Rock Most
Gig Seeker Pro

Rock Most

Atlanta, Georgia, United States | INDIE

Atlanta, Georgia, United States | INDIE
Band Hip Hop Hip Hop

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

Music

Press


"11 releases that took ATL’s hip-hop underground deeper and higher in 2011"

See Article - Creative Loafing (ATL)


"Georgia triple threat says "Rise & Shine to the ATL underground""

The sophomore effort from Atlanta DJ/Producer/MC, Rock Most., Rise & Shine features 16 tracks of hip hop goodness. With beats and production techniques that would be intstantly approved by anyone on the Rhymesayers label, Rock Most's flow is surprisingly smoothe, while at the same time breaking away and punctuating syllables like a modern day Rev Run (fans of Brother Ali will be at home with Most's pace).

To a degree, Rock Most could be described as a "conscious" rapper with a definitel backpack lean, but with enough mention of strippers and ex-girlfriends to give him plenty to talk about with more mainstream Atlanta based hip hop gods. This is rap for everyday life. There's no bling, no Benzes, and very little bravado. The Ohio native turned Atlanta hip hop staple is the ideal soundtrack for a solo cruise in you car on a Thursday night. This is blue- collar rap and makes no apologies about it. Throw Rise & Shine on your headphones and let Rock Most be the mental backdrop for your walk to work. (Dirty Bob Records)
Produced by Rock most
Mastered by Glenn Schick at GS Mastering - Performer Magazine


"Georgia triple threat says "Rise & Shine to the ATL underground""

The sophomore effort from Atlanta DJ/Producer/MC, Rock Most., Rise & Shine features 16 tracks of hip hop goodness. With beats and production techniques that would be intstantly approved by anyone on the Rhymesayers label, Rock Most's flow is surprisingly smoothe, while at the same time breaking away and punctuating syllables like a modern day Rev Run (fans of Brother Ali will be at home with Most's pace).

To a degree, Rock Most could be described as a "conscious" rapper with a definitel backpack lean, but with enough mention of strippers and ex-girlfriends to give him plenty to talk about with more mainstream Atlanta based hip hop gods. This is rap for everyday life. There's no bling, no Benzes, and very little bravado. The Ohio native turned Atlanta hip hop staple is the ideal soundtrack for a solo cruise in you car on a Thursday night. This is blue- collar rap and makes no apologies about it. Throw Rise & Shine on your headphones and let Rock Most be the mental backdrop for your walk to work. (Dirty Bob Records)
Produced by Rock most
Mastered by Glenn Schick at GS Mastering - Performer Magazine


"Georgia triple threat says "Rise & Shine to the ATL underground""

The sophomore effort from Atlanta DJ/Producer/MC, Rock Most., Rise & Shine features 16 tracks of hip hop goodness. With beats and production techniques that would be intstantly approved by anyone on the Rhymesayers label, Rock Most's flow is surprisingly smoothe, while at the same time breaking away and punctuating syllables like a modern day Rev Run (fans of Brother Ali will be at home with Most's pace).

To a degree, Rock Most could be described as a "conscious" rapper with a definitel backpack lean, but with enough mention of strippers and ex-girlfriends to give him plenty to talk about with more mainstream Atlanta based hip hop gods. This is rap for everyday life. There's no bling, no Benzes, and very little bravado. The Ohio native turned Atlanta hip hop staple is the ideal soundtrack for a solo cruise in you car on a Thursday night. This is blue- collar rap and makes no apologies about it. Throw Rise & Shine on your headphones and let Rock Most be the mental backdrop for your walk to work. (Dirty Bob Records)
Produced by Rock most
Mastered by Glenn Schick at GS Mastering - Performer Magazine


"Georgia triple threat says "Rise & Shine to the ATL underground""

The sophomore effort from Atlanta DJ/Producer/MC, Rock Most., Rise & Shine features 16 tracks of hip hop goodness. With beats and production techniques that would be intstantly approved by anyone on the Rhymesayers label, Rock Most's flow is surprisingly smoothe, while at the same time breaking away and punctuating syllables like a modern day Rev Run (fans of Brother Ali will be at home with Most's pace).

To a degree, Rock Most could be described as a "conscious" rapper with a definitel backpack lean, but with enough mention of strippers and ex-girlfriends to give him plenty to talk about with more mainstream Atlanta based hip hop gods. This is rap for everyday life. There's no bling, no Benzes, and very little bravado. The Ohio native turned Atlanta hip hop staple is the ideal soundtrack for a solo cruise in you car on a Thursday night. This is blue- collar rap and makes no apologies about it. Throw Rise & Shine on your headphones and let Rock Most be the mental backdrop for your walk to work. (Dirty Bob Records)
Produced by Rock most
Mastered by Glenn Schick at GS Mastering - Performer Magazine


"Georgia triple threat says "Rise & Shine to the ATL underground""

The sophomore effort from Atlanta DJ/Producer/MC, Rock Most., Rise & Shine features 16 tracks of hip hop goodness. With beats and production techniques that would be intstantly approved by anyone on the Rhymesayers label, Rock Most's flow is surprisingly smoothe, while at the same time breaking away and punctuating syllables like a modern day Rev Run (fans of Brother Ali will be at home with Most's pace).

To a degree, Rock Most could be described as a "conscious" rapper with a definitel backpack lean, but with enough mention of strippers and ex-girlfriends to give him plenty to talk about with more mainstream Atlanta based hip hop gods. This is rap for everyday life. There's no bling, no Benzes, and very little bravado. The Ohio native turned Atlanta hip hop staple is the ideal soundtrack for a solo cruise in you car on a Thursday night. This is blue- collar rap and makes no apologies about it. Throw Rise & Shine on your headphones and let Rock Most be the mental backdrop for your walk to work. (Dirty Bob Records)
Produced by Rock most
Mastered by Glenn Schick at GS Mastering - Performer Magazine


"Rock Most is a grown-ass man, son  Rise & Shine finds Atlanta MC overcoming tragedy and hip-hop's tragic flaw by Chad Radford"

In the summer of 2009, Atlanta MC Rock Most released his solo debut, For Lovers Only (F.L.O.). It was a solid tongue-twister cut from a swath of backpacker beats and rhymes underscored by the urgency in his voice. But whether he knew it or not, his dedication to form undermined the fact that he had much more to say than the conventions of the genre allowed.

"For Lovers Only was about my love for hip-hop," Powell says. "I needed to make that album, get it out of my system and move on to something with a little more depth."

With his second offering, Rise & Shine, Rock Most, aka Rodney Powell, 37, expands his repertoire with a fun but mature sound and vision. The title is a reminder that in order to shine as an artist one has to rise through the ranks and above the stereotypes of indie rap. Inspired in part by a tragic wake-up call, the follow-up to Rock Most's debut also doubles as his own cue to remain conscious of his words and actions while pushing himself, and the genre, forward.

As a former lyricist for Atlanta's woefully overlooked underground hip-hop trio, MSEIZE (pronounced emcees) for more than a decade, Powell's pedigree casts him as a godfather within the local scene. Easing into the first verse of "Who's Coming With Me," he seals the deal, declaring, "This is my second go around, they say my sophomore release/but I've been doing this since Rakim was saying 'peace.'" By spelling it out here he lays the groundwork for an album that gains strength from his experiences and carries a deceptively simple title that holds meaning on multiple levels.

All of this makes him out to sound like a heavy-duty head-trip, but in person his laid-back posture and warm laugh reveal he's anything but a tormented spirit. "I don't want to come across as some kind of preachy, more-righteous-than-you kind of dude, but I'm a grown man and I act accordingly," Powell explains while sipping an Arden's Garden smoothie on a lazy Sunday afternoon in Little Five Points.

The variety of beats throughout the album, most of which Powell produced, form a patchwork of styles covering an audible timeline that has unfolded over the years.

After parting ways with his MSEIZE group mates Supreme Words and DJ Fudge, Powell meandered into a solo career. But after one traumatic night last February, things changed. During an attempted robbery at gunpoint, his attacker faltered long enough for Powell to draw his own gun and kill his assailant in self-defense. To this day he's hesitant to broadcast the incident — something that a lesser MC might be more likely to exploit for potential gain. But Rock Most is too real for that.

"I was scared. He said he was going to kill me," Powell recalls. "I spent the night in jail afterward, not knowing if I was going to spend the rest of my life in prison. They kept saying it would be alright, but they had to wait until morning so the DA could approve my release. When I got out I went straight to the studio. The sun was out and that's when I came up with that title, Rise & Shine. Birds were chirping and I had focus. I thought, 'You obviously are supposed to be here. Whatever it takes, do this better than anything you've done before.'"


The transformation that culminates on Rise & Shine is a profound sense of self-reliance and inspiration. The album's first single, "Rock With Me" (featuring Tru.Ski the Transmitter), carries a subdued '90s backpacker aesthetic, cerebral textures and a modern sheen that defies the clichés of both underground and mainstream rap.

"Pass 'Em By," "Move" (featuring Boog Brown) and the title track (featuring Cherry Royale) blend old-school soul and hip-hop with rhymes that are pragmatic without sacrificing a sense of humor. Powell possesses serious skills, but he doesn't take himself too seriously. "I'm a dynamic dude and I'm certainly not going to come from one angle all the time, because I don't want to hear that [either]. Sometimes I like to laugh, and sometimes when I go out I don't want to hear a hip-hop song all night long. That's just part of being a real person."

Powell's call-it-like-I-see-it delivery resonates on such songs as "Pass 'Em By" and "Whatever." Meanwhile, "Guilty Pleasure" tells the tale of a stripper who has mastered her craft and worked twice as hard to become the best and baddest in the club. By the end of the song she's reaping the rewards of hard work. In the context of the album, it feels like a fairly straightforward allegory for Powell's own rise, but working a pole ain't the same as rocking a mic. "A strip club and the underground hip-hop scene are two totally different things," he says, "but struggling as an independent artist, that's what the album is all about."

Listen to Rock Most - "Pass 'Em By" featuring Jahah

- Creative Loafing (ATL)


"Rock Most is a grown-ass man, son  Rise & Shine finds Atlanta MC overcoming tragedy and hip-hop's tragic flaw by Chad Radford"

In the summer of 2009, Atlanta MC Rock Most released his solo debut, For Lovers Only (F.L.O.). It was a solid tongue-twister cut from a swath of backpacker beats and rhymes underscored by the urgency in his voice. But whether he knew it or not, his dedication to form undermined the fact that he had much more to say than the conventions of the genre allowed.

"For Lovers Only was about my love for hip-hop," Powell says. "I needed to make that album, get it out of my system and move on to something with a little more depth."

With his second offering, Rise & Shine, Rock Most, aka Rodney Powell, 37, expands his repertoire with a fun but mature sound and vision. The title is a reminder that in order to shine as an artist one has to rise through the ranks and above the stereotypes of indie rap. Inspired in part by a tragic wake-up call, the follow-up to Rock Most's debut also doubles as his own cue to remain conscious of his words and actions while pushing himself, and the genre, forward.

As a former lyricist for Atlanta's woefully overlooked underground hip-hop trio, MSEIZE (pronounced emcees) for more than a decade, Powell's pedigree casts him as a godfather within the local scene. Easing into the first verse of "Who's Coming With Me," he seals the deal, declaring, "This is my second go around, they say my sophomore release/but I've been doing this since Rakim was saying 'peace.'" By spelling it out here he lays the groundwork for an album that gains strength from his experiences and carries a deceptively simple title that holds meaning on multiple levels.

All of this makes him out to sound like a heavy-duty head-trip, but in person his laid-back posture and warm laugh reveal he's anything but a tormented spirit. "I don't want to come across as some kind of preachy, more-righteous-than-you kind of dude, but I'm a grown man and I act accordingly," Powell explains while sipping an Arden's Garden smoothie on a lazy Sunday afternoon in Little Five Points.

The variety of beats throughout the album, most of which Powell produced, form a patchwork of styles covering an audible timeline that has unfolded over the years.

After parting ways with his MSEIZE group mates Supreme Words and DJ Fudge, Powell meandered into a solo career. But after one traumatic night last February, things changed. During an attempted robbery at gunpoint, his attacker faltered long enough for Powell to draw his own gun and kill his assailant in self-defense. To this day he's hesitant to broadcast the incident — something that a lesser MC might be more likely to exploit for potential gain. But Rock Most is too real for that.

"I was scared. He said he was going to kill me," Powell recalls. "I spent the night in jail afterward, not knowing if I was going to spend the rest of my life in prison. They kept saying it would be alright, but they had to wait until morning so the DA could approve my release. When I got out I went straight to the studio. The sun was out and that's when I came up with that title, Rise & Shine. Birds were chirping and I had focus. I thought, 'You obviously are supposed to be here. Whatever it takes, do this better than anything you've done before.'"


The transformation that culminates on Rise & Shine is a profound sense of self-reliance and inspiration. The album's first single, "Rock With Me" (featuring Tru.Ski the Transmitter), carries a subdued '90s backpacker aesthetic, cerebral textures and a modern sheen that defies the clichés of both underground and mainstream rap.

"Pass 'Em By," "Move" (featuring Boog Brown) and the title track (featuring Cherry Royale) blend old-school soul and hip-hop with rhymes that are pragmatic without sacrificing a sense of humor. Powell possesses serious skills, but he doesn't take himself too seriously. "I'm a dynamic dude and I'm certainly not going to come from one angle all the time, because I don't want to hear that [either]. Sometimes I like to laugh, and sometimes when I go out I don't want to hear a hip-hop song all night long. That's just part of being a real person."

Powell's call-it-like-I-see-it delivery resonates on such songs as "Pass 'Em By" and "Whatever." Meanwhile, "Guilty Pleasure" tells the tale of a stripper who has mastered her craft and worked twice as hard to become the best and baddest in the club. By the end of the song she's reaping the rewards of hard work. In the context of the album, it feels like a fairly straightforward allegory for Powell's own rise, but working a pole ain't the same as rocking a mic. "A strip club and the underground hip-hop scene are two totally different things," he says, "but struggling as an independent artist, that's what the album is all about."

Listen to Rock Most - "Pass 'Em By" featuring Jahah

- Creative Loafing (ATL)


"Review: Rise & Shine 8/22/2011"

By Thomas Quinlan"I'd like to present to you just a collection of my thoughts," says Ohio-born but Atlanta, GA-based MC Rock Most to open debut album Rise & Shine. Not surprisingly, it's a successful blueprint. The tight raps are anchored by an abundance of swagger and witty braggadocio, but Most also demonstrates an affinity for conscious lyrics that's a throwback to groups like A Tribe Called Quest and De La Soul. The comparison is apt considering the varied beats that put a heavy emphasis on mellow, mid-tempo jazz and smooth, soulful boom-bap, both with plenty of singing on the hooks. Standouts on this solid hip-hop album include "Pass 'Em By," a soulful piano tune about jealousy, punctuated by short electric guitar riffs, "Hating You," a soulful hate song about a failed relationship, pro-exotic dancer number "Guilty Pleasure," which takes an interesting stance for a conscious rapper, and braggadocio tracks "Who's Coming With Me," "Prosper" and "Going Up." Although on the latter he does rap, "This song isn't about bragging/It's about when I do this/what actually happens." If Rise & Shine is any indication, he's telling the truth.
(Dirty Bomb) - Exclaim Magazine (online)


"Review: Rise & Shine 8/22/2011"

By Thomas Quinlan"I'd like to present to you just a collection of my thoughts," says Ohio-born but Atlanta, GA-based MC Rock Most to open debut album Rise & Shine. Not surprisingly, it's a successful blueprint. The tight raps are anchored by an abundance of swagger and witty braggadocio, but Most also demonstrates an affinity for conscious lyrics that's a throwback to groups like A Tribe Called Quest and De La Soul. The comparison is apt considering the varied beats that put a heavy emphasis on mellow, mid-tempo jazz and smooth, soulful boom-bap, both with plenty of singing on the hooks. Standouts on this solid hip-hop album include "Pass 'Em By," a soulful piano tune about jealousy, punctuated by short electric guitar riffs, "Hating You," a soulful hate song about a failed relationship, pro-exotic dancer number "Guilty Pleasure," which takes an interesting stance for a conscious rapper, and braggadocio tracks "Who's Coming With Me," "Prosper" and "Going Up." Although on the latter he does rap, "This song isn't about bragging/It's about when I do this/what actually happens." If Rise & Shine is any indication, he's telling the truth.
(Dirty Bomb) - Exclaim Magazine (online)


"Review of Rise & Shine"

In 1995 on "Playas From The South," the late Pimp C quipped that "niggas be hollerin' Texas just because it rhyme with Lexus." In a way, I have the same sentiment towards a colloquialism that you'll see countless times on Twitter and Facebook if you're up early enough or just haven't gone to bed yet: Rise and grind. I suppose it's okay to say, but I suspect that in half of the cases, that grind leans more towards Folgers coffee than anything else. But what do I know? Anyway, sorry for going off on a tangent there. Here we have Ohio-born and Atlanta-based Rock Most with his sophomore release "Rise & Shine." The LP features ATL notables Boog Brown and Clan Destined and others including Tru.Ski, Stan Steam, Jahah and Cherry Royale. As Rock was working on "Rise," he had a couple experiences that changed both his life and the course of the record. First, there was a head-on collision which totaled the tour van and secondly, there was an armed robbery situation which ended with Rock shooting and killing the robber in self-defense. Now that right there gives Rock all the ammunition he needed to become one of the game's biggest gangsta rappers on wax, but he chose to take the two negatives and put the emotion associated with them into "Rise & Shine."

Rock Most is a triple threat artist being that in addition to emceeing, he also deejays and produces as well. He makes this known off the bat on the album's opener "Who's Coming With Me" as he raps: "They became refined by the things we say/ But y'all couldn't drop science to save your G.P.A./ See me deejay, see me rock mics/ See the crowd hype, but with you not quite." The "Dirty Bomb Airlines" skit is fairly short and comes off as a cross between a Family Guy bit and the host from ATCQ's "Midnight Marauders" album. "Pass 'Em By" tells the classic tale of friends that become enemies when success comes into the picture and "Whatever" hits on a few predicaments that seem to be prevalent in many interpersonal relationships. There's the I-don't-care-about-those-other-girls-just-be-good-to-me approach, the young woman that's blinded by bling and the woman that's so jaded that she can't see a good thing when it's staring her in the face situation. All very common, making it a track that should be easy for some to relate to on a few levels. Rock gives the middle finger to labels on "Labels," as he rejects the categorization of East Coast, West Coast, mainstream, underground or whatever else for his music. RM takes us to the strip club to indulge in his "Guilty Pleasure" and makes a great point by asking "Don't you spend money on YOUR favorite entertainer?" Well, as with most things, you have to take the good with the bad, and attempting to pour whiskey in your man's MPC is certainly on the bad list of things examined on "Hating You." Boog Brown makes her presence felt on "Move" which implores emcees to step their game up and get the crowd moving. Time's up for all that standing in one place foolishness and Rock asks "How you so hip that you forgot the hop?" Rock takes flight on "Going UP" and confesses that the song isn't about bragging, but about what actually happens, as he raps:

"Anybody who ever knew me know it ain't no game
Up to the same old thing and I ain't gon change
Doing shows, gettin' money is how I sustain
Leavin suckas in the dust like a souped-up Mustang
And their engines freeze up, most of the emcees suck
And it's amazing because y'all love 'em like some D-cups
Y'all hopeless, like some gold diggers with prenups
Tryin to catch my flow, but it's too deaf and greased up
Rock Most, two words, definition literal
Triple threatening and pivotal on analog and digital
Whatever a nigga do, try to be my best at
Not your best, but my best. The most high, the blessed at
Take all you fresh cats, wrap y'all into one
But y'all still don't roll like me, second to done
Man I'm holdin' down the A, still reppin for the O
Rock muthafuckin Most, somebody better let em know"

Tru.Ski makes his second guest appearance on "Ready" which is all about preparing for change and venturing outside of the comfort zone of complacency. "Prosper" is another strong song as the album starts to near its end. The main idea of the track is that we don't necessarily need be a superstar or amass hundreds of accolades to be considered a success. Prosperity is where it's at. Fans of "The Mack" will appreciate the short skit that precedes the Clan Destined-featuring "Kill The Feed" and the album closing title track. We find Rock dishing out advice for anyone with an open ear to listen, as he raps:

"So yes, success is a habit But you gotta get it in, it don't come automatic The only thing that's certain is giving up is tragic To all y'all sittin' back, praying on magic Do your due diligence, rise off your asses Stop complaining about how you had it the baddest Facebook that shit, determine your own status"

Rock Most comes across as a pretty cool dude. He doesn't seem to be to - RapReviews.com


"Review of Rise & Shine"

In 1995 on "Playas From The South," the late Pimp C quipped that "niggas be hollerin' Texas just because it rhyme with Lexus." In a way, I have the same sentiment towards a colloquialism that you'll see countless times on Twitter and Facebook if you're up early enough or just haven't gone to bed yet: Rise and grind. I suppose it's okay to say, but I suspect that in half of the cases, that grind leans more towards Folgers coffee than anything else. But what do I know? Anyway, sorry for going off on a tangent there. Here we have Ohio-born and Atlanta-based Rock Most with his sophomore release "Rise & Shine." The LP features ATL notables Boog Brown and Clan Destined and others including Tru.Ski, Stan Steam, Jahah and Cherry Royale. As Rock was working on "Rise," he had a couple experiences that changed both his life and the course of the record. First, there was a head-on collision which totaled the tour van and secondly, there was an armed robbery situation which ended with Rock shooting and killing the robber in self-defense. Now that right there gives Rock all the ammunition he needed to become one of the game's biggest gangsta rappers on wax, but he chose to take the two negatives and put the emotion associated with them into "Rise & Shine."

Rock Most is a triple threat artist being that in addition to emceeing, he also deejays and produces as well. He makes this known off the bat on the album's opener "Who's Coming With Me" as he raps: "They became refined by the things we say/ But y'all couldn't drop science to save your G.P.A./ See me deejay, see me rock mics/ See the crowd hype, but with you not quite." The "Dirty Bomb Airlines" skit is fairly short and comes off as a cross between a Family Guy bit and the host from ATCQ's "Midnight Marauders" album. "Pass 'Em By" tells the classic tale of friends that become enemies when success comes into the picture and "Whatever" hits on a few predicaments that seem to be prevalent in many interpersonal relationships. There's the I-don't-care-about-those-other-girls-just-be-good-to-me approach, the young woman that's blinded by bling and the woman that's so jaded that she can't see a good thing when it's staring her in the face situation. All very common, making it a track that should be easy for some to relate to on a few levels. Rock gives the middle finger to labels on "Labels," as he rejects the categorization of East Coast, West Coast, mainstream, underground or whatever else for his music. RM takes us to the strip club to indulge in his "Guilty Pleasure" and makes a great point by asking "Don't you spend money on YOUR favorite entertainer?" Well, as with most things, you have to take the good with the bad, and attempting to pour whiskey in your man's MPC is certainly on the bad list of things examined on "Hating You." Boog Brown makes her presence felt on "Move" which implores emcees to step their game up and get the crowd moving. Time's up for all that standing in one place foolishness and Rock asks "How you so hip that you forgot the hop?" Rock takes flight on "Going UP" and confesses that the song isn't about bragging, but about what actually happens, as he raps:

"Anybody who ever knew me know it ain't no game
Up to the same old thing and I ain't gon change
Doing shows, gettin' money is how I sustain
Leavin suckas in the dust like a souped-up Mustang
And their engines freeze up, most of the emcees suck
And it's amazing because y'all love 'em like some D-cups
Y'all hopeless, like some gold diggers with prenups
Tryin to catch my flow, but it's too deaf and greased up
Rock Most, two words, definition literal
Triple threatening and pivotal on analog and digital
Whatever a nigga do, try to be my best at
Not your best, but my best. The most high, the blessed at
Take all you fresh cats, wrap y'all into one
But y'all still don't roll like me, second to done
Man I'm holdin' down the A, still reppin for the O
Rock muthafuckin Most, somebody better let em know"

Tru.Ski makes his second guest appearance on "Ready" which is all about preparing for change and venturing outside of the comfort zone of complacency. "Prosper" is another strong song as the album starts to near its end. The main idea of the track is that we don't necessarily need be a superstar or amass hundreds of accolades to be considered a success. Prosperity is where it's at. Fans of "The Mack" will appreciate the short skit that precedes the Clan Destined-featuring "Kill The Feed" and the album closing title track. We find Rock dishing out advice for anyone with an open ear to listen, as he raps:

"So yes, success is a habit But you gotta get it in, it don't come automatic The only thing that's certain is giving up is tragic To all y'all sittin' back, praying on magic Do your due diligence, rise off your asses Stop complaining about how you had it the baddest Facebook that shit, determine your own status"

Rock Most comes across as a pretty cool dude. He doesn't seem to be to - RapReviews.com


"Review of Rise & Shine"

In 1995 on "Playas From The South," the late Pimp C quipped that "niggas be hollerin' Texas just because it rhyme with Lexus." In a way, I have the same sentiment towards a colloquialism that you'll see countless times on Twitter and Facebook if you're up early enough or just haven't gone to bed yet: Rise and grind. I suppose it's okay to say, but I suspect that in half of the cases, that grind leans more towards Folgers coffee than anything else. But what do I know? Anyway, sorry for going off on a tangent there. Here we have Ohio-born and Atlanta-based Rock Most with his sophomore release "Rise & Shine." The LP features ATL notables Boog Brown and Clan Destined and others including Tru.Ski, Stan Steam, Jahah and Cherry Royale. As Rock was working on "Rise," he had a couple experiences that changed both his life and the course of the record. First, there was a head-on collision which totaled the tour van and secondly, there was an armed robbery situation which ended with Rock shooting and killing the robber in self-defense. Now that right there gives Rock all the ammunition he needed to become one of the game's biggest gangsta rappers on wax, but he chose to take the two negatives and put the emotion associated with them into "Rise & Shine."

Rock Most is a triple threat artist being that in addition to emceeing, he also deejays and produces as well. He makes this known off the bat on the album's opener "Who's Coming With Me" as he raps: "They became refined by the things we say/ But y'all couldn't drop science to save your G.P.A./ See me deejay, see me rock mics/ See the crowd hype, but with you not quite." The "Dirty Bomb Airlines" skit is fairly short and comes off as a cross between a Family Guy bit and the host from ATCQ's "Midnight Marauders" album. "Pass 'Em By" tells the classic tale of friends that become enemies when success comes into the picture and "Whatever" hits on a few predicaments that seem to be prevalent in many interpersonal relationships. There's the I-don't-care-about-those-other-girls-just-be-good-to-me approach, the young woman that's blinded by bling and the woman that's so jaded that she can't see a good thing when it's staring her in the face situation. All very common, making it a track that should be easy for some to relate to on a few levels. Rock gives the middle finger to labels on "Labels," as he rejects the categorization of East Coast, West Coast, mainstream, underground or whatever else for his music. RM takes us to the strip club to indulge in his "Guilty Pleasure" and makes a great point by asking "Don't you spend money on YOUR favorite entertainer?" Well, as with most things, you have to take the good with the bad, and attempting to pour whiskey in your man's MPC is certainly on the bad list of things examined on "Hating You." Boog Brown makes her presence felt on "Move" which implores emcees to step their game up and get the crowd moving. Time's up for all that standing in one place foolishness and Rock asks "How you so hip that you forgot the hop?" Rock takes flight on "Going UP" and confesses that the song isn't about bragging, but about what actually happens, as he raps:

"Anybody who ever knew me know it ain't no game
Up to the same old thing and I ain't gon change
Doing shows, gettin' money is how I sustain
Leavin suckas in the dust like a souped-up Mustang
And their engines freeze up, most of the emcees suck
And it's amazing because y'all love 'em like some D-cups
Y'all hopeless, like some gold diggers with prenups
Tryin to catch my flow, but it's too deaf and greased up
Rock Most, two words, definition literal
Triple threatening and pivotal on analog and digital
Whatever a nigga do, try to be my best at
Not your best, but my best. The most high, the blessed at
Take all you fresh cats, wrap y'all into one
But y'all still don't roll like me, second to done
Man I'm holdin' down the A, still reppin for the O
Rock muthafuckin Most, somebody better let em know"

Tru.Ski makes his second guest appearance on "Ready" which is all about preparing for change and venturing outside of the comfort zone of complacency. "Prosper" is another strong song as the album starts to near its end. The main idea of the track is that we don't necessarily need be a superstar or amass hundreds of accolades to be considered a success. Prosperity is where it's at. Fans of "The Mack" will appreciate the short skit that precedes the Clan Destined-featuring "Kill The Feed" and the album closing title track. We find Rock dishing out advice for anyone with an open ear to listen, as he raps:

"So yes, success is a habit But you gotta get it in, it don't come automatic The only thing that's certain is giving up is tragic To all y'all sittin' back, praying on magic Do your due diligence, rise off your asses Stop complaining about how you had it the baddest Facebook that shit, determine your own status"

Rock Most comes across as a pretty cool dude. He doesn't seem to be to - RapReviews.com


"Review of Rise & Shine"

In 1995 on "Playas From The South," the late Pimp C quipped that "niggas be hollerin' Texas just because it rhyme with Lexus." In a way, I have the same sentiment towards a colloquialism that you'll see countless times on Twitter and Facebook if you're up early enough or just haven't gone to bed yet: Rise and grind. I suppose it's okay to say, but I suspect that in half of the cases, that grind leans more towards Folgers coffee than anything else. But what do I know? Anyway, sorry for going off on a tangent there. Here we have Ohio-born and Atlanta-based Rock Most with his sophomore release "Rise & Shine." The LP features ATL notables Boog Brown and Clan Destined and others including Tru.Ski, Stan Steam, Jahah and Cherry Royale. As Rock was working on "Rise," he had a couple experiences that changed both his life and the course of the record. First, there was a head-on collision which totaled the tour van and secondly, there was an armed robbery situation which ended with Rock shooting and killing the robber in self-defense. Now that right there gives Rock all the ammunition he needed to become one of the game's biggest gangsta rappers on wax, but he chose to take the two negatives and put the emotion associated with them into "Rise & Shine."

Rock Most is a triple threat artist being that in addition to emceeing, he also deejays and produces as well. He makes this known off the bat on the album's opener "Who's Coming With Me" as he raps: "They became refined by the things we say/ But y'all couldn't drop science to save your G.P.A./ See me deejay, see me rock mics/ See the crowd hype, but with you not quite." The "Dirty Bomb Airlines" skit is fairly short and comes off as a cross between a Family Guy bit and the host from ATCQ's "Midnight Marauders" album. "Pass 'Em By" tells the classic tale of friends that become enemies when success comes into the picture and "Whatever" hits on a few predicaments that seem to be prevalent in many interpersonal relationships. There's the I-don't-care-about-those-other-girls-just-be-good-to-me approach, the young woman that's blinded by bling and the woman that's so jaded that she can't see a good thing when it's staring her in the face situation. All very common, making it a track that should be easy for some to relate to on a few levels. Rock gives the middle finger to labels on "Labels," as he rejects the categorization of East Coast, West Coast, mainstream, underground or whatever else for his music. RM takes us to the strip club to indulge in his "Guilty Pleasure" and makes a great point by asking "Don't you spend money on YOUR favorite entertainer?" Well, as with most things, you have to take the good with the bad, and attempting to pour whiskey in your man's MPC is certainly on the bad list of things examined on "Hating You." Boog Brown makes her presence felt on "Move" which implores emcees to step their game up and get the crowd moving. Time's up for all that standing in one place foolishness and Rock asks "How you so hip that you forgot the hop?" Rock takes flight on "Going UP" and confesses that the song isn't about bragging, but about what actually happens, as he raps:

"Anybody who ever knew me know it ain't no game
Up to the same old thing and I ain't gon change
Doing shows, gettin' money is how I sustain
Leavin suckas in the dust like a souped-up Mustang
And their engines freeze up, most of the emcees suck
And it's amazing because y'all love 'em like some D-cups
Y'all hopeless, like some gold diggers with prenups
Tryin to catch my flow, but it's too deaf and greased up
Rock Most, two words, definition literal
Triple threatening and pivotal on analog and digital
Whatever a nigga do, try to be my best at
Not your best, but my best. The most high, the blessed at
Take all you fresh cats, wrap y'all into one
But y'all still don't roll like me, second to done
Man I'm holdin' down the A, still reppin for the O
Rock muthafuckin Most, somebody better let em know"

Tru.Ski makes his second guest appearance on "Ready" which is all about preparing for change and venturing outside of the comfort zone of complacency. "Prosper" is another strong song as the album starts to near its end. The main idea of the track is that we don't necessarily need be a superstar or amass hundreds of accolades to be considered a success. Prosperity is where it's at. Fans of "The Mack" will appreciate the short skit that precedes the Clan Destined-featuring "Kill The Feed" and the album closing title track. We find Rock dishing out advice for anyone with an open ear to listen, as he raps:

"So yes, success is a habit But you gotta get it in, it don't come automatic The only thing that's certain is giving up is tragic To all y'all sittin' back, praying on magic Do your due diligence, rise off your asses Stop complaining about how you had it the baddest Facebook that shit, determine your own status"

Rock Most comes across as a pretty cool dude. He doesn't seem to be to - RapReviews.com


"Rap Reviews Feature Interview:Rock Most"


As a member of the Atlanta trio MSEIZE, with Supreme Words and MVP, Rock Most and his partners in rhyme made some noise in the underground hip-hop world. In 2009 it came time for him to seize the day on his own. Rock Most went solo, releasing F.L.O. (For Lovers Only), and later this month the emcee/producer/DJ is following that release up with Rise & Shine. In-between he had not one, but TWO near death experiences. All in all, it's been a pretty wild ride, and this week RapReviews caught up with Rock Most to find out more about that ride, his music, and how his two near death experiences affected his work. He also revealed his feelings on the job DJs are doing when it comes to breaking new music, and how Chuck D made his day, TWICE.
Adam Bernard: You were raised in Ohio, but have spent your entire post-high school life in Atlanta. How often do people say "you don't sound like an Atlanta artist" to you, and do you take that as a compliment, or as a lack of awareness regarding the full Atlanta hip-hop scene?

Rock Most: I think it's definitely a lack of awareness, and I guess whether or not it's a compliment or insult depends on who it comes from {*laughs*}. I've been here for a pretty long time and yeah, I do get that a lot, "oh, you don't sound like you're from Atlanta." In fact, it's actually hindered me from getting shows in other cities because when I say I'm from Atlanta they have a preconceived notion of what I'm gonna do and it's just not it. I can't say it's necessarily an insult, in my eyes, cuz I feel like I have a lot of good southern artist friends, but people don't necessarily realize that Atlanta is a melting pot, not just culturally, but musically. You have people from all over the world in all genres of music right here. It covers the whole gamut.

AB: Even with the plethora of artists and genres residing in Atlanta, would you say you go against the grain at all?

RM: When it comes to the mainstream, absolutely, just because I don't necessarily try to make a particular type of music, I just do what I feel and that's what you hear on the album. Some people say "that song sounds southern, that song sounds east coast, that song sounds west coast," and that's fine, I'll take all those things because I like all those things. Ultimately I just want people to say it sounds good.

AB: Your latest album is titled Rise & Shine. What ideas are you looking to get across with this effort?

RM: The most important thing that I wanted to do was just be an artist. I wasn't really concerned with trying to present a certain image, I just wanted to make my music and be an artist and have a message but not be preachy. I want people to have a good time, and enjoy the music, but I also don't want them to veg out and become idiots. I wanted it to be balanced, not necessarily to please everyone, because you can never do that, but to give people an option for something else other than what the mainstream is offering right now. I don't necessarily want to be an underground artist, I just want to be an artist and whatever people want to call it, if that's what makes them feel good about it, then I'm fine with it.

AB: The title of the album, the cover and back images of sunrises; why such the reverence for morning?

RM: The title is actually a double meaning. Rise & Shine is relevant to the cover because in hip-hop right now, in urban music, everyone's talking about shining, being on top, and all these flossy things and what not, and not too many people are talking about rising, at least not the artists that are getting the attention, so I wanted the album cover to reflect the beginning because even when you're dealing with the sun it doesn't shine until it rises and I think that's a very relevant point that the youth need to understand. It's OK to want to shine, we all want that, but we have to go through the things necessary to get to that point and that's starting at the beginning, that's sunrise. The other meaning is you gotta wake up. As a people we need to wake up and look for broader horizons.

AB: Most artistic endeavors lead to a steady diet of Ramen Noodles. You have three artistic endeavors - emcee, producer, DJ. Is this in order to make sure you don't have an all Ramen Noodle diet, or do you simply want to starve three times over?

RM: {*laughs*} That's a good question. I've always been fascinated with DJing, but it's not something I started to take seriously until the last five years. It's something I did off and on all my life. Emceeing was my first love. At ten years old I was like I'm gonna do THAT for the rest of my life. The small town which I come from (Ravenna, OH), at that point in time, there weren't any other emcees or producers, so I started producing out of a necessity. I can't say I was the best at it at first {*laughs*}. DJing definitely has been my bread and butter the last few years, allowing me to DJ at night and make music by day. I still have Ramen Noodles every now a - RapReviews.com


"Rap Reviews Feature Interview:Rock Most"


As a member of the Atlanta trio MSEIZE, with Supreme Words and MVP, Rock Most and his partners in rhyme made some noise in the underground hip-hop world. In 2009 it came time for him to seize the day on his own. Rock Most went solo, releasing F.L.O. (For Lovers Only), and later this month the emcee/producer/DJ is following that release up with Rise & Shine. In-between he had not one, but TWO near death experiences. All in all, it's been a pretty wild ride, and this week RapReviews caught up with Rock Most to find out more about that ride, his music, and how his two near death experiences affected his work. He also revealed his feelings on the job DJs are doing when it comes to breaking new music, and how Chuck D made his day, TWICE.
Adam Bernard: You were raised in Ohio, but have spent your entire post-high school life in Atlanta. How often do people say "you don't sound like an Atlanta artist" to you, and do you take that as a compliment, or as a lack of awareness regarding the full Atlanta hip-hop scene?

Rock Most: I think it's definitely a lack of awareness, and I guess whether or not it's a compliment or insult depends on who it comes from {*laughs*}. I've been here for a pretty long time and yeah, I do get that a lot, "oh, you don't sound like you're from Atlanta." In fact, it's actually hindered me from getting shows in other cities because when I say I'm from Atlanta they have a preconceived notion of what I'm gonna do and it's just not it. I can't say it's necessarily an insult, in my eyes, cuz I feel like I have a lot of good southern artist friends, but people don't necessarily realize that Atlanta is a melting pot, not just culturally, but musically. You have people from all over the world in all genres of music right here. It covers the whole gamut.

AB: Even with the plethora of artists and genres residing in Atlanta, would you say you go against the grain at all?

RM: When it comes to the mainstream, absolutely, just because I don't necessarily try to make a particular type of music, I just do what I feel and that's what you hear on the album. Some people say "that song sounds southern, that song sounds east coast, that song sounds west coast," and that's fine, I'll take all those things because I like all those things. Ultimately I just want people to say it sounds good.

AB: Your latest album is titled Rise & Shine. What ideas are you looking to get across with this effort?

RM: The most important thing that I wanted to do was just be an artist. I wasn't really concerned with trying to present a certain image, I just wanted to make my music and be an artist and have a message but not be preachy. I want people to have a good time, and enjoy the music, but I also don't want them to veg out and become idiots. I wanted it to be balanced, not necessarily to please everyone, because you can never do that, but to give people an option for something else other than what the mainstream is offering right now. I don't necessarily want to be an underground artist, I just want to be an artist and whatever people want to call it, if that's what makes them feel good about it, then I'm fine with it.

AB: The title of the album, the cover and back images of sunrises; why such the reverence for morning?

RM: The title is actually a double meaning. Rise & Shine is relevant to the cover because in hip-hop right now, in urban music, everyone's talking about shining, being on top, and all these flossy things and what not, and not too many people are talking about rising, at least not the artists that are getting the attention, so I wanted the album cover to reflect the beginning because even when you're dealing with the sun it doesn't shine until it rises and I think that's a very relevant point that the youth need to understand. It's OK to want to shine, we all want that, but we have to go through the things necessary to get to that point and that's starting at the beginning, that's sunrise. The other meaning is you gotta wake up. As a people we need to wake up and look for broader horizons.

AB: Most artistic endeavors lead to a steady diet of Ramen Noodles. You have three artistic endeavors - emcee, producer, DJ. Is this in order to make sure you don't have an all Ramen Noodle diet, or do you simply want to starve three times over?

RM: {*laughs*} That's a good question. I've always been fascinated with DJing, but it's not something I started to take seriously until the last five years. It's something I did off and on all my life. Emceeing was my first love. At ten years old I was like I'm gonna do THAT for the rest of my life. The small town which I come from (Ravenna, OH), at that point in time, there weren't any other emcees or producers, so I started producing out of a necessity. I can't say I was the best at it at first {*laughs*}. DJing definitely has been my bread and butter the last few years, allowing me to DJ at night and make music by day. I still have Ramen Noodles every now a - RapReviews.com


"Rap Reviews Feature Interview:Rock Most"


As a member of the Atlanta trio MSEIZE, with Supreme Words and MVP, Rock Most and his partners in rhyme made some noise in the underground hip-hop world. In 2009 it came time for him to seize the day on his own. Rock Most went solo, releasing F.L.O. (For Lovers Only), and later this month the emcee/producer/DJ is following that release up with Rise & Shine. In-between he had not one, but TWO near death experiences. All in all, it's been a pretty wild ride, and this week RapReviews caught up with Rock Most to find out more about that ride, his music, and how his two near death experiences affected his work. He also revealed his feelings on the job DJs are doing when it comes to breaking new music, and how Chuck D made his day, TWICE.
Adam Bernard: You were raised in Ohio, but have spent your entire post-high school life in Atlanta. How often do people say "you don't sound like an Atlanta artist" to you, and do you take that as a compliment, or as a lack of awareness regarding the full Atlanta hip-hop scene?

Rock Most: I think it's definitely a lack of awareness, and I guess whether or not it's a compliment or insult depends on who it comes from {*laughs*}. I've been here for a pretty long time and yeah, I do get that a lot, "oh, you don't sound like you're from Atlanta." In fact, it's actually hindered me from getting shows in other cities because when I say I'm from Atlanta they have a preconceived notion of what I'm gonna do and it's just not it. I can't say it's necessarily an insult, in my eyes, cuz I feel like I have a lot of good southern artist friends, but people don't necessarily realize that Atlanta is a melting pot, not just culturally, but musically. You have people from all over the world in all genres of music right here. It covers the whole gamut.

AB: Even with the plethora of artists and genres residing in Atlanta, would you say you go against the grain at all?

RM: When it comes to the mainstream, absolutely, just because I don't necessarily try to make a particular type of music, I just do what I feel and that's what you hear on the album. Some people say "that song sounds southern, that song sounds east coast, that song sounds west coast," and that's fine, I'll take all those things because I like all those things. Ultimately I just want people to say it sounds good.

AB: Your latest album is titled Rise & Shine. What ideas are you looking to get across with this effort?

RM: The most important thing that I wanted to do was just be an artist. I wasn't really concerned with trying to present a certain image, I just wanted to make my music and be an artist and have a message but not be preachy. I want people to have a good time, and enjoy the music, but I also don't want them to veg out and become idiots. I wanted it to be balanced, not necessarily to please everyone, because you can never do that, but to give people an option for something else other than what the mainstream is offering right now. I don't necessarily want to be an underground artist, I just want to be an artist and whatever people want to call it, if that's what makes them feel good about it, then I'm fine with it.

AB: The title of the album, the cover and back images of sunrises; why such the reverence for morning?

RM: The title is actually a double meaning. Rise & Shine is relevant to the cover because in hip-hop right now, in urban music, everyone's talking about shining, being on top, and all these flossy things and what not, and not too many people are talking about rising, at least not the artists that are getting the attention, so I wanted the album cover to reflect the beginning because even when you're dealing with the sun it doesn't shine until it rises and I think that's a very relevant point that the youth need to understand. It's OK to want to shine, we all want that, but we have to go through the things necessary to get to that point and that's starting at the beginning, that's sunrise. The other meaning is you gotta wake up. As a people we need to wake up and look for broader horizons.

AB: Most artistic endeavors lead to a steady diet of Ramen Noodles. You have three artistic endeavors - emcee, producer, DJ. Is this in order to make sure you don't have an all Ramen Noodle diet, or do you simply want to starve three times over?

RM: {*laughs*} That's a good question. I've always been fascinated with DJing, but it's not something I started to take seriously until the last five years. It's something I did off and on all my life. Emceeing was my first love. At ten years old I was like I'm gonna do THAT for the rest of my life. The small town which I come from (Ravenna, OH), at that point in time, there weren't any other emcees or producers, so I started producing out of a necessity. I can't say I was the best at it at first {*laughs*}. DJing definitely has been my bread and butter the last few years, allowing me to DJ at night and make music by day. I still have Ramen Noodles every now a - RapReviews.com


"Rock Most Crept Up the charts..."

Head over to Rap Attack where "Rock With Me," the first single from Rock Most's forthcoming second album, Rise and Shine, is sitting pretty in the no. 6 position on the national chart.

After that, hit up Record Breakers chart where he's in the no. 8 slot. Such early accolades bode well for the former MSEIZE rapper. Rise and Shine hits the streets with an album release party at the Earl on Sat., Sept. 3 with Joe Stu & Captain Mudfish and DJ Fudge. - Creative Loaging "Crib Notes"


"Rock Most Crept Up the charts..."

Head over to Rap Attack where "Rock With Me," the first single from Rock Most's forthcoming second album, Rise and Shine, is sitting pretty in the no. 6 position on the national chart.

After that, hit up Record Breakers chart where he's in the no. 8 slot. Such early accolades bode well for the former MSEIZE rapper. Rise and Shine hits the streets with an album release party at the Earl on Sat., Sept. 3 with Joe Stu & Captain Mudfish and DJ Fudge. - Creative Loaging "Crib Notes"


"Clan Destined interviews Rock Most"

Steeped in Atlanta’s rich music scene, hip-hop MC and producer Rock Most (Dirty Bomb Records) says his city consists of a tight knit community of artists. As his single “Rock With Me” featuring Tru.Ski The Transmitter, continues to clime the college radio charts and he readies his sophomore album, Rise & Shine, Rock Most chops it up with fellow Atlanta’s hip-hop crew Clan Destined (Domination Recordings, Rawkus Records Online Distribution).
The duo, consisting of DT and Yamin Semali aka DJ AmDex, collaborated with Rock on track 15, called ‘Kill The Feed,’ and their last project “Self Titled” earned them a perfect 5 out of 5 stars in Creative Loafing. Rock Most, both an MC and producer of his album, says Atlanta’s thriving music scene is a perfect place to get inspiration.
Clan Destined: Why did you name your album Rise and Shine?
Rock Most: “Rise & Shine” has a double meaning. Primarily because of the current state of hip-hop. So many artist have begun to focus on shining, that rising has become secondary. And that’s backwards as hell! Which brings forth the second meaning…It’s time to wake up!
CD: What makes this project different from your first record, For Lovers Only?
RM: FLO was my first solo album so I think I was still finding my solo identity musically and lyrically. I loved it because it was solely for me! On R&S I reached out to more of the great musicians and artists in my circle which in turn made it a more well rounded project for the people.
CD: Many people come to Atlanta pursuing music as a career. Why do you think this place is such a magnet for aspiring artists?
RM: ATL is populated by more people from different places than anywhere I’ve ever been. I think this creates an environment for artist to expose (and be exposed to) different styles and sounds. It’s a great place to hone your skills
CD: You DJ parties (quite well), hold the MC title and produce tracks all while touring all over the map. Which do you enjoy most?
RM: Thank You. I’ve been an MC the longest which lead to the other art forms. I love them all but I’d say emceeing is my favorite because of the ability to say exactly what I feel and affect peoples emotions. DJing allows the same but it’s not as personal to me.
CD: Do you like being solo more or as much as you enjoyed being in MSEIZE? Why or why not?
RM: Although its a very different feeling, I’d have to say I like it the same. I miss the group interaction the most when I watch Clan Destined! But the solo thing is completely mine so there’s a certain satisfaction to that!
- URB.com


"For Lover Only Release Party"

The Graveyard Tavern dug up something special this evening as heads descended upon it for this
much anticipated release party. The who’s who of the scene along with the headliner’s friends and
family were there and ready to party. In his trademark fedora, Rock Most took the stage with a
commanding presence and proceeded to rock the house thoroughly. “Hopefully this means that we can
carry on the tradition of making good music that’s still fun to be a part of. It doesn’t have to be always
conscious or always preachin’ to be fun, but it can still have a message.” he said moments after his
performance. “I’m trying to ?nd that balance between entertainment and real hip-hop.” I’d say this
cat found what he was looking for.
- www.beatstudies.com


Discography

1999 - "Like Thieves in the Night LP" - MSEIZE

2005 - " The Outer Party Experience LP" - MSEIZE

2007 " Alright b/w Easy 12""- MSEIZE

2007 -" The Intervention" - MSEIZE

2008 - "Rock Box" - DJ Rock Most Mixtape

2009 - "F.L.O (For Lovers Only) " - Rock Most

2010 "ATLevation Vol 1" - DJ Rock Most Mixtape
2011- Rock Most -"Rise & Shine"
2011- Rock With Me (#3 Single in the country on college radio)
2011- Pass Em By (#2 Single in the country on college radio)
2013- RMFM- The Spring Collection (April)- EP
2013- RMFM- The Summer Collection (July)
2013- RMFM- The Fall Collection (October
2013- RMFM- The Winter Collection (December)

Photos

Bio

 Rock Most (born Rodney M. Powell) is a hip hop triple threat (MC/Producer/DJ) that calls Atlanta, Georgia home. Raised in Ravenna, Ohio he began rapping the age of eleven years old. His love for hip hop naturally transformed into deejaying and eventually music production. He moved to Atlanta after graduating high school and immediately began immersing himself in the local scene. Over the years he has produced and/or recorded with such greats as Chuck D and Professor Griff of Public Enemy, Diamond D, and Mr. Mike of South Circle as well as a number of Atlanta mainstays.
    After enjoying moderate success as 1/3 of his group MSEIZE, Rock Most went solo in 2009 and toured with "FLO (For Lovers Only) to a great reception not only in the US but as far away San Jose Costa Rica. His 2011 release Rise & Shine received critical acclaim and produced two college chart-topping singles “Rock With Me” and “Pass Em’ By. Chad Radford of Creative Loafing Atlanta referred to the LP as “What hip hop should sound like in 2011”.
In 2013 Rock Most is releasing a series of 4 EPs entitled “RMFM”. The First installment “The Spring Collection is being released on April 3rd (his birthday) and features an appearance from El Da Sensei of the legendary Artifacts on the song “We Can’t Wait” as well as additional production from Rahgroove and Trü.ski The Transmitter.
“RMFM is my equivalent of a self-titled project. I think it exemplifies who am as an artist and just a person in General. There’s songs like the title track in which the acronym stands for Rock Mother F*****N Most and others where I’m Raising MY Fellow Man or Reflecting My Favorite Moments” Says the artist when asked about the meaning.
The listener can expect a balance of thought provoking, relatable lyrics with a dash of fun-loving feel good music that Rock Most has been noted for in the past. The RMFM series is mostly produced by Rock Most, but also features guest appearances by Diamond D and others providing a blend of classic head nodding tracks with a fresh modern production value. At the end of the day it’s very clear that Rodney Makes Fantasic Music.