Robot Workers
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Robot Workers

Calgary, Alberta, Canada | SELF

Calgary, Alberta, Canada | SELF
Band Rock Funk

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This band hasn't logged any future gigs

Apr
12
Robot Workers @ Vern's

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Mar
28
Robot Workers @ Dicken's Pub

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Mar
23
Robot Workers @ The Area

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

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Music

Press


S/T – SELF-RELEASED

CALGARY CORNER

Calgary’s Robot Workers are a unique bunch. Their songs are energetic, stylistically diverse and surprisingly pop-oriented despite the band’s multi-genre approach and penchant for quick shifts. In addition, the band understands how to own its influences without relying on them; at several points, the song’s style and mood are reminiscent of another artist even though the sound is nowhere near. For instance, the verse vocals in “Cowboy Breakdown” are clearly an homage to Bob Dylan’s “Subterranean

Homesick Blues,” but the lazy/jazzy instrumentation makes sure the song feels like Robot Workers’ own.

Their self-titled debut is full of these nice little touches and you’re likely to catch yourself humming most of these songs at some point or another. Robot Workers is a debut album and as such has the tough task of bottling the band’s live energy and, although it succeeds more often than not, there are a few moments – particularly when the band tries to play laid-back ska – that feel a little tepid.

Thankfully, these moments are few and far-between. Robot Workers have an incredible ear for pop music and they are all talented musicians. The guitar tracks alone make the album worth listening to, but clever arrangements and a fearless devotion to genre-hopping make the album worth listening to over and over.

By John Julius - Beatroute (AB)


Robots are created to make life easier. They do tough jobs, build fancy things and are efficient and complicated machines, all programmed and built by their ingenious creators. With their debut self-titled album, Calgary’s Robot Workers show they were programmed with the ability to make sweet music and do so with the natural and effortless skills robots are known for.

The album kicks off with the bouncy “Sinister”, immediately creating a really groovy, almost reggae feel with emphasis on the upbeats and a completely catchy melody. This is a track to get stuck in your head and dance to later – and actually, this can be said about the whole album. There isn’t a song on here that won’t make you move, whether you dance like a Rastafarian or go nuts like a ‘90s headbanger. This is one of the best features of the album, the ability to create universal dance appeal without sacrificing good music.

A cool thing about this album is the number of long instrumentals, like those in “Cowboy Breakdown” and “Madness of the Dream”, which sometimes sound like natural jam sessions and is actually a bit hard to do. It takes a lot of talent, chemistry and technical knowledge to be able to do this, especially in the fun-sounding way Robot Workers does. They feel authentic, raw and a bit more organic than their cold robot exteriors might have us believe.

Throughout the album Robot Workers puts out great repeating riffs (like in “Cowboy Breakdown” and “King of Aces”), upbeat percussion and cool, sometimes wailing vocals. They’ve got a mix of reggae, country, rock and funk, creating a ton of different sounds and a nice variety of tracks to listen to. You might think of Queens of the Stone Age, Cake, Everlast, Radiohead, and something else you can’t quite figure out; they create their own sound, and we really can’t wait to hear what they’ll come out with next.

Robot workers are a stellar up-and-coming Calgary band and this is an album you have to check out. The official release party is December 21 at Lord Nelson’s in Calgary, so check them out and make sure you grab a copy. Check them out online and on Facebook, and thank their creators for the great music these robots have been programmed to make. - indie403.com


Robots are created to make life easier. They do tough jobs, build fancy things and are efficient and complicated machines, all programmed and built by their ingenious creators. With their debut self-titled album, Calgary’s Robot Workers show they were programmed with the ability to make sweet music and do so with the natural and effortless skills robots are known for.

The album kicks off with the bouncy “Sinister”, immediately creating a really groovy, almost reggae feel with emphasis on the upbeats and a completely catchy melody. This is a track to get stuck in your head and dance to later – and actually, this can be said about the whole album. There isn’t a song on here that won’t make you move, whether you dance like a Rastafarian or go nuts like a ‘90s headbanger. This is one of the best features of the album, the ability to create universal dance appeal without sacrificing good music.

A cool thing about this album is the number of long instrumentals, like those in “Cowboy Breakdown” and “Madness of the Dream”, which sometimes sound like natural jam sessions and is actually a bit hard to do. It takes a lot of talent, chemistry and technical knowledge to be able to do this, especially in the fun-sounding way Robot Workers does. They feel authentic, raw and a bit more organic than their cold robot exteriors might have us believe.

Throughout the album Robot Workers puts out great repeating riffs (like in “Cowboy Breakdown” and “King of Aces”), upbeat percussion and cool, sometimes wailing vocals. They’ve got a mix of reggae, country, rock and funk, creating a ton of different sounds and a nice variety of tracks to listen to. You might think of Queens of the Stone Age, Cake, Everlast, Radiohead, and something else you can’t quite figure out; they create their own sound, and we really can’t wait to hear what they’ll come out with next.

Robot workers are a stellar up-and-coming Calgary band and this is an album you have to check out. The official release party is December 21 at Lord Nelson’s in Calgary, so check them out and make sure you grab a copy. Check them out online and on Facebook, and thank their creators for the great music these robots have been programmed to make. - indie403.com


Calgary band Robot Workers know how to have fun and they love to show it. Over a few beers at Sam’s in Kensington, the band opened up about their recording process, their upcoming CD and much more. It was obvious after the first beer why the band is so beloved: friendly and outgoing, each of them is charming and a little weird (in the best way possible), and each of their personalities comes out in their playing.

Which, according to drummer Adam Mudry, happens over a good jam session.

“These three fellas used to live in a house that we could dedicate as a jam house… it’s a hole in the ground now,” says guitar player and vocalist Chris McGeachy, who laughingly adds, “We wrote a song about it, but it’s not on the CD.”

Aside from their jamming, the band has been playing a lot through the city, both to fund their upcoming CD and because it’s fun, though the band may jokingly tell you it’s because playing shows is cheaper than renting jam space.

Their fast-approaching album release has been anticipated for some time now, especially with how often the band has been playing around the city. Their tenacity with shows should pay with their CD release, for which they will be picking up new merch.

The CD itself is expected to have 10 songs, seven of which were recorded in their old jam house.

“We like people dancing, and we’re lucky to have a lot of really good friends who come out to shows, and people who maybe don’t have a great opinion of us, but we don’t want it to get any lower,” McGeachy says, laughing.

Between playing so many shows and working on their upcoming album, it’s a wonder that Robot Workers have time for much of anything else. It doesn’t seem like they’d want the extra time, though, since all the band members seem to be completely in love with their project and playing together. They haven’t really experienced much of an effect from the constant playing aside from tighter sets, and maybe a better chance at catching some attention.

“The rule of thumb is if you really want to make any money, you know, in the city, you need to have three sets, essentially. Three to four sets,” says McGeachy, “So that’s our goal, I guess. We need to maybe learn some covers or something!”

Clearly a joke, as the band is pretty good about not writing songs they don’t genuinely enjoy. If they find they don’t particularly like practicing a song, it’s likely it won’t develop any further, and the band moves on to more productive things.

“If someone happens to hear it, and they’re like, ‘Oh, why don’t you play that song?’ I’m like, ‘…because I don’t like it,’” says Mudry.

To support their new album, Robot Workers is planning a small tour through western Canada, including the coast, and blame their day jobs for the shortness of the adventure.

“I plan on leaving my house!” laughs singer and bassist Dustin Wahlund.

“We’d obviously like to go on tour, but we’re all working schlubs,” says McGeachy.

Still, their infectiousness can’t be denied. With a new album ready to send out to the world, Robot Workers are working towards being able to let go of their day jobs and still be able to keep all their parts in working order.

Robot Workers will release their upcoming album on December 21 at Lord Nelson’s.

By Erin A. Burke
Photo: Keith Skrastins - Beatroute (AB)


Calgary band Robot Workers know how to have fun and they love to show it. Over a few beers at Sam’s in Kensington, the band opened up about their recording process, their upcoming CD and much more. It was obvious after the first beer why the band is so beloved: friendly and outgoing, each of them is charming and a little weird (in the best way possible), and each of their personalities comes out in their playing.

Which, according to drummer Adam Mudry, happens over a good jam session.

“These three fellas used to live in a house that we could dedicate as a jam house… it’s a hole in the ground now,” says guitar player and vocalist Chris McGeachy, who laughingly adds, “We wrote a song about it, but it’s not on the CD.”

Aside from their jamming, the band has been playing a lot through the city, both to fund their upcoming CD and because it’s fun, though the band may jokingly tell you it’s because playing shows is cheaper than renting jam space.

Their fast-approaching album release has been anticipated for some time now, especially with how often the band has been playing around the city. Their tenacity with shows should pay with their CD release, for which they will be picking up new merch.

The CD itself is expected to have 10 songs, seven of which were recorded in their old jam house.

“We like people dancing, and we’re lucky to have a lot of really good friends who come out to shows, and people who maybe don’t have a great opinion of us, but we don’t want it to get any lower,” McGeachy says, laughing.

Between playing so many shows and working on their upcoming album, it’s a wonder that Robot Workers have time for much of anything else. It doesn’t seem like they’d want the extra time, though, since all the band members seem to be completely in love with their project and playing together. They haven’t really experienced much of an effect from the constant playing aside from tighter sets, and maybe a better chance at catching some attention.

“The rule of thumb is if you really want to make any money, you know, in the city, you need to have three sets, essentially. Three to four sets,” says McGeachy, “So that’s our goal, I guess. We need to maybe learn some covers or something!”

Clearly a joke, as the band is pretty good about not writing songs they don’t genuinely enjoy. If they find they don’t particularly like practicing a song, it’s likely it won’t develop any further, and the band moves on to more productive things.

“If someone happens to hear it, and they’re like, ‘Oh, why don’t you play that song?’ I’m like, ‘…because I don’t like it,’” says Mudry.

To support their new album, Robot Workers is planning a small tour through western Canada, including the coast, and blame their day jobs for the shortness of the adventure.

“I plan on leaving my house!” laughs singer and bassist Dustin Wahlund.

“We’d obviously like to go on tour, but we’re all working schlubs,” says McGeachy.

Still, their infectiousness can’t be denied. With a new album ready to send out to the world, Robot Workers are working towards being able to let go of their day jobs and still be able to keep all their parts in working order.

Robot Workers will release their upcoming album on December 21 at Lord Nelson’s.

By Erin A. Burke
Photo: Keith Skrastins - Beatroute (AB)


Discography

Robot Workers (2012)

Photos

Bio

An up-and-coming band from Calgary, AB

Whats that sound? That infectious, groove-shaking sound? Robot Workers is a four-piece fusion of rock / funk / surf and prog blended in a party mix and served with a slice of awesome. Dubbed by some as a band with the identity crisis, Robot Workers defies being pigeonholed into a single genre and instead challenges the notion that a band can be put in a single category under the code of record store labelling.

But dont be afraid, the beauty of this band is that we are all Robot Workers, toiling away and waiting to play and Robot Workers sound will bombard your eardrums with sonic harmony while causing an inexplicable desire to shake what your maker gave you.

Their debut album released Dec 21 2012

Band Members