Robbie Boyd
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Robbie Boyd

City of London, England, United Kingdom | Established. Jan 01, 2010 | SELF

City of London, England, United Kingdom | SELF
Established on Jan, 2010
Band Folk Singer/Songwriter

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“I’ve seen the raging winds outside my door” despite overcast predictions Robbie Boyd pulls the optimistic stops of summer with some They Might Be Giants afro-folk. Bouncing bongo choruses complete this green and pleasant pop exhalation. - Trebuchet Magazine


Review Summary:
Impressive folk-pop release with a huge amount of energy and incredible feel good factor.

With an incredibly uplifting folk-pop sound and a strong social networking presence, Robbie Boyd is an artist that has already built up quite a name for himself complete with the backing of his band. They’ve performed twice on ITV’s ‘This Morning’, toured Argentina, Italy, France, Germany and the UK, and later this month Robbie Boyd and his band will even be performing at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park along with The Feeling and McFly. Having previously released a couple of EPs under the name The Robbie Boyd Band, the focus is now placed firmly upon Robbie Boyd in name at least with the ‘Painted Sky’ EP, the band does however in practise remain absolutely central to the sound.
With first track ‘I Want You To Stay’ there is more than a hint of the exotic, a tropical feel about the music as bongo drums are pounded, a smattering of saxophone is provided, and the music takes you away to a far away place. There’s a huge amount of positively about the sound; this is feel good music, absolutely no doubt about it, and a summertime release for this EP is most definitely absolutely fitting.
The music transports us away from the ocean with second track ‘Before It Falls Apart’, although the feel good factor absolutely remains. There’s a great emphasis on the bass here, and it’s bass guitarist Simon Fitzpatrick that really seems to hold the track together with his simple yet supremely effective instrumental style. Instrumentally the track feels a lot more stripped back than first track ‘I Want You To Stay’, allowing Robbie Boyd’s vocal display to really blossom. Robbie Boyd really does have an excellent voice, and with the focus placed far more upon Boyd you really begin to appreciate just how impressive his vocal tone truly is. Robbie Boyd’s voice is smooth yet strong, soothing to listen to and also hugely appealing. The band certainly has a huge part to play in the ultimate success of this EP, Robbie Boyd’s vocal display is absolutely cracking though, and with vocals this good Boyd and his band will surely go a long way.
‘Oh Alaska’ is definitely the standout track of the EP. There’s a great beat throughout the song and sensational sparing utilisation of the saxophone; this is a track that feels absolutely huge, a piece of music that could easily propel Robbie Boyd and his band to an even higher level of success with a single release. Any of the tracks present on this EP would surely make a successful single in fact, and with final track ‘Red Queen’ Robbie Boyd and his band further showcase their talent as they close out the EP with another absolutely stunning offering of music. The tone changes with ‘Red Queen’, there’s an excellent tempo shift to the track as it starts out fairly mellow and cranks up to another level at around the one minute mark. This is a song that should definitely go down well when Robbie Boyd and his band perform with The Feeling later this month, with Robbie Boyd’s vocal display here sounding quite similar to The Feeling’s own Dan Gillespie Sells.
There’s a lot to appreciate about Robbie Boyd’s ‘Painted Sky’ EP. With the high energy, extreme feel good factor of the music, this is an EP that will not only make a great soundtrack to the summer, but also no doubt provide a warming feeling when you listen to it on those cold, dark winter nights, too. It’s a shame there’s only four tracks to the EP really as you definitely feel that you want more, Robbie Boyd certainly displays here that he and his band are to be watched out for in the future though, and it should provide for a hugely impressive listening experience when they come to releasing a full studio album of music. - Alt-Uk


Walking into the Barfly, it was clear that The Robbie Boyd Band were going to give fans a treat tonight. Celebratory balloons, free band-themed cakes and fairy lights surrounding the small but packed room added to the party atmosphere of this gig, the launch of the Spring Generation EP. Opening with ‘I Won’t Let You Go’, the sold-out crowd was instantly captivated by Robbie’s smooth, warm voice harmonised perfectly by his 6-piece backing band, sparking reminiscence of a fresher, more interesting Mumford and Sons.
His new single followed, titled ‘Spring Generation’- a song that propels the band from being another typical nu-folk act and into something far more special; a summery, Mexican-style beat underlying and pushing this song into a song, it’s impossible not to dance to. The funky bass in ‘Oh Alaska’ had a similar effect, as his dedicated fanbase moved in unison to the band’s diverse sound.
Boyd continues with ‘I Want You To Stay’, a song written just a couple of weeks ago, before heading back into tracks from the new EP. ‘When I Believe’ takes influence from the band’s Kingston roots in its talky verses, but alludes to Boyd’s busking history with a catchy, simple chorus and ability to get the crowd joining in, and ‘Unlock The Key’, their self-confessed “Elton moment” sends shivers down the spine, Boyd’s voice shining through above layers of textured strings, keys and gentle guitars. Ending the main set with ‘Red Queen’, Boyd and his band cannot help but grin, a proud moment for them- this is their first sold-out-in-advance show, and they deserve it with a set so packed full of tuneful, instantly lovable songs.
The encore is met with huge applause, and Boyd arrives alone to play ‘Never Never Land’, a song he says he has not played in a few years. The silence falls in all the right places, the audience not daring to speak or even breathe too loudly, watching the man onstage perform to perfection. The band leave the more-than-satisfied Barfly with ‘I Want Something Different’, a song which is climactic, shambolic but coordinated, a beautiful mess of folk noise which, judging from the grinning faces walking to the tube station, left an impact on the those in attendance. There’s no doubt that Robbie Boyd and his band will be making even more of an impact- perhaps even on the mainstream- in no time.
Gig Review by Chloe Gynne - Gig Junkies


I raise my hand and I admit my flair for songwriters, it happens if your mum and dad were raised in the 60s and 70s. My mother used to sing to me a heartbreaking love song as a lullaby which kind of scarred me for life, but hey the lyrics were pure poetry. Robbie Boyd has a very similar background, inspired by the classic of rock and folk music like Bob Dylan, Paul Simon and The Beatles, he started busking till he managed to get on important stage as 2 Shepherd’s Bush Empire, Hyde Park, Bestival and and the Wilderness Festival.
Yesterday night he was at the Bush Hall in Shepherd’s Bush, a full house waiting for his performance. The front row was filled with children, teenagers with braces, middle-aged people and seniors. Elements of his success a danceable fusion of pop-jazz with hints of rock and blues and his beautifully crafted lyrics, able to create an atmosphere that wraps the listener into an imaginary world.
The band opened with ‘Before It Falls apart’ a rhythmic country ballad that coalesced together percussions, double bass and a clear and clean female choir in the background that accompanied and exalted the male voice. The real treat of the performance was ‘Amsterdam’ a song that started as a slow and nostalgic tune, the instruments and the voice alternated and they are both protagonists and predominant. The music slowly grew till it got to its highest peak and exploded with all the elements of the band joining in. The singer surprised his affectionate fans coming off of stage for an unplugged version of ‘I Won’t Let You Go’. Robbie, Adam, Mared and Mike sung the lyrics accompanied only by Robbie’s guitar, one of those intimate, precious moment that, fans will cherish for life and, thinking back, they will be able to say ‘I was there’.
The performance was closed by ‘Something Different’; the band went completely ballistic jumping and dancing on the stage following the rhythm of the song, possessed by the melody and by the incredible atmosphere they created and breathed with their fans. 7/10
Monica Guerrasio - With Guitars 7/10


There was more fun to be had at the Folk Guild Stage, where eight members of the Robbie Boyd Band threw a sax accompanied party and sang about Alaska. - The Times


"If 2010 was all about Mumford and his sons, 2011 is the year for Robbie Boyd and his buddies"
- It's All Happening


"If 2010 was all about Mumford and his sons, 2011 is the year for Robbie Boyd and his buddies"
- It's All Happening


“Generating plenty of buzz around the London circuit, The Robbie Boyd Band are getting a good live reputation. They’ve got some wonderful songs”
- Charlie Ashcroft, Amazing Radio


THE HIT SHEEET “Tip for 2011 - Robbie Boyd”
- David Cox, The Outside Organisation Ltd


“A fine new lyrical songwriter. Works hard at his craft and improves every time I see him. The audience actually listen to The Robbie Boyd Band!”
- Barry Mason, leading songwriter, with songs recorded by Tom Jones, Rod Stewart, Barbara Streisand an


“Robbie Boyd just gets better and better. His beautiful song-writing is accompanied by an eclectic mix of talented West London based musicians producing a funky folk sound.”
- Sophie McCreddie, TML


“Robbie Boyd just gets better and better. His beautiful song-writing is accompanied by an eclectic mix of talented West London based musicians producing a funky folk sound.”
- Sophie McCreddie, TML


“The Robbie Boyd Band have a genuinely exciting sound. Brilliantly catchy songs with melodies that will stay in your head for days. Catch them live before they go wild nuts.”
- Paul Stanborough, producer for Guy Chambers


“Robbie Boyd is a very talented new singer/ songwriter with the ability to create original songs without losing the commercial touch. I was delighted to feature his compositions Oh Alaska and New Hampshire on my BBC Radio 2 American Pie series where they stood comparison very well with work by several long-established songwriters and performers.”
- Sir Tim Rice, BBC Radio 2


"A shining jewel in the crown of our latest Proud Galleries Strum Session most certainly. Robbie's colourful & creative compositions accompanied with the raw talent of THAT awe inspiring band make this a live performance you never want to miss. Rarely is a gig so electric."
- Strum!


'Do It Yourself' as a 'model' in music, has been a term that has been growing up hand-in-hand with the onset and development of the 'digital revolution'. Singers, songwriters and artists have access to increasingly cheaper, higher quality recording software and hardware, combined with an even cheaper platform in which to connect with their audience, so cheap in fact it's free; the world wide web.

At some stage in an artist's career, even a 'DIY' one, they will have to perform 'live'. This is a fundamental skill for any artist looking to expand on their online profile, gain further exposure and showcase themselves not just to new and existing fans, but to certain facets of 'the industry'. That doesn't necessarily have to be record labels, it could mean promoters, managers or booking agents for example. Generalising the 'DIY' model; you might not need or want a record deal, but there is still room for other areas of the music industry to develop your career.

Why do I mention this, and apologies if it was a smidgen of a waffle. Last week I met a singer/songwriter by the name of Robbie Boyd. He has been writing songs, promoting himself through his online profiles, performing regularly and building an ever-growing fan-base. He is a driven guy and keen to get his music to the masses performing either solo or with his 6/7 piece band, a band I might add that are extremely tight and compliment Robbie's quirky, effervescent lyrics and songwriting style beautifully.

The underpinnings to Robbie's sound is identifiable as 'folk' but there is something else there, he'll describe it as 'funk', I'll describe it as 'a cheery disposition with a cheeky wink'. Robbie writes good hooks and his songs leave you smiling, which is never a bad result (even his more sombre tunes!)

Robbie and his band are gigging regularly in London and I would highly recommend going to check them out as it's a great experience. They'll wrap you up in the music with welcoming arms and give you a friendly peck on the cheek, in a totally appropriate way of course.

I caught Robbie at a studio and thought I would ask him some questions. Some people may call it an interview, I will label it simply as an informative, friendly chat! Over to you Mr. Boyd... - Music Travels


As Mumford & Sons shared the stage with Bob Dylan at the Grammys, Noah and the Whale re-entered the Top 40 and Laura Marling, albeit awkwardly, accepted her Brit award, one thing seemed obvious: pop just got posh. By grouping these three acts together, I’m committing a crime that the media partakes in and one that I found hugely irritating. Yes they all share a Pop/Folk tendency (and romantic links to Marling) to different degrees but the constant comparison, and subsequent competition seems hugely irritating. Any reviews that I have read lately of Noah and the Whale’s latest album have started with Mumford & Sons and Laura Marling comparisons which seem incongruent to the scope of the review. Reviews of Rihanna don’t start with comparisons to every single American, R&B/Pop artists so why are these three be pitted against each other.

Rant over, this leads to my introduction of a great band that (and I’m putting a great deal of faith into a public that has recently embraced the startlingly bland The Wanted) will inevitably be compared to Mumford et al. The Robbie Boyd Band is headed up by (unsurprisingly) Robbie Boyd who just like Mumford & Sons’ Winston Marshall, Noah and the Whale’s Charlie Fink and all of Can You Hear This‘s staff team went to St. Paul’s School. When their album arrived in the post, there was an exciting feeling attached to the CD. This feels like a band with huge potential, great song writing and some commercial kudos to their catalogue. They’ve also won the backing of music gold, Sir Tim Rice selected one of their songs for a BBC Radio 2 programme and referred to Robbie as ‘a singer of considerable talent with the ability to create original songs without losing the commercial touch.’ That’s quite some praise. Just below this, the statement that the band ‘are carving a niche into the Folk/Pop/Rock genre of the moment with a twist of their own,’ instils suspicion in my mind, already overloaded with so many of the Folk artists ’with a twist’ de jour.

And yet such suspicions were premature. Robbie tells me that, although the band has hugely different interests, his influences vary from The Beatles, Arcade Fire and The Kinks. So far so good, and it’s clear that their music is a culmination of different musical genres. In the album, I found a sensitively crafted and impressively varied piece of music. I interviewed Robbie to delve a bit deeper into how he created his sound:
Your band dynamic seems really interesting. How does it work with regards to the song-making process and are there any points of conflict that occur?
The way it usually works is that I will bring a song that I have written to the band either in acoustic form or it’s already been produced. When it starts off acoustically, it’s not long before everyone has created a part of their own and it becomes a full band song! The result is normally fantastic. I am a firm believer of trying everything out once and if it works then keep it in and if not then either try something new or leave it out. There’s not usually any conflict, it’s a pretty good democracy.


It strikes me that (whether good or bad) you guys will be compared to the recent onslaught of popular Folk acts. Does the success of bands like Mumford & Sons give you hope or worry you that the public will have had enough of the genre?
Hope. I think it’s really great what Mumford & Sons have achieved. They have created an open mindedness towards what constitutes Folk and are one of the main bands leading a resurgence in its popularity. I think it’s wonderful that it’s still relevant to a modern audience that is just discovering the genre. Their recent success shows that people will admire and appreciate whatever you do, as long as you do it well and are passionate about it. Every industry is competitive, the whole point is finding something fresh and interesting; for them it’s Folk n Roll, for us it’s Funky Folk! We don’t want to live in anyone else’s shadow. The Folk/Pop/Rock genres that we cross over will always be expanding, so hopefully the public will never get tired and more importantly, it’s up to us to keep them interested.


One my favourite songs of the album was Oh Alaska, which I asked Robbie about:


How did you come up with Oh Alaska? It seems like one of the standout songs from the album and definitely a single in its own right.
Sir Tim Rice has been running a programme on BBC Radio 2 since last July called American Pie, all about the music of the American states. In one of his first shows he mentioned that there wasn’t much music from the state of Alaska and if any songwriters wanted to write a song and send it in he might feature it. I came up with Oh Alaska in about half an hour. I produced it on my computer, put it on a CD and hand delivered the track to Sir Tim’s producer at the BBC. Three months later he called me on my mobile saying “Hello, this is Tim Rice, I have chosen your track Oh Alaska to feature on my Radio 2 Programme Am - Can you hear this


As Mumford & Sons shared the stage with Bob Dylan at the Grammys, Noah and the Whale re-entered the Top 40 and Laura Marling, albeit awkwardly, accepted her Brit award, one thing seemed obvious: pop just got posh. By grouping these three acts together, I’m committing a crime that the media partakes in and one that I found hugely irritating. Yes they all share a Pop/Folk tendency (and romantic links to Marling) to different degrees but the constant comparison, and subsequent competition seems hugely irritating. Any reviews that I have read lately of Noah and the Whale’s latest album have started with Mumford & Sons and Laura Marling comparisons which seem incongruent to the scope of the review. Reviews of Rihanna don’t start with comparisons to every single American, R&B/Pop artists so why are these three be pitted against each other.

Rant over, this leads to my introduction of a great band that (and I’m putting a great deal of faith into a public that has recently embraced the startlingly bland The Wanted) will inevitably be compared to Mumford et al. The Robbie Boyd Band is headed up by (unsurprisingly) Robbie Boyd who just like Mumford & Sons’ Winston Marshall, Noah and the Whale’s Charlie Fink and all of Can You Hear This‘s staff team went to St. Paul’s School. When their album arrived in the post, there was an exciting feeling attached to the CD. This feels like a band with huge potential, great song writing and some commercial kudos to their catalogue. They’ve also won the backing of music gold, Sir Tim Rice selected one of their songs for a BBC Radio 2 programme and referred to Robbie as ‘a singer of considerable talent with the ability to create original songs without losing the commercial touch.’ That’s quite some praise. Just below this, the statement that the band ‘are carving a niche into the Folk/Pop/Rock genre of the moment with a twist of their own,’ instils suspicion in my mind, already overloaded with so many of the Folk artists ’with a twist’ de jour.

And yet such suspicions were premature. Robbie tells me that, although the band has hugely different interests, his influences vary from The Beatles, Arcade Fire and The Kinks. So far so good, and it’s clear that their music is a culmination of different musical genres. In the album, I found a sensitively crafted and impressively varied piece of music. I interviewed Robbie to delve a bit deeper into how he created his sound:
Your band dynamic seems really interesting. How does it work with regards to the song-making process and are there any points of conflict that occur?
The way it usually works is that I will bring a song that I have written to the band either in acoustic form or it’s already been produced. When it starts off acoustically, it’s not long before everyone has created a part of their own and it becomes a full band song! The result is normally fantastic. I am a firm believer of trying everything out once and if it works then keep it in and if not then either try something new or leave it out. There’s not usually any conflict, it’s a pretty good democracy.


It strikes me that (whether good or bad) you guys will be compared to the recent onslaught of popular Folk acts. Does the success of bands like Mumford & Sons give you hope or worry you that the public will have had enough of the genre?
Hope. I think it’s really great what Mumford & Sons have achieved. They have created an open mindedness towards what constitutes Folk and are one of the main bands leading a resurgence in its popularity. I think it’s wonderful that it’s still relevant to a modern audience that is just discovering the genre. Their recent success shows that people will admire and appreciate whatever you do, as long as you do it well and are passionate about it. Every industry is competitive, the whole point is finding something fresh and interesting; for them it’s Folk n Roll, for us it’s Funky Folk! We don’t want to live in anyone else’s shadow. The Folk/Pop/Rock genres that we cross over will always be expanding, so hopefully the public will never get tired and more importantly, it’s up to us to keep them interested.


One my favourite songs of the album was Oh Alaska, which I asked Robbie about:


How did you come up with Oh Alaska? It seems like one of the standout songs from the album and definitely a single in its own right.
Sir Tim Rice has been running a programme on BBC Radio 2 since last July called American Pie, all about the music of the American states. In one of his first shows he mentioned that there wasn’t much music from the state of Alaska and if any songwriters wanted to write a song and send it in he might feature it. I came up with Oh Alaska in about half an hour. I produced it on my computer, put it on a CD and hand delivered the track to Sir Tim’s producer at the BBC. Three months later he called me on my mobile saying “Hello, this is Tim Rice, I have chosen your track Oh Alaska to feature on my Radio 2 Programme Am - Can you hear this


Robbie Boyd and his band have already got a pretty big fan base, they make folky pop music and this is ‘Stepping Stones’ - Flying with Anna


Robbie Boyd has been working bloody hard to secure a place on the competitive British music scene. He has recently performed on ITV’s This Morning (twice!), and is constantly touring, playing intimate headline shows, alongside massive supports slots with acts such as McFly and The Feeling. Not only this, but last summer he also became the first British person ever to perform on the roof of London’s O2 Arena. All this, and he hasn’t even released his debut album yet!

Which leads us onto this: So Called Man, Robbie’s joyous debut full-length. It’s a record packed full of personality and meaning, carried by his soft vocals and overflowing with youthful energy. Opening with the catchy Orion’s Belt, Boyd’s sharp sense of rhythm and fluent writing style is instantly introduced, before he brings out his much-loved ukulele for heartfelt track I Won’t Let You Go. Summer songs like this may be somewhat clichéd, but the infectious melodies will have you singing along, and you can’t help but smile when the chorus kicks in.

Lyrically, it’s an album of love and hope. The lyrics aren’t always be brimming with happiness, as in Less Than Friends, the tale of lost love, or the defiance shown in Amsterdam; though, the bubbly instrumentation and Boyd’s warm vocals offer optimism where there very easily could have been none. Brave and I Want You to Stay are two exceptional tracks with catchy melodies exuding life and positivity, and they manage to stand out amongst a collection of well-written songs.

It isn’t all get-up-and-dance, happy-go-lucky tracks. Towards the end of the record, the uncertainty of Roll The Dice gives a glimpse into the dark side of this artist’s folk-pop repertoire. A slow, melancholy track complete with violins and a reflective piano backing, it’s a song for those who enjoy something a bit slower and more heartfelt. Never Never Landbrings the record to a close, and it’s really only after the final notes of this song play out that you realise how much of an enjoyable listen this record makes. If you’re still searching for that annual feel-good record to act as the soundtrack of your summer, look no further than So Called Man.

[4.5/5] - Indulge-sound.com (Heather)


London-based singer-songwriter Robbie Boyd has been working bloody hard to secure a place on the competitive British music scene. He has recently performed on ITV’s This Morning (twice!), and is constantly touring, playing intimate headline shows, alongside massive supports slots with acts such as McFly and The Feeling. Not only this, but last summer he also became the first British person ever to perform on the roof of London’s O2 Arena. All this, and he hasn’t even released his debut album yet!

Which leads us onto this: So Called Man, Robbie’s joyous debut full-length. It’s a record packed full of personality and meaning, carried by his soft vocals and overflowing with youthful energy. Opening with the catchy Orion’s Belt, Boyd’s sharp sense of rhythm and fluent writing style is instantly introduced, before he brings out his much-loved ukulele for heartfelt track I Won’t Let You Go. Summer songs like this may be somewhat clichéd, but the infectious melodies will have you singing along, and you can’t help but smile when the chorus kicks in.

Lyrically, it’s an album of love and hope. The lyrics aren’t always be brimming with happiness, as in Less Than Friends, the tale of lost love, or the defiance shown in Amsterdam; though, the bubbly instrumentation and Boyd’s warm vocals offer optimism where there very easily could have been none. Brave and I Want You to Stay are two exceptional tracks with catchy melodies exuding life and positivity, and they manage to stand out amongst a collection of well-written songs.

It isn’t all get-up-and-dance, happy-go-lucky tracks. Towards the end of the record, the uncertainty of Roll The Dice gives a glimpse into the dark side of this artist’s folk-pop repertoire. A slow, melancholy track complete with violins and a reflective piano backing, it’s a song for those who enjoy something a bit slower and more heartfelt. Never Never Landbrings the record to a close, and it’s really only after the final notes of this song play out that you realise how much of an enjoyable listen this record makes. If you’re still searching for that annual feel-good record to act as the soundtrack of your summer, look no further than So Called Man.

[4.5/5] - Indulge-sound.com (Heather)


Summer has arrived early. Yeah, really.

I can’t help but feel it despite looking out of my window to see a cloudy sky and the hint of rain in the distance heading over this way. It’s chilly and only some of the time does the sun make it out from behind those infernal British clouds.

But there’s just no doubt in my mind that summer is all around me. It must be, because Robbie Boyd’s newly released debut album ‘So Called Man’ tells me it is. Every single track has been sown together with joy that can only come from being out on a sunny day and partying like the sun will never go down. I defy anyone to listen to ‘I want you to stay’ and not feel the urge to bop away with a cheesy grin slapped on their face whatever the weather. This is feel-good on steroids.

All twelve tracks abound with luscious, uplifting melodies and Boyd’s easy-on-the-ear voice is well supported with a great band and excellent studio production. Even downbeat songs like the Coldplay-esque ‘Amsterdam’ leave you gently swaying, feeling calm but in no way saddened.

I’m struggling to find a favourite track to suggest because they’re all so good. Possibly the child-like fantasy ‘Spring Generation’ or, if not, then Boyd’s single ‘Less Than Friends’ (which was released on the 12 May) which is a fascinatingly toe-tapping tale of unrequited love. It should be dark and moody; instead the song is full of hope – which pretty much sums up what this album is all about.

You’re not going to find deep lyrics here which make you think about the darker sides of life (thought Boyd avoids, with ease, being trite and slushy). Instead you can blast this album out during your barbecue or party to help your guests get in the mood for the summer. Although recognised as ‘folk-driven’ don’t mistake this as music which will lull you to sleep with gentle modal melodies. No, the acoustic rock backing is in full force giving a powerful rhythmic drive which is as uplifting as the tunes themselves.

This is music to play while you tidy the house, drive to work – or better still drive home from work – and to play on a Friday in readiness for a cracking good weekend with your mates. In short, Robbie Boyd recreates the positive good-time vibes his sell-out concerts are known for making the album a must-have for summer-worshippers.

Summer has arrived. I know it is because Robbie Boyd is summer in musical form and he is here now. - The Doughnut


The Robbie Boyd Band have very dedicated fans – so much so that two of them even flew in from Italy especially to see them at their sold-out launch party for their latest EP, Spring Generation. The band powered their way through an hour of music, each song catchier than the last and as foot-tappingly feel-good as the next, and had the crowd singing and dancing along from the opening lines of I Won’t Let You Go – a track from their debut EP Autumn’s Flown. Spring Generation was brought to life in its live version as the audience sang along in response to the band.
The energy levels were brought down to a calmer level in their new song Unlock The Key, which featured some beautiful moments from violinist Mared Evans. The pace was picked up again in A London Reminition, which seemed particularly popular with the audience, perhaps in part due to its nod to Portobello Road, where the band regularly perform and which seemed to have been responsible for bringing an impressive proportion of the audience to Camden.
The Robbie Boyd Band’s songs are best enjoyed live – the audience participation and amount of energy the band exude bring the catchy songs to life and leave you with them firmly lodged in your head by the end of the night. The Lean, the fourth track off their new EP is another great example of this – a song which already seems to be an audience favourite, again perhaps thanks to the audience participation nature of the song, which added to the feel-good factor of the gig.
The evening drew to a close with Take Me Back To Dreamland, which segued neatly into Red Queen – the slowed-down introduction of which kicked in to an energetic finish. Boyd returned to the stage to huge applause for an encore: first an acoustic performance of Never Never Land, which Boyd had not performed solo for a few years, before welcoming back the rest of the band for a final hurrah of Amsterdam and I Want Something Different.
Lizzi Michael - Thank Folk For That


Discography

'Under My Skin': played on BBC Radio 2 by Graham Norton (05/10/13)

'Oh Alaska': played on Xfm (Hattie Pearson), BBC Radio 2 (Graham Norton, Jeremy Vine), 6 Music (Chris Hawkins)

'I want you to stay': played on Xfm (Hattie Pearson), BBC Radio 2 (Graham Norton, Jeremy Vine), 6 Music (Chris Hawkins), BBC London

'Spring Generation': played on BBC Radio 2 (Graham Norton), 6 Music

'When I Believe': played on BBC Radio 2 (Graham Norton, Paul O'Grady), 6 Music

'Orion's Belt': played on Xfm, Absolute Radio (Dave Gorman), BBC Radio 2 (Graham Norton, Paul O'Grady), 6 Music

'I won't let you go': played on Xfm, BBC Radio 2 (Graham Norton, Paul O'Grady), 6 Music (Tom Robinson)

'New Hampshire': played on BBC Radio 2 (Tim Rice)

Released four EPs (7 Singles):
'Under My Skin', 'Painted Sky', 'Spring Generation', 'Autumn's Flown'

Photos

Bio

Tom Deacon, BBC Radio 1 – “Brilliant”

Hattie Pearson, Xfm – ‘I can’t express how much I love this band; can’t get enough of them!’

Graham Norton, BBC Radio 2 – “Isn’t that a lovely thing? Very nice indeed”

Dave Gorman, Absolute Radio – “Great track, more than deserves to rub shoulders with
Pulp & Elbow”

Robbie Boyd has performed live on ITV’s ‘This Morning’ twice, been regularly aired on BBC Radio 2 by the likes of Graham Norton and Jeremy Vine, and has just released this year’s hotly tipped debut album, ‘So Called Man’, produced and mixed by Tristan Ivemy (Frank Turner, Magic Numbers). Set to be the song of the Summer, Robbie’s debut single, Less Than Friends, is a true toe-tapper, demonstrating Robbie’s versatile vocals and his band’s powerful folk-driven groove.

 

Robbie’s charming songs have captivated a worldwide audience of over
10,500 Facebook fans and 500,000 YouTube views, he’s supported artists like
The Kooks, McFly, The Feeling, Johnny Flynn, Daughter and Suggs. Robbie’s sold out his last six London headline shows, performed at the O2 Shepherd’s Bush Empire, and was the first ever Brit to perform on the roof of the O2 Arena.
Robbie and his band have toured extensively around the UK and Europe; played sold out shows in Argentina, along with radio interviews and magazine features; recorded, performed & written songs in Nashville, and Robbie has just returned from Japan where he was invited to write and perform. Robbie played at the Isle of Wight Festival 2014 and has previously performed at Bestival, Wilderness, Great Escape, Standon Calling and Beautiful Days Festival among others.

 

‘So Called Man’ draws on Robbie’s broad range of musical influences, and features 12 songs decorated with luscious melodies and hopeful lyrics reminiscent of
Ben Howard, with a post-Mumford twang. The album includes debut single
Under My Skin’, a bittersweet love song that’s already had much praise: “The chorus explodes to life with sing-along qualities and a euphoric sweep, that leaves a smile on your face. A real crowd-pleaser that deserves to be a massive hit.” Indie London

 

Robbie’s lyrical inspiration is an uplifting affirmation of the many hours spent busking on the streets of London, Paris and Buenos Aires where he honed his craft. The tight harmonies and instantly memorable tunes, reflect Robbie’s refreshingly positive outlook, displayed on tracks such as ‘Brave’, while the catchy chorus on ‘I Want You To Stay’ is pure feel-good and immediately addictive.

 

Robbie’s talented band of like-minded minstrels, add to the festivities whenever they play live, filling each venue with good time vibes. Their performances have been positively reviewed in The Times, Evening Standard and Time Out, with online support coming from the likes of Huffington Post and Rolling Stone. Robbie’s songs have also been played on Xfm, Absolute Radio and 6 Music, and his song-writing skills have earned him co-writes with legends such as the one and only Ray Davies

Band Members