Psyche Origami
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Psyche Origami

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The best kept secret in music

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This is the second Psyche Origami 12" I review. Well, to refresh our memories, we can read that review here. At the same time however, we know that this 12" (with selections from the "Is Ellipsis" album) will be remembered, as it includes one incredible song.
And the song is another case of 'the b-side wins again', because "Dead Right" is just hard to beat like that. The piano sample is incredible. And it goes and goes and goes before Wyzsztyk is even saying a single word. Instead he searches through his rhyme book to just find the proper lyrics to bless this incredible music. Wyz' decided to spit some representing and some conscious (like "I can't sweat tomorrow because I'm hungry today") lyrics over the harder drum that gets added to the piano. Even though the sample sounds quite spiritual, the combination with braggadocio still works, and thus this song is just butters. The biggest 'fault' about this song is that it ends a little sudden. Actually it just breaks apart, as if the producer didn't know how to properly end this. Even though he ends the song the same way as he leads from the intro into the song. That doesn't make it better though.
There's however two more offerings on here, both on the a-side. The first is "Nuff Teef", a song opening with a nifty little 'but you can't have it, you don't have enough teeth to chew it' sample. This song pulls a rap version of 'I can't get no satisfaction', as that's what Wyzsztyk is talking about. At the same time he also gets a couple of boasting verses in there, again balancing two elements on a song. Finally there's "Eye Detector" and here the 'I'm bigger than you' reigns supreme. The beat got harder too, and it shows that in a very different way, Psyche Origami can do more than just one good song, as this is the second on this 12".

- Tadah


These guys take your psyche and fold it up into new creations...combining the smooth, dope ass elements of A Tribe Called Quest with supreme DJing skills... - CM


PSYCHE ORIGAMI: The Standard
Backpacker hip-hop trio Psyche Origami's sophomore LP, The Standard, is named after the imaginary petroleum station depicted on its sleeve. The Atlanta-based trio owes more to Bay Area turntablist rap than to Organized Noize, so while the album explores a world of Snickers, Newports and gallons of windshield wiper fluid, there's also an added aisle for social commentary. MC Wyzsztyk takes cues from Gift Of Gab and Del, while crate-digger DJs Dainja and Synthesis fill the breaks with dialogue snippets and jazz loops (along with percussive accents from studio players). It's a little like Madlib if he stayed up all night watching Clerkswith Cut Chemist. On "Directions,"Wyzsztyk remains earnest even when mixing the metaphysical with Battlebots. "When in doubt," he raps. "MapQuest a route to any place outside of the box."The rhymes on "Commercial Property" even mimic a bored attendant channel surfing. It's a gas.
- Reed Fischer
- CMJ New Music Monthly


Atlanta’s Psyche Origami has a lineup that’s almost as unorthodox as their name. The group’s two DJs (Synthisis and Dainja) do double duty on the decks while MC Wzysztyk (pronounced Wiz-stick) handles the mic. What’s even stranger is that the group’s sound breaks heavily from their city of origin. The ATL is mostly characterized by Magic City-patronizing, skeet-happy members of the WHAT! Generation; Psyche, on the other hand, has more in common with Jurassic 5 than YoungbloodZ. Their playful, bop-heavy style suggests an undeniable Left Coast influence.

The Standard is set around a simple concept—our dudes work at a gas station. Pretty much every track begins with some sort of underhanded dialogue that befits the shirt-with-a-nametag-sewn-on occupation. While this sounds about as stimulating as a Young Jeezy Christmas album, the seemingly mundane notion allows for some humorous and appealing musical extrapolation. While Wyzsztyk (damn that’s a lot of consonants!) doesn’t stray too far from the verbal precedents set by the likes of J5 and company, he still manages to unify his abilities with the efforts of his wax-scratching backers.

Album opener “Fool Service” is rife with sunny loops and key breaks that suggest Synthisis and Dainja have done some heavy digging in the secondhand crates. This discipline is displayed through The Standard; while it gets a bit old at some points, the specificity of it all merits some forgiveness. The record’s most energetic production comes in the form of “Commercial Property.” The jabbing synthetic keys and just-passin’-through horn riffs help detract from the fact that Wyz’s verses sound a whole, whole lot like the Fresh Prince (hey, it’s not that bad). Guest rapper Binkis also contributes his slurry, drunken Ghostface-esque flow to the track.

“Wherever You Are” features Wyz telling other cliques that, much like a cartographer on a power trip, Psyche’s modus operandi is “mapping out coordinates and smashing insubordinates.” The title track’s luscious snares accompany the rapper as he opines over pretenders that “try to set it, but must be overdosing on that local anesthetic.”

Okay, so Psyche Origami isn’t the most original group in the world. But hell, not too many people coming out of Atlanta sound like this. At its best, The Standard is a refreshing umbrella-adorned drink sipped beneath the scorching Georgia sun. And at its worst? It’s sure to be an inspiration to every bored high school kid slaving away at their local Sunoco station.

– Drew Lazor
- Okayplayer


The mind is a labyrinth, and few have mastered its shadowy inner workings with as much brain-bending fortitude as Psyche Origami. The trio -- MC Wyzsztyk (pronounced wiz-stick), and DJs Dainja and Synthesis -- weaves a complex web of beats and lyrical breakdowns that culminate in a heady and abstract cerebral stew. Now, with the release of its first full-length offering, Is Ellipsis ... (Arc the Finger Records), the group's impeccable transition from the studio to the stage is wholly documented.
When Psyche Origami (then operating as a duo without Dainja) dropped the Perforated EP (Royal Fuzz) in 2001, the group's fast and complicated style was enough to make even the most progressive hip-hop heads take notice. Twisting eccentric urban leanings into concept-driven hip-hop gave the group a sophisticated edge. But it wasn't until taking the act to a live setting that Psyche Origami truly shined.
Shortly after releasing Perforated, the group enlisted the able hands of Dainja to add another level to the arrangements and bring clarity to the live set. "There's stuff on the recordings that needs four hands if you're going to pull it off live," says Synthesis. "We added live interludes to [Is Ellipsis...] to show that when we're on-stage, we really do make it work."
Wyzsztyk adds, "We wanted the complexities from the record to translate to the live set. And with Dainja on board, we really do make it work. The sum is greater than the parts."
- Creative Loafing


Saturday, February 28, Tasty World

Success is not just about grabbing attention. It's about setting yourself apart - immediately - from other acts. That's one of the reasons Atlanta's progressive underground hip hop act Psyche Origami employs its two-DJs-one-MC style. "I think if someone walks into a Psyche show," says Wyzsztk,

the group's enthusiastic frontman, "they'll see two DJs spinning, and that's not what they've always come to expect. Usually it's 'x' amount of MCs with one DJ... for me, I look at it as three MCs, really, because these guys [DJ's Dainja and Synthesis], they'll chime in with ad-libbed scratches or rhythm scratches in unison, building off each other."
The Atlanta trio released its debut full-length, the impressive Is Ellipsis, in November of 2003. The album features guest spots from several ATL undergrounders and works as a light-hearted paean to old-school beats. "With my writing style," says Wyzsztyk (pronounced wiz-stick), "I like to take time with the track. Some cats like to get it out and knock it down fast, but I like to make every line count and to make sure the songs have continuity." As evidence, note Is Ellipsis' emphasis on forward-thinking ideals and its refutation of mainstream hip hop thought; Wyz's wordplay may amuse at first, but second listens aim for headier revelations.
Despite the strength of the album, the three seek to present live show and album as separate experiences. Says Wyzsztyk: "These mainstream guys that have supposedly so much money, but they can't have their music pressed to wax and hire a DJ, and will play their hit - twice! - off a CD? It hurts! Our live show, with its dueling DJ segment, gives people something to remember. Let the album bring them out, then we'll show them live what it's about." [Chris Hassiotis]
- Flagpole


Comprised of two DJs and one MC, Atlanta's Psyche Origami reminds me of a time when I actually enjoyed a lot of hip-hop. Groups like A Tribe Called Quest, Boogie Down Productions, and De La Soul gave the listener something to think about while also having fun without the crunk-n-bling of what passes for hip-hop today. And that's exactly what Psyche Origami is bringing back on Is Ellipsis. DJs Dainja and Synthesis supply jazzy beats while MC Wyzsztyk flows old school, giving songs like "The Wharf Song," "Eye Detector" and "Perspective" a smooth, laid back vibe. And remember that onetime hip-hop staple called record scratching? Psyche Origami not only remembers it, but also does it very well. For all the substance missing in mainstream hip-hop, Psyche Origami's underground sound provides more than enough to make up for it. - Prick Magazine


Comprised of two DJs and one MC, Atlanta's Psyche Origami reminds me of a time when I actually enjoyed a lot of hip-hop. Groups like A Tribe Called Quest, Boogie Down Productions, and De La Soul gave the listener something to think about while also having fun without the crunk-n-bling of what passes for hip-hop today. And that's exactly what Psyche Origami is bringing back on Is Ellipsis. DJs Dainja and Synthesis supply jazzy beats while MC Wyzsztyk flows old school, giving songs like "The Wharf Song," "Eye Detector" and "Perspective" a smooth, laid back vibe. And remember that onetime hip-hop staple called record scratching? Psyche Origami not only remembers it, but also does it very well. For all the substance missing in mainstream hip-hop, Psyche Origami's underground sound provides more than enough to make up for it.

- Jonathan Williams (Music Editor) - Prick Magazine


Psyche Origami's website claims that the group has the “intent of turning the audience's concept of 'hip-hop music' on its head,” and the group's debut full-length Is Ellipsis might just do so, at least locally. In a city dominated by a certain kind of dirty-south-influenced hip-hop, a group of Psyche Origami's caliber is unfortunately a rarity. While the group doesn't exactly break any untouched ground, they do adhere to a seemingly-forgotten aesthetic usually associated with groups like De La Soul and Tribe Called Quest. The musical turntable skills of dueling DJs Synthesis and Dainja are refreshingly impressive in an age of MPC samplers and DigiDesign ProTools. These two are true artists; they approach the turntables with a fantastic musical sensibility that shows a deep appreciation of arrangement. Mixing original samples with great vinyl choices, Psyche Origami crafts lusciously interesting tracks on which lyricist Wyzsztyk can work his vocal magic. MC Wyzsztyk is a hip-hop lyricist of the finest variety, weaving his words into the tracks with cool precision. Without relying upon an overuse of obscenities he is able to relate stories on a wide range of subjects, all the while maintaining an air of sophistication uncommon in most modern hip-hop music. Is Ellipsis is a hip-hop record of top quality; the tracks are interesting, refreshing, and inviting. Hopefully, Psyche Origami's brand of hip-hop will find a wider audience and return a bit of the lost musical dignity of which the current musical community is in such dire need. - Performer Magazine


Atlanta-based ArcTheFinger releases two records representing the ATL’s indie rap scene. Utilizing two DJ’s and an MC, Psyche Origami puts the emphasis on communication. Between the DJ’s exchanging Boom bap like badminton and the noddin knowledge spit through the mic, Psyche Origami is quick to the Cut. - XLR8R


Discography

Get Gassed Up - 12" Single - Nov.2006
The Standard - LP - Nov.2005
Wherever You Are - 12" Single - Oct.2005
At Last - 12" Single - Oct. 04
Nuff Teef - 12" Single - Jan. 2004
Is Ellipsis - LP - Nov. 2003
Perspective - 12" Single - 2002
The Perforated EP - 2002

Photos

Feeling a bit camera shy

Bio

BIOGRAPHY:
4 Turntables: 1 Mic. A State-Of-The-Art Spin on the Foundations of Hip-hop. Dubbed "head-change music," Psyche Origami's material walks the thin line between "conscious" music and "party" music, with a live show that brings the content of the records to an even higher level.

The three 12" singles cut from "Is Ellipsis," the first Psyche O full length, enjoyed heavy rotation on college radio nationwide and were a favorite of New York's SURE and California's Heavyweights record pools. The singles were also a top seller in the US and Japan through TRC Distribution. In 2004-05, PO toured 36 US markets. Due in large part to the exposure gained through this aggressive tour schedule, "Is Ellipsis" was picked up by RedEye Distribution and is available in Virgin Megastores, Borders Books and Music, Best Buy and an assortment of independent stores nationwide, as well as online through Amazon.com , I-Tunes, and sandboxautomatic.com.

Sharing the stage with such heavyweights as Jurassic Five, Talib Kweli, and Ludacris, Psyche O has started to make itself known for entertaining shows that bring back the feel of the 'Golden Age' from which it was spawn. This Atlanta bred act has also been fortunate enough to have music featured on Cartoon Network's Adult Swim programming.

"Get Gassed Up" is the second single to be released from the ambitious PO sophomore effort, "The Standard": a thematic album that uses a metaphorical gas station as a backdrop to convey thoughts centered around the idea that if the body is a vehicle, what would the gas station sound like that refueled it. "The Standard" is a mostly lighthearted Hip-hop exploration of the human condition and of the realities we create, and touches on themes such as convenience, motivation, and service. 'The Standard' reached #1 on the CMJ Music charts and held a top ten position for over 6 weeks. The 'Get Gassed Up' single was picked up by Fat Beats Distribution in August of 2006.

After 'The Standard', Psyche Origami plans on extending its creative range with a project that is less thematic, but just as powerful in message and scope. "The idea is to keep the listeners on their toes. Our fans are a demanding bunch, and each time we raise the bar to satisy our previous fans as well as continuing to rope in new ones", says Mr. Wyzard, emcee/producer of Psyche Origami. With that said, look out for a new Psyche Origami album in 2007.