Rankin Scroo

Rankin Scroo

 Oakland, California, USA
BandWorldReggae

RANKIN SCROO is a consciouss high energy innovative performer with his band Crucial Youth. He's an actor in many movies, including sound tracks, wrote songs for Black Unhuru and known for his Jamaican hooks on hip hop E-40's hits to mention a few. Rankin writes, produces, engineer. His performances display the sound and ambiance every fan and promoter remembers. Rankin Scroo is a guaranteed crowd pleaser.

Band Press

Rankin Scroo still building on a solid Foundation – Reggae Review

Rankin Scroo

Born: Jamaica, West Indies

Genres: Reggae/World, Hip Hop

Rankin's latest offering SOLID is a showcase of Rankin Scroo’s
authentic Jamaican sound and style. A work for all music lovers,
SOLID is a shining example of Rankin's musical genius. "Dream Dream" featuring Lutan Fyah is a classic lovers rock piece that appeals to ages 2 through 92. Soothing to the ear and heart this will be a favorite pick not just now but for years to come. "Hips Like Wha" with its Caribbean, African, Calypso vibe will be loved by all who dare to dance to its beat. When Rankin Scroo sings "Above Dem" believe it, he means it! He is above them! The deliverence of his testimony will take you to a higher dimension. Rankin Scroo co-wrote two songs on the Black Uhuru Now album "Freedom Fighter" and "Take Heed" that plays in the movie "Men At Work". Rankin's exceptional co-writing and performance on E40's "Breaking News" lead the record to Gold. "Act A Ass" a track from the same Gold LP is in the movie "Be Cool" starring John Travolta

Rankin Scroo still building on a solid Foundation – Reggae Review

Rankin Scroo

Born: Jamaica, West Indies

Genres: Reggae/World, Hip Hop

Rankin's latest offering SOLID is a showcase of Rankin Scroo’s
authentic Jamaican sound and style. A work for all music lovers,
SOLID is a shining example of Rankin's musical genius. "Dream Dream" featuring Lutan Fyah is a classic lovers rock piece that appeals to ages 2 through 92. Soothing to the ear and heart this will be a favorite pick not just now but for years to come. "Hips Like Wha" with its Caribbean, African, Calypso vibe will be loved by all who dare to dance to its beat. When Rankin Scroo sings "Above Dem" believe it, he means it! He is above them! The deliverence of his testimony will take you to a higher dimension. Rankin Scroo co-wrote two songs on the Black Uhuru Now album "Freedom Fighter" and "Take Heed" that plays in the movie "Men At Work". Rankin's exceptional co-writing and performance on E40's "Breaking News" lead the record to Gold. "Act A Ass" a track from the same Gold LP is in the movie "Be Cool" starring John Travolta

04-07-2007 :: Rankin Scroo :: Godfada (Crucial Youth) – Igloo Magazine

"...This music is earnest, at times clever, at times plaintive, but always soulful and direct, which is why it gets under my skin..."
***(04.07.07) I first heard Rankin' Scroo at a party in Oakland. Bear with me; this detail is important for two reasons. Godfada was playing through somebody's laptop speakers, and without strong bass, the sound was colorless. Even worse, Rankin' Scroo's lyrics, already a game to decipher, were impenetrable. The music seemed as remarkable as the wallpaper. Lesson number one: this CD needs to be heard at full volume, through speakers that are—what's the term?—big-boned. Godfada would sound best in a car, driving aimlessly through city streets at night. This is why Oakland is important. Although Rankin' Scroo has traveled a circuitous route from Jamaica to New York to Hawaii to Oakland, his take on reggae has a particularly urban, West Coast flavor. And he won't let you forget it. Two of his strongest tracks, "Riding West" and "California Gangster," boast a mix of strength and sensitivity that evokes West Coast R&B thuggery. And the endorsements from E-40 and Keak Da Sneak draw Rankin' Scroo into the ranks of the recent Bay Area hip-hop renaissance.
Rankin' Scroo is a man of many hats, literally (check out his website www.rankinscroo.com) and figuratively, and not all of them fit the same. His self-consciously sexy songs, "Wyle Syde" and "Love No Other," don't have the charismatic rhythms and memorable wordplay of the other tracks. And the less said about the palm-muted rock guitar on "Vengeance," the better. Ultimately, though, these two sides of Rankin' Scroo (the lover, the fighter) work best in combination, like in the kiss-and-tell swagger of "Girl Talk" or the broken-hearted "Bad Treatment."
If you're not already a fan of reggae, this album is not going to convert you. Once more, let's go back to that party in Oakland. I was talking to a fellow Igloo reviewer about Godfada, and he wanted to find irony in its songs. But although Rankin' Scroo is playful, he is far from ironic. And thank Jah. This music is earnest, at times clever, at times plaintive, but always soulful and direct, which is why it gets under my skin. This leads me to lesson number two: don't underestimate Rankin' Scroo. He might just surprise you.

04-07-2007 :: Rankin Scroo :: Godfada (Crucial Youth) – Igloo Magazine

"...This music is earnest, at times clever, at times plaintive, but always soulful and direct, which is why it gets under my skin..."
***(04.07.07) I first heard Rankin' Scroo at a party in Oakland. Bear with me; this detail is important for two reasons. Godfada was playing through somebody's laptop speakers, and without strong bass, the sound was colorless. Even worse, Rankin' Scroo's lyrics, already a game to decipher, were impenetrable. The music seemed as remarkable as the wallpaper. Lesson number one: this CD needs to be heard at full volume, through speakers that are—what's the term?—big-boned. Godfada would sound best in a car, driving aimlessly through city streets at night. This is why Oakland is important. Although Rankin' Scroo has traveled a circuitous route from Jamaica to New York to Hawaii to Oakland, his take on reggae has a particularly urban, West Coast flavor. And he won't let you forget it. Two of his strongest tracks, "Riding West" and "California Gangster," boast a mix of strength and sensitivity that evokes West Coast R&B thuggery. And the endorsements from E-40 and Keak Da Sneak draw Rankin' Scroo into the ranks of the recent Bay Area hip-hop renaissance.
Rankin' Scroo is a man of many hats, literally (check out his website www.rankinscroo.com) and figuratively, and not all of them fit the same. His self-consciously sexy songs, "Wyle Syde" and "Love No Other," don't have the charismatic rhythms and memorable wordplay of the other tracks. And the less said about the palm-muted rock guitar on "Vengeance," the better. Ultimately, though, these two sides of Rankin' Scroo (the lover, the fighter) work best in combination, like in the kiss-and-tell swagger of "Girl Talk" or the broken-hearted "Bad Treatment."
If you're not already a fan of reggae, this album is not going to convert you. Once more, let's go back to that party in Oakland. I was talking to a fellow Igloo reviewer about Godfada, and he wanted to find irony in its songs. But although Rankin' Scroo is playful, he is far from ironic. And thank Jah. This music is earnest, at times clever, at times plaintive, but always soulful and direct, which is why it gets under my skin. This leads me to lesson number two: don't underestimate Rankin' Scroo. He might just surprise you.

Solid (Crucial Youth, 2008) – Reggae Reviews

Rankin Scroo is a veteran Jamaican DJ who was a pioneer in the Hawaiian reggae ("Jahwaiian") scene back in the '80s as part of the duo Rankin' Scroo & Ginger. He's since settled into the San Francisco Bay area of California, where he's worked with rappers like Too Short, E-40, and Money B, leading his style to evolve into a mix of reggae and hip-hop that he terms "urban reggae." I don't know if either the term (see Urban Beat Reggae) or the sound itself (see Mad Lion and compilations like Hip Hop Reggae, NYC Badmen, and Rush Dem) is as original as he thinks, but Rankin Scroo pulls it off with flying colors on his latest effort, Solid. His second such foray into urban reggae (following 2001's Godfada), Solid is a blast, a freewheeling, engaging set that showcases Scroo's wonderful versatility. He can chat in a traditional dancehall DJ style, he can sing (even performing a straight-up R&B ballad, "Lovin Everything About You"), and he can do a little in between, with the type of sing-jay delivery that's so popular nowadays with artists like Sizzla and Anthony B. Hip-hop reggae hybrids are tough to pull off, but Scroo does it on "Run Come" and "Hoyah Hoyah," a pair of fun tracks driven by digi-hip-hop beats and chant-along choruses. Even if this sort of sound isn't your thing, don't fear, because only four of the 14 tracks on this "urban reggae" album feature hip-hop beats. The rest is primarily roos with a couple of strong lovers-styled tunes ("Dream Dream," featuring Lutan Fyah and the righteous in message but still smooth lovers in sound "Heavenly Father") and the aforementioned R&B ballad, which is the only track on Solid that doesn't really mesh. The bulk of great material on the album comes from rootsy sing-jay tracks like "My People," "Above Dem," "My Father's House," and "Lurkin," wicked jams that should appeal to any fans of Sizzla, Jah Mason, Turbulence, and the like. Between these roots tunes and the hip-hop joints, Solid contains not one or two, but several of the catchiest songs I've heard in quite some time. Hear for yourself at www.rankinscroo.com.

Solid (Crucial Youth, 2008) – Reggae Reviews

Rankin Scroo is a veteran Jamaican DJ who was a pioneer in the Hawaiian reggae ("Jahwaiian") scene back in the '80s as part of the duo Rankin' Scroo & Ginger. He's since settled into the San Francisco Bay area of California, where he's worked with rappers like Too Short, E-40, and Money B, leading his style to evolve into a mix of reggae and hip-hop that he terms "urban reggae." I don't know if either the term (see Urban Beat Reggae) or the sound itself (see Mad Lion and compilations like Hip Hop Reggae, NYC Badmen, and Rush Dem) is as original as he thinks, but Rankin Scroo pulls it off with flying colors on his latest effort, Solid. His second such foray into urban reggae (following 2001's Godfada), Solid is a blast, a freewheeling, engaging set that showcases Scroo's wonderful versatility. He can chat in a traditional dancehall DJ style, he can sing (even performing a straight-up R&B ballad, "Lovin Everything About You"), and he can do a little in between, with the type of sing-jay delivery that's so popular nowadays with artists like Sizzla and Anthony B. Hip-hop reggae hybrids are tough to pull off, but Scroo does it on "Run Come" and "Hoyah Hoyah," a pair of fun tracks driven by digi-hip-hop beats and chant-along choruses. Even if this sort of sound isn't your thing, don't fear, because only four of the 14 tracks on this "urban reggae" album feature hip-hop beats. The rest is primarily roos with a couple of strong lovers-styled tunes ("Dream Dream," featuring Lutan Fyah and the righteous in message but still smooth lovers in sound "Heavenly Father") and the aforementioned R&B ballad, which is the only track on Solid that doesn't really mesh. The bulk of great material on the album comes from rootsy sing-jay tracks like "My People," "Above Dem," "My Father's House," and "Lurkin," wicked jams that should appeal to any fans of Sizzla, Jah Mason, Turbulence, and the like. Between these roots tunes and the hip-hop joints, Solid contains not one or two, but several of the catchiest songs I've heard in quite some time. Hear for yourself at www.rankinscroo.com.

Zookeeper of radio KZSU track by track Solid Album Review – Radio KZSU

Monday, May 12, 2008, 8:06:40 AM | Sadie O.
Review by Sadie O.
Rankin Scroo – Solid
Reviewed by Sadie O., 5/9/08
Conscious Dancehall/Reggae by Bay Area singer and producer. Almost all of the riddims are entirely put together by Rankin Scroo himself, and although they’re interesting and mostly eminently listenable, I miss having some interplay of musicians. Vocals and lyrics are quite strong.
No FCCs detected. I like 5 best, 1, 7 and 13 also quite good.
1. 4:05 ***starts with ticking and yells, then forceful dancehall.
2. 3:36 *starts with a bit of praying, then very mellow slow organ-based skank. Religious lyrics with female backing vocals.
3. 3:06 **often-used acoustic guitar nyahbinghi riddim, cool dancehall vocals
4. 4:00 tabla intro turns into bouncy midtempo skank, very commercial production. Love song.
5. 3:53 ****fine downtempo one-drop, simple but with layers of instrumentation, solid lyrics.
6. 2:56 **somewhat downtempo skank, political diatribe.
7. 3:40 ***downtempo organ-based skank with a bit of nyahbinghi drumming, some falsetto dancehall vocals a la Sizzla.
8. 4:23 **long intro, very sparse electronic riddim.
9. 3:35 execrable love song, custom made for BET, with sugar coating.
10. 3:37 *downtempo sparse dancehall, dance number, all about the girl’s body – but actually rather fun.
11. 4:07 **downtempo roots skank, Rasta lyrics.
12. 4:11 *downtempo electronic dancehall riddim, religious lyrics.
13. 5:00 ***slightly downtempo skank with bouncy syncopation, Rasta lyrics.
14. 3:50 **another sparse electronic dancehall one-drop, strong lyrics.
http://zookeeper.stanford.edu/zkrss.php?feed=reviews

Zookeeper of radio KZSU track by track Solid Album Review – Radio KZSU

Monday, May 12, 2008, 8:06:40 AM | Sadie O.
Review by Sadie O.
Rankin Scroo – Solid
Reviewed by Sadie O., 5/9/08
Conscious Dancehall/Reggae by Bay Area singer and producer. Almost all of the riddims are entirely put together by Rankin Scroo himself, and although they’re interesting and mostly eminently listenable, I miss having some interplay of musicians. Vocals and lyrics are quite strong.
No FCCs detected. I like 5 best, 1, 7 and 13 also quite good.
1. 4:05 ***starts with ticking and yells, then forceful dancehall.
2. 3:36 *starts with a bit of praying, then very mellow slow organ-based skank. Religious lyrics with female backing vocals.
3. 3:06 **often-used acoustic guitar nyahbinghi riddim, cool dancehall vocals
4. 4:00 tabla intro turns into bouncy midtempo skank, very commercial production. Love song.
5. 3:53 ****fine downtempo one-drop, simple but with layers of instrumentation, solid lyrics.
6. 2:56 **somewhat downtempo skank, political diatribe.
7. 3:40 ***downtempo organ-based skank with a bit of nyahbinghi drumming, some falsetto dancehall vocals a la Sizzla.
8. 4:23 **long intro, very sparse electronic riddim.
9. 3:35 execrable love song, custom made for BET, with sugar coating.
10. 3:37 *downtempo sparse dancehall, dance number, all about the girl’s body – but actually rather fun.
11. 4:07 **downtempo roots skank, Rasta lyrics.
12. 4:11 *downtempo electronic dancehall riddim, religious lyrics.
13. 5:00 ***slightly downtempo skank with bouncy syncopation, Rasta lyrics.
14. 3:50 **another sparse electronic dancehall one-drop, strong lyrics.
http://zookeeper.stanford.edu/zkrss.php?feed=reviews

(100.0%) 05-24-2008 :: Rankin Scroo :: Solid (Crucial Youth) – Igloo Magazine

"...Rankin Scroo's challenge is to make you lose yourself in that message, to coax your spirit out of its hiding place, to - for lack of a more elegant word - inspire you..."

(05.24.08) As an intrepid Igloo reporter, I travel the lengths of the Earth to bring you news about music that matters. Currently, I'm in San Francisco, listening to music from Oakland by way of Jamaica, New York, and Hawaii, but my mind is struggling to escape a paradox. How can I both like Rankin' Scroo, and not like Rankin Scroo? How can I resolve the part of me that believes in the purity of truth and beauty with the part that cringes when the self-styled Urban Reggae Godfada rhymes "near and far" with "shining star"? How can Rankin Scroo make me believe that life is really very simple, yet leave me wishing it were just a bit more fucked up?
I need to get out, clear my head. Intrepid reporter for the people that I am, I wander down to the Cannabis Awareness Day festival at Civic Center. So many dreadlocks. So much for clarity. Things get murky, strange. But the strangeness helps me see a way out of the problem. Pass the dutch and I'll explain.
First off, I need to elaborate on the problem. This is Rankin Scroo's return to roots reggae, so certain topics are inevitable. Still, "community" is a terribly un-lyrical word. Just try rhyming something with it. Unity? Opportunity? Even the 16-year-old poet in me winces a little at that. Rankin Scroo's lyrics are breezy and sweet, but their meaning is compromised by their inelegance. This is a man who uses "evilus" as an adjective in his liner notes. But, then again, his message is impossible to argue with. Humanity, love, peace, art. What kind of Nazi-reviewer would harsh that?
Lyrics aside, Rankin Scroo's production has never sounded better. Compared to his last outing on Godfada, the synths are better integrated, the instrumentation more memorable, and overall the sound is tighter and punchier. But every once in a while, something fully lame sneaks in, like slow-jam chimes cascading into a verse. Especially on the love songs.
Gah... I'm shuddering at these sappy love songs. I mean, I'm a romantic at heart, but this guy is teddy bears and chocolate. On the R&B jam "Lovin Everything About You," when Rankin Scroo croons, "Let's get married," it makes me wanna go shooting. "I wanna get married to you." I wanna cut my heart out with a spoon.
The love songs miss the mark, but I can't help liking the roots rhythms on tracks like "Jah Bless." When I reviewed his last album, I admired Rankin' Scroo's ability to be soulful and direct, even if it was unsettling. After all, it's good to feel unsettled and weird.
But then I started thinking: Wouldn't it be creepy if these songs were really the ravings of a madman, and we heard them as art? You see, Rankin' Scroo is an outsider. He believes in the purity of love. When he sings about truth and strength and beauty, he doesn't add qualifiers. There is. And there is not. And there are things that should be. And there are things that shouldn't be. There is Good. And there is Bad.
Rankin' Scroo's challenge is to make you lose yourself in that message, to coax your spirit out of its hiding place, to --for lack of a more elegant word --inspire you. And when he hits it, it really works. "Hips Like Wha" makes me want to dance around like Mick Jagger. And I start feeling that maybe it's the world that's crazy, not Rankin' Scroo and me, struggling in Babylon.
So, this may be unusual, but I want to end this review with prayer. Dear Jah: Give me the strength to carry on, to lose myself in music, and to forgive Rankin' Scroo's inconsistencies.
Amen. Or whatever. Just pass the dutch.

(100.0%) 05-24-2008 :: Rankin Scroo :: Solid (Crucial Youth) – Igloo Magazine

"...Rankin Scroo's challenge is to make you lose yourself in that message, to coax your spirit out of its hiding place, to - for lack of a more elegant word - inspire you..."

(05.24.08) As an intrepid Igloo reporter, I travel the lengths of the Earth to bring you news about music that matters. Currently, I'm in San Francisco, listening to music from Oakland by way of Jamaica, New York, and Hawaii, but my mind is struggling to escape a paradox. How can I both like Rankin' Scroo, and not like Rankin Scroo? How can I resolve the part of me that believes in the purity of truth and beauty with the part that cringes when the self-styled Urban Reggae Godfada rhymes "near and far" with "shining star"? How can Rankin Scroo make me believe that life is really very simple, yet leave me wishing it were just a bit more fucked up?
I need to get out, clear my head. Intrepid reporter for the people that I am, I wander down to the Cannabis Awareness Day festival at Civic Center. So many dreadlocks. So much for clarity. Things get murky, strange. But the strangeness helps me see a way out of the problem. Pass the dutch and I'll explain.
First off, I need to elaborate on the problem. This is Rankin Scroo's return to roots reggae, so certain topics are inevitable. Still, "community" is a terribly un-lyrical word. Just try rhyming something with it. Unity? Opportunity? Even the 16-year-old poet in me winces a little at that. Rankin Scroo's lyrics are breezy and sweet, but their meaning is compromised by their inelegance. This is a man who uses "evilus" as an adjective in his liner notes. But, then again, his message is impossible to argue with. Humanity, love, peace, art. What kind of Nazi-reviewer would harsh that?
Lyrics aside, Rankin Scroo's production has never sounded better. Compared to his last outing on Godfada, the synths are better integrated, the instrumentation more memorable, and overall the sound is tighter and punchier. But every once in a while, something fully lame sneaks in, like slow-jam chimes cascading into a verse. Especially on the love songs.
Gah... I'm shuddering at these sappy love songs. I mean, I'm a romantic at heart, but this guy is teddy bears and chocolate. On the R&B jam "Lovin Everything About You," when Rankin Scroo croons, "Let's get married," it makes me wanna go shooting. "I wanna get married to you." I wanna cut my heart out with a spoon.
The love songs miss the mark, but I can't help liking the roots rhythms on tracks like "Jah Bless." When I reviewed his last album, I admired Rankin' Scroo's ability to be soulful and direct, even if it was unsettling. After all, it's good to feel unsettled and weird.
But then I started thinking: Wouldn't it be creepy if these songs were really the ravings of a madman, and we heard them as art? You see, Rankin' Scroo is an outsider. He believes in the purity of love. When he sings about truth and strength and beauty, he doesn't add qualifiers. There is. And there is not. And there are things that should be. And there are things that shouldn't be. There is Good. And there is Bad.
Rankin' Scroo's challenge is to make you lose yourself in that message, to coax your spirit out of its hiding place, to --for lack of a more elegant word --inspire you. And when he hits it, it really works. "Hips Like Wha" makes me want to dance around like Mick Jagger. And I start feeling that maybe it's the world that's crazy, not Rankin' Scroo and me, struggling in Babylon.
So, this may be unusual, but I want to end this review with prayer. Dear Jah: Give me the strength to carry on, to lose myself in music, and to forgive Rankin' Scroo's inconsistencies.
Amen. Or whatever. Just pass the dutch.

Skyline Press Review on Rankin Scroo – SkylinePress.Net

So I was able to review Rankin Scroo's album "Godfada" last year and while his Rastafarian appearance and quick lipped vocals made me interested for a short time, I wasn't really into it (maybe because I'm not a reggae fan). But I wanted to give him another chance to see if he could wow me with his new album "Solid." Something about his name just makes me laugh and have to listen to his music but we will see if his music will keep me listening or keep me laughing (at it).
Well it looks like Rankin Scroo has finally caught up to the 21st century because where before he had deeply rooted reggae beats in place before, he now has a more of a modern sound of reggae (keeping it similar but somehow different) Kind of like how your Grandfather eventually learned how to check his emails on his computer. More speech about "Jah" and "Heavenly Father" which normally inhabit Rankin' lyrics and his classic Jamaican slurin' is heavy on the Sean Paul and just the way some people like it.
Are you asking me if I like this? Personally I know some people can get down with these soul jams and sometimes when I'm drunk and a nice reggae jam can coax the hip dancing styles out of my white legs I'll listen to it, but otherwise I wouldn't be pumping "Solid" for very long. I will say that this record grows on you and there are a few tracks that will have the average R&B fans turning up the volume for because this has some serious soul.
So if you like Jah (God, for those under a rock) and you like the scrambling vocals of reggae then you might like Rankin Scroo's new album "Solid." If you need more rock in your reggae check out Skindred because that might be better for you. Soul and Jamaican love for all! I'm hungry for things that are jerked right now, I wonder why.

~ Pernell
May 27 2008

Skyline Press Review on Rankin Scroo – SkylinePress.Net

So I was able to review Rankin Scroo's album "Godfada" last year and while his Rastafarian appearance and quick lipped vocals made me interested for a short time, I wasn't really into it (maybe because I'm not a reggae fan). But I wanted to give him another chance to see if he could wow me with his new album "Solid." Something about his name just makes me laugh and have to listen to his music but we will see if his music will keep me listening or keep me laughing (at it).
Well it looks like Rankin Scroo has finally caught up to the 21st century because where before he had deeply rooted reggae beats in place before, he now has a more of a modern sound of reggae (keeping it similar but somehow different) Kind of like how your Grandfather eventually learned how to check his emails on his computer. More speech about "Jah" and "Heavenly Father" which normally inhabit Rankin' lyrics and his classic Jamaican slurin' is heavy on the Sean Paul and just the way some people like it.
Are you asking me if I like this? Personally I know some people can get down with these soul jams and sometimes when I'm drunk and a nice reggae jam can coax the hip dancing styles out of my white legs I'll listen to it, but otherwise I wouldn't be pumping "Solid" for very long. I will say that this record grows on you and there are a few tracks that will have the average R&B fans turning up the volume for because this has some serious soul.
So if you like Jah (God, for those under a rock) and you like the scrambling vocals of reggae then you might like Rankin Scroo's new album "Solid." If you need more rock in your reggae check out Skindred because that might be better for you. Soul and Jamaican love for all! I'm hungry for things that are jerked right now, I wonder why.

~ Pernell
May 27 2008

Two years after the release of his debut album Godfada, the Jamaican singjay Rankin Scroo returns with a brand new set due out on May. – United Reggae

Here is the new album from the Jamaican artist Rankin Scroo who lives between his native island and Hawaii.
The singjay now comes with Solid, a 14 tracks album with modern roots, dancehall and more hip hop vibrancies tunes, due out on May, 27th on his label Crucial Youth. Note that we find 3 combinations with Lutan Fyah on ‘Dream Dream’, Jah Dan for the heavy ‘My People’ and the Hawaiian female singer Ginger on ‘Heavenly Father’.


Two years after the release of his debut album Godfada, the Jamaican singjay Rankin Scroo returns with a brand new set due out on May. – United Reggae

Here is the new album from the Jamaican artist Rankin Scroo who lives between his native island and Hawaii.
The singjay now comes with Solid, a 14 tracks album with modern roots, dancehall and more hip hop vibrancies tunes, due out on May, 27th on his label Crucial Youth. Note that we find 3 combinations with Lutan Fyah on ‘Dream Dream’, Jah Dan for the heavy ‘My People’ and the Hawaiian female singer Ginger on ‘Heavenly Father’.


Rankin Scroo Solid – XLR8R Magazine

Crucial Youth — US
Reggae
http://www.xlr8r.com/reviews/rankin-scroo/solid
A longtime presence on Cali’s underappreciated reggae scene, Rankin Scroo was introduced to a whole new audience through his work with E-40. That explains why Solid’s opening number, “Run Come,” doesn’t just bubble, it slaps. A one-man band, Scroo plays most of the instruments, sings and chats with equal finesse, and produced and mixed the album to boot. His self-determination is as evident as his talent, yet he’s not completely on his own: Ginger nices up “Heavenly Father,” Jah Dan appears on “My People,” and Lutan Fyah shares lead vox on “Dream Dream.” With contemporary reggae mired in a formulaic pop-oriented state, Solid blazes an original, independent trail through the roots-dancehall wilderness.
Reviewed by Eric K. Arnold • July 16 2008

Rankin Scroo Solid – XLR8R Magazine

Crucial Youth — US
Reggae
http://www.xlr8r.com/reviews/rankin-scroo/solid
A longtime presence on Cali’s underappreciated reggae scene, Rankin Scroo was introduced to a whole new audience through his work with E-40. That explains why Solid’s opening number, “Run Come,” doesn’t just bubble, it slaps. A one-man band, Scroo plays most of the instruments, sings and chats with equal finesse, and produced and mixed the album to boot. His self-determination is as evident as his talent, yet he’s not completely on his own: Ginger nices up “Heavenly Father,” Jah Dan appears on “My People,” and Lutan Fyah shares lead vox on “Dream Dream.” With contemporary reggae mired in a formulaic pop-oriented state, Solid blazes an original, independent trail through the roots-dancehall wilderness.
Reviewed by Eric K. Arnold • July 16 2008

Press quotes – Various Magazines

"Beautifully funky flows in breezily melodious and often surprising musical settings."
L.A. WEEKLY

"...This music is earnest, at times clever, at times plaintive, but always soulful and direct, which is why it gets under my skin..."
IGLOO MAGAZINE

"lyrical styling"
ALL THINGS GO

Rankin Scroo is a performer, songwriter and engineer all in one package.
REGGAE REVIEW

"resilient grooves and soulful vocals"
COPPER PRESS

"Rankin Scroo delivers great emotion in songwriting and the melodies get stuck in your head."
The VM Underground Show

Interesting mix of low-key hip hop with Reggae and dancehall
KZSU ZOOKEEPER

A career that would defamiliarize reggae by mixing it with dancehall, hip hop, R&B and, if this disc is any indication, rock music as well.
POPMATTERS

A standing figure that is often imitated but never duplicated.
SKYLINE PRESS

"definitely worth listening too."
TRITON COLLEGE PAPER

Who would have ever guessed that indie-rock laden San Francisco is home to reggae icon who is ever bit as talented as Black Uhuru and is an innovator in urban-reggae.
ZERO MAGAZINE

If you are looking to be purely entertained, this is an enjoyable album from one of the Bay Area's most established reggae personalities.
JAHWORKS

very pure forum with a whole lot of soul behind it
ALL AGES ZINE

If this amazing cd, or impressive resume isn't enough to prove that Rankin Scroo is the official "Godfodda" of "Urban Reggae" see him live, you'll be singin a whole new tune.
SUBURBAN HORROR

The Scroo has apparently endless bursts of creativity, leaving you guessing as to what the next track will be like.
SPLENDID E-zine

Creative fusion of Dancehall Reggae with hip-hop and R&B resulting in an excellent disc that will continuously draw you in with it's soulful hooks and infectious beats.
MUSIC KORNER

"Since I heard the first tunes of this guy I cannot stop listening. Best sounds for the summer of 2007. I promise"
76 Magazine (GERMANY)

there are some real gems to be found in Scroo's colloquialisms.
Pandemonium (Canada)

Godfada, an album that not only reinforces Rankin Scroo's image of himself as a pioneer but also serves to introduce audiences to Urban Reggae
POPMATTERS

Pushes the harmonies to another level
NEUFUTUR

Jamaica-by-way-of-Hawaii Transplant Rankin Scroo delivers Wicked Beats
ZERO MAGAZINE
"Rankin's Scroo's music is simply some of the hottest material that graced ours ears in 2008! His music gets into your soul and makes a home, and we cannot wait until his newest album in May!"

YOUTUBE FAN:
boooooooom
Yes I Rankin Scroo big big respect big big artist aie aie aie!!!!
News album "Solid" is very very good "segregation" big tune
"My People" Feat Jah Dan is bid big big tune aaaaaaaaaaaa!!!!
"Lurkin" booooom tune big big album nuff respect

San Francisco Chronicle
THE ARTS
Reggae artist brings his street savvy to hip-hop's E-40
Tony Cooper, Chronicle Staff Writer

Friday, March 26, 2004

Rapper E-40 is known for his colorful lyrics, and they are occasionally suitable for a family newspaper. But when the subject turns to reggae artist Rankin' Scroo, he dishes out glowing praise, not phrases that need editing.

"The dude is extremely talented,'' said E-40, whose real name is Earl Stevens. E-40 is a Vallejo native and a graduate of Hogan High School who lives in San Ramon. "He's professional, man... My fans love him. We come together like peanut butter and jelly when we collaborate."

They've jammed at various venues in the Bay Area over the last few months and Scroo (Harold Johnson) is featured on two cuts on E-40's most recent CD, "Breakin News." Scroo is on the title track and a tune called "Act A Ass," and also appeared in the E-40 video "automatic."

Returning the favors, E-40 provides an endorsement for the Oakland-based Scroo on his latest offering, "Godfada." While E-40 didn't perform in the infamous Super Bowl halftime show -- a la Nelly -- he is a major "playa" in the hip-hop business.

That's why Scroo's association with E-40 has kicked up the former's profile a few notches. Many E-40 followers who hitherto wouldn't have known Rankin' Scroo from Kenny Rankin are turned on by his music, and eventually check out his CDs or concerts.

"It has really given him the edge he needed to combine the hip-hop area with reggae,'' said Darren Hodges, Scroo's manager.”E-40's record really took off on a national level. It's the chemistry we needed ... (Scroo) is getting a lot of interest."

And it's working for E-40 as well. Scroo has noticed that their performances have drawn an older crowd than E-40 would attract on his own, and a more youthful contingent than would normally see him.

The fact that Scroo and his group play live instruments -- no taped stuff here -- pleases musical purists and helps create a more lively atmosphere.

"We certainly get a lot of interest in the (under 18) crowd,'' said Scroo.”Hip-hop and reggae are a g

Press quotes – Various Magazines

"Beautifully funky flows in breezily melodious and often surprising musical settings."
L.A. WEEKLY

"...This music is earnest, at times clever, at times plaintive, but always soulful and direct, which is why it gets under my skin..."
IGLOO MAGAZINE

"lyrical styling"
ALL THINGS GO

Rankin Scroo is a performer, songwriter and engineer all in one package.
REGGAE REVIEW

"resilient grooves and soulful vocals"
COPPER PRESS

"Rankin Scroo delivers great emotion in songwriting and the melodies get stuck in your head."
The VM Underground Show

Interesting mix of low-key hip hop with Reggae and dancehall
KZSU ZOOKEEPER

A career that would defamiliarize reggae by mixing it with dancehall, hip hop, R&B and, if this disc is any indication, rock music as well.
POPMATTERS

A standing figure that is often imitated but never duplicated.
SKYLINE PRESS

"definitely worth listening too."
TRITON COLLEGE PAPER

Who would have ever guessed that indie-rock laden San Francisco is home to reggae icon who is ever bit as talented as Black Uhuru and is an innovator in urban-reggae.
ZERO MAGAZINE

If you are looking to be purely entertained, this is an enjoyable album from one of the Bay Area's most established reggae personalities.
JAHWORKS

very pure forum with a whole lot of soul behind it
ALL AGES ZINE

If this amazing cd, or impressive resume isn't enough to prove that Rankin Scroo is the official "Godfodda" of "Urban Reggae" see him live, you'll be singin a whole new tune.
SUBURBAN HORROR

The Scroo has apparently endless bursts of creativity, leaving you guessing as to what the next track will be like.
SPLENDID E-zine

Creative fusion of Dancehall Reggae with hip-hop and R&B resulting in an excellent disc that will continuously draw you in with it's soulful hooks and infectious beats.
MUSIC KORNER

"Since I heard the first tunes of this guy I cannot stop listening. Best sounds for the summer of 2007. I promise"
76 Magazine (GERMANY)

there are some real gems to be found in Scroo's colloquialisms.
Pandemonium (Canada)

Godfada, an album that not only reinforces Rankin Scroo's image of himself as a pioneer but also serves to introduce audiences to Urban Reggae
POPMATTERS

Pushes the harmonies to another level
NEUFUTUR

Jamaica-by-way-of-Hawaii Transplant Rankin Scroo delivers Wicked Beats
ZERO MAGAZINE
"Rankin's Scroo's music is simply some of the hottest material that graced ours ears in 2008! His music gets into your soul and makes a home, and we cannot wait until his newest album in May!"

YOUTUBE FAN:
boooooooom
Yes I Rankin Scroo big big respect big big artist aie aie aie!!!!
News album "Solid" is very very good "segregation" big tune
"My People" Feat Jah Dan is bid big big tune aaaaaaaaaaaa!!!!
"Lurkin" booooom tune big big album nuff respect

San Francisco Chronicle
THE ARTS
Reggae artist brings his street savvy to hip-hop's E-40
Tony Cooper, Chronicle Staff Writer

Friday, March 26, 2004

Rapper E-40 is known for his colorful lyrics, and they are occasionally suitable for a family newspaper. But when the subject turns to reggae artist Rankin' Scroo, he dishes out glowing praise, not phrases that need editing.

"The dude is extremely talented,'' said E-40, whose real name is Earl Stevens. E-40 is a Vallejo native and a graduate of Hogan High School who lives in San Ramon. "He's professional, man... My fans love him. We come together like peanut butter and jelly when we collaborate."

They've jammed at various venues in the Bay Area over the last few months and Scroo (Harold Johnson) is featured on two cuts on E-40's most recent CD, "Breakin News." Scroo is on the title track and a tune called "Act A Ass," and also appeared in the E-40 video "automatic."

Returning the favors, E-40 provides an endorsement for the Oakland-based Scroo on his latest offering, "Godfada." While E-40 didn't perform in the infamous Super Bowl halftime show -- a la Nelly -- he is a major "playa" in the hip-hop business.

That's why Scroo's association with E-40 has kicked up the former's profile a few notches. Many E-40 followers who hitherto wouldn't have known Rankin' Scroo from Kenny Rankin are turned on by his music, and eventually check out his CDs or concerts.

"It has really given him the edge he needed to combine the hip-hop area with reggae,'' said Darren Hodges, Scroo's manager.”E-40's record really took off on a national level. It's the chemistry we needed ... (Scroo) is getting a lot of interest."

And it's working for E-40 as well. Scroo has noticed that their performances have drawn an older crowd than E-40 would attract on his own, and a more youthful contingent than would normally see him.

The fact that Scroo and his group play live instruments -- no taped stuff here -- pleases musical purists and helps create a more lively atmosphere.

"We certainly get a lot of interest in the (under 18) crowd,'' said Scroo.”Hip-hop and reggae are a g

Rankin Scroo review from Beat Magazine: – The Beat Magazine

Volume 27 No.3 2008

Rankin Scroo offers roots, lovers rock, rollicking raga and more Solid (Crucial Youth). On many of the tracks he plays bass, guitar, keyboards and drums and vocals, bringing in longtime partner (and co-producer) Ginger for vocals on “Heavenly Father” as well as talent like Jah Dan (“My People”), Lutan Fyah (“Dream Dream”) and Wadi Gad on various cuts. Top cuts include “Jah Bless”, “My Father’s House” and “Solid As A Rock”. Hailing from Jamaica originally, Scroo has been holding forth Oakland area for many years and is in top form on this latest release. [Ring tones and merchandise available, www.myspace.com/rankinscroo, www.rankinscroo.com, www.crucialyouth.com ]

Written By: Chuck Foster

Rankin Scroo review from Beat Magazine: – The Beat Magazine

Volume 27 No.3 2008

Rankin Scroo offers roots, lovers rock, rollicking raga and more Solid (Crucial Youth). On many of the tracks he plays bass, guitar, keyboards and drums and vocals, bringing in longtime partner (and co-producer) Ginger for vocals on “Heavenly Father” as well as talent like Jah Dan (“My People”), Lutan Fyah (“Dream Dream”) and Wadi Gad on various cuts. Top cuts include “Jah Bless”, “My Father’s House” and “Solid As A Rock”. Hailing from Jamaica originally, Scroo has been holding forth Oakland area for many years and is in top form on this latest release. [Ring tones and merchandise available, www.myspace.com/rankinscroo, www.rankinscroo.com, www.crucialyouth.com ]

Written By: Chuck Foster