Alison Krauss "Raising Sand" project only hinted at."

The kind of cross-genre stew that the Robert Plant-Alison Krauss "Raising Sand" project a few years ago only hinted at, "He Said She Said" is a wonderfully creative collaboration between blues singer/guitarist Sue Foley and alt-country singer Peter Karp that carves out a new musical space between two distinctive artists and takes both places neither would be likely to have gone alone.

Foley possesses one of the most immediately identifiable sounds on guitar going today, in the blues or any other style. A few notes and you know it's her playing. Karp's calling card is a rich, deep singing voice ---- a voice that contrasts nicely with Foley's high, nasal vocals.

While their performance talents interlock nicely, what makes "He Said She Said" such a rewarding listen is the fact that they've created a sound that's equal parts Foley's electric blues and Karp's Americana. While each wrote about half the songs, it's not as if Foley's songs are blues and Karp's alt-country. Rather, each song manages to incorporate both styles, with not a little vintage rock 'n' roll thrown in, perhaps as the common catalyst.

"Danger Lurks," written by Foley and given a haunting vocal introduction atop a Spanish-tinged acoustic guitar, is as much tango or chanson as it is blues: Mostly, it's a dark salon song you might hear in a jazz club in Lisbon or Vienna late on a weeknight, beautifully crafted and utterly unlike Foley's typical sound. It's a lovely "wow" moment.

On Karp's "Scared," Foley takes the lead vocal atop a muted trumpet ---- reminding of nothing so much as the exquisite if underknown pairing of Miles Davis and John Lee Hooker on the soundtrack to Dennis Hopper's forgotten 1990 film "The Hot Spot."

These are just two of the surprises, and they show that this album is one of those rare combinations of disparate talents that causes each to push the other into something new and delightful ---- along the lines of Mark Knopfler and Emmylou Harris or the above Davis-Hooker meeting. - North Country Times, San Diego, CA


"Blind Pig Records are out with another winner for those of you who dig the bluesier side of this mix we here call Americana."

Our friends at Blind Pig Records are out with another winner for those of you who dig the bluesier side of this mix we here call Americana. He said, She said by Peter Karp and Sue Foley is that disc! Sometimes two artists are on the same path, heading in basically the same direction and eventually collide in a creative crash! Thus was the case with these two. Their explanation of the project spells it out well:

“He Said – She Said” is the new inspired show featuring a collaboration of original songs by Peter Karp and Sue Foley. The project is based around a correspondence the two shared through letters that were written over a year period. These letters started as a casual exchange between two committed performers sharing their common bond of the loneliness of the road, the pain of separation from family and home and above all, the drive to make music. But as time went on the letters they shared became more poignant, more revealing. Those letters became their songs. The result is “He Said – She Said.” The show features songs of two artists in development, sharing artistic purpose and spiritual kinship in a meeting of hearts and minds.

If you are not familiar with these two, imagine combining the songwriting creativity of a couple of Johns..(Hyatt or Prine) with the guitar and sass of Bonnie Raitt and you get the idea of what we have here. That’s not to say Sue Foley can’t pen a tune. Some of the best on the disc are her contributions, including my favorite track on the disc, the beautiful acoustic guitar ode So Far So Fast. Ditto her tune Danger Lurks; a flamenco influenced solo guitar musical “film noir” that ends appropriately enough with “I”m doomed, so doomed.” Karp’s Wait has a mid-70’s Stones sound I really liked. You can’t overlook the lyrics on this disc. Being inspired by personal letters, the lyrics hold more meaning that those of your average tune; something they obviously took seriously with the project.

This is a thoroughly enjoyable disc by two musicians who stand well on their own, but together even stand perhaps just a bit taller! - Americana Roots


"The words and music are appealing enough in their own right but it's the honesty in the execution and expression that makes this compelling."

I wasn't the first person to know about Peter Karp and Sue Foley's He Said She Said project but I was privy to the possibility before many when he mentioned it during our interview about its predecessor, his stunning solo album Shadows And Cracks. That was at the end of 2007. After a two-year gestation period, He Said She Said was released in March of this year and Karp and Foley have been out on the road promoting it.

To discuss the album without mentioning the story behind it would be lunacy but it's all too easy to get distracted by it and what it means or might mean. The story is interesting enough but means little if the music sucks.

So what is that story? The album was born out of a series of letters between the two artists while on the road about the toll the road took on them, their families, homes, and hearts. As the two exchanged these letters they became increasingly personal and revealing. Those letters form basis of the songs of He Said She Said.

The concept of a "He said / She said" record has been tried before and to mixed results. The idea is good and that's a great place to start but none of that much matters if the duo can't make it work. A He and She could be lamenting a relationship that didn't work or chronicling the start of something special or the ups-and-downs in between that lead to exciting and frightening places and all of that is interesting, but there are tens of thousands of forgettable odes to love and its impacts. The concept is sound and the backstory intriguing but it takes more than that for success. Do Karp and Foley bring anything to the idea? Do they make it believable? Do they make it interesting? Does the album work independent of the underlying concept?

I use the word concept and while a blues concept album might be fun, HSSS isn't a concept album in a contrived, '70s prog-rock sense. There are no characters or plotlines nor is there a chronological or specific narrative, but there is an inescapable sense of connection among these songs. They flow into and out of each other despite changes in tempo, mood, vocalist, musical styles, and arrangement. Karp and Foley split writing duties throughout and the results are at times meditative, nocturnal, gritty, sensuous, thoughtful, and confessional. It's not surprising there is a singer/songwriter aesthetic to the record, particularly from Karp as he is an extraordinary lyricist and craftsman, but they break that up by relying on their blues and roots backgrounds, giving both acoustic and electric blues flourishes to the record. They also mix in brief bursts of Southwestern flavor and a smattering of horns here and there to help the songs sonically stand apart while still feeling linked to one another. The words and music are appealing enough in their own right but it's the honesty in the execution and expression that makes this compelling. - Josh Holloway, Blog Critics


Discography

This is the first collaborative project for the two of them, but both have CD's of their solo projects available:

Sue Foley:
1992 - Young Girl Blues
1994 - Without a Warning
1995 - Big City Blues
1996 - Walk in the Sun
1998 - Ten Days in November
2000 - Love Comin' Down
2000 - Back to the Blues
2002 - Where the Action Is
2004 - Change
2006 - New Used Car
2007 - Time Bomb

Peter Karp
2004 - Turning Point
2007 - Shadows and Cracks

Photos

Bio

“He Said - She Said” is an inspired collaboration between Canadian Juno award winner Sue Foley and critically acclaimed U.S. singer / songwriter and Blind Pig artist Peter Karp. The songs are adapted from letters and e-mails between the two over a 2-year period. They tell the story of two artists in development, after they met at when Sue was asked to lend back up vocals to an album of Peter's. Peter says, “What started as a casual exchange became a revealing account of the personal struggles and dramatic changes that were happening in our lives. Our shared thoughts became intimate. Then, we turned those letters into songs and made a CD together. It's by far the best thing either of us have created simply because it comes from the honesty of real life.” But make no mistake, it also has lots of humor and is a very engaging show moving between nylon acoustic guitar, dobro, grand piano and electric guitars. Often they have a tight rhythm section keeping it all moving. These two songwriters bring a wealth of performance history to this collaboration. Blind Pig Records released this new project internationally in March. Since then it has been a huge success, hitting #1 on the Blues Chart for 6 weeks, in the Top 5 for 12 weeks, and cracking the Billboard Top 10 as well.