Rachel Goodrich
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Rachel Goodrich

Miami, Florida, United States | INDIE

Miami, Florida, United States | INDIE
Band Folk Acoustic

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Divider imageAcclaimed Rachel Goodrich Readies Greg Wells-Produced LP of Vaudeville Indie-Pop Out 2/21/11; “Light Blub” MP3 + Video Available Now

Download: “Light Bulb”

Hailing from Miami Florida, Rachel Goodrich arrived on the scene with her 2008 debut album Tinker Toys, which turned the heads of some notable press outlets for it’s upbeat, addicting, and eclectic version of vaudeville-inspired indie pop. In a city chock full of djs and electronic artists, Rachel captures a different part of her hometown’s sunny elements to create music that truly stands out from the rest of the pack. The New York Times which dubbed her as a “queen of the Miami indie rock scene,” and her music has already been featured in the Showtime TV series Weeds, the MTV show My Life as Liz, and a national Crayola advertising campaign.

“Light Blub,” the song featured in Weeds, is available here as a free download. Also, Miami’s Sweat Records recently held a Rachel Goodrich video contest, where 37 directors entered to create a video for “Light Blub.” Three winners were chosen, but included here is the undeniably awesome, ultra-thugged out version directed by Lucas Leyva.

Rachel Goodrich is putting the finishing touches on her second full length album, Rachel Goodrich, which will be released on February 21st, 2011 on her own Yellow Bear Records imprint. Joining the fray this time is Grammy winning producer Greg Wells, who has worked with the likes of Rufus Wainwright, Weezer, Katy Perry, Timbaland, Jamie Cullum, and many more. The 11-song full length album will be accompanied by a handful of Spring tour dates as well. - Terrorbird


"SXSW Spotlight - Rachel Goodrich"

he Sunshine State really is the perfect place for Rachel Goodrich. When she sings, you can almost see the cartoon bluebirds flocking to her sweet, high voice, but she's no Goody Two-shoes. Goodrich is the perfect in-between: You want to eat ice-cream sundaes with her, then chug tequila down at the boardwalk.

After years of playing in various Miami bands, starting at age 15, the Florida native retreated to the bedroom and started writing songs on her own. Out of necessity, she added ukulele and kazoo to fill out the sound of just her and a guitar. She plays a Rickenbacker live and fastens her kazoo in a harmonica holder for solos.

"That came from recording on my own," she says of her multi-instrumentalism, "and building songs as I would hear and see them, which involved different sounds and colors. Playing a different instrument each time is inspirational, and naturally these instruments carry different vibes."

Vibe is what Goodrich exudes, and her quirky sense of style and humor reflect her 24 years. There's a youthful glow to last fall's Tinker Toys, her debut LP, released on her own Yellow Bear label, wherein she sings about buying weed, missing the sun, and loving jelly beans with a self-aware smirk and a bit of Holly Golightly's tongue-in-cheek delivery. Aided by upright bass and trombone, it's a giddy mix of rock and pop she's dubbed shake-a-billy.

"I must have heard or said something that rang a bell," she explains of the inspiration for songs. "It starts off fun and adventurous. I get excited, into it. Then I think about it way too much. I can't just write it down and call it a day. I have to make sure I love it and know this is something I want to sing aloud." - Austin Chronicle


"Rachel Goodrich - "Queen of Miami Indie""

ON a balmy November night here, Rachel Goodrich was playing to a rapt moonlit crowd in a courtyard of Churchill’s Pub. She had her red cowboy hat, her percussionist with a mix of blocks, bells and toys, her band of skilled players who are so tight they’re loose, and her kazoo. The ramshackle space in the Little Haiti neighborhood was full of fans and fellow musicians, who sang along with Ms. Goodrich’s gin-clear voice as she led her band through the kind of controlled hootenanny that has made her the queen of the Miami indie rock scene. She is the Feist-like jewel of a town more known for machined bass, booty and beats than for handcrafted songs.

“Rachel has everything: the band, the look, the sound,” said Nick Scapa, 25, a local musician and one of several young entrepreneurs trying to put Miami on the musical map. Ms. Goodrich, 24, was the most buzzed-about act at a benefit for Hear Miami, an organization dedicated to spreading the word about the region’s burgeoning music. For a city without much of an indie scene, there was an excitement level at Churchill’s that felt like Toronto or San Francisco or Boston. Except with that brilliant Miami moon.

Thanks to talents like Ms. Goodrich, Miami’s reputation as a dead zone for live music may be changing. A spate of CDs by Miami artists, propelled by local promoters and backed with national tours, are poised to raise the city’s profile. Ms. Goodrich released “Tinker Toys,” her charming debut album, on her own Yellow Bear label in October. Rough Guide has compiled the independent CDs by the Spam Allstars, the Latin-funk band that is a veteran of the international festival circuit. Jacob Jeffries, a 20-year-old pianist, bandleader and singer-songwriter, is recording the final disc of a trilogy. And record labels and music publishers are starting to pay attention.

Miami is “striving to find an independent music scene,” said Barbara Cane, vice president and general manager for writer and publisher relations at BMI, who is working with Mr. Jeffries. “It’s going to take one little person like Jacob to open doors to all those other Jacobs down there.”

The indie music scene is also getting a lift from the increasing international visibility of Miami’s creative class. This week tens of thousands of art makers and appreciators will descend on the city for the annual Art Basel Miami Beach, the fair that vaulted the region’s fertile visual arts to world-renowned status. At some of those parties the jet set will be serenaded by the newest exponents of this growing tropical bohemia, bands with jazz-school pedigrees and hybrid sounds: the punk-soul of Awesome New Republic (better known as ANR), the electro bliss of Airship Rocketship and the progressive pop of the JeanMarie.

“I have faith that eventually the international respect being paid to the art scene will carry over to the music scene,” said Michael-John Hancock, the singer of ANR. He and his band mate, Brian Robertson, were among the first in a small wave of graduates of the University of Miami’s Frost School of Music to stay and make a stand as a band.

It may not seem surprising for a metropolitan area the size of South Florida to have a thriving rock scene. But Miami has never been a typical American city; as the joke goes, “It’s lovely, and so close to the U.S.” While Miami has countless dance clubs, there are very few establishments that support live local music. The city has long been a center of the Latin music industry, but Latin artists have trouble finding places to play too. Miami rappers like Rick Ross, Trina, DJ Khaled and Flo Rida have made “da Bottom,” as they call it, a major player in the world of hip-hop, but they’ve built their reps through strip clubs, mixtapes and cameos on other artists’ recordings.

For bands the city’s physical isolation presents obstacles. Whereas musicians in the Northeast can tour from one major city to another to build a regional fan base, for Miamians it’s about an 11-hour drive to Atlanta, the next musical mecca. “Geographically it’s a struggle to get out of South Florida,” Mr. Jeffries said.

And the transient nature of a city full of tourists and immigrants fosters a nightlife that’s built around partying. The music that D.J.’s spin in local clubs is heavily beat driven: hip-hop, techno, trance. Until recently, the primary outlet for the alternative crowd was the experimental electronic genre called intelligent dance music.

- New York Times


"Rachel Goodrich is Set to Soar"


Posted on Mon, May. 18, 2009
Miami Beach singer-songwriter Rachel Goodrich is set to soar

BY JORDAN LEVIN
jlevin@MiamiHerald.com
Rachel Goodrich wrote her first song when she was 12. Nothing was going right for her at Nautilus Middle School in Miami Beach, and the music just came out.

''It was about having a bad day at school -- so many tests, gum in my hair,'' she says. ``Everything was just wrong. Nothing good happened that day.''

So she wrote down what she was feeling.

''I thought that's what you were supposed to do, write a song,'' Goodrich says, sitting barefoot by the open doors to the balcony of her South Beach apartment, smoking a cigarette and sipping an oversized Cuban coffee. ``I didn't understand about covering other people's tunes until the end of seventh grade.''

At 25 (''I feel so crazy old,'' she says), Goodrich is still writing songs about what she feels and what happened that day. It's her way of working things out.

''If I think about a song, I get my thoughts clear and I know what I think,'' she says.

She clarifies her mind with the catchiest tunes, the oddest instruments (in addition to guitar and piano, she's fond of the ukulele, kazoo and toy trumpet), and lyrics so idiosyncratic you'd never mistake them for anyone else's.

''Where did all the time go?'' she sings in The Black Hole. ``When nobody was looking, I went behind their backs and took it all.''

''Her sound is its own thing, and it's entirely original,'' says Lolo Reskin, owner of Sweat Records music store in Little Haiti, a center for Miami's alternative music scene, where Goodrich's self-produced album, Tinker Toys, has been the bestselling CD for the past year.

'We've had people who were like `Yeah, the new Rachel Goodrich is out, I've been waiting for this for so long,' '' says Reskin. ``Not many local artists inspire that kind of admiration.''

Goodrich is beginning to inspire more than local interest. This summer she goes on a tour that includes key venues like New York's Mercury Lounge; the Rothbury Festival in Michigan, where the Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan, and Girltalk will also play; and Los Angeles' Hotel Café, known for breaking singer-songwriters.

In July she'll produce her next record with Greg Wells, an L.A. songwriter and producer whose long list of famous clients includes Katy Perry, Rufus Wainwright, Mika, Pink and Natasha Bedingfeld.

Wells, who discovered Goodrich on her MySpace page after a friend tipped him off, ''just about fell off my chair'' when she played for him at his studio. He's enthusiastic enough about her prospects to produce her record for free and help her shop for a label in exchange for a cut if she succeeds.

''I truly think she might be one of the great new talents,'' Wells said from L.A. ``Her writing is 10 steps ahead of what most people are doing. Even though it's not super commercial, I think the music is so good it might actually be a hit. The music becomes so infectious, and there's a confidence and a silliness that's so great.''

WEIRD INSTRUMENTS

Goodrich delights in using unexpected instruments: a plastic toy trumpet from a Dumpster that a fan gave her after a show, a child's xylophone bought on the street, saucepans from her kitchen. (``I didn't have a whole lot of percussion to work with, so I just grabbed some pots and pans. It really made a lot of sense.'').

But it's not just for novelty's sake. She uses the trumpet's sharp toot and the xylophone's high-pitched jangle in a way that heightens the sound and personality of her songs.

Goodrich, who was born in Hollywood and grew up in Miami Beach, has always been assured about making music. Her father, a real estate agent, played, collected and traded guitars. She studied piano, but used to play her father's instruments on the sly, and switched to guitar at 12. (She's now fluent on both.)

She took to carrying a guitar everywhere. ''If I wrote a song, I'd take any opportunity to play it,'' she says. 'I'd play at PTA meetings. I learned that if you bring a guitar, people are like `Oh, are you going to play for us?' And I'd be like 'Yeah!' ''

''She's a born musician,'' says Reskin. ``She started writing at such a young age, and she still has such a childlike sense that leads her to be inspired by things like light bulbs and Gummi Bears. She gets very excited about stuff and her enthusiasm is contagious.''

By 16, Goodrich was playing local clubs like Churchill's and Tobacco Road. Her mother would bring her, wait in the parking lot and drive her home; Goodrich never let her come in.

''Once I set foot onstage I was completely free,'' she says. ``I love performing. I like the feeling of being on the spot, I like the pressure. With every performance I meet new people, learn something new. And more songs come out of that.''

Goodrich's songs have an almost stream-of-consciousness quality. Her craft is evident in the wry humor and inventive word play and in the way the lyrics fuse with the music.

'Well I'm gettin' kind of bored, wish that I could record,'' she sings in Terminal Song, inspired by being stuck at LaGuardia airport with a boyfriend and coaxing him to compose with her. ``Baby we could write a song and fly away.''

She disses that same boyfriend on Excuses. ``Excuses, excuses oh, be careful with its usage, for it may be abusive verbally.''

On Side of the Road, written after a discouraging day of job hunting, mournful slide guitar heightens an air of resigned near-despair that echoes the classic blues she loves.

MUSIC FROM '50s, '60s

Goodrich has an old soul when it comes to music -- there's hardly a contemporary artist on the list of influences on her MySpace page, and her apartment is full of folk, blues, jazz and psychedelic rock records from the '50s and '60s: Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, Ella Fitzgerald, James Taylor, Donovan, Tiny Tim, the Beatles, the Grateful Dead.

''I love vinyl,'' she says. ``It's so much fun, and it feels so real. It makes me feel like I've got the natural resource. I wanna know where [the music] came from.

``Music is historical. Everything came from somewhere else, and I wanna know where it came from. You should know about something if you love it.''


- Miami Herald


Discography

Rachel Goodrich - "TINKER TOYS" LP

Rachel Goodrich - "Rachel Goodrich" LP 2/21/11

Photos

Bio

Hailing from Miami Florida, Rachel Goodrich arrived on the scene with her 2008 debut album Tinker Toys, which turned the heads of some notable press outlets for it’s upbeat, addicting, and eclectic version of vaudeville-inspired indie pop. In a city chock full of djs and electronic artists, Rachel captures a different part of her hometown’s sunny elements to create music that truly stands out from the rest of the pack. The New York Times which dubbed her as a “queen of the Miami indie rock scene,” and her music has already been featured in the Showtime TV series Weeds, the MTV show My Life as Liz, and a national Crayola advertising campaign.

“Light Blub,” the song featured in Weeds, is available here as a free download. Also, Miami’s Sweat Records recently held a Rachel Goodrich video contest, where 37 directors entered to create a video for “Light Blub.” Three winners were chosen, but included here is the undeniably awesome, ultra-thugged out version directed by Lucas Leyva.

Rachel Goodrich is putting the finishing touches on her second full length album, Rachel Goodrich, which will be released on February 21st, 2011 on her own Yellow Bear Records imprint. Joining the fray this time is Grammy winning producer Greg Wells, who has worked with the likes of Rufus Wainwright, Weezer, Katy Perry, Timbaland, Jamie Cullum, and many more. The 11-song full length album will be accompanied by a handful of Spring tour dates as well.