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porcupine

La Crosse, Wisconsin, United States | INDIE

La Crosse, Wisconsin, United States | INDIE
Band Alternative Rock

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"Onion review"

The guys in La Crosse trio Porcupine put in time playing in different bands in the early ’90s, when mainstream rock and mainstream-ish indie bands just sounded more innocent, and you can certainly hear traces of that era’s alt-rock singles in their music. But the recent album The Trouble With You doesn’t feel dated: It’s more like a well-crafted jumble of sounds for those who enjoy classic rock, post-punk, shoegaze, and the lighter side of Foo Fighters. At the end of the day, Porcupine adds up to approachable guitar-pop, even when the hooks occasionally catch listeners off-guard, whether on the short opening instrumental “Intro” or the oddball verses and crunchy chorus of “Exit 180.” - The Onion AV Club


"Built On A Weak Spot review"

Although Porcupine hasn’t been together for too terribly long, the members that make up the trio have all spent their fair share of time in various other rock/indie/alternative acts throughout the 90’s and beyond (Space Bike, Junk Farm, Remover, etc.). Their debut album The Trouble With You was released earlier this year in February I believe through Blue Worm Records and is pretty clearly a result of many of the influences/sounds that were collected over those years playing in other gigs. While the beginning of the album opens with a sort of dreamy minute long intro, it quickly cuts into the next track “So Far, So Good” that has me almost wanting to bet money that one of the members is a Chavez fan. But that’s what makes The Trouble With You a fun item to listen to as the eleven tracks featured here are peppered with these sorts of quick subtle influences that all come together to form these oddball but at the same time strangely pleasant upbeat rock numbers. By the end of the album you’ve heard everything from the mathier side of Midwestern rock (ex: Self-Evident) to the muffled fuzz akin to J. Mascis to the warbled guitar tones that are usually reserved for acts considered under the shoegaze canopy. And Porcupine for the most part pull it all together successfully in a mere thirty five minutes. A strong debut from these guys and well worth checking out if anything above mentioned perks your interest.

Porcupine – Exit #180 [MP3]

For those interested in picking up The Trouble With You, it’s available currently through CD Baby. Definitely give it a go if you enjoy what you hear! - www.builtonaweakspot.com


"Built On A Weak Spot review"

Although Porcupine hasn’t been together for too terribly long, the members that make up the trio have all spent their fair share of time in various other rock/indie/alternative acts throughout the 90’s and beyond (Space Bike, Junk Farm, Remover, etc.). Their debut album The Trouble With You was released earlier this year in February I believe through Blue Worm Records and is pretty clearly a result of many of the influences/sounds that were collected over those years playing in other gigs. While the beginning of the album opens with a sort of dreamy minute long intro, it quickly cuts into the next track “So Far, So Good” that has me almost wanting to bet money that one of the members is a Chavez fan. But that’s what makes The Trouble With You a fun item to listen to as the eleven tracks featured here are peppered with these sorts of quick subtle influences that all come together to form these oddball but at the same time strangely pleasant upbeat rock numbers. By the end of the album you’ve heard everything from the mathier side of Midwestern rock (ex: Self-Evident) to the muffled fuzz akin to J. Mascis to the warbled guitar tones that are usually reserved for acts considered under the shoegaze canopy. And Porcupine for the most part pull it all together successfully in a mere thirty five minutes. A strong debut from these guys and well worth checking out if anything above mentioned perks your interest.

Porcupine – Exit #180 [MP3]

For those interested in picking up The Trouble With You, it’s available currently through CD Baby. Definitely give it a go if you enjoy what you hear! - www.builtonaweakspot.com


"Concert Live Wire review"

Porcupine pricks the ear
with prog, pop and alt-rock
Porcupine - The Trouble With You
(Blue Worm Records)
3 stars (out of 5 stars)
Reviewed: Sept. 7, 2009

Review by Tony Bonyata

While the LaCrosse, WI-based rock trio Porcupine may not be making the waves stirred by their local Northern Wisconsin contemporaries Bon Iver and The Daredeveil Christopher Wright, on their debut full-length The Trouble With You the threesome have, without a doubt, created one of the most unique, if not schizophrenic albums to come out of the Badger State in some time.

Led by guitarist and singer/songwriter Casey Virock, along with basist Dave Reinders and Jeff Bahr, Porcupine weaves an intricately woven tapestry of -90s alternative, hard rock, Midwestern power pop, along with the ecentricites of -70s prog and math-rock. Songs such as the geometrical "Exit 180" is driven by a repetitive Robert Fripp-like guitar riff yet still retains the rock edge from early -90s alt-rock, even including a slice of Red Hot Chili Peppers-flavored metal-funk near the song's close. "Picture Pefect" twists and turns with surprising time changes, while "Dark Mood" melds a heavier rock aesthetic with strong pop sensibilities. And on the punchy King Crimson-meets-Cheap Trick rocker "So Far So Good" Virock's vocals are hauntingly reminiscent of a more subdued Ozzy Osbourne from his early days with Black Sabbath (which, in this case, is actually a good thing).

While this may be their debut outing the members of the band are no newcomers to the music industry. Virock played in a number of Midwestern bands, most notably Space Bike from 1994 to '98. Before joining Virock in Space Bike, Reinders also performed with a band called Junk Farm, as well as running his own recording studio in a local LaCrosse club. Bahr cut his teeth with the Minneapolis-based rock outfit Remover, along with a slew of other lesser-known Midwestern bands. So with their collective music histories it's little wonder that their first effort as Porcupine sounds so fully realized... and refreshing.
- www.concertlivewire.com


"Concert Live Wire review"

Porcupine pricks the ear
with prog, pop and alt-rock
Porcupine - The Trouble With You
(Blue Worm Records)
3 stars (out of 5 stars)
Reviewed: Sept. 7, 2009

Review by Tony Bonyata

While the LaCrosse, WI-based rock trio Porcupine may not be making the waves stirred by their local Northern Wisconsin contemporaries Bon Iver and The Daredeveil Christopher Wright, on their debut full-length The Trouble With You the threesome have, without a doubt, created one of the most unique, if not schizophrenic albums to come out of the Badger State in some time.

Led by guitarist and singer/songwriter Casey Virock, along with basist Dave Reinders and Jeff Bahr, Porcupine weaves an intricately woven tapestry of -90s alternative, hard rock, Midwestern power pop, along with the ecentricites of -70s prog and math-rock. Songs such as the geometrical "Exit 180" is driven by a repetitive Robert Fripp-like guitar riff yet still retains the rock edge from early -90s alt-rock, even including a slice of Red Hot Chili Peppers-flavored metal-funk near the song's close. "Picture Pefect" twists and turns with surprising time changes, while "Dark Mood" melds a heavier rock aesthetic with strong pop sensibilities. And on the punchy King Crimson-meets-Cheap Trick rocker "So Far So Good" Virock's vocals are hauntingly reminiscent of a more subdued Ozzy Osbourne from his early days with Black Sabbath (which, in this case, is actually a good thing).

While this may be their debut outing the members of the band are no newcomers to the music industry. Virock played in a number of Midwestern bands, most notably Space Bike from 1994 to '98. Before joining Virock in Space Bike, Reinders also performed with a band called Junk Farm, as well as running his own recording studio in a local LaCrosse club. Bahr cut his teeth with the Minneapolis-based rock outfit Remover, along with a slew of other lesser-known Midwestern bands. So with their collective music histories it's little wonder that their first effort as Porcupine sounds so fully realized... and refreshing.
- www.concertlivewire.com


"Rift Magazine review"

by Dan McDonald

There is something about a loud and distorted Fender Jazzmaster sound that is a beautiful thing. This fact is one that resonates throughout this whole record. The record seems to have been mixed in a way that showcases that guitar flavor as well, with the guitar in front of the vocals. I find myself wanting more and more of that dirty thick guitar tone and then boom…there it is again, and even heavier. Perhaps this is one reason why I see resemblance to Dinosaur Jr., as that heavy Jazzmaster sound is what J. Mascis is known for. This record is full of little surprises and gems.

The intro has somewhat of a Wilco sound to it and plays heavily with textures, sets the tone for the record nicely. “Exit #180” has some pleasing dynamic changes and displays that luscious heavy guitar tone. “Dead Mint Club” is a well structured and written album highlight. “Dark Mood” has a really interesting slide guitar and is definitely a highlight of the album. The closing track, “Life Boat” is really nice and has great flow to it and leaves you wanting more, which is always a good way to end a record.

Porcupine show plenty of playfulness with quirky guitar melodies that immediately become accompanied with the heavy grunge sound of the early 90’s. This full length is a great entrance for this band and I think they will be something to lookout for in the near future.

Final Grade = B+ (but almost an A-)
- www.riftmagazine.com


"Rift Magazine review"

by Dan McDonald

There is something about a loud and distorted Fender Jazzmaster sound that is a beautiful thing. This fact is one that resonates throughout this whole record. The record seems to have been mixed in a way that showcases that guitar flavor as well, with the guitar in front of the vocals. I find myself wanting more and more of that dirty thick guitar tone and then boom…there it is again, and even heavier. Perhaps this is one reason why I see resemblance to Dinosaur Jr., as that heavy Jazzmaster sound is what J. Mascis is known for. This record is full of little surprises and gems.

The intro has somewhat of a Wilco sound to it and plays heavily with textures, sets the tone for the record nicely. “Exit #180” has some pleasing dynamic changes and displays that luscious heavy guitar tone. “Dead Mint Club” is a well structured and written album highlight. “Dark Mood” has a really interesting slide guitar and is definitely a highlight of the album. The closing track, “Life Boat” is really nice and has great flow to it and leaves you wanting more, which is always a good way to end a record.

Porcupine show plenty of playfulness with quirky guitar melodies that immediately become accompanied with the heavy grunge sound of the early 90’s. This full length is a great entrance for this band and I think they will be something to lookout for in the near future.

Final Grade = B+ (but almost an A-)
- www.riftmagazine.com


"Subba Cultcha review"

A nice slice of contemporary rock with its own flavour

Categorising music by genre may be an inexact science at best – and getting more and more so as genre lines continue to be blurred by an ever-increasing flood of artists looking for creative space and that all-elusive original sound. Even so, Porcupine have done rather well to find such a sound while remaining simultaneously accessible and musically adept.

The fact that this is their debut would be even more impressive if I were unaware that they share a hefty musical CV including such noteworthy types as Space Bike and Remover. That notwithstanding, “The Trouble With You” is a smooth and absorbing listen which somehow manages to fill the space betwixt Queen and Queens Of The Stone Age.

Add in a pinch of Muse – for the clever and occasionally bewildering time changes – and some Shudder To Think and you’ve got yourself a reasonable idea of where these Midwesterners are coming from, musically speaking. An interesting record which, with the right backing, could see these chaps attain new heights in their musical careers.

- www.subba-cultcha.com


"Leicester Bangs review"

Porcupine – The Trouble With You (Blue Worm Records)
Mix Queens of the Stone Age, Chilli Pepper rhythms and Bob Mould melodic rock overload and you begin to get the essence of Minneapolis threesome Porcupine. But to define them by their influences doesn't do justice to the drive, subtlety and unique sound of their first CD. All three members are veterans of the Midwest rock circuit and have come together to blend perfectly, Lyricist and singer Casey Virock fronting with an accomplished performance and adding angular chops and thunderous power chords in equal measure. Drummer Jeffrey Bahr holds the sticks like divining rods but taps a deep torrent of thundering rapids as handily as he drips and dabs a delicate tattoo when needed. David Reinders anchors the ensemble with tricky, melodic bass. Check out the websites, buy the CD, try to resist the swagger of “Dead Mint Club” and the spiky thrust
of “Exit#180” and learn to love Porcupine.
www.porcupineband.com
www.myspace.com/porcupinetheband
Carl J. - Leicester Bangs


"Leicester Bangs review"

Porcupine – The Trouble With You (Blue Worm Records)
Mix Queens of the Stone Age, Chilli Pepper rhythms and Bob Mould melodic rock overload and you begin to get the essence of Minneapolis threesome Porcupine. But to define them by their influences doesn't do justice to the drive, subtlety and unique sound of their first CD. All three members are veterans of the Midwest rock circuit and have come together to blend perfectly, Lyricist and singer Casey Virock fronting with an accomplished performance and adding angular chops and thunderous power chords in equal measure. Drummer Jeffrey Bahr holds the sticks like divining rods but taps a deep torrent of thundering rapids as handily as he drips and dabs a delicate tattoo when needed. David Reinders anchors the ensemble with tricky, melodic bass. Check out the websites, buy the CD, try to resist the swagger of “Dead Mint Club” and the spiky thrust
of “Exit#180” and learn to love Porcupine.
www.porcupineband.com
www.myspace.com/porcupinetheband
Carl J. - Leicester Bangs


"Collective Zine review"

Reviewed by Phil Differ
Porcupine generate enough hooks to open a fishing appliance store with the Queens of the Stone Age influenced grooves as the most popular choice of bait. Grungy infectious bass lines, my favorite aspect of this album, are complimented by an impeccable tone. The guitar playing is influenced by an array of bands ranging from Led Zeppelin to Unwound, utilizing this factor to create something unique and original. The concrete drums and bass work in unison as a solid backbone while the guitarist and his vocals occasionally wander off, returning to provide the instrumentation a real punch. My only trifling complaint is that the band’s sound would be enhanced with gruffer vocals. At first I was not too keen on the vocals, yet after a few listens I have warmed to them more. At first I thought they sounded like Brandon Boyd but now although I can’t think of a suitable comparison they are far more enjoyable.

The album stars with a short Yo La Tengo intro which sets the mood perfectly. The band’s songwriting capabilities flourish and intensify throughout, as cleverly assembled songs such as ‘Picture Perfect’ and ‘Go Getter’ are the album’s pinnacle tracks. The latter of these two tracks has one of the best arrangements I have heard in a while. ‘The Trouble With You’ progresses in a magnificent manner with each individual idea searching for originality and all the concepts joining to reach the same destination. You can almost caress the chemistry this band maintains, something which also differentiates Porcupine from the flock. Safety is a common characteristic present in the sound of many new bands and it’s exciting when you hear a band taking a gamble. As much as I love stuff like grind and doom, catchy shit can pack a punch with as much force. As mentioned before the grungy bass lines steal the show for me on this one.
- Collective Zine


"Collective Zine review"

Reviewed by Phil Differ
Porcupine generate enough hooks to open a fishing appliance store with the Queens of the Stone Age influenced grooves as the most popular choice of bait. Grungy infectious bass lines, my favorite aspect of this album, are complimented by an impeccable tone. The guitar playing is influenced by an array of bands ranging from Led Zeppelin to Unwound, utilizing this factor to create something unique and original. The concrete drums and bass work in unison as a solid backbone while the guitarist and his vocals occasionally wander off, returning to provide the instrumentation a real punch. My only trifling complaint is that the band’s sound would be enhanced with gruffer vocals. At first I was not too keen on the vocals, yet after a few listens I have warmed to them more. At first I thought they sounded like Brandon Boyd but now although I can’t think of a suitable comparison they are far more enjoyable.

The album stars with a short Yo La Tengo intro which sets the mood perfectly. The band’s songwriting capabilities flourish and intensify throughout, as cleverly assembled songs such as ‘Picture Perfect’ and ‘Go Getter’ are the album’s pinnacle tracks. The latter of these two tracks has one of the best arrangements I have heard in a while. ‘The Trouble With You’ progresses in a magnificent manner with each individual idea searching for originality and all the concepts joining to reach the same destination. You can almost caress the chemistry this band maintains, something which also differentiates Porcupine from the flock. Safety is a common characteristic present in the sound of many new bands and it’s exciting when you hear a band taking a gamble. As much as I love stuff like grind and doom, catchy shit can pack a punch with as much force. As mentioned before the grungy bass lines steal the show for me on this one.
- Collective Zine


"Hubbub UK review"

The debut album from Wisconsin’s Porcupine opens with the sound of a train pulling into a station in Austria, a station that the band admit themselves they have never been yet have heard is very nice. It sure is an interesting way of opening an album and heralds the arrival of the first track on The Trouble with You, appropriately entitled “Intro”. A sublime combination of guitar based rock with a funky undertone is to follow. Though a debut album these boys from the mid-west (Casey Virock, David Reindeers and Jeffrey Bahr) are no virgins to the music scene having performed with the likes of Space Bike, Junk Farm and Remover between them. With a sound that makes any kind of genre pigeonholing near enough impossible, it is best just to appreciate the likes of “Books”, “Dark Mood” and “Life Boat” for the truly superb songs that they are. Look out for the guys at a train station near you. - Hubbub UK


"Hubbub UK review"

The debut album from Wisconsin’s Porcupine opens with the sound of a train pulling into a station in Austria, a station that the band admit themselves they have never been yet have heard is very nice. It sure is an interesting way of opening an album and heralds the arrival of the first track on The Trouble with You, appropriately entitled “Intro”. A sublime combination of guitar based rock with a funky undertone is to follow. Though a debut album these boys from the mid-west (Casey Virock, David Reindeers and Jeffrey Bahr) are no virgins to the music scene having performed with the likes of Space Bike, Junk Farm and Remover between them. With a sound that makes any kind of genre pigeonholing near enough impossible, it is best just to appreciate the likes of “Books”, “Dark Mood” and “Life Boat” for the truly superb songs that they are. Look out for the guys at a train station near you. - Hubbub UK


"Next Clues review"

Review from www.nextclues.com (Translated fron French)

PORCUPINE
THE TROUBLE WITH YOU[CD]
BLUE WORM RECORDS
2009
This small animal
is jerked like a sea urchin. When you open it, inside you find a bunch of pretty little melodies, indie-rock songs and a captivating power pop that is colored leaves swallow without pouting. Perhaps therein lies the problem, the trouble with Porcupine: Where is the iodine? The subject is not as difficult as it seems, Porcupine lack of spice.Yet all is cleverly tied, because for them, these old timers in the Midwest (two former Space Bikes + a Remover groups nineties who had failed to know their heyday in the Minneapolis area) were better than the experience and hours of flight time. They have a sense of melody, and that's undeniable. The eleven tracks are catchy and should logically I dig the skull to lodge in my brain for eternity, but I might try at any time of day, every time something gets stuck.Even when my mood is set fair, it goes well, then it stops soon. And every time I feel I miss a good thing - so I thought to use exceptionally objectivity for this chronic, but I will not apologize because that is something pathetic, or just average as is the case here.Initially I thought it was because I had been badly used in pop, that once you had been contaminated (lubricated) by XTC, there was nothing to do. That the remainder of any such public could toil as he wanted, he would never peg as the Mayor of Simpleton, and listen to songs Gentillet but malicious, I'd better highlight recent albums of swindoniens, the undesirables who are not so rotten they want to believe. Well, Nonsuch, it's been years.I then let rest.

When I return, I Regout to another influence that jumps to the ear, the Beatles, and understand a little better what is wrong. Instead of a Rubber Soul that oozes out of a revolver, one feels the 70's pointing the nose. It starts to stink the Lennon solo - or worse, a duet with Ono - and George Harrison in a garden gnomes (My Sweet Lord 45t was my favorite when I was four, tied with Joe's America Dassin - I got it). Electricity and a bit more saturation.But not too much. It's not totally that. This is not America. I leave a longer rest.

Since the beginning, the porcupine hid anything. It was not the small side Foo Fighters bothered me. It was not felt to be landed on a group cursed the Hardvark - another strange animal - too good to hold its own knowledge of the game there was another great influence evident in that ... but I found it ... So I let rest a little.

Last attempt. I. Damn, it took me time - they would not have said it immediately in their bio, which I based my brains a bit? - Big Star. Porcupine Big Star. Or rather Alex Chilton with the Posies in backing band. So why the effect is the same. I know I should find it very well, but I can never really relax me and let me board because of fucking 70's influences that float, or rather who sank the ship.Big Star (even with three real historical album), I think it's always great for two pieces, the third, I'm getting pissed off, and the fourth that I graze total. The Only Ones also have always provoked the effect of rapid saturation. Will understand.Another girl, another planet, I still let stand one last time? This time I think not, we'll stop there, with the feeling that The Trouble With You is especially The Trouble With Me, because I certainly am not old enough - yet ... - and not enough loser (it not) to inflict the power pop cracked and perky, even if finally, two of his virtues are to rest their ears and give a smile.

About excessive cleanliness: Men of the Porcupine had with Blue Worm Records, this disc is pressed into a housing certified 100% organic, 10% minimum from recycled, 100% vegetable ink ... (all must weigh half a gram) ... I wonder why the more thorny issue of lack meat ... damn tree huggers ...
(6.5/10) - www.nextclues.com


"Next Clues review"

Review from www.nextclues.com (Translated fron French)

PORCUPINE
THE TROUBLE WITH YOU[CD]
BLUE WORM RECORDS
2009
This small animal
is jerked like a sea urchin. When you open it, inside you find a bunch of pretty little melodies, indie-rock songs and a captivating power pop that is colored leaves swallow without pouting. Perhaps therein lies the problem, the trouble with Porcupine: Where is the iodine? The subject is not as difficult as it seems, Porcupine lack of spice.Yet all is cleverly tied, because for them, these old timers in the Midwest (two former Space Bikes + a Remover groups nineties who had failed to know their heyday in the Minneapolis area) were better than the experience and hours of flight time. They have a sense of melody, and that's undeniable. The eleven tracks are catchy and should logically I dig the skull to lodge in my brain for eternity, but I might try at any time of day, every time something gets stuck.Even when my mood is set fair, it goes well, then it stops soon. And every time I feel I miss a good thing - so I thought to use exceptionally objectivity for this chronic, but I will not apologize because that is something pathetic, or just average as is the case here.Initially I thought it was because I had been badly used in pop, that once you had been contaminated (lubricated) by XTC, there was nothing to do. That the remainder of any such public could toil as he wanted, he would never peg as the Mayor of Simpleton, and listen to songs Gentillet but malicious, I'd better highlight recent albums of swindoniens, the undesirables who are not so rotten they want to believe. Well, Nonsuch, it's been years.I then let rest.

When I return, I Regout to another influence that jumps to the ear, the Beatles, and understand a little better what is wrong. Instead of a Rubber Soul that oozes out of a revolver, one feels the 70's pointing the nose. It starts to stink the Lennon solo - or worse, a duet with Ono - and George Harrison in a garden gnomes (My Sweet Lord 45t was my favorite when I was four, tied with Joe's America Dassin - I got it). Electricity and a bit more saturation.But not too much. It's not totally that. This is not America. I leave a longer rest.

Since the beginning, the porcupine hid anything. It was not the small side Foo Fighters bothered me. It was not felt to be landed on a group cursed the Hardvark - another strange animal - too good to hold its own knowledge of the game there was another great influence evident in that ... but I found it ... So I let rest a little.

Last attempt. I. Damn, it took me time - they would not have said it immediately in their bio, which I based my brains a bit? - Big Star. Porcupine Big Star. Or rather Alex Chilton with the Posies in backing band. So why the effect is the same. I know I should find it very well, but I can never really relax me and let me board because of fucking 70's influences that float, or rather who sank the ship.Big Star (even with three real historical album), I think it's always great for two pieces, the third, I'm getting pissed off, and the fourth that I graze total. The Only Ones also have always provoked the effect of rapid saturation. Will understand.Another girl, another planet, I still let stand one last time? This time I think not, we'll stop there, with the feeling that The Trouble With You is especially The Trouble With Me, because I certainly am not old enough - yet ... - and not enough loser (it not) to inflict the power pop cracked and perky, even if finally, two of his virtues are to rest their ears and give a smile.

About excessive cleanliness: Men of the Porcupine had with Blue Worm Records, this disc is pressed into a housing certified 100% organic, 10% minimum from recycled, 100% vegetable ink ... (all must weigh half a gram) ... I wonder why the more thorny issue of lack meat ... damn tree huggers ...
(6.5/10) - www.nextclues.com


"WLUR 91.5 FM review"

Comments: The Queens of the Stone Age vibe found on Porcupine's album The Trouble With You is pretty undeniable, but not to ill effect. There's a slightly messy, loose quality to the record (and the first half is more successful than the second), but the solid drums and bass keep the sound modern. A bit quirky, it's upbeat pop rock--start with tracks 2 and 4. - Justine Griffin


"WLUR 91.5 FM review"

Comments: The Queens of the Stone Age vibe found on Porcupine's album The Trouble With You is pretty undeniable, but not to ill effect. There's a slightly messy, loose quality to the record (and the first half is more successful than the second), but the solid drums and bass keep the sound modern. A bit quirky, it's upbeat pop rock--start with tracks 2 and 4. - Justine Griffin


Discography

"The Trouble With You"
cd out on Blue Worm Records

"The Sensation of Being Somebody"
cd and vinyl out on Hang Up Records

"Metal Ghost / Porcupine" split 7" single
out on Big Action Records

"A*Star / Porcupine" split 7" single
out on Moon Sounds Records

stream/download all at: www.porcupineband.bandcamp.com

Photos

Bio

La Crosse, Wi trio Porcupine organically forges its singular brand of Rock'n'Roll reminiscent of the late-90s alternative without compromise. Un-yielded by what's trendy, Casey Virock (guitars/vocals) with Dave Reinders (bass) and Ian Prince (drums) derive some of their inspiration from 70's classic rock and 60's British psychedelica, resulting in a Swervedriver meets Queens of The Stone Age type sound.

Porcupine was founded in early 2006 by Casey Virock and Ex-Space Bike Co-Member Davey Reinders. Hoping to spring board off their recent success from Space Bike, including opening slots for Frank Black, The Descendants, The Melvins, The Jesus Lizard and Everclear, Porcupine began touring and playing the Midwest. Over the last 6 years Porcupine has continued to build momentum. They have released two full length LP's, two split 7" singles, a record charting at #115 in the CMJ top 200, opening slots with the Meat Puppets and Mission of Burma and songs featured on T.V. shows, such as, The Real World, Best Ink, and The Challenge.

Ian Prince has been supplying the backbone for top-notch indie bands like Story of the Sea, Houston and Kid Dakota for well over a decade. Possessing the perfect combination of play-for-the-song sensibility and an "all or nothing" attitude, Prince is an undeniable powerhouse on the drums. Porcupine is set to release a new six song EP on Riot House Records in early December.

Band Members