Potzee

Potzee

BandHip Hop

Original Midwest Hip Hop fueled with highly contagious hooks that stand on top of sharp, well planned verses. Currently the single "Dat Girl" is burning up radio stations across the country. They were signed in March of 2005 to Warner Brothers/Asylum.

Biography

The streets already got the word, because the word hit the streets,
blazing like Southern smoke. It takes a fierce skill set to go to bat
with the best MCs in the hip hop game, but Potzee is redefining the
meaning of a St. Louis slugger. The rest of the world is about to find
out about St. Louis's unsung lyrical force when Potzee's full-length
Hongree drops in 06 (Unauthorized/Asylum).

Potzee's already got fans licking their lips in anticipation. He said
"Good Evening" to weak MCs with the breakout buzz record in summer '05
with longtime partner Murphy Lee. Now the club banger "Dat Girl" is
making its way into the clubs and airwaves on both coasts. As Potzee
claims as his alter ego Mister Good Evening," " I'm on the way up and I
ain't never comin' back down.

"Round here they call me the hook master," Potzee says of his trademark
talent, with that Midwestern twang that rides easy over the beat. But
Potzee's got that flow that comes with blending regional styles. "Being
from the Mid, we've been watching everybody all the years," he explains.
"We're a combination of everything. Not too fast, not too slow. We ride
that line on everything."

Potzee's given name is Akio Gray, which means bright boy, a christening
that has proved true time and time again. A protégé of Murphy Lee,
Potzee earned his respect the old fashioned way — grinding his way up
the food chain. 23-year old Potzee first hit the scene in '99 still in
his teens turning up on fiery cuts "Whatever" and "Potential Baller."
He's been touring with the St. Lunatics and spitting rhymes practically
since his high school days in St. Louis's Jennings neighborhood. But
things weren't always sugary sweet for Potzee. He caught a case straight
out of high school that blemished his record with a felony. "While I was
in there I closed my eyes and saw every conversation my father and I
had. I always been in the streets in some kind of way." When Potzee
worked his way through his legal troubles, he changed up his focus,
reuniting with his crew forming the foundations of his group— Quor
made up of Gena, Adonis, Beezy, Youvee and Koole. "I've been through it.
You can make mistakes but you have to learn from mistakes."

While success doesn't come easily in the industry nor the streets, music
does to Potzee. It's in his blood. Raised on the riveting funk of the
Stylistics and Ohio Players, the group his father toured and sang with,
Potzee was exposed to artistry early on. "At that time to get in the
industry you had to be on point in every aspect," Potzee says with
admiration. He takes these lessons to heart with his own approach to
songwriting. "I take the time to come up with a concept and put a song
together. I get a concept then I write my hook. If the hook's not right
then the songs not going to be right."

As sure as a good hook, some things stay tried true. Potzee might be a
young cat, but he's takes the route of an old soul, favoring antiques,
old cars and nostalgic TV sitcoms. " I'm on the old school, that's what
I get from the old heads, you got a little sense." He grabbed his name
from the 1950s TV show Happy Days. "People say you smoke a lot that's
why you did it. I made the name fit to people in the street. The older
people will say" Happy Days," so it won't scare them. My mom is like how
you talking about old TV shows when you so young? I'm like they show
reruns. "Good Times" started before I was even born."

Wherever he draws his motivation, it's a gift that turns up on songs
that jump off at first play. "Dat Girl," produced by Harley Davidson
(Chamillionaire/Pretty Ricky), is a track that has pure club banger
written all over it. Also, keeping the ladies moving is the flavorful
"Bootch" which is all out good time St. Louis speak and bounce. "I just
ride the track, throw in a few metaphors and make them dance a little
bit," Potzee says. "I have the metaphors, but I don't make that my whole
verse."

He keeps it real and raw on "I Ain't Playing With You" remembering
exactly where he comes from. " I want to make sure the verses are
relatable. The average everyday man, he's going through what I went
through. I try to keep everything on that level."

Fresh off Nelly's Sweatsuit tour, Potzee is a self-professed studio rat
when he's staying still in the Lou, buckling down to knock out tracks at
every opportunity. With mixtape teases "Starvin", DJ Smallz & Potzee's
colab "Reloaded' and two hot singles, Potzee has blasted the heat, but
he's standing firm on home plate. "I have a fam where getting by is what
we do. As long as we can pay these bills its okay," he says revealing
his humble side. Potzee is the type of MC who lets his skills speak,
while he takes the humble, be real road and the practical with his indie
imprint U-C-Me. He quotes himself on a joint he calls "More Problems."
It's hard as hell waking up/No job,