Rhyne McCormick
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Rhyne McCormick

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, United States | SELF

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, United States | SELF
Band Americana Singer/Songwriter

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The opening track “Through These Eyes” clocks in at just over two minutes. The brevity of the song leaves the listener satisfied with its completion, yet somehow I was eager to hear more of this delightful song.

Rhyne describes “5104? as a blues number, but somehow the description escapes me. If I had to place the style, I’d almost group this into a pop/soul feel. Rhyne’s vocals have a distinctive soulful character that breathes a fresh life into his tasteful acoustic guitar playing.

“Storm Runner” is a beautiful song dedicated to his late friend. I can feel Rhyne’s emotion pouring out over his vocals and melody line. One of the greatest gifts we musicians can offer the world is the chance to describe the world around us through rhyme and song. Rhyne takes us there in his own way.

“Deeper” really shines as a standout on this album for me. I’m sure Rhyne finds inspiration in various styles, most notably in this tune; I hear shadings of Dave Matthews’ funk-eclectic style of playing matched with Jimmy Page’s movable chord shape voicings a la “Over The Hills And Far Away”. Copious use of harmonics creates a nice atmosphere for the listener.

Overall, Live At The Capitol Theatre gives the listener just enough to become intimately familiar with Rhyne’s sound and also the desire to hear more. - PA Music Scene


Rhyne McCormick has recorded with the likes of local musical celebrities, The Badlees, and has produced with Tom “T-Bone” Edmonds, a vet in the music industry, with artists like Lenny Kravitz, Meat Loaf and The Rolling Stones notched on his belt, to name a few. However, on his fifth record, Live at The Capitol Theatre, McCormick decides to take the road less traveled and put out a live album. Without the acoustically-sound studio and seasoned professionals to mix each track, McCormick takes a chance and puts out an album that strips it all down and takes you to the heart of it all—straight to the music.

While recording live can be an intimidating venture for a lot of musicians, and it certainly isn’t something suggested for the new kid on the block, McCormick proves he has earned his right in the live album hall of fame with Live at the Capitol Theatre, just released this May, 2010. McCormick shared the stage in York, Pennslvania, for this five-song, extended play album with fellow musician Dave SanSoucie on backup guitar as well as Seth Ryan who lent some vocal harmonies for The Train Song, a moving song that was inspired by the loss of McCormick’s cousin to heroine.

McCormick successfully projects an “acoustic rock with a soul” feel on tracks like “Deeper,” written as a reminder that while misery might love company, sometimes you need to get out of the house, “dig a little deeper” and see the sunshine even in the midst of a storm. A song that McCormick rarely performs live, “Storm Runner,” is a standout song on the album as it has a beautifully sobering, almost melancholy, melody that immediately stirs up emotion before McCormick even breathes a word. SanSoucie’s delicate picking blended with McCormick’s deep, raw tone effectively tells the story of a man realizing that death is on the horizon and that, no matter how hard he tries, the storm keeps coming.

Each of Live’s five original tracks are written as though they were made to be performed no other way than by a man with his guitar, absent of all of the additional instrumentals that can enhance a song, though sometimes rob it of the heart and soul put into it when first written—when there was just a guy sitting in the basement with his guitar, strumming on his strings and scribbling lyrics on coffee stained, scrap paper. What Live at the Capitol Theatre does is take you into that basement with McCormick and expose you to all of the heart, soul and naked emotion that he put into each track, encouraging you that there really is still music out there that moves you. So, unless you prefer the tiresome tunes that tend to disgrace our airwaves, this album will drive you to McCormick’s next live performance, as after listening to it you will find that Live’s five songs really is just not enough. - KindWeb


Rhyne McCormick has recorded with the likes of local musical celebrities, The Badlees, and has produced with Tom “T-Bone” Edmonds, a vet in the music industry, with artists like Lenny Kravitz, Meat Loaf and The Rolling Stones notched on his belt, to name a few. However, on his fifth record, Live at The Capitol Theatre, McCormick decides to take the road less traveled and put out a live album. Without the acoustically-sound studio and seasoned professionals to mix each track, McCormick takes a chance and puts out an album that strips it all down and takes you to the heart of it all—straight to the music.

While recording live can be an intimidating venture for a lot of musicians, and it certainly isn’t something suggested for the new kid on the block, McCormick proves he has earned his right in the live album hall of fame with Live at the Capitol Theatre, just released this May, 2010. McCormick shared the stage in York, Pennslvania, for this five-song, extended play album with fellow musician Dave SanSoucie on backup guitar as well as Seth Ryan who lent some vocal harmonies for The Train Song, a moving song that was inspired by the loss of McCormick’s cousin to heroine.

McCormick successfully projects an “acoustic rock with a soul” feel on tracks like “Deeper,” written as a reminder that while misery might love company, sometimes you need to get out of the house, “dig a little deeper” and see the sunshine even in the midst of a storm. A song that McCormick rarely performs live, “Storm Runner,” is a standout song on the album as it has a beautifully sobering, almost melancholy, melody that immediately stirs up emotion before McCormick even breathes a word. SanSoucie’s delicate picking blended with McCormick’s deep, raw tone effectively tells the story of a man realizing that death is on the horizon and that, no matter how hard he tries, the storm keeps coming.

Each of Live’s five original tracks are written as though they were made to be performed no other way than by a man with his guitar, absent of all of the additional instrumentals that can enhance a song, though sometimes rob it of the heart and soul put into it when first written—when there was just a guy sitting in the basement with his guitar, strumming on his strings and scribbling lyrics on coffee stained, scrap paper. What Live at the Capitol Theatre does is take you into that basement with McCormick and expose you to all of the heart, soul and naked emotion that he put into each track, encouraging you that there really is still music out there that moves you. So, unless you prefer the tiresome tunes that tend to disgrace our airwaves, this album will drive you to McCormick’s next live performance, as after listening to it you will find that Live’s five songs really is just not enough. - Folktowne


"Deeper," from the album, Live at the Capitol Theatre, is Dames of PA's number 2 song on the top 5 songs of 2009.

“Deeper” is a song which was inspired by seasonal affective disorder – or that down in the dumps feeling you get in the depths of winter from lack of sunshine. The song starts by describing the malaise but continues on to encourage the listener with, “You don’t have to go real far to find your inspiration…..dig a little deeper deep down in your soul…”
- Dames of PA


Discography

Acoustic Ceiling - 1999
Spin the Bottle - 2001
Burning Bridges - 2003
Soul Dust - 2005
Live at the Capitol Theatre - 2009

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Bio

Rhyne McCormick was born and raised in the mountains of central Pennsylvania, and at an early age began singing, playing the guitar and creating an impressive collection of vinyl. Influenced by a wide variety of musical genres such as country, rock, blues, folk and soul, McCormick melts all these genres together when making his own music, for a result that can be classified as truly “American”.

Friends and fellow musicians have described his music as “heartfelt” and having “soul;” a true slice of McCormick goes into each of his songs. He had more than 150 inspired performances this past year, and his passion is evident as he puts his heart and soul into each performance as though it were the first and the last.

McCormick demonstrates this ability on his most recent album, Live at the Capitol Theatre, produced by McCormick and Dave San Soucie, fellow musician and friend. This 5-song EP was recorded in April of 2009 at The Strand Capitol in York, Pennsylvania. The album includes songs that have his traditional, rock and soul sound such as Deeper and 5104 while he taps into a deeper and more moving sound in songs like Through These Eyes, The Train Song and Storm Runner, each song touching the listener in a way that McCormick is able to achieve through his thoughtful and inspirational lyrics.

But it’s not just others’ lives that have been touched. McCormick’s life was also touched by a dear friend and brother who had been a part of his life for more than 10 years, passing away in 2000. When McCormick met with his dying friend, he knew that it may be the last conversation they ever had and listened as his friend told him that he felt that no matter what he did, the storm—death—just kept chasing him. That conversation later became the song, Storm Runner, undeniably his most moving track on Live at the Capitol Theatre, if not to date.

He will be back in the studio in spring of 2011, and he is aching to be there. McCormick is diligently working on new songs and is ready to put out a studio-recorded, full-length album that will remind his fans and new listeners alike of why we listen to music—his music. We listen to it because we all need our own, daily dose of that feel-good, deep down in your soul passion—the kind that moves you and drives you to do something, be something, believe in something. And if McCormick is known for anything among other musicians and fans alike, it is his passion for his music, his drive to do more and his belief in the human spirit.