Pippa Drysdale
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Pippa Drysdale

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Music

Press


"Acoustic Magazine UK"

“I can imagine a few of these tracks being honed by chick flicks, and charming songs such as Cherry Blossom Tree and Stupid Angel are sure to be heard in the near future.” - Acoustic Magazine UK


"Acoustic Magazine UK"

“I can imagine a few of these tracks being honed by chick flicks, and charming songs such as Cherry Blossom Tree and Stupid Angel are sure to be heard in the near future.” - Acoustic Magazine UK


"Groove Magazine"

“Become entranced by these simple melodies and very direct and acute observations on love and life.” - Groove


"Xpress Magazine"

“Fate, existentialism, the human condition…these things propel Drysdale, whose musical tales-from-the-soul bear the mark of an artist unafraid of standing in the crosshairs.” - Xpress


"Xpress Magazine"

“Fate, existentialism, the human condition…these things propel Drysdale, whose musical tales-from-the-soul bear the mark of an artist unafraid of standing in the crosshairs.” - Xpress


"Drum Media Review"

“With an angelic voice and an obvious knack for deeper lyrical meaning, Drysdale proved to be a sweeter slice of Fiona’s Apple.” - Drum Media


"Glastonbury Emerging Talent Judge"

“Pippa Drysdale – Just Five Minutes: This song was the most infectious catchy song on my list. It s a snappy radio friendly piece of power pop.” - www.fourforty4.com


"Glastonbury Emerging Talent Judge"

“Pippa Drysdale – Just Five Minutes: This song was the most infectious catchy song on my list. It s a snappy radio friendly piece of power pop.” - www.fourforty4.com


"Sydney Morning Herald"

“This Australian singer-songwriter can be wincingly honest in her sweet folk-pop songs and her open-hearted lyrical sentiments might strike a chord with anyone who’s checked the horoscopes of their partner or ex-partner as well as their own, for example. Such guileless insights are part of her charm, though, as are her warm-throated vocals and the astute self-awareness of Kinda Guy.” - Sydney Morning Herald


"Velvet Ant Review - Bluebird"

“On Bluebird, Drysdale offers a more stripped back sound which features her playing guitar and piano. This more back to basics approach works in Drysdale’s favour as it highlights her trifecta of talent: her musicianship, song writing ability and her voice. And just when you think that’s enough for one person she demonstrates her bilingual skills in the catchy French lyrics of’ (je ne peux pas te dire) Adieu.’

The Album opens with the quirky ‘The Angel Song’, that wouldn’t be out of place on the Juno soundtrack. It’s an immediately likeable track, but the hidden joy of this album is that many of the songs come alive after several plays.

Notable standouts are the love and longing on ‘Razorblade Spoon’ and the song ‘Lighthouse’ which has single potential. Drysdales angelic voice delicately soars over ‘The Shadow Song, and has a commanding presence in ‘Superhero’. On ‘The Best Thing’ she takes us on a lyrical journey from the place (New York) to the abstract, personal and emotional.

There are many references on the album to shadows, silhouettes and not being seen but on Bluebird Drysdale actually reveals her fragilities, her loves, her hopes and fears, and this makes for an unafraid melodic statement on the human condition.” - Velvet Ant


"Velvet Ant Review - Bluebird"

“On Bluebird, Drysdale offers a more stripped back sound which features her playing guitar and piano. This more back to basics approach works in Drysdale’s favour as it highlights her trifecta of talent: her musicianship, song writing ability and her voice. And just when you think that’s enough for one person she demonstrates her bilingual skills in the catchy French lyrics of’ (je ne peux pas te dire) Adieu.’

The Album opens with the quirky ‘The Angel Song’, that wouldn’t be out of place on the Juno soundtrack. It’s an immediately likeable track, but the hidden joy of this album is that many of the songs come alive after several plays.

Notable standouts are the love and longing on ‘Razorblade Spoon’ and the song ‘Lighthouse’ which has single potential. Drysdales angelic voice delicately soars over ‘The Shadow Song, and has a commanding presence in ‘Superhero’. On ‘The Best Thing’ she takes us on a lyrical journey from the place (New York) to the abstract, personal and emotional.

There are many references on the album to shadows, silhouettes and not being seen but on Bluebird Drysdale actually reveals her fragilities, her loves, her hopes and fears, and this makes for an unafraid melodic statement on the human condition.” - Velvet Ant


"Leicester Bangs Review"

“Pippa Drysdale’s roots are probably in her music, one of her few constants in a busy life. Her songs – confessional, honest, life-affirming – are generally played on piano, and exist in a genre shared by Feist, Fiona Apple and Tori Amos. “Bluebird” is her fourth album, and every lyric and melody is her own, every word sung, Drysdale sings, and the list of secondary instruments she plays includes vibraphone, guitars and Hammond organ. She’s joined by Chris Vallejo on bass (and other instruments), and percussionist Josh Shubert.
Beginning with the pure pop tones of “The Angel Song”, its façade of simple, quirky delights disguises something altogether more complex, and is beautifully executed. “Razorblade Spoon” takes a more recognisable route – though the result is just as pleasurable, and as with all of “Bluebird” there’s much satisfaction to be found in Drysdale’s wordplay. Of course, on “(Je Ne Peux Pas Te Dire) Adieu” it may not be quite as obvious, but a breezy tune and a generous helping of charm carry the day.” - Leicester Bangs


"Leicester Bangs Review"

“Pippa Drysdale’s roots are probably in her music, one of her few constants in a busy life. Her songs – confessional, honest, life-affirming – are generally played on piano, and exist in a genre shared by Feist, Fiona Apple and Tori Amos. “Bluebird” is her fourth album, and every lyric and melody is her own, every word sung, Drysdale sings, and the list of secondary instruments she plays includes vibraphone, guitars and Hammond organ. She’s joined by Chris Vallejo on bass (and other instruments), and percussionist Josh Shubert.
Beginning with the pure pop tones of “The Angel Song”, its façade of simple, quirky delights disguises something altogether more complex, and is beautifully executed. “Razorblade Spoon” takes a more recognisable route – though the result is just as pleasurable, and as with all of “Bluebird” there’s much satisfaction to be found in Drysdale’s wordplay. Of course, on “(Je Ne Peux Pas Te Dire) Adieu” it may not be quite as obvious, but a breezy tune and a generous helping of charm carry the day.” - Leicester Bangs


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Though seldom ending happily-ever-after, the songs of Pippa Drysdale are deceptively sunny.

Described as ‘wincingly honest’ by the Sydney Morning Herald, Drysdale’s existential lyrics paint with a palate that often favours darker shades, but with the sparkle and light of eternal optimism. Both delicately feminine and evocatively unrestrained, the voice that delivers these lyrics can reflect the frailty of a broken heart or the passion of a new beginning with equal convincingness.

Due for release in 2013, Pippa’s fourth album is the direct result of a bruised heart and a slightly fractured soul. It is a collection of songs exploring themes such as adultery, the nature of existence, heartbreak and hope, and was produced with an elegantly simple approach: put a musician and a microphone in a room full of instruments and hit record – the songs will do the rest.

It is a stripped-back record based primarily on the piano and guitar, with guest appearances from a quirky collection of vintage instruments such as the wurly, omnichord and Hammond. But most importantly, the album is real. The stories are true and everything was played by a human.

A naturalized Australian born in Africa, Pippa Drysdale spent her youth in transit – doing most of her growing up, she reminisces, on aeroplanes. It is of no surprise then that, as an adult, she has spent her career as a troubadour; commuting back and forth between New York, London and Perth, while successfully touring continental Europe and the UK – performing everything from festivals to underground clubs.

Now with her new album complete, Pippa will be resuming touring schedule in 2013, covering the UK, Germany and France. And as a songwriter who draws primarily upon her own experiences, being out in the big bad world is exactly where she needs to be…as long as this world is still full of surprises, so too will be the music of Pippa Drysdale.

“With an angelic voice and an obvious knack for deeper lyrical meaning, Drysdale proved to be a sweeter slice of Fiona’s Apple.” Drum Media

“Fate, existentialism, the human condition…these things propel Drysdale, whose musical tales-from-the-soul bear the mark of an artist unafraid of standing in the crosshairs.” Xpress Magazine

“Become entranced by these simple melodies and very direct and acute observations on love and life.” Groove Magazine