RTP
Gig Seeker Pro

RTP

London, England, United Kingdom | INDIE

London, England, United Kingdom | INDIE
Band Alternative Rock

Calendar

This band hasn't logged any future gigs

This band hasn't logged any past gigs

This band has not uploaded any videos
This band has not uploaded any videos

Music

Press


Great band. This single is like getting a slap in the face from the hottest girl in school, but then going back for more because you like her that much. Sharp, spiky, sexy, shuddering, shivering stuff.
Mischa Pearlman - The Fly


Ever feel jaded with the music scene like you no longer have something to believe in? If you look like I feel, here cometh Royal Treatment Plant’s debut, ‘Hope Is Not Enough’ to your aid. An album self released by the London five piece who have been strumming their beleaguered hearts to a pulp, in London's indie music scene for quite a while now.
On title track, ‘Hope Is Not Enough’, you’ll find a much needed Batman-esque guitar rift injected into your most porous vein. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this little gem comes mixed from the decks of the legendary Mike Chapman (he who is responsible for producing Blondie’s infamous ‘Parallel Lines’ album back in the day). ‘Half As Much’ slows it down somewhat before submerging your head under the surface of their power pop, when the drums kick in; pounding into your skull like you’ve left your brain in the bathroom with last night’s MDMA.
‘Undercurrent’ is probably the most standout track. "Did reality kill your fun?" Err, quite frankly, lead lady, Princess P, it did! But it’s ok because you can rock the **** out with this striking song (mixed once again by good ol’ Mikey C.). Guitarist DJ’s caresses the strings in all the right ways. It’s both sharp, shrill AND melodic (make of that what you will!). We’d throw comparisons the way of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Metric. Other tracks on the album can be a bit hit and miss in places. ‘Hearts And Minds’ is a slower and more subdued, as is ‘Crack Whore’, but you can’t fault them technically.
Their strength does seem to lay in the angrier, angsty tracks with more bite. ‘You Don’t Need Me’ twists back to Batman-like rifts and quick chipper beats. It’s not disappointing. Being slightly schizophrenic in its application is perhaps the album’s biggest appeal. You get thrown into one belter of a track which you can dance and jump your heart out to, before plunging into some low-fi track to chill the **** out. The main let down of the album is that it’s only comprised of a lean 8 tracks but this is presumably a choice of quality over quantity. It’s short but sweet. You’ll like it, we promise! - Gigwise


With careering guitar riffs swaying in and out of time signatures, and bass drum crunches attempting to throttle Paula Steele’s domineering yet nonchalant vocals, Riot Grrl has finally made it’s way back. And with Royal Treatment Plant’s ‘Get Played’ it’s returned with a renewed pop bite. Paula flirts with dismissive coyness one moment, singing “you didn’t come here for the silence… though it’s all you will desire” only to retort suddenly with the hostile shriek of “Lets all go out, lets all get played!”. It’s terrifying stuff.
They will no doubt get comparisons to Babes in Toyland and Huggy Bear, but this group also thrash out and use time changes that bring to mind Sonic Youth. When it’s slow it’s seductive and alluring - and when it lashes into a bombastic climax it gets the blood pressure rocketing and the heart pumping. The guitars screech in and over the rhythm section, the colossal bass lines wobble and thump their big size nines, and together with the sensual hum of the keyboard, the song whips itself into a frenzy. Meanwhile, the more laid back B-side ‘Hearts and Minds’ slows things down, as they soar through epic melodies and soft vocals. Definitely worth a listen. - Artrocker


With careering guitar riffs swaying in and out of time signatures, and bass drum crunches attempting to throttle Paula Steele’s domineering yet nonchalant vocals, Riot Grrl has finally made it’s way back. And with Royal Treatment Plant’s ‘Get Played’ it’s returned with a renewed pop bite. Paula flirts with dismissive coyness one moment, singing “you didn’t come here for the silence… though it’s all you will desire” only to retort suddenly with the hostile shriek of “Lets all go out, lets all get played!”. It’s terrifying stuff.
They will no doubt get comparisons to Babes in Toyland and Huggy Bear, but this group also thrash out and use time changes that bring to mind Sonic Youth. When it’s slow it’s seductive and alluring - and when it lashes into a bombastic climax it gets the blood pressure rocketing and the heart pumping. The guitars screech in and over the rhythm section, the colossal bass lines wobble and thump their big size nines, and together with the sensual hum of the keyboard, the song whips itself into a frenzy. Meanwhile, the more laid back B-side ‘Hearts and Minds’ slows things down, as they soar through epic melodies and soft vocals. Definitely worth a listen. - Artrocker


And on the seventh day, beyond popular belief, he didn't rest. Instead, he or she or whatever put in motion the wheels that would eventuate in Royal Treatment Plant a few thousand years later.
So good it's unholy are the most appropriate words to describe the debut long-shortish player (it's only eight tracks) from London based ensemble Royal Treatment Plant, as this is a very very lush record indeed...
But wait! Just as I scribe these blasphemic words, since pop music had long been the nemesis of religion, I learn that chief songwriter for the outfit Paula Steel was actually raised in the jungle by a fanatically religious father! True story. Having escaped such a life that would have undoubtedly strangled her creativity like a boa constructor, she's made a pilgrimage into the spoils of rock'n'roll and delivered Hope is Not Enough. We get it; it's Mowgli meets Whitney Huston. But the result is surprisingly fan-f**king-tastic.
Opening and title track 'Hope is Not Enough' starts with a hectic, exaggerated synth assault, not unlike the mental soundtrack you'd experience running through the thick jungle escaping a crazed commune leader. But then it all sinks a scale deeper into a dainty punk track - 'Undercurrent' is a hasty, Blondie-esque thrash-slaught from the start but when wedded with Steels sweet, lippy voice, it's less abrasive and more of a sound prospect.
There are only eight tracks here, but to be perfectly honest if there were any more you'd properly start foaming at the mouth and twitching in frustration. Steel's tone is so winningly yet understatedly sexy, and let's be honest, even if it's absolute bullocks, there's nothing more alluring than a church girl turned rock. - Rockfeedback


Raised by fanatical Seventh Day Adventist missionaries in Papua New Guinea, heard nothing but Christian folk until the age of 18, awakened by the biblical barkings of Pixies … so far so Australasian Kings of Leon, right? And singer Paula Steel has produced similarly cool and deviant avant-rock - this eight-track, 30 minute debut is all Metric alt.polish and Strokes serration, with songs about bitter break ups and drunken nights on the anti-Jesus juice. For all Paula's doe-eyed cooing, there's a vampiric roar of frustration bursting out of 'You Don't Need Me' that suggests a heart to RTP as raw and bleeding as any Gallows mosher. Filthy/Regal. Mark Beaumont. 8/10 - NME Magazine


Discography

EP - Carry Me (Human Condition Records, 2006)
Single - Get Played (Blacklight Music, 2008)
Single - Undercurrent (Blacklight Music, 2008)
Album - Hope Is Not Enough (Blacklight Music, 2008)
Album - Hope Is Not Enough (Universal Music Australia, 2009)
Single - All The Same (Tip Top Recordings, 2010)
EP - All That's Left (Tip Top Recordings, November 2010)
Single - Battle Scars (Tip Top Recordings, February 2011)
Album - TBC (Tip Top Recordings, April 2011)

Photos

Bio

From daughter of Seventh Day Adventist preachers in New Guinea to dragging the uninitiated to worship at the altar of melodic rock as singer in RTP, Paula Steel has trodden an unconventional path to enlightenment.

Suddenly enraptured with the rock’n’roll dream Steel moved to London where she met bassist DJ. The pair recruited keyboardist and guitarist Tom Farncombe and drummer Chris Hodges before completing the band with guitarist Sam Taylor. Jamie Watson (producer of Snow Patrol) liked the early material so much he released it on Edinburgh’s Human Condition Records. The release of ‘Carry Me’ gained RTP a management contract with Light Music Network and they recorded the debut album with Placebo and Blur knob-twiddler Teo Miller.

With nods of approval from peers like The Automatic and Los Campesinos!, ‘Hope Is Not Enough’, released in late-2008, was hailed in the press and heavily supported on radio and TV: Album of the Week on Huw Stephen’s BBC Radio 1 show; Nomination for Debut Album of the Year 2008 on XFM; 'Half As Much' playlisted on XFM, BBC Radio 1, and BBC 6Music; MTV2 playlist with ‘Undercurrent’ video while the single was also named NME Radio Single of the Week (Neil Cole), BBC 6 Music Single of the Week (Steve Lamacq). The success of the release tempted Universal Music to license the record for Australasia in 2009. First single, ‘Undercurrent’ was recorded with legendary producer Mike Chapman (Blondie, Suzi Quatro) who travelled to Manchester and London to watch the band perform live at their In The City and Camden Crawl showcases, mixing two further tracks for the album.

RTP began recording for the follow-up in August 2010 having signed to new UK Indie label Tip Top Recordings. Their track 'All The Same' is currently being synched as the title track to Channel 4's music show 'On Track' and next single 'All That's Left' (November 22) has been remixed by America's most in demand remix artists RAC and dubstep heavyweight Dan Donovan. RTP have found the perfect shoe-gaze, rock out mix to truly convert the masses. Back on record, back on the road, RTP is back with a mighty bang.