Ragweed
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Ragweed

Brighton, England, United Kingdom | SELF

Brighton, England, United Kingdom | SELF
Band Rock Alternative

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Dec
07
Ragweed @ Retro Bar

Manchester, England, United Kingdom

Manchester, England, United Kingdom

Dec
06
Ragweed @ TBA

Edinburgh, None, United Kingdom

Edinburgh, None, United Kingdom

Dec
05
Ragweed @ TBA

Leeds, None, United Kingdom

Leeds, None, United Kingdom

Music

Press


Brighton 3 piece Ragweed have a new EP in the offing which opens with a number called “Mind Bottling”, which displays some Therapy-esque guitar and drums.

The tortured screams of Tom (guitar/vox) are largely unintelligable but I imagine that’s deliberate. To coin a phrase all of their own it’s “ear-ringing”, which isn’t in dispute. Is it filthy however, you the listener must decide! It certainly isn’t pop!! On “Habit” there’s an interesting intro and some fierce hitting from Nick. More screaming follows where a more audible vocal (I feel) would work equally well. The “Get Outta My Head” chorus is sung with real anger on this scuzzy number which follows the same vein. “New Tricks” has better vocals over the scuzzy guitars alongside Nick’s strong drums. There’s a great bridge with a wonderful bass-line and drum fills on (for me) the standout track here.
“Fat Collapse” opens with Sophie’s bass,some pounding drums and more screaming! The driving guitars and big middle 8 are not unpleasant despite the screeching vocals to finish. (To this) reviewer there’s elements of Sonic Youth in the guitars which works well here. For a band who describe themselves as having influences ranging Melodic Punk, Melodic Rock, Metal, Punk, Scuzzy Surf Rock one is left in no doubt what Ragweed are about. - Rock Regeneration


Reviewer on behalf of GIGgle Pics

This Brighton-based three piece are, in a word, savage. Ragweed describe their goal as being to “create a filthy, ear ringing, uncensored breed of pop that you love deep down”; Double Chalker achieves this goal. It’s raw energy and fury delivered without compromise, apology or conceit. This is honest, thoughtful and thunderously heavy.

Clearly a progressive bunch, Ragweed are vocal supporters of various causes both popular and underground (thank the lord they spoke out against Paul McCartney fronting “Nirvana”) and they present an irreverent and industrious image.

Opening track ‘Mind-Bottling’ is bass-heavy sludge cut through with acidic howls. The drums and vocals seem to each ride on the bass’s powerful sonic assault; both hammer away separately creating an intoxicating rhythm. ‘Habit’ is my personal favourite; it’s so varied it’s impossible to believe it’s only 2 minutes 19 seconds long. Tom’s menacing vocals variously spit, roar and screech; they confront – “What’s in your mind? Joy or guilt?” - and command – “Get outta my head” – in a deceptively melodic delivery.

‘New Tricks’ finds Tom howling with the kind of manic joy one associates with the insane and depraved, and he seamlessly shifts from near Pearl Jam-like harmonies to a stray-cat howl. The song builds to a thumping crescendo following various leadership changes between bass and drums. ‘Fat Collapse’ is a fitting final song; an ominous bass intro gives way to a thumping set of riffs and crashing drums. A two-pronged vocal track switches between a deep guttural admonition and something like screams from within an avalanche.

Double Chalker is loud and confrontational but it’s also intelligent and at times intricate. Ragweed have managed to draw in a variety of genres through ingenious structural arrangements that makes the shifts between riffs and tempo seem somehow logical. At times this is reminiscent of the best of early Therapy? – particularly on ‘Fat Collapse’; there’s a claustrophobic feel throughout, like being chased through a darkened labyrinth while someone outside screams directions.

Basically, its brilliant. - GIGgle Pics


Reviewer on behalf of GIGgle Pics

This Brighton-based three piece are, in a word, savage. Ragweed describe their goal as being to “create a filthy, ear ringing, uncensored breed of pop that you love deep down”; Double Chalker achieves this goal. It’s raw energy and fury delivered without compromise, apology or conceit. This is honest, thoughtful and thunderously heavy.

Clearly a progressive bunch, Ragweed are vocal supporters of various causes both popular and underground (thank the lord they spoke out against Paul McCartney fronting “Nirvana”) and they present an irreverent and industrious image.

Opening track ‘Mind-Bottling’ is bass-heavy sludge cut through with acidic howls. The drums and vocals seem to each ride on the bass’s powerful sonic assault; both hammer away separately creating an intoxicating rhythm. ‘Habit’ is my personal favourite; it’s so varied it’s impossible to believe it’s only 2 minutes 19 seconds long. Tom’s menacing vocals variously spit, roar and screech; they confront – “What’s in your mind? Joy or guilt?” - and command – “Get outta my head” – in a deceptively melodic delivery.

‘New Tricks’ finds Tom howling with the kind of manic joy one associates with the insane and depraved, and he seamlessly shifts from near Pearl Jam-like harmonies to a stray-cat howl. The song builds to a thumping crescendo following various leadership changes between bass and drums. ‘Fat Collapse’ is a fitting final song; an ominous bass intro gives way to a thumping set of riffs and crashing drums. A two-pronged vocal track switches between a deep guttural admonition and something like screams from within an avalanche.

Double Chalker is loud and confrontational but it’s also intelligent and at times intricate. Ragweed have managed to draw in a variety of genres through ingenious structural arrangements that makes the shifts between riffs and tempo seem somehow logical. At times this is reminiscent of the best of early Therapy? – particularly on ‘Fat Collapse’; there’s a claustrophobic feel throughout, like being chased through a darkened labyrinth while someone outside screams directions.

Basically, its brilliant. - GIGgle Pics


"Rock at its best. No! not Blackpool rock, music rock! It can be consumed in small bites and on a late night." - Independent Music News


"Rock at its best. No! not Blackpool rock, music rock! It can be consumed in small bites and on a late night." - Independent Music News


" I really quite like Ragweed and the sound they’ve come up with, and I think that’s largely down to them not following conventions and simply carving out their own sound." - Loud-Stuff


" I really quite like Ragweed and the sound they’ve come up with, and I think that’s largely down to them not following conventions and simply carving out their own sound." - Loud-Stuff


" . . .Has an energy that the majority of bands fail to depict." - Brighton Unsigned


" . . .Has an energy that the majority of bands fail to depict." - Brighton Unsigned


"Ragweed is punky, grungy, and dirty . . . I love it" - Brighton Unsigned


"Ragweed is punky, grungy, and dirty . . . I love it" - Brighton Unsigned


Having reviewed Ragweed's live record last time I was curious to hear what they sounded like in a studio setup and actually, this five-track EP is not that much different in sound; that's a good thing though.

OK, so it is a slightly cleaner sound without the muffled blanket of the live record, which allows you to hear the tunes, the great bass lines and off kilter riffage but only just, they haven't lost any of that intensity in translation and there is still a scratchy, surf-rock type scuzz overlaying the band's angry punky-indie-rock.

The trio's tunes may threaten to make your ears ring but they also make you dance; those bass lines are cracking and coupled with the mile-a minute riffs, drumming and Tom's spot on vocals, (just on the right side of barely contained angst), it's a seriously energetic and raw combination that deserves your attention. - Room Thirteen


Having reviewed Ragweed's live record last time I was curious to hear what they sounded like in a studio setup and actually, this five-track EP is not that much different in sound; that's a good thing though.

OK, so it is a slightly cleaner sound without the muffled blanket of the live record, which allows you to hear the tunes, the great bass lines and off kilter riffage but only just, they haven't lost any of that intensity in translation and there is still a scratchy, surf-rock type scuzz overlaying the band's angry punky-indie-rock.

The trio's tunes may threaten to make your ears ring but they also make you dance; those bass lines are cracking and coupled with the mile-a minute riffs, drumming and Tom's spot on vocals, (just on the right side of barely contained angst), it's a seriously energetic and raw combination that deserves your attention. - Room Thirteen


For any up and coming band, the opportunity to play in a venue like Islington O2 Academy 2 is pretty huge. Tonight Brighton's own, Ragweed, had just that chance at the cool little event 'Upsurge' which boasts a showcase of "The bands of today making the music for tomorrow". The only real issue tonight is the fact that the packed line up meant quite an early show time, in turn leaving it hard to get the punters in for everyone. Ragweed fell victim to this a bit, but this had nothing to do with their musical talent as the three-piece delivered a furious, confident, in-your-face performance. And by the end of the set they had gathered quite a lot of interest from the people drifting in.

In terms of an event this was a big show for Ragweed, but it was also made big by the fact that the new bassist had only been in the band for a few days. With that said, the band were as tight as ever in the live environment, ploughing through tracks like New Tricks from their EP Double Chalker alongside some exciting sounding newer material. The blend of grunge inspired scuzzy punk and catchy riffs helps make this band just so enjoyable live. With some more exciting shows lined up in the near future, including Edinburgh Fringe no less, it won't be long until Ragweed are topping the bill on events like this and getting in the crowds they really deserve in this type of venue. Big performance. - Room Thirteen


For any up and coming band, the opportunity to play in a venue like Islington O2 Academy 2 is pretty huge. Tonight Brighton's own, Ragweed, had just that chance at the cool little event 'Upsurge' which boasts a showcase of "The bands of today making the music for tomorrow". The only real issue tonight is the fact that the packed line up meant quite an early show time, in turn leaving it hard to get the punters in for everyone. Ragweed fell victim to this a bit, but this had nothing to do with their musical talent as the three-piece delivered a furious, confident, in-your-face performance. And by the end of the set they had gathered quite a lot of interest from the people drifting in.

In terms of an event this was a big show for Ragweed, but it was also made big by the fact that the new bassist had only been in the band for a few days. With that said, the band were as tight as ever in the live environment, ploughing through tracks like New Tricks from their EP Double Chalker alongside some exciting sounding newer material. The blend of grunge inspired scuzzy punk and catchy riffs helps make this band just so enjoyable live. With some more exciting shows lined up in the near future, including Edinburgh Fringe no less, it won't be long until Ragweed are topping the bill on events like this and getting in the crowds they really deserve in this type of venue. Big performance. - Room Thirteen


Since reviewing Ragweed's last EP they've undergone some changes physically, sporting a brand new Bassist and backing vocalist (Sophie) and with Nick on drums; front man Tom is still in the driving seat though, penning another set of scuzzy, grunge infused surf-pop tunes. Surprisingly, despite the changes the Ragweed sound has remained pretty constant with Tom's schizophrenic vocal approach (screams one moment, whispers the next) and the overall blanket of distorted noise approach still overlaying everything.

Actually, even though the style remains constant, here the tunes feel more focused; those great melodies seep through even more and everything just feeling more cohesive in general. A particular favourite on this new record is Habit, an instantly catchy number with a mix of carefully controlled segments and distorted mania, the opening moments - off kilter vocals with the lightest of backing which quickly descends into blasts of intense guitar and heavy hit drums are fantastic. Fat Collapse is also a corker, a lovely chunky bass line feeds into some really hooky riffage. Nicely done as always. - Room Thirteen


Since reviewing Ragweed's last EP they've undergone some changes physically, sporting a brand new Bassist and backing vocalist (Sophie) and with Nick on drums; front man Tom is still in the driving seat though, penning another set of scuzzy, grunge infused surf-pop tunes. Surprisingly, despite the changes the Ragweed sound has remained pretty constant with Tom's schizophrenic vocal approach (screams one moment, whispers the next) and the overall blanket of distorted noise approach still overlaying everything.

Actually, even though the style remains constant, here the tunes feel more focused; those great melodies seep through even more and everything just feeling more cohesive in general. A particular favourite on this new record is Habit, an instantly catchy number with a mix of carefully controlled segments and distorted mania, the opening moments - off kilter vocals with the lightest of backing which quickly descends into blasts of intense guitar and heavy hit drums are fantastic. Fat Collapse is also a corker, a lovely chunky bass line feeds into some really hooky riffage. Nicely done as always. - Room Thirteen


On Ragweed’s Bandcamp page they outline their goal as follows: “to create a filthy, ear ringing, uncensored breed of pop that, for reasons you can’t explain, you love deep down.” They’re not lying. Double Chalker is raw like a sore blister, but somewhere beneath the Therapy?-inspired buzzsaw riffs and the guttural punk rock screams lie a band who, if they can’t burst your eardrums, will at least place a damn catchy tune in them.

You’re forgiven to think the EP starts like Nirvana’s timeless “Scentless Apprentice”, but it’s quickly apparent from the hardcore maelstrom that follows on “Mind Bottling” we’re talking an even more abrasive beast. Forget Kurt Cobain smashing his Fender in drag, this is Kurt Cobain bludgeoning a guinea pig with his Strat while dressed in Nazi uniform. It’s brutal stuff, and not for the more casual listener, but fans of early Therapy? and similar noise rock will take it to their hearts.

Second track “Habit” follows a similar routine – the intro makes you think of skate punk bands like Pennywise and Rancid, but then: oh wait there’s that dead guinea pig again. On this track it’s worth noting the deceptively impressive musicianship of drummer Nick Spooner, whose machine gun drum fills do well to create the let’s-batter-our-listener-into-a-pulp atmosphere that pervades this record.

The Distillers feature prominently as an influence here too, not least during the third track “New Tricks”. Vocalist Tom’s angsty drawls during the verses are almost a mirror of the dirtier side of Brody Dalle, but midway through the track suddenly morphs to a bass / drum jam. It’s a brilliantly mischievous piece of song craft which provides a (comparatively) brief respite from all the noise, but it’s not long before we’re back with the jagged guitars, hammering drums and earth-shaking bass.

It’s a template this most uncompromising of bands is willing to stick to and very capably as well – put in a deceptively calm piece of pop rock, then blow the listener’s cochlea clean off. Two minutes and fifteen seconds into closer “Fat Collapse” we have a splendid (for lack of a better word) summation of what this band’s about. A perfectly-reasonable Pixies-esque melody plays for about eight bars, and then turns into a section I can only describe as Metallica’s “Motorbreath” being played through a blender.

If it sounds all a bit nasty, then it’s safe to say this record isn’t quite for your delicate ears. But if you like your rock unrefined, ill-behaved and most importantly of all, louder than a rocket engine, this abrasive three-piece Brighton band might just be the best new thing you’ve heard in a long while - Sound and Motion


On Ragweed’s Bandcamp page they outline their goal as follows: “to create a filthy, ear ringing, uncensored breed of pop that, for reasons you can’t explain, you love deep down.” They’re not lying. Double Chalker is raw like a sore blister, but somewhere beneath the Therapy?-inspired buzzsaw riffs and the guttural punk rock screams lie a band who, if they can’t burst your eardrums, will at least place a damn catchy tune in them.

You’re forgiven to think the EP starts like Nirvana’s timeless “Scentless Apprentice”, but it’s quickly apparent from the hardcore maelstrom that follows on “Mind Bottling” we’re talking an even more abrasive beast. Forget Kurt Cobain smashing his Fender in drag, this is Kurt Cobain bludgeoning a guinea pig with his Strat while dressed in Nazi uniform. It’s brutal stuff, and not for the more casual listener, but fans of early Therapy? and similar noise rock will take it to their hearts.

Second track “Habit” follows a similar routine – the intro makes you think of skate punk bands like Pennywise and Rancid, but then: oh wait there’s that dead guinea pig again. On this track it’s worth noting the deceptively impressive musicianship of drummer Nick Spooner, whose machine gun drum fills do well to create the let’s-batter-our-listener-into-a-pulp atmosphere that pervades this record.

The Distillers feature prominently as an influence here too, not least during the third track “New Tricks”. Vocalist Tom’s angsty drawls during the verses are almost a mirror of the dirtier side of Brody Dalle, but midway through the track suddenly morphs to a bass / drum jam. It’s a brilliantly mischievous piece of song craft which provides a (comparatively) brief respite from all the noise, but it’s not long before we’re back with the jagged guitars, hammering drums and earth-shaking bass.

It’s a template this most uncompromising of bands is willing to stick to and very capably as well – put in a deceptively calm piece of pop rock, then blow the listener’s cochlea clean off. Two minutes and fifteen seconds into closer “Fat Collapse” we have a splendid (for lack of a better word) summation of what this band’s about. A perfectly-reasonable Pixies-esque melody plays for about eight bars, and then turns into a section I can only describe as Metallica’s “Motorbreath” being played through a blender.

If it sounds all a bit nasty, then it’s safe to say this record isn’t quite for your delicate ears. But if you like your rock unrefined, ill-behaved and most importantly of all, louder than a rocket engine, this abrasive three-piece Brighton band might just be the best new thing you’ve heard in a long while - Sound and Motion


Grunge metal, assailing senses, assertively strumming, shredding, screeching, rampaging its way through a limited, yet riveting, range of redoubtable, rousing heavy metal riffs; four tracks, ‘Mind Bothering’, ‘Habit’, ‘New Tricks’ and ‘Fat Collapse’, of full on ferocity, tamed by violently vociferous yet well tempered instrumentation, pleasantly modulated guitar screaming with passion, grinding in grit, drilling drums and percussion ridden hard, without wheels falling off, taut and tight not just wild and, most beguiling bass, dangerous, dark, rounded, deep, elastically mobile, fleeting, swift, especially magnetic on last track, ‘Fat Collapse’. At first, vocal sounds like crazed satanic shriek, tantrum torn, vehemently shaken from tortured, incomprehensible lips, but settles into staccato, precisely punctuated, percussive, chant, where rhythms replace words.

I was unsure, but then I got to feel heat of Ragweed’s beat, twirled in their tempest, devil stomping on my head, spat out of malevolent maelstrom, I emerged cleansed and refreshed, cobwebs torn to shreds. From moment of insertion, this CD made me fearful of Hi-fi explosion, I half expected it to self implode or expel itself forcibly, pinning me to the wall but, sucked into its black hole I became strangely afflicted, addicted to its glowering call. Sounds like it is going to blow your head off, but not just raw fire, as you taste more, subtleties emerge and then you’re hooked. - Mudkiss Zine


Grunge metal, assailing senses, assertively strumming, shredding, screeching, rampaging its way through a limited, yet riveting, range of redoubtable, rousing heavy metal riffs; four tracks, ‘Mind Bothering’, ‘Habit’, ‘New Tricks’ and ‘Fat Collapse’, of full on ferocity, tamed by violently vociferous yet well tempered instrumentation, pleasantly modulated guitar screaming with passion, grinding in grit, drilling drums and percussion ridden hard, without wheels falling off, taut and tight not just wild and, most beguiling bass, dangerous, dark, rounded, deep, elastically mobile, fleeting, swift, especially magnetic on last track, ‘Fat Collapse’. At first, vocal sounds like crazed satanic shriek, tantrum torn, vehemently shaken from tortured, incomprehensible lips, but settles into staccato, precisely punctuated, percussive, chant, where rhythms replace words.

I was unsure, but then I got to feel heat of Ragweed’s beat, twirled in their tempest, devil stomping on my head, spat out of malevolent maelstrom, I emerged cleansed and refreshed, cobwebs torn to shreds. From moment of insertion, this CD made me fearful of Hi-fi explosion, I half expected it to self implode or expel itself forcibly, pinning me to the wall but, sucked into its black hole I became strangely afflicted, addicted to its glowering call. Sounds like it is going to blow your head off, but not just raw fire, as you taste more, subtleties emerge and then you’re hooked. - Mudkiss Zine


Brighton's Ragweed lets it all hang out. They're unapologetic for the filth of their noise.

There's no words to explain what Ragweed does. They're off the wall and so hard to properly describe that it's best to do the lazy uninformed music critic band comparison: 'Dead Milkmen mixed with Suicidal Tendencies, with a lot of Unsane playing in the background'.

EPs are hard, because they're just a handful of songs by which to judge a band. But in the case of Ragweed's Double Chalker, it's obvious they're a fantastic live band. It's all about the powerhouse drums, which they let drive their songs - though the insanely loud guitar and kick-ass scuzz bass only help their live appeal. - Risk And Consequences


Brighton's Ragweed lets it all hang out. They're unapologetic for the filth of their noise.

There's no words to explain what Ragweed does. They're off the wall and so hard to properly describe that it's best to do the lazy uninformed music critic band comparison: 'Dead Milkmen mixed with Suicidal Tendencies, with a lot of Unsane playing in the background'.

EPs are hard, because they're just a handful of songs by which to judge a band. But in the case of Ragweed's Double Chalker, it's obvious they're a fantastic live band. It's all about the powerhouse drums, which they let drive their songs - though the insanely loud guitar and kick-ass scuzz bass only help their live appeal. - Risk And Consequences


Brighton has over the past decade or so, built a reputation for spawning new, innovative, quirky artrock type bands. Indeed, some of my favourite bands have their roots in the sunny environs of the South Coast town.

But where you have a more balmy, temperate climate and a fertile ground for cultivating bright new music, these conditions will also encourage the growth of a less attractive, more irritating and aggressive type – RAGWEED!

This three-piece DIY punk band seems to be a thorn among roses. There is no denying them their space – not that they need much of it with only the third of the five tracks (‘Sunshine’) hanging around for anywhere near as long as three minutes!

There is a certain quaintness (if such a word can be used relative to punk music) about the CD that arrived here at LOUD HORIZON. It seems to embrace the DIY ethos, with the sound quality somewhat distant and hazy, like it’s been recorded in someone’s kitchen. Initially, I found it to be a bit annoying, but it actually somehow seems right.

In general, the songs are like a combination of your three chord ‘cretin rock’ bands (e.g. Teenage Bottlerocket) and the more threatening noise of some generic hardcore bands. It’s all pretty fast and furious and with five songs in marginally more than eleven minutes, RAGWEED sound like a band in a hurry.

It just goes to prove that even in the field of music, where you have flowers you have weeds. But perhaps they can grow together in harmony – or even discord! - LOUD HORIZON


Brighton has over the past decade or so, built a reputation for spawning new, innovative, quirky artrock type bands. Indeed, some of my favourite bands have their roots in the sunny environs of the South Coast town.

But where you have a more balmy, temperate climate and a fertile ground for cultivating bright new music, these conditions will also encourage the growth of a less attractive, more irritating and aggressive type – RAGWEED!

This three-piece DIY punk band seems to be a thorn among roses. There is no denying them their space – not that they need much of it with only the third of the five tracks (‘Sunshine’) hanging around for anywhere near as long as three minutes!

There is a certain quaintness (if such a word can be used relative to punk music) about the CD that arrived here at LOUD HORIZON. It seems to embrace the DIY ethos, with the sound quality somewhat distant and hazy, like it’s been recorded in someone’s kitchen. Initially, I found it to be a bit annoying, but it actually somehow seems right.

In general, the songs are like a combination of your three chord ‘cretin rock’ bands (e.g. Teenage Bottlerocket) and the more threatening noise of some generic hardcore bands. It’s all pretty fast and furious and with five songs in marginally more than eleven minutes, RAGWEED sound like a band in a hurry.

It just goes to prove that even in the field of music, where you have flowers you have weeds. But perhaps they can grow together in harmony – or even discord! - LOUD HORIZON


24 Feb
By Luke Randall

Brighton’s Ragweed don’t piss about, they air a distinct disdain for subtlety on That’s Where Babies Come From. This brief but brutal EP hammers home its five tracks with all the granite hostility of a casually tossed house-brick at a copper’s head. They make a truckload of noise for three-piece, begging the listener to draw obvious comparison, but it would be idle to just reference the N word. Rather, they sound reminiscent of the period in American 80s alternative music that immediately pre-dated Sub Pop and Grunge; when the uneasy bedfellows of punk, metal, and hardcore met with the experimental noodlings of art-college fops. Such groups bid farewell to their stylistic constraints and just let it happen; bands like Scratch Acid, Killdozer and early Butthole Surfers.

Ragweed – Big Yellow


The track Big Yellow is all bludgeoned drums and bloodied slabs of down-tuned guitar. Tom Adamson comes across as vocally bi-polar; rasping inaudibly at one moment to venting some proper vexation with a nice line in screaming.
Sunshine treads a far punkier path, driven by a morose bass line, the guitar comes and goes in brash power chords that punctuate the tune structure. Tom’s distressed shriek remains ongoing letting us know that he’s ‘playing with myself outside.’

Recorded in just six hours and self-released, the EP extols the time honored DIY punk-ethic, one Ragweed have extended to hosting their own night at The Cowley Club.

Shadows over Cowley Club is a monthly event of like-minded bands cut from a similar noisy and abrasive ilk. Their next gig is Sunday 26 February at the Cowley Club.

Luke Randall - Brighton Noise


24 Feb
By Luke Randall

Brighton’s Ragweed don’t piss about, they air a distinct disdain for subtlety on That’s Where Babies Come From. This brief but brutal EP hammers home its five tracks with all the granite hostility of a casually tossed house-brick at a copper’s head. They make a truckload of noise for three-piece, begging the listener to draw obvious comparison, but it would be idle to just reference the N word. Rather, they sound reminiscent of the period in American 80s alternative music that immediately pre-dated Sub Pop and Grunge; when the uneasy bedfellows of punk, metal, and hardcore met with the experimental noodlings of art-college fops. Such groups bid farewell to their stylistic constraints and just let it happen; bands like Scratch Acid, Killdozer and early Butthole Surfers.

Ragweed – Big Yellow


The track Big Yellow is all bludgeoned drums and bloodied slabs of down-tuned guitar. Tom Adamson comes across as vocally bi-polar; rasping inaudibly at one moment to venting some proper vexation with a nice line in screaming.
Sunshine treads a far punkier path, driven by a morose bass line, the guitar comes and goes in brash power chords that punctuate the tune structure. Tom’s distressed shriek remains ongoing letting us know that he’s ‘playing with myself outside.’

Recorded in just six hours and self-released, the EP extols the time honored DIY punk-ethic, one Ragweed have extended to hosting their own night at The Cowley Club.

Shadows over Cowley Club is a monthly event of like-minded bands cut from a similar noisy and abrasive ilk. Their next gig is Sunday 26 February at the Cowley Club.

Luke Randall - Brighton Noise


http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150374532598262&set=a.454693823261.244405.370819033261&type=3&theater

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150374532598262&set=a.454693823261.244405.370819033261&type=3&theater - Chichester Observer


http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150374532598262&set=a.454693823261.244405.370819033261&type=3&theater

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150374532598262&set=a.454693823261.244405.370819033261&type=3&theater - Chichester Observer


Discography

"That's Where Babies Come From" EP Released Feb 2012

"Double Chalker" EP Released Jul 2012

Photos

Bio

Taking their name from a stubborn, raw, irritating plant, Ragweed's goal was simple; They wanted to be a punk band that metal heads would like, a metal band that punks would like, and fuse the whole thing together with some good, catchy pop hooks.

Influenced by the likes of; Big Black, The Pixies, Bitch Alert, Therapy? The Distillers, Tool and may more. Ragweed came to life at the end of 2011 in Brighton (U.K.) with front man Tom Adamson, bass player Matt Knight and drummer Sam Harrison. In February 2012 they recorded their first EP "That's Where Babies Come From" in 6 hours and set off on a tour to promote the record.

After a couple of line up changes due to commitment, the band when back in to the studio in July 2012 and recorded their second EP "Double Chalker", once more touring on it's release.

A year later with six tour under their belt, a show at Edinburgh Fringe, and two more tours before the end of 2013, Ragweed are now building up to their debut album which should gain them many a fan and properly announce their presence in the Underground British Rock Scene.