Red This Ever
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Red This Ever

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Red This Ever “Selfless” $14 — This new release by the self-described synth rock band, Red This Ever, is actually quite strong, sometimes reminding me of Iris’ more recent material, blended with that gothic tinge you’d find with The Cruxshadows. It’s a nice blend of guitars and synth programing and a quality singer that sets them apart as one of the bands to watch in the scene. You can listen to audio samples of all the tracks and order the CD here :
http://www.adifferentdrum.com/artist.php?n=88450114347-9 - A Different Drum


If you’ve never listened to local band Red This Ever, then you are missing out on what is probably one of the hottest synth-rock acts in the Baltimore music scene. On July 5th, these guys, along with the JV Myka Project, played the first show in a series that is being called the SëN Baltimore’s Live Music Summer set. JV Myka opened the show a little after 9pm at The Depot, and played a decent line up of songs. A few covers were thrown in along with some of their own music, and included was a divine rendition of The Clash song “Should I Stay Or Should I Go.” Most memorable, though, were the belly dancer duo—brought out to shake their hips for a single song’s duration, much to the enjoyment of any men (and some women) in the crowd.
The evening’s smorgasbord of 80’s-style music was continued with Red This Ever. Claiming a heavy influence in the new-wave/ synth-pop movement, their set is a powerful mix of body-shaking, danceable beats. Falling somewhere in between the more modern bands She Wants Revenge and Interpol, singer Roy Retrofit picks up an adorable quasi-British accent as he vocalizes. Although their recorded demos sound more fluid and polished, their live performance is what really takes them to the next level talent-wise. RTE seems like the kind of band that always manages to transcend the barrier between performer and audience, and The Depot was the perfect place for their commingling to happen. Maybe it is just the raw energy of being there, live, in front of friends and fans alike—Roy’s use of the song “Giveaway” to hand random things out to people in the crowd was a special touch, and the way that he held the hand of one of his groupies while serenading her and staring into her eyes would have caused any teenyboppers (had they been present) to open a cream factory. By the end of the evening, the floor stage was crowded with bodies, swaying back and forth to rocker chick Ada’s unstoppable bass lines, and head bobbing to Matt’s keyboard stylings. Tony on the drums and Brendan tearing up the guitar complete the five-top ensemble.

Bottom line: these guys rock. Their first full-length album Selfless is in the works, and their next show is on August 29th at Sonar for the E.Joseph and The Phantom Heart CD release party. If this venue was any indicator of the future of Red This Ever, they are definitely worth a watchful eye and an add on MySpace.
- By Jessica Snow (SceneMagazine)


A great deal of synthpop music in this day and age seems to follow a rather simplistic and familiar template, focusing on a very literal interpretation of the genre by using primarily (if not exclusively) synthesizers and pop music structures to create a sound that is instantly recognizable and accessible. Leave it to Baltimore, MD's Red This Ever to turn those conventions around and return to an aesthetic more in line with the genre's beginnings in the '80s. The five members of this band, vocalist Roy Retrofit, guitarist Brendan Tobin, bassist Ada Ruiz, keyboardist Mathew Marzolf, and drummer Tony Calato all bring a wide range of influences, from harder-edged industrial like Ministry and Skinny Puppy to the softer and more melodic sounds of Wolfsheim and Depeche Mode. With each band member contributing to the electronics, creating a collective sound that defies strict categorization. Are they a synthpop band with guitars, or are they a rock band with synths? The answer would be yes: they are these things, and more. One of two bands to represent Baltimore at the first Nuclearfest in July 2007, Red This Ever speak to ReGen about their dedication to their craft as musicians and live performers, the development of their soon-to-be-released debut album Selfless, their love of drinking, and just who they talk to on their Web site guestbook.

INTERVIEW
Red This Ever is currently recording your first album, Selfless. What can you tell us about the development of the album? What about the title, how does it relate to the concept of the album?
Retrofit: I guess the main reason for the title Selfless...it's a song that we wrote about how we feel for each other and how we feel for playing music. I think it's more about the music than it is about the fans. A lot of the fans are like, 'You're selfless for me,' but it's more about being selfless for the music. I think we'd do it even if we don't care.
Ruiz: And sometimes we do. [Laughs.]
We enjoy playing music. We don't do it for the money or the fame. We just want to play. We'll play for two people and still feel good performing.
Retrofit: I think that's how it came to be decided as the album title.
You're one of the two bands from Baltimore playing Nuclearfest . What are your thoughts on the underground music scene in Baltimore?
Retrofit: I like to drink, so Baltimore's my favorite city.
Ruiz: We drink for free! [Laughs.]
Tobin: Baltimore is amazing for underground music, because it's not just about industrial music or goth music or power noise. We know bands from Baltimore that people in this festival would probably look at it and not know what to think of it. But some of them are our best friends.
Retrofit: And they'll watch one of our shows and they'll want to play with us, so we play with southern rock bands. We've played with all sorts of bands. It's all about the party.
Calato: We've had fans come on stage and join us on songs that they like.
Ruiz: From other bands.
Calato: Yeah, they'll just say, 'Hey, I love this song, can I come up and play it with you on stage?' And it's worked out great. We have a lot of fun doing that.
You guys define yourselves as an electro and synthpop band, which in this scene people usually think that means electronic instruments only, but you use guitars, bass, and drums. What are your thoughts on the juxtaposition of organic and synthetic instruments in today's electronic music?
Retrofit: That's a good question.
Calato: We're seeing a lot more of it. We played a series of shows a little while back, and they asked us to define ourselves, and we all kind of stood there looking at each other.
Ruiz: We didn't really know how to define it.
Calato: We defined it as synth rock, because we have lots of synth and we have the same traditional rock elements of guitar, bass, and drums. So far, we've heard from people that it sounds a little too rock for synthpop, but it's a lot of synth for just plain rock.
Retrofit: One thing I can say is that we're big electronic, industrial, and synthpop junkies. Matthew's run Commencement in Baltimore, and I still DJ Electroshock, and Brendan's DJ'd, and we all know and love the music a lot. It's a heavy influence on our music, but it's kind of an evolution for us. We get to express ourselves in a different way a lot of the stuff that we love.
Tobin: And everything that we wrote, every song that we play, was written first and foremost on electronic instruments.
Ruiz: And then we'd add the more organic elements of guitar, bass, and drums.
Marzolf: The good thing about it is you notice also that being in underground music you deal with a different sound guy every time you play. By adding some organic elements, you get to confuse them less than if it's all electronics.
Calato: We have a lot of different influences, too, so that helps a lot. That helps to find the sound. Brendan has a lot of influences in his background, I've got mine, Roy and Ada have theirs, Mathew does, so it's a nice rounded mix.
What's next for Red This Ever?
Calato: World domination!
Ruiz: Yes!
Retrofit: It's on the map. It's still a few years away, so be prepared. [Laughs.]
When are we going to see the release of Selfless?
Retrofit: It's looking like November. We're working with a recording artist, Ger Olsen, and we're also working with this great, great guy named Greg Humphries, who actually loves us to death and has us come into his studio to record. They're anticipating November, which is close to my birthday, so we might make it a big birthday bash for its release on a new label called Victimless Crime Records.
How do you feel that playing live has developed the sound of the album?
Retrofit: It's really funny because I feel that it's hard for us to want to put something out unless we played it out a lot live, because then we'd have to go into the studio and get everything recorded and lay it all down. Early on, we got into the studio, and we ended up recording before we really had a feel for some songs, and we can tell the difference. We had to go back and rerecord a lot of that stuff after we played a lot of it live. So, I think the live element helps us determine which songs are the ones that are important.
Is there anything you'd like to say to our readers?
Calato: Keep listening.
Retrofit: Yeah, listen!
Tobin: Keep an open mind.
Ruiz: Go to our Web site www.redthisever.net.
Retrofit: And sign our guestbook, because we're tired of talking to ourselves.
Ruiz: And my mom. [Laughs.] - Review by: Ilker Yücel (Regen Magazine)


Well, if you missed the Red This Ever show at Midnight this Saturday, more's the pity; and I'm sure you're going to hear about it. The band was, as always, fantastic; and they brought out a virtually record crowd in spite of the White House's latest attempt to screw up our parking (Bush apparently was making a speech at the same hotel up L Street that hosted Cheney earlier this year--grrrr!!!). We've hosted a number of excellent live acts at Midnight over the years, but I can't recall any that got such an overwhelmingly favorable reception as RTE. Don't be surprised if we bring them back again later this year once they start a tour to promote their first CD...
- Scott Royce


‘red this ever’ brought a full capacity crowd for their synth rock set harkening back to the early days with a supreme stage show...

[won first, second, third round of emergenza] - Emergenza - By Billy Danforth


Discography

Selfless (Full-Length CD) due out 05.01.09
currently you can find Proliferation, Never Find My Way and Giveaway being played on college radio.
12 Tracks Mixed and Mastered by Drew Mazurek

Lying on the Bathroom (EP) 2008

Giveaway (EP) 2007

IRRESISTIBLE (Limited EP 2007)

Photos

Bio

Red This Ever is a Baltimore based New Wave, Synth-Rocker band filled with shy anger and catchy hooks. If you enjoy listening to synthpop or rock, you'll love Red This Ever.

Their songs fluidly combine the sound of current electronic scene with intriguing melodies and infectious rhythms that harken back to the glorious days of the Post-Punk, New Wave revolution. Red This Ever have often been blamed for having songs that stick to you like glue, as well as not having enough room to dance.

Compared to the likes of Depeche Mode, Gary Numan, The Cars and The Cure and influenced by such artist as Wolfsheim, the Pixies and Joy Division, they have created a sound that is hard to label but far to easy to relate to. The crafting of uniquely dark and clever pop songs have made Red This Ever a band for fans of all ages, with the potential to appeal to all points across the underground music board, from their enticing synth-driven melodies to their goth rock energy, with just the occasional moments of grim emotion that would stir even the most hardened rivet-head.

Their energetic tongue-in-cheek performances have proven time and again that they are an act not to miss live. Sharing stage's with an eclectic variety of renowned artist such as And One, Iris, Das Ich, Attrition, The Start, Shinny Toy Guns, Freezepop and more, Red This Ever believes that a good show comes from more than just the music, and they prove this every time they play live.

Their Debut album Selfless is making waves across internet and college radio stations as well as a variety of alternative club scenes in the US. Described in one review as "a feel that conjures memories of some of the stronger acts of the '80s, but with a distinctly darker edge," Trubie Turner of Regen Magazine, Selfless continues to attract the broadest of audiences with its staunch appeal.

After returning from their 2009 US Selfless Tour, Red This Ever the band is now working on their next release entitled Never Listen (due out early 2010).