Polytype
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Polytype

Orangeville, Utah, United States | SELF

Orangeville, Utah, United States | SELF
Band Alternative EDM

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How much does a band name matter? Would Oasis have been has huge if they were still called ‘The Rain’? What if Radiohead were known as ‘On a Friday’? Such was the dilemma faced by ‘Soft Science’ a few weeks ago upon learning of the existence of their musical doppelgangers. Nevertheless, presumably after many a beer, the Utah four piece have emerged reincarnated as ‘Polytype’.

Their first single ‘Refract’ serves as an ideal statement of intent, a delicate blend of synth and electronic tinkering that makes for immersive listening. Fuzzy, echoey vocals glide through crisply manufactured sounds, peaking beautifully towards its conclusion. An additional festive treat is provided in their unique ‘Winter Lullaby’ which exhibits a delightful sensitivity in its simplicity, with enough electronic caresses to ensure a sense of depth as well.

Both tracks are available to download for free whilst the album ‘basic//complex’ is scheduled for release in February next year. You can listen and download below before heading over to Polytype’s newly redesigned site to check out what else they’re up to… - First Song For Your Mixtape


How much does a band name matter? Would Oasis have been has huge if they were still called ‘The Rain’? What if Radiohead were known as ‘On a Friday’? Such was the dilemma faced by ‘Soft Science’ a few weeks ago upon learning of the existence of their musical doppelgangers. Nevertheless, presumably after many a beer, the Utah four piece have emerged reincarnated as ‘Polytype’.

Their first single ‘Refract’ serves as an ideal statement of intent, a delicate blend of synth and electronic tinkering that makes for immersive listening. Fuzzy, echoey vocals glide through crisply manufactured sounds, peaking beautifully towards its conclusion. An additional festive treat is provided in their unique ‘Winter Lullaby’ which exhibits a delightful sensitivity in its simplicity, with enough electronic caresses to ensure a sense of depth as well.

Both tracks are available to download for free whilst the album ‘basic//complex’ is scheduled for release in February next year. You can listen and download below before heading over to Polytype’s newly redesigned site to check out what else they’re up to… - First Song For Your Mixtape


Newcomers Polytype (formerly known as Soft Science) create an atmosphere of elegance and precision with their new single, "Refract."

The song's high quality production hides behind waves and waves of beautiful composition in this download-worthy track from upcoming album Basic//Complex, to be released February 1st 2013.

Polytype is a new indie pop band based in Provo, Utah. The sound on their most recent releases blend synth with skilled vocal work creating a tightly rendered, highly artificialized, product of expression.

"Refract" expresses this thoroughly. Synth chimes through your headphones crystal clear, pausing only for the entrance of layered vocals. For the rest of the song a constantly-evolving blending of the two occurs, producing a soothing ambient harmony. Each band member shows a deep mastery over his part in the song, as every piece has an unmistakeable scientific precision. This mastery earns Polytype and "Refract" an 8/10.

Keep an eye open for Basic//Complex to drop, but in the meantime check out the beautiful single streaming. - In Your Speakers


Newcomers Polytype (formerly known as Soft Science) create an atmosphere of elegance and precision with their new single, "Refract."

The song's high quality production hides behind waves and waves of beautiful composition in this download-worthy track from upcoming album Basic//Complex, to be released February 1st 2013.

Polytype is a new indie pop band based in Provo, Utah. The sound on their most recent releases blend synth with skilled vocal work creating a tightly rendered, highly artificialized, product of expression.

"Refract" expresses this thoroughly. Synth chimes through your headphones crystal clear, pausing only for the entrance of layered vocals. For the rest of the song a constantly-evolving blending of the two occurs, producing a soothing ambient harmony. Each band member shows a deep mastery over his part in the song, as every piece has an unmistakeable scientific precision. This mastery earns Polytype and "Refract" an 8/10.

Keep an eye open for Basic//Complex to drop, but in the meantime check out the beautiful single streaming. - In Your Speakers


Each band’s story of origin differs. Some begin out of boredom, and others seem to align out of fate. Polytype’s story is one that reminds me of a phrase that occasionally floats through my mind: Genius is born out of necessity. Band members Mason Porter (on synth and vocals), Jason Gibby (on synth), Jared Price (on keys) and Scott Haslam (on guitar) are from Provo. Polytype strictly avoid imposing a certain feeling upon their listeners. Instead, they aim to create a soundscape where listeners can form their own story and interpretation. Price says, “We wanted something people can really sink their teeth into. You know, lead them to the gate, but not give them the tour.” In my experience, this has been entirely true while listening to their recently released, self-titled debut album. I can only see shapes and lines when I hear their music. It’s as if a new portal of my mind is gently opened for exploration, and it’s very geometric. Their “open for interpretation” style is also evident in their music video for “Cyclone,” produced by Gibby’s little brother, Kyle Gibby. The video features a humanoid in an all-black outfit. As he roams through scenes of nature, he remains still as everything rapidly moves in reverse around him. It’s nothing short of a mind bender.

Porter, Gibby and Price played in an indie folk band (Dandy Lyon) just over two years ago. It was at the 2010 Fork Music Fest in American Fork that Haslam heard his future band members playing. Haslam was already a guitar player and approached Porter, having previously seen him around town. Both Haslam and Dandy Lyon were ready to take their skills in a new direction. This was the beginning of Polytype.

Each member of the band agrees that Radiohead is a collective influence. Price says, “For someone not into electronic music, [Radiohead] can open the door.” Radiohead is a fair comparison to Polytype’s sound. It’s not synth pop, and it’s not EDM, but it’s heavily oriented around electronic sounds, with guitar riffs added by Haslam. Price and Porter each wrote about half of the album’s lyrics. “I pay attention to vowel sounds and melodies. I want the words to fit nicely with the music,” says Porter. They assured me that each element of their music receives equal focus. “I wouldn’t sell our album as a book of poetry,” says Porter. When you hear the music, it’s clear the sound is not complete without the ghostly romanticism of Porter’s voice, and the lyrics only complement the sound. When I asked them if they would describe their music as dark, Porter responded, saying, “Our moms think it’s dark.” Price added, saying, “[But] We want it to get weirder.” Haslam described his motivation behind their unique sound simply as, “the excitement of making new noise. I just want to intrigue the listener,” he says. The guys spent over a year working on the album and hired local star producer Nate Pyfer, who has done work with The Moth & The Flame and Imagine Dragons, to complete the album.

Polytype’s overall aim is to create a viable electronic scene in Provo. “We don’t want to maintain a monopoly on the scene or anything,” says Haslam. They want more bands they can play alongside with for a well-rounded electronic set. Polytype admit they’re not the first with a synth-based sound to come out of their area. They mentioned Night Night as one band who has tried a more experimental electronic sound in recent years. What Polytype have going for them, more than anything, is timing. Haslam has a capable basement studio, each band member is committed to the life changes that will result from success, and, as Price mentioned, this is a fresh sound for the Provo area.

Polytype has some pure motives behind their music offerings, and anyone in attendance at their shows is a witness to that. The band has a West Coast tour coming up soon with Golden Sun—a testament to their dedication as a band. This is just one of the many growing experiences Polytype has ahead of them. Once these guys wrap up their tour, their music will be in much higher demand. Luckily for us, once the tour’s over, they’re going straight to work on their second album. Their sound is one that’s not only unique to the Provo scene, but to Salt Lake’s as well. The second album will definitely be one to keep your eyes peeled for, and if you haven’t already listened to the first album, then head over to polytype.bandcamp.com for something new and intriguing. - SLUG Magazine


Each band’s story of origin differs. Some begin out of boredom, and others seem to align out of fate. Polytype’s story is one that reminds me of a phrase that occasionally floats through my mind: Genius is born out of necessity. Band members Mason Porter (on synth and vocals), Jason Gibby (on synth), Jared Price (on keys) and Scott Haslam (on guitar) are from Provo. Polytype strictly avoid imposing a certain feeling upon their listeners. Instead, they aim to create a soundscape where listeners can form their own story and interpretation. Price says, “We wanted something people can really sink their teeth into. You know, lead them to the gate, but not give them the tour.” In my experience, this has been entirely true while listening to their recently released, self-titled debut album. I can only see shapes and lines when I hear their music. It’s as if a new portal of my mind is gently opened for exploration, and it’s very geometric. Their “open for interpretation” style is also evident in their music video for “Cyclone,” produced by Gibby’s little brother, Kyle Gibby. The video features a humanoid in an all-black outfit. As he roams through scenes of nature, he remains still as everything rapidly moves in reverse around him. It’s nothing short of a mind bender.

Porter, Gibby and Price played in an indie folk band (Dandy Lyon) just over two years ago. It was at the 2010 Fork Music Fest in American Fork that Haslam heard his future band members playing. Haslam was already a guitar player and approached Porter, having previously seen him around town. Both Haslam and Dandy Lyon were ready to take their skills in a new direction. This was the beginning of Polytype.

Each member of the band agrees that Radiohead is a collective influence. Price says, “For someone not into electronic music, [Radiohead] can open the door.” Radiohead is a fair comparison to Polytype’s sound. It’s not synth pop, and it’s not EDM, but it’s heavily oriented around electronic sounds, with guitar riffs added by Haslam. Price and Porter each wrote about half of the album’s lyrics. “I pay attention to vowel sounds and melodies. I want the words to fit nicely with the music,” says Porter. They assured me that each element of their music receives equal focus. “I wouldn’t sell our album as a book of poetry,” says Porter. When you hear the music, it’s clear the sound is not complete without the ghostly romanticism of Porter’s voice, and the lyrics only complement the sound. When I asked them if they would describe their music as dark, Porter responded, saying, “Our moms think it’s dark.” Price added, saying, “[But] We want it to get weirder.” Haslam described his motivation behind their unique sound simply as, “the excitement of making new noise. I just want to intrigue the listener,” he says. The guys spent over a year working on the album and hired local star producer Nate Pyfer, who has done work with The Moth & The Flame and Imagine Dragons, to complete the album.

Polytype’s overall aim is to create a viable electronic scene in Provo. “We don’t want to maintain a monopoly on the scene or anything,” says Haslam. They want more bands they can play alongside with for a well-rounded electronic set. Polytype admit they’re not the first with a synth-based sound to come out of their area. They mentioned Night Night as one band who has tried a more experimental electronic sound in recent years. What Polytype have going for them, more than anything, is timing. Haslam has a capable basement studio, each band member is committed to the life changes that will result from success, and, as Price mentioned, this is a fresh sound for the Provo area.

Polytype has some pure motives behind their music offerings, and anyone in attendance at their shows is a witness to that. The band has a West Coast tour coming up soon with Golden Sun—a testament to their dedication as a band. This is just one of the many growing experiences Polytype has ahead of them. Once these guys wrap up their tour, their music will be in much higher demand. Luckily for us, once the tour’s over, they’re going straight to work on their second album. Their sound is one that’s not only unique to the Provo scene, but to Salt Lake’s as well. The second album will definitely be one to keep your eyes peeled for, and if you haven’t already listened to the first album, then head over to polytype.bandcamp.com for something new and intriguing. - SLUG Magazine


Polytype opened up their email to me regarding their new album "Basic//Complex" by referencing our Ramona Falls interview from last year. There could not be a more perfect introduction to Polytype's album (due for release February 1st), as influences from Ramona Falls' previous band, Menomena, are heavily present. "Basic//Complex" features eclectic and dark instrumentation, with a perfect fusion of synthesizers and drum machines with guitars and analogue drum sounds. Rounding out the instrumentation are strong yet smooth vocals. This record from Provo, Utah sounds exactly what I imagine Provo to feel like — a city named #1in optimism by Gallup last year.
All tracks blend perfectly together to create their own world, but the ones that stand out are:
track 1, Cyclone, bold, attention-grabbing synth stabs suck you into the album, not spitting you out until the end
track 3, Refract, a catchy single with great hooks
tack 8, Coinflip, the most experimental-electronic track
track 10, Familiar Skin, features very well executed background vocals, developing into a piano outro which carefully closes the world that has been created.

The record cover is also of note, immediately evoking the aesthetic of the Ghostly International label. No surprise, Ghostly artist Matt Shlian created the paper sculpture on the cover. Someone get this to the label, because "Basic//Complex" would stand perfectly alongside Ghostly International's list of high-quality releases (and no, no one paid me to say that). - West Coast Fix


Polytype opened up their email to me regarding their new album "Basic//Complex" by referencing our Ramona Falls interview from last year. There could not be a more perfect introduction to Polytype's album (due for release February 1st), as influences from Ramona Falls' previous band, Menomena, are heavily present. "Basic//Complex" features eclectic and dark instrumentation, with a perfect fusion of synthesizers and drum machines with guitars and analogue drum sounds. Rounding out the instrumentation are strong yet smooth vocals. This record from Provo, Utah sounds exactly what I imagine Provo to feel like — a city named #1in optimism by Gallup last year.
All tracks blend perfectly together to create their own world, but the ones that stand out are:
track 1, Cyclone, bold, attention-grabbing synth stabs suck you into the album, not spitting you out until the end
track 3, Refract, a catchy single with great hooks
tack 8, Coinflip, the most experimental-electronic track
track 10, Familiar Skin, features very well executed background vocals, developing into a piano outro which carefully closes the world that has been created.

The record cover is also of note, immediately evoking the aesthetic of the Ghostly International label. No surprise, Ghostly artist Matt Shlian created the paper sculpture on the cover. Someone get this to the label, because "Basic//Complex" would stand perfectly alongside Ghostly International's list of high-quality releases (and no, no one paid me to say that). - West Coast Fix


Utah's Polytype just released their debut album - an enticing mix of Radiohead-esque minimal electronic production and fuzzy warm guitar riff. Really a great winter soundtrack. Maybe you already heard their first single Refract. Basic//Complex is the title track, more on the Thom Yorke end of their sound, ace stuff. Get the album directly through the band, here.

And how about that photo from their release party - looks like an epic setup. Hat tip to photographer Steve Peters. - Poule d'Or


Utah's Polytype just released their debut album - an enticing mix of Radiohead-esque minimal electronic production and fuzzy warm guitar riff. Really a great winter soundtrack. Maybe you already heard their first single Refract. Basic//Complex is the title track, more on the Thom Yorke end of their sound, ace stuff. Get the album directly through the band, here.

And how about that photo from their release party - looks like an epic setup. Hat tip to photographer Steve Peters. - Poule d'Or


Sometimes, a band will learn to run before it learns to walk. This is the story the members of Polytype found themselves living.

A mere six months after the Provo-based group’s lineup solidified, Polytype (formerly Soft Science) was the opening band for The Moth & the Flame’s CD release show in November 2011 at Velour. Afterward, producer Nate Pyfer approached the group and suggested they record an album.

“We only had four songs at the time, and he wanted us to go into the studio two months later,” Mason Porter says with a laugh. Usually, a band will have an entire catalog of songs ready before entering the studio, but Polytype decided they were up for the challenge.

At this point, according to Jason Gibby, the band had two serious questions to ask itself: “Do we have it in us to make an album? Are we good enough to make an album?”

A year later, Polytype had recorded Basic//Complex, due out Feb. 1.

“I think that the position we were in was great,” Scott Haslam says after a recent practice. “I’m glad we didn’t go into it with a bunch of songs that we already had, you know? We kind of just took a few ideas that we had and just grew with it.”

Lounging in Haslam’s basement, the four young men of Polytype—Jared Price rounds out the lineup—take a moment to muse on their year spent recording. The learning process, they agree, was invaluable. Speaking about the time, effort and funds required for a full-length album, “We look at it like our tuition, like going to college, because we want to make a career out of music,” Porter says. “It’s a huge bargain.”

The result of this learning process is an album that feels breezy and natural. Even on the heavier tracks, like album opener “Cyclone” and the funky, growling “Devils Out,” Porter’s vocals are relaxed, even distant. Fans of contemporary electronic indie will find Polytype’s off-kilter rhythms and sustained, layered vocal melodies reminiscent of Toro Y Moi and The xx. The album feels like a record for late nights and low lighting. Tracks like “Needs” possess an eerily soothing quality, despite strong, propulsive beats. Lyrics are often vague and convey more feeling than actual meaning. Polytype extends an open invitation to the listener to interpret and explore the music, free from concrete significance.

The ambiguity in Polytype’s music is deliberate. “We’re here just to give [listeners] a canvas to work with,” Gibby says. Porter agrees, saying the band wanted to make music that can “mean something different to everybody— something special to everybody.”

According to Porter, the group knew one thing for certain: “We wanted to make something with a high re-listen value—a record that got better the more you listened to it. I think we accomplished that.”

Polytype’s sound has a newness, an organic quality that comes from the fertility of young musicians trying something completely novel. The songs evolved from Porter’s original concepts, mostly written for acoustic guitar. “Usually what would happen is that we would try working on one of my songs, and then we’d make changes here and there, and all of a sudden it would be a completely new song,” Porter says.

“Every part [of the album],” Haslam says, “went through a severe cleansing process.”

That doesn’t mean the band didn’t have to perform a magic trick or two. The album’s first single, “Refract,” and “Gunmetal” were written just weeks before the final mixing in a manic last-minute drive to finish the album. The latter was a pastiche of ideas Porter had recorded casually. “I didn’t hear the chorus or anything” before the final mix was sent back, Haslam says. When he did hear the track, “It just blew my mind.” The whole band agrees that these tracks are now among their favorites.

After a year of hard work, steep learning curves and, in Haslam’s words, “growing up,” Polytype says they’re ready to take the next steps: a western tour and, hopefully, an EP release sometime in 2013. “It’s kind of funny,” Porter says. “By the time we finished the record, we felt like we had a good enough grasp of our instruments to actually write the music that we wanted to write.”

POLYTYPE
CD Release Show
w/ Lake Island, Mideau
Velour
135 N. University Ave., Provo
Friday, Feb. 1, 8 p.m.
$8 - Salt Lake City Weekly


Sometimes, a band will learn to run before it learns to walk. This is the story the members of Polytype found themselves living.

A mere six months after the Provo-based group’s lineup solidified, Polytype (formerly Soft Science) was the opening band for The Moth & the Flame’s CD release show in November 2011 at Velour. Afterward, producer Nate Pyfer approached the group and suggested they record an album.

“We only had four songs at the time, and he wanted us to go into the studio two months later,” Mason Porter says with a laugh. Usually, a band will have an entire catalog of songs ready before entering the studio, but Polytype decided they were up for the challenge.

At this point, according to Jason Gibby, the band had two serious questions to ask itself: “Do we have it in us to make an album? Are we good enough to make an album?”

A year later, Polytype had recorded Basic//Complex, due out Feb. 1.

“I think that the position we were in was great,” Scott Haslam says after a recent practice. “I’m glad we didn’t go into it with a bunch of songs that we already had, you know? We kind of just took a few ideas that we had and just grew with it.”

Lounging in Haslam’s basement, the four young men of Polytype—Jared Price rounds out the lineup—take a moment to muse on their year spent recording. The learning process, they agree, was invaluable. Speaking about the time, effort and funds required for a full-length album, “We look at it like our tuition, like going to college, because we want to make a career out of music,” Porter says. “It’s a huge bargain.”

The result of this learning process is an album that feels breezy and natural. Even on the heavier tracks, like album opener “Cyclone” and the funky, growling “Devils Out,” Porter’s vocals are relaxed, even distant. Fans of contemporary electronic indie will find Polytype’s off-kilter rhythms and sustained, layered vocal melodies reminiscent of Toro Y Moi and The xx. The album feels like a record for late nights and low lighting. Tracks like “Needs” possess an eerily soothing quality, despite strong, propulsive beats. Lyrics are often vague and convey more feeling than actual meaning. Polytype extends an open invitation to the listener to interpret and explore the music, free from concrete significance.

The ambiguity in Polytype’s music is deliberate. “We’re here just to give [listeners] a canvas to work with,” Gibby says. Porter agrees, saying the band wanted to make music that can “mean something different to everybody— something special to everybody.”

According to Porter, the group knew one thing for certain: “We wanted to make something with a high re-listen value—a record that got better the more you listened to it. I think we accomplished that.”

Polytype’s sound has a newness, an organic quality that comes from the fertility of young musicians trying something completely novel. The songs evolved from Porter’s original concepts, mostly written for acoustic guitar. “Usually what would happen is that we would try working on one of my songs, and then we’d make changes here and there, and all of a sudden it would be a completely new song,” Porter says.

“Every part [of the album],” Haslam says, “went through a severe cleansing process.”

That doesn’t mean the band didn’t have to perform a magic trick or two. The album’s first single, “Refract,” and “Gunmetal” were written just weeks before the final mixing in a manic last-minute drive to finish the album. The latter was a pastiche of ideas Porter had recorded casually. “I didn’t hear the chorus or anything” before the final mix was sent back, Haslam says. When he did hear the track, “It just blew my mind.” The whole band agrees that these tracks are now among their favorites.

After a year of hard work, steep learning curves and, in Haslam’s words, “growing up,” Polytype says they’re ready to take the next steps: a western tour and, hopefully, an EP release sometime in 2013. “It’s kind of funny,” Porter says. “By the time we finished the record, we felt like we had a good enough grasp of our instruments to actually write the music that we wanted to write.”

POLYTYPE
CD Release Show
w/ Lake Island, Mideau
Velour
135 N. University Ave., Provo
Friday, Feb. 1, 8 p.m.
$8 - Salt Lake City Weekly


Polytype
Basic//Complex
Self-Released
Street: 02.01
Polytype = Teen Daze + Washed Out
Polytype are aptly named, considering their heavily layered production of ambient noise. This album is hypnotic dream-pop with a moody touch. However, it differs from Purity Ring’s formula by embracing electronic roots as opposed to Southern rap-influenced beats. The music, at times, is as funky as Hot Chip, but that’s just one layer. The songs always hold an ethereal feel that harnesses your attention. They reflect an inner-city beauty that’s full of lights and architecture, creating lines in constant motion. It’s a privilege to hear music like this come out of our city. Polytype’s sound is complemented by Bon Iver–like vocals that linger effortlessly. “Running Out” is a must-hear from this album. Ever since I let these songs sink into my ears, I’ve been hooked. - SLUG Magazine


Polytype
Basic//Complex
Self-Released
Street: 02.01
Polytype = Teen Daze + Washed Out
Polytype are aptly named, considering their heavily layered production of ambient noise. This album is hypnotic dream-pop with a moody touch. However, it differs from Purity Ring’s formula by embracing electronic roots as opposed to Southern rap-influenced beats. The music, at times, is as funky as Hot Chip, but that’s just one layer. The songs always hold an ethereal feel that harnesses your attention. They reflect an inner-city beauty that’s full of lights and architecture, creating lines in constant motion. It’s a privilege to hear music like this come out of our city. Polytype’s sound is complemented by Bon Iver–like vocals that linger effortlessly. “Running Out” is a must-hear from this album. Ever since I let these songs sink into my ears, I’ve been hooked. - SLUG Magazine


Something big is about to hit the Provo music scene. One band is reuniting and one band is just getting started. Together, these bands will put on a show that is out of the ordinary.

On Friday Sept. 28, Provo’s Velour Live Music Gallery will host Alex Bateman, NightNight, Loud Harp and Soft Science. This show will be the culmination of a coming-home show, a revival show and a last chance effort at a Kickstarter campaign.

Loud Harp has never played a show in Utah, but is well known elsewhere. They just came home from a successful summer tour and according to local musician Mason Porter, their debut in Provo is highly anticipated.

NightNight is band comprised of local heros in the Provo music scene. The band features Scott Shepard,who also sings for New Nervous and Book On Tape Worm.

“We’re all working on different projects,” Shepard said. “But it’s fun to get together for this side project, especially for this show. We want to support Soft Science. The album they’re working on sounds incredible.”

The other members of NightNight include McKay Stevens, singer for The Vibrant Sound and co-founder of Northplatte Records with Joshua James, and Nate Pyfer who toured with Joshua James and produced The Moth & The Flame’s album and is producing Soft Science’s record. NightNight has a big local following and hasn’t played a show in nearly two years.

Shepard said playing at the Velour rejuvenates the band.

“There is such a good community in Provo,” Shepard said. “We look for and foster friendships when we do play. The vibes we get are good, and it pumps us up for more projects. We feed off the success everybody of there and that helps make it a great show.”

Soft Science is a relatively new band working on its first album. Like the name implies, Soft Science uses electronic beats to create sounds decorated with melancholic melodies. The thunderous, powerful beats are evocative of the mystique surrounding the mood of the band. The organic and naturalistic sounds are produced electronically and build on each other to create an aesthetic unlike any other in the local scene.

“Electronic music is something that’s never been incredibly popular in Provo,” Jason Gibby, the band’s primary beat maker, said. “We just think it’s fun to make music that’s fresh and if people like it, all the better.”

The band consists of Mason Porter (vocals), Scott Haslam (guitar), Jason Gibby (synthesizer, samplers) and Jared Price (base, synthesizer). Each of the members work together, exchanging positive criticism and encouragement to further and deepen the sounds of the band.

“We rely on the interaction of technology and traditional instruments to create an innovative musical experience,” Haslam said. “One of our goals is to push musical boundaries. We are exploring new ways to be creative both with audio and visuals. In an artistic, non-traditional way, we want our shows to be as exciting as rock shows, but with a totally different sound.”

The band’s album “Basic.Complex” is in the final stages of production. The show on Friday will serve as the final promotional push for the Kickstarter campaign the band launched to raise funds to finish the record.

Soft Science is offering interactive incentives to those who pledge to the Kickstarter campaign. Those who pledge $10 are pre-ordering their copy of the album, those who pledge $25 will have the privilege of attending a pre-listening pizza party with the band, and those who pledge $50+ will get to come into the studio and record sounds with the band that will be used in live shows and possibly future albums. Other incentives can also be found at the Kickstarter page.

“Producing this album has been a slow process,” Porter said. “We realized it was in our best interest to put our all into recording. We’ve already spent a lot of money for studio time and stuff, now we’re asking our fans to help get us the rest of the way. This is a chance for us to connect with our fan base, and it gives them a chance to see our growth.”

Those in attendance at the show will be able to pledge their assistance to this up and coming band at the merchandise table at Velour.

“We’re really excited for this show,” Price said. “We’re used to playing with a lot of folk or rock bands, and we love that music, but the line-up for this show is more similar to our sound than usual, because we are playing with NightNight. We’re striving to create the chance for fans to connect to something new and fresh in the music scene.”

Correction: In the first edition of this story, it said NightNight is coming out with a new album in October. It is actually Book on Tapeworm that will release a new album. - The Universe


Discography

Still working on that hot first release.

Photos

Bio

Polytype makes electronic music in Provo, Utah.

Band Members