PVC Street Gang
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PVC Street Gang

Dallas, Texas, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2009 | SELF

Dallas, Texas, United States | SELF
Established on Jan, 2009
Band Rock Avant-garde

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Were it not for Turbo Fruits' own somewhat in-your-face set, the night would've belong to PVC Street Gang, for sure, and not just because of the yucks attendees had over the fact that the PVC dudes have gone to almost painstaking efforts to make their new EP's packaging resemble a stomped-on cocaine baggie. The band, thankfully performing around town with some regularity again, offered up an unrelenting display for their 40-or-so-minute offering, reminding everyone in the room why Dallas was so up in arms over these guys when they broke through-ish (locally, at least) with their still-great 2009 single, "Cutlass." - Central Track


Were it not for Turbo Fruits' own somewhat in-your-face set, the night would've belong to PVC Street Gang, for sure, and not just because of the yucks attendees had over the fact that the PVC dudes have gone to almost painstaking efforts to make their new EP's packaging resemble a stomped-on cocaine baggie. The band, thankfully performing around town with some regularity again, offered up an unrelenting display for their 40-or-so-minute offering, reminding everyone in the room why Dallas was so up in arms over these guys when they broke through-ish (locally, at least) with their still-great 2009 single, "Cutlass." - Central Track


It all began quite simply enough. As the PVC Street Gang was finishing up their set at this year's Lumberjack Fest in Denton at Dan's, venerable guitarist and all-around goofball, Ryan Thomas Becker, began grinding suggestively against a slim, petite brunette just near the front door.

PVC Street Gang finished Cutlass, the song that was the soundtrack to the dance party, and the entire audience of close to 200 exploded in raucous applause, largely for the band, but also for the side show.

It was that moment that snapped this year's Lumberjack Fest into place, and afterward, people all around the bar could be heard saying things like, "This band is nuts!" or "Man, I love this band! Been seeing them since, like, 08."
- Dallas Observer


It all began quite simply enough. As the PVC Street Gang was finishing up their set at this year's Lumberjack Fest in Denton at Dan's, venerable guitarist and all-around goofball, Ryan Thomas Becker, began grinding suggestively against a slim, petite brunette just near the front door.

PVC Street Gang finished Cutlass, the song that was the soundtrack to the dance party, and the entire audience of close to 200 exploded in raucous applause, largely for the band, but also for the side show.

It was that moment that snapped this year's Lumberjack Fest into place, and afterward, people all around the bar could be heard saying things like, "This band is nuts!" or "Man, I love this band! Been seeing them since, like, 08."
- Dallas Observer


The PVC Street Gang is a rock band. Explain more than that is unnecessary, but then I would not post, or blog, to write, and I have a family to support with my salary blogger.

I say this because a hearing of Cutlass just to find everything that you like or that ever liked rock, waiting for a fine specimen of the genre. Do not miss it.

The beat and bass are undeniable and have been operating for decades, the voice has that rare balance between anger and mockery; guitars, punchy, cut here and there. All sentences are propaganda, slogans ready to bradados aloud.

Cutlass is very, very simple, but there is intelligence in the way pop music was assembled: the pause climate in which only remain low and hit, and hit or vocal or guitar and the beat. When one realizes, and spent the whole song was not dull, because there were always small changes around you. This is not for anyone.

Best rock song of 2009 so far? Look, be in danger. And please stop with this lazy litany of "rock is dead". He always knew how to adapt to the zeitgeist, in sound and aesthetics. Looks like a cockroach. - DOMINODROMO


The PVC Street Gang is a rock band. Explain more than that is unnecessary, but then I would not post, or blog, to write, and I have a family to support with my salary blogger.

I say this because a hearing of Cutlass just to find everything that you like or that ever liked rock, waiting for a fine specimen of the genre. Do not miss it.

The beat and bass are undeniable and have been operating for decades, the voice has that rare balance between anger and mockery; guitars, punchy, cut here and there. All sentences are propaganda, slogans ready to bradados aloud.

Cutlass is very, very simple, but there is intelligence in the way pop music was assembled: the pause climate in which only remain low and hit, and hit or vocal or guitar and the beat. When one realizes, and spent the whole song was not dull, because there were always small changes around you. This is not for anyone.

Best rock song of 2009 so far? Look, be in danger. And please stop with this lazy litany of "rock is dead". He always knew how to adapt to the zeitgeist, in sound and aesthetics. Looks like a cockroach. - DOMINODROMO


It’s one of the songs of the summer, and you may not have heard it yet. “Cutlass” by PVC Street Gang is comprised of four simple elements: a basic bass line, minimal percussion, fuzzy guitars, and unison vocals. What makes it so amazing, though, is that each ingredient is used so sparingly. The end result: a white hot song that demands for you to dance.

But the PVC Street Gang fun doesn’t stop with “Cutlass.” Their entire self-titled EP, which was released in June, is surprisingly dynamic for only having five songs. There’s the organ-toting and spooky “Nightmare City” and the sparse crooner, “Wolf Heart Torso.” But even though the songs don’t follow the same formula throughout, the EP upholds a fluidity throughout that’s important for any record to have.

PVC Street Gang just one more testament to why you should be paying attention to Denton, Tx. Between their EP and the work of Fergus & Geronimo, that town is a hotbed for incredible music. - FIVE TUNES


It’s one of the songs of the summer, and you may not have heard it yet. “Cutlass” by PVC Street Gang is comprised of four simple elements: a basic bass line, minimal percussion, fuzzy guitars, and unison vocals. What makes it so amazing, though, is that each ingredient is used so sparingly. The end result: a white hot song that demands for you to dance.

But the PVC Street Gang fun doesn’t stop with “Cutlass.” Their entire self-titled EP, which was released in June, is surprisingly dynamic for only having five songs. There’s the organ-toting and spooky “Nightmare City” and the sparse crooner, “Wolf Heart Torso.” But even though the songs don’t follow the same formula throughout, the EP upholds a fluidity throughout that’s important for any record to have.

PVC Street Gang just one more testament to why you should be paying attention to Denton, Tx. Between their EP and the work of Fergus & Geronimo, that town is a hotbed for incredible music. - FIVE TUNES




If the three members of Denton's PVC Street Gang didn't tell you that they were in a band, chances are you would mistake them for out-of-work computer programmers and motley ones at that.

"Well, I am currently out of work," singer/guitarist Chris McGaha says with a chuckle. Bald, stout and seemingly oblivious to the current economic downturn, McGaha remains in good spirits; perhaps that's because the band he sort of founded back in 2006 is starting to gain some notice.

"We like where the band is now," he says. "This all started with me making my own beats on a shitty Casio keyboard and a distortion pedal. But, eventually, you look up and everybody is in the band for the same reason."

That reason? A soon-to-be-released debut EP, a projected summer release of a full-length effort and a multitude of gigs. Not bad for some guys who didn't even know the others existed until a couple of years ago.

"We are a very, very, very, very good band," bassist Chris Vivion jokes. "This is the first time in my life that I've been able to rely on other people to get shit done."

Tall and shaggy, Vivion comes off as McGaha's polar opposite. Yet the pair (who met at a party on Fry Street in Denton in late 2007) have a symbiosis that has enabled them to relatively quickly write a bevy of top-notch material.

And you'll be able to hear that material any day now, when PVC Street Gang's debut EP is finally released.

"We're just waiting for duplication," Vivion says, shrugging.

Included on the CD will be "Cutlass," the band's signature statement—if three slackers from North Texas can even have a signature statement. Yet "Cutlass" is indeed a wonder to hear, an oddball amalgamation of post-punk, electropop and fey hip-hop that is both catchy and creepy. It's been listened to on the band's MySpace page nearly 10,000 times.

"Most of those were by me from my other MySpace page," McGaha says, snorting. "What's funny is that 'Cutlass' came together in 15 minutes, and Chris and I just looked at each other and knew it was cool."

Other cool tracks include "Nightmare City," "Secret Society" and "Night Terrors," songs that successfully merge the classically sleazy synths of Suicide with the propulsive guitar work of Gang of Four. Both "Cutlass" and "Night Terrors" have already been turned into appropriately disturbing and claustrophobic videos. Again, not bad for a trio of guys who look like they may, at any time, ask you for a handout.

Besides their music, not much else about these guys could be described as cool. Sitting with the trio at a Vietnamese eatery in Deep Ellum, it's easy to get the feeling that you're providing some sort of charitable service just by talking with these dudes.

Hell, they even got the band name wrong: Former member Jeff Moore thought he was referencing the film Apocalypse Now with the name choice, but it turns out the military boat in the film is called PBR Street Gang. Whoops.

"After a few shows, we realized that we got the name wrong, but we figured, fuck it, we were stuck with it," McGaha says. "Now we get people thinking we're plumbers."

Though most of the tracks on the forthcoming EP were made with a drum machine, McGaha and Vivion knew they eventually wanted to beef up the sound with a third player. They found that member when Klearlight Studio engineer Jimi Bowman recommended session drummer Pete Young (who has worked with Glen Reynolds, Paul Slavens and Corn Mo, among others) as Vivion and McGaha were recording some early demos. Although nearly a decade older than Vivion and McGaha, Young fit in perfectly—which in this case, yes, means he's almost as fucked up as the other two.

A married father of two, Young comes across like a community college professor who was fired for having porn on his computer. Perpetually smiling, with a caustic sense of humor, Young's experience and talent offer the perfect bonding agent for the warped creativity of his bandmates.

"I've played with a lot of bands, metal acts, all kinds," Young says. "And I feel really comfortable with these guys."

And though they're exceedingly laid-back in person, when placed in front of a crowd, the trio manages to summon anger from hitherto unknown sources to become one of the area's best live acts.

"It's an energy thing, man," McGaha says. "There's obviously a sense of tension out there. We try to put the aggression out there for everybody."

So far, "everybody" has meant audiences in Denton, Dallas and Fort Worth, plus the ones they've played for during a few shows in Austin.

Each member's job (or lack thereof) allows him the flexibility necessary to play gigs—lots of gigs. Seemingly every weekend, it's possible to spot PVC Street Gang's name on an area marquee, sometimes more than once.

"Luckily," McGaha says, "no one has gotten sick of us yet."

And, chances are, as long as these guys keep showing the originality and chutzpah they already have, few are going to tire of their sh - Dallas Observer.com




If the three members of Denton's PVC Street Gang didn't tell you that they were in a band, chances are you would mistake them for out-of-work computer programmers and motley ones at that.

"Well, I am currently out of work," singer/guitarist Chris McGaha says with a chuckle. Bald, stout and seemingly oblivious to the current economic downturn, McGaha remains in good spirits; perhaps that's because the band he sort of founded back in 2006 is starting to gain some notice.

"We like where the band is now," he says. "This all started with me making my own beats on a shitty Casio keyboard and a distortion pedal. But, eventually, you look up and everybody is in the band for the same reason."

That reason? A soon-to-be-released debut EP, a projected summer release of a full-length effort and a multitude of gigs. Not bad for some guys who didn't even know the others existed until a couple of years ago.

"We are a very, very, very, very good band," bassist Chris Vivion jokes. "This is the first time in my life that I've been able to rely on other people to get shit done."

Tall and shaggy, Vivion comes off as McGaha's polar opposite. Yet the pair (who met at a party on Fry Street in Denton in late 2007) have a symbiosis that has enabled them to relatively quickly write a bevy of top-notch material.

And you'll be able to hear that material any day now, when PVC Street Gang's debut EP is finally released.

"We're just waiting for duplication," Vivion says, shrugging.

Included on the CD will be "Cutlass," the band's signature statement—if three slackers from North Texas can even have a signature statement. Yet "Cutlass" is indeed a wonder to hear, an oddball amalgamation of post-punk, electropop and fey hip-hop that is both catchy and creepy. It's been listened to on the band's MySpace page nearly 10,000 times.

"Most of those were by me from my other MySpace page," McGaha says, snorting. "What's funny is that 'Cutlass' came together in 15 minutes, and Chris and I just looked at each other and knew it was cool."

Other cool tracks include "Nightmare City," "Secret Society" and "Night Terrors," songs that successfully merge the classically sleazy synths of Suicide with the propulsive guitar work of Gang of Four. Both "Cutlass" and "Night Terrors" have already been turned into appropriately disturbing and claustrophobic videos. Again, not bad for a trio of guys who look like they may, at any time, ask you for a handout.

Besides their music, not much else about these guys could be described as cool. Sitting with the trio at a Vietnamese eatery in Deep Ellum, it's easy to get the feeling that you're providing some sort of charitable service just by talking with these dudes.

Hell, they even got the band name wrong: Former member Jeff Moore thought he was referencing the film Apocalypse Now with the name choice, but it turns out the military boat in the film is called PBR Street Gang. Whoops.

"After a few shows, we realized that we got the name wrong, but we figured, fuck it, we were stuck with it," McGaha says. "Now we get people thinking we're plumbers."

Though most of the tracks on the forthcoming EP were made with a drum machine, McGaha and Vivion knew they eventually wanted to beef up the sound with a third player. They found that member when Klearlight Studio engineer Jimi Bowman recommended session drummer Pete Young (who has worked with Glen Reynolds, Paul Slavens and Corn Mo, among others) as Vivion and McGaha were recording some early demos. Although nearly a decade older than Vivion and McGaha, Young fit in perfectly—which in this case, yes, means he's almost as fucked up as the other two.

A married father of two, Young comes across like a community college professor who was fired for having porn on his computer. Perpetually smiling, with a caustic sense of humor, Young's experience and talent offer the perfect bonding agent for the warped creativity of his bandmates.

"I've played with a lot of bands, metal acts, all kinds," Young says. "And I feel really comfortable with these guys."

And though they're exceedingly laid-back in person, when placed in front of a crowd, the trio manages to summon anger from hitherto unknown sources to become one of the area's best live acts.

"It's an energy thing, man," McGaha says. "There's obviously a sense of tension out there. We try to put the aggression out there for everybody."

So far, "everybody" has meant audiences in Denton, Dallas and Fort Worth, plus the ones they've played for during a few shows in Austin.

Each member's job (or lack thereof) allows him the flexibility necessary to play gigs—lots of gigs. Seemingly every weekend, it's possible to spot PVC Street Gang's name on an area marquee, sometimes more than once.

"Luckily," McGaha says, "no one has gotten sick of us yet."

And, chances are, as long as these guys keep showing the originality and chutzpah they already have, few are going to tire of their sh - Dallas Observer.com


You just can't help but smile when you are around Chris McGaha and Chris Vivion of the PVC Street Gang. These are two dudes who really get it. They love what they are doing, and they really love the attention their band has received in the past few months, especially considering their debut EP has not even been released yet.

"Our goal is to have it out by the end of summer," Vivion proclaims with a glance over to his smirking counterpart. "We have been playing shows, trying to raise the money to get it out. And it is there now...the money IS there now right?" As McGaha's smirk expands to a full fledged laugh he responds in between chuckles, "We'll see, when putting out a record you never really know, but we should be okay."

Despite the somewhat uncertain financial situation of the band, the two Denton locals seem less than concerned. And for good reason you could guess. While they are still looking for a solid fan base in their home town, the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth have been mighty kind to the relatively young band. With shows at The Cavern on Greenville, and a write-up in the Dallas Observer, the PVC Street Gang is starting to build up a solid reputation as a hard-rocking and hard-working group.

The band's live show is a sight to behold. While Vivion, a normally laid-back individual seemingly flips a switch in his head to become a rowdy rock and roll personality on stage, McGaha, the lead singer, simply turns his dial up a bit. His switch has apparently been stuck in the "ON" position for a while. "For me, a live show is pretty much an amplified version of how I live every day life."

Despite their different styles and energy levels, the two are on the same page when it comes to the band. They are totally and wholeheartedly committed to the success of the PVC Street Gang, and the best part is to see how much fun they seem to be having while accomplishing their goals.

Their sound diverges from that of most bands in the area. The music is dark, funky, and a bit creepy at times. But boy, you just can't turn it off once it is on. "A lot of these songs were written on a four track at two in the morning, drunk in a garage somewhere," McGaha admits. A sentence which only strengthens the argument that these guys are having a great time doing what they love.

Once their self-titled EP is finally released, we should see the next step in growth for the band. It is tough to speculate as to exactly how far this band will go. They are not the sexiest group in the world, but their attractive personas are more than enough to carry these guys a long way. And McGaha is not afraid to dream big. "I want Axl Rose money," he says with a snicker, "but will I get it, who knows? I mean who knows if I even really want that...mo money mo problems right? HaHa."

Sooner or later, Denton is going to fully embrace this band. I mean, it just has to happen. They are too much fun to be ignored. This Friday's show at Hailey's should help out with that. Opening for RTB2 and The Cocky Americans should bring out a big crowd and expose the Denton audience to the PVC Street Gang. - Pegasusnews.com


You just can't help but smile when you are around Chris McGaha and Chris Vivion of the PVC Street Gang. These are two dudes who really get it. They love what they are doing, and they really love the attention their band has received in the past few months, especially considering their debut EP has not even been released yet.

"Our goal is to have it out by the end of summer," Vivion proclaims with a glance over to his smirking counterpart. "We have been playing shows, trying to raise the money to get it out. And it is there now...the money IS there now right?" As McGaha's smirk expands to a full fledged laugh he responds in between chuckles, "We'll see, when putting out a record you never really know, but we should be okay."

Despite the somewhat uncertain financial situation of the band, the two Denton locals seem less than concerned. And for good reason you could guess. While they are still looking for a solid fan base in their home town, the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth have been mighty kind to the relatively young band. With shows at The Cavern on Greenville, and a write-up in the Dallas Observer, the PVC Street Gang is starting to build up a solid reputation as a hard-rocking and hard-working group.

The band's live show is a sight to behold. While Vivion, a normally laid-back individual seemingly flips a switch in his head to become a rowdy rock and roll personality on stage, McGaha, the lead singer, simply turns his dial up a bit. His switch has apparently been stuck in the "ON" position for a while. "For me, a live show is pretty much an amplified version of how I live every day life."

Despite their different styles and energy levels, the two are on the same page when it comes to the band. They are totally and wholeheartedly committed to the success of the PVC Street Gang, and the best part is to see how much fun they seem to be having while accomplishing their goals.

Their sound diverges from that of most bands in the area. The music is dark, funky, and a bit creepy at times. But boy, you just can't turn it off once it is on. "A lot of these songs were written on a four track at two in the morning, drunk in a garage somewhere," McGaha admits. A sentence which only strengthens the argument that these guys are having a great time doing what they love.

Once their self-titled EP is finally released, we should see the next step in growth for the band. It is tough to speculate as to exactly how far this band will go. They are not the sexiest group in the world, but their attractive personas are more than enough to carry these guys a long way. And McGaha is not afraid to dream big. "I want Axl Rose money," he says with a snicker, "but will I get it, who knows? I mean who knows if I even really want that...mo money mo problems right? HaHa."

Sooner or later, Denton is going to fully embrace this band. I mean, it just has to happen. They are too much fun to be ignored. This Friday's show at Hailey's should help out with that. Opening for RTB2 and The Cocky Americans should bring out a big crowd and expose the Denton audience to the PVC Street Gang. - Pegasusnews.com


Discography

2009 - First EP
2009 - first single "Cutlass" which has had numerous rotations on Gorilla Vs. Bear satellite radio, as well as college radio and internet radio over seas.
2012 - So So Party 7"

Photos

Bio

Formed in 2004 by Chris McGaha and Jeff Moore, PVC Street Gang was a garage project intent on mixing rock and post-punk influences ranging from The Clash, Big Flame, Gang of Four, Fugazi, The Fall and The Buzzcocks to Roxy Music, Thin Lizzy, Ween, Todd Rundgren, and R. Stevie Moore, while utilizing a lo-fi approach to recording. A few shows later and after the departure of Moore to L.A., Chris Vivion joined the band on bass guitar and local session wiz Pete Young was "drafted" into playing drums. After a rotation through several drummers (including Jimi Bowman, John McIntyre, and Andrew Barner) Clay Stinnett was selected to fill the spot on drums. Under this lineup, PVC has elevated itself above and beyond the competition with a super high energy and engaging show, drawing compliments from fans and peers alike.

Band Members