Runaway Dorothy
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Runaway Dorothy

New York City, New York, United States | SELF

New York City, New York, United States | SELF
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"09/01/2012 - September Featured Artist: RUNAWAY DOROTHY"

From the soulful melodic sounds of “Abilene” to the Country rock twang of “Hard Way Home” you know you have found something great in NY band Runaway Dorothy. Their music paints a whole new picture on the face of Country , pairing nicely with rock and blues undertones to create a genre that would incite a replay even by those who can't bare the thought of traditional Country fare.
- Jenna Lynn Monroe


"03/18/2012 - I was charmed by several bands including Brooklynites Runaway Dorothy (a new discovery)"

http://festival.iamhighvoltage.com/ - High Voltage Rocks


"03/15/2012 - Runaway Dorothy sounded interesting enough to entice me to stop at the Chuggin Monkey for a couple of songs"

"That Runaway Dorothy album is killer. It's great. It's so good...” - Adam Duritz of Counting Crows
A quintessential experience at SX is stumbling upon a band by just hearing their music while walking past a venue. Runaway Dorothy sounded interesting enough to entice me to stop at the Chuggin Monkey for a couple of songs. Any band that get people out on the dancefloor so early in the day deserves some credit. A nice way to ease into the day, although they did sound better live than they do on record. - Turn it up or Turn it off


"08/14/2012 - SNEAK PEEK: Frank Germano’s Runaway Dorothy cover art"

I first met Frank Germano at SXSW 2011 at the RSL showcase– and I almost instantly knew what a talented artist he was. He’d designed and painted a gorgeous custom Strat (which I had the privilege of signing). He’s done a lot of pretty impressive artwork (and even more custom guitars– check it out).



I’ve been excited about his work on the forthcoming Runaway Dorothy record, and am happy and privileged again to be able to share an early look at the record cover with you. Thanks Nick & Frank for giving me this opportunity! I’m dying to see the rest of the artwork and hear the record– but I love getting to see the whole journey, from songwriting to art to completion - Katie Darby


"06/16/2012 - One to watch in 2012"

ONE TO WATCH IN 2012 - I don't think I was prepared for how good Runaway Dorothy had become. Having seen the band play in Austin was an awakening. Booking them to play The Outlaw Roadshow was pretty much genius as it proved - they were one of the most popular bands in our entire lineup - but all that paled in comparison to what unfolded in Boston on Runaway Dorothy's arrival. Dave Parnell and the boys have grown tighter with each live session, each night on the road. And the new material they are set to unleash rivals anything we have seen our heard in the last year. Mark my words people - you will be hearing much more from this act in the year to come... - Ryan Spaulding


"11/05/2010 - 5 Best Unsigned Bands of 2010"

http://www.indiemediamag.com/2010/music/5-best-unsigned-bands-of-2010/ - Aldo Singer


"03/08/2012 - Gliph App for Personal Privacy Control Launches at SXSW"

Gliph, based in Portland, Ore., launched its new app that helps users protect their personal privacy information. A hot issue as of late, the app aims to put the power back in the consumer's hands by allowing them to choose exactly what personal information they share and with whom they share it.

Available for iPhone and Android devices, Gliph uses simple native interfaces, which allow users to select their own unique “gliph” pseudonym (a combination of three to five visual icons, such as a star, mushroom, and diamond). Then, instead of giving out their digits or social feeds right from the start, users can give out their gliph and reveal how much information they want to share on a person-by-person basis. Of course, they can mature the relationship though in-app text messaging for free.

“We believe people are multi-faceted and should be allowed to reflect a unique identity that matches each relationship, whether it be professional or social,” said Rob Banagale co-founder, and CEO. “Gliph lets people reveal only what’s appropriate and earn trust over time—just like we all do in off-line relationships.”

Security is a major part of the cross-platform application. In fact, it uses security measures to ensure the user’s conversations and personal data are signed and encrypted, in transit and prior to being stored on the server. “We secure your first name better than most websites secure your credit card information,” Banagale explains.

For conference and festival goers in Austin at SXSW, make sure to stop by Gliph's cart at the southwest corner of 4th Street & N. Congress Avenue for free mobile device charging from 12 p.m. to 1 a.m. CST each day. Their "Yeti" mascot will also be making a few special appearances and the company has partnered with Brooklyn-based band Runaway Dorothy, which will be performing showcases throughout the week.

Read more: http://blogcritics.org/scitech/article/gliph-app-for-personal-privacy-control/#ixzz1xcZytnkh
- BC App Attack


"01/30/2011 - Absolutely terrific alt country band called Runaway Dorothy"

http://www.rocknycliveandrecorded.com/2011/01/subway-runaway-dorothy.html - Rock NYC Live


"03/08/2011 - You won't want to "Runaway" from this "Dorothy""

As one of their fans stated on the Runaway Dorothy Facebook page, "Why aren't you guys famous yet?" I'm wondering the same thing. Runaway Dorothy is a band worth checking out! Fronted by David Parnell, Runaway Dorothy's music is said to be the love child of Coldplay and Jacob Dylan. "Caulfield" sets the tone for their debut album, The Arc with a collection of beautiful, melodic life experiences. Some have described The Arc as haunting but David best describes his collection as, "A true reflection of what was going on in his life at that time, a real snapshot.." I would describe Runaway Dorothy as authentic with real emotions and heart felt lyrics. I believe that a true artist is one that has the courage to expose those raw emotions, David has in a sense pulled away the velvet curtain to show the real man behind the voice. You just can't help but get drawn into their melodies and find yourself tapping your foot to their music. I highly recommend checking them out. Runaway Dorothy available on itunes or at runawaydorothy.com! Here's a link to their website Runaway Dorothy - KCS Music Review


"05/11/2012 - Weekly Shoutout Vol. 26: Artists about to LAUNCH"

RUNAWAY DOROTHY booked by LAUNCH MUSIC CONFERENCE


Nick: The four members of Runaway Dorothy, who all hail from the American south, had to come all the way to Brooklyn to put their Americana dreams in motion. While they might be a long way from home, there's buckets of comfort baked into tracks like "Takes a Lot of Love", which while lamenting love lost still put you right at ease. The folks at LAUNCH will have to batten down their hearts, lest Runaway Dorothy sneak in and take up permanent residence.

- Sonicbids


"05/17/2012 - Ryan's Smashing Life Brings Three Rising Stars to Cafe 939"

One of the leading voices of Boston's music scene is blogger Ryan Spaulding of Ryan's Smashing Life. Always on the precipice of what's hot like a crystal ball for music, Ryan's Smashing Life is a go-to source for local music lovers. This Friday, May 18, Bostonians can catch three acts handpicked by Ryan himself at The Red Room @ Cafe 939 in what's sure to be a can't-miss show featuring singer-songwriter folk, Americana, Southern rock, blues, country, and pop. Starting at 8:00 p.m., Ryan's Smashing Life presents Runaway Dorothy, Gus + Scout, and Beautiful Small Machines.

How'd this dream team come together? "After attending the Outlaw Roadshow booked by Ryan and Adam Duritz of the Counting Crows at SXSW 2012, I extended an offer for Ryan to book one or more of his band into the Red Room for a showcase," explains Venue Manager/Talent Buyer Jackie Indrisano. "Simultaneously, I received an email from Berklee President Roger H. Brown regarding his son Lucas' friends Gus + Scout, who were gaining tons of noteriety not only for their lineage but for their amazing talent and songs. Ryan and I agreed this would be a perfect bill - a dream bill - if all three bands could perform at the Red Room on the same night. It'll be one for the books."

Here's some info about the artists:

RUNAWAY DOROTHY - It took a journey of 500 miles to unite the members of Runaway Dorothy. All hailing from the South, Dave, Brett, Evan and Sammy did not come together as Runaway Dorothy until mutual friends and good fortune brought the foursome together in New York City’s outer borough of Brooklyn. It wasn’t until Runaway Dorothy's Dave Parnell met North Carolina’s own Ryan Adams of Whiskeytown by chance, that he garnered the confidence to pursue his own music. The band has stirrings of Americana, Southern Rock and Country in their veins. Coming off an epic 12-show run this year at SxSW including a spot on Ryan's showcase with Counting Crows frontman Adam Duritz, Runaway Dorothy are set to release their sophomore album tilted THE WAIT in June.

GUS + SCOUT - Prepare to have your expectations for this night exceeded. Gus + Scout make beautiful, soaring vocals and blues-influenced folk rock. Members Gus Wenner (son of Rolling Stone founder Jan Wenner) and Scout Willis (daughter of Demi Moore and Bruce Willis) have known one another since childhood but only started playing music together about a year ago while attending Brown University. That time has been well-spent as the sounds you will hear from up on the stage are some of the most beautiful and arresting we have heard in 2012. This will be their very first time together before an audience here in Boston.

BEAUTIFUL AND SMALL MACHINES - One of the big finds so far in 2012, the new MIA cover for "Paper Planes" by Beautiful Small Machines has taken the world by storm. The song has been on the front page for Hype Machine for the last two months. Clearly, there is something going on here. Caught somewhere between the 70's, 80's and deep space, the electro-pop duo of Bree Sharp and Don DiLego learned about comedy from Adult Swim and heartache from Philp K. Dick.

Check out those videos! I for one can't wait to see these acts live. Hope to see you there!
- Backbay Patch


"05/01/2012 - The Rock Office Review, Candlebox, Runaway Dorothy"

The Rock Office Review - Kevin Davis & Bill Smith


"05/02/2012 - "Support these Guys""

Runaway with Dorothy
By: Bill Smith

Every once in a great while, I discover a band that fills my heart with over whelming happiness that I have a job where I get to share what I discovered with all you good people. Runaway Dorothy, and their album The Arc, is a perfect example of what I mean. Hailing from Brooklyn, New York, RD truthfully sounds nothing like I would expect a band from Brooklyn to sound like. I was assuming they would be a super tough, hard edge, profanity laced group of common placed, shallow three chord hacks we’ve come to expect these days from people who try to pass themselves of as musicians. Was I ever wrong! What I found was a tight knit, well produced and performed band that displayed vulnerability in their music that is seldom heard from these days.

Runaway Dorothy is an Alternative Country band, or what some may call Americana. With a sound similar to Whiskeytown, Ryan Adams, and Counting Crows, while throwing in some elements of Radiohead and U2 in for good measure. The music here is filled with lush harmonica playing, authentic country and western elements such as beautiful pedal steel, and probably the finest acoustic guitar sound captured on tape that I can remember hearing in a long, long while. Even though RD may be an independent artist, they are certainly keeping up with the majors with a steady stream of gigs all across the nation. RD recently finished a 14 show stint in seven days, ending with twelve of these shows being held at last month South by Southwest in Austin, Texas.

Standout tracks on The Arc include “Abilene,” “Volatile,” and “Hard Way Home.” The track that strikes me as a modern Alt-Country masterpiece is “Takes A lot of Love,” this is a powerful and emotive song that cuts straight t to the heart. It’s simply beautiful with its orchestration, and harmonica playing to counterbalance that. I would highly recommend support these guys by purchasing their CD, and getting out there and seeing them next time they’re in town.

Grade: A- - Bill Smith


"03/18/2012 - They are fantastic."

Runaway Dorothy is a country/folk group from New York City. I started listening to Runaway Dorothy about a year ago when I saw a tweet between Rosanne Cash and Rob Thomas raving about this band. They are fantastic. Runaway Dorothy has been compared to Jakob Dylan, Ryan Adams and Coldplay. You can also catch Adam Duritz (who I met at The Driskell) of the Counting Crows singing their praise on Twitter quite often. Do yourself a favor and check them out. - Lori Hillhouse


"06/23/2010 - REVIEW: Runaway Dorothy’s "The Arc""

“The Arc” greeted me with a unique problem. I was fully ready, after listening, to sit down and tell you all of the things it reminds me of, and all of the things it doesn’t– and then I started to think about the fallacy of review. I mean, doesn’t it seem like there has to be a better way to discuss something than to discuss the things that came before it? Shouldn’t the review be more about the music than other music that I happen to be well-versed in?

So I’m going to get the comparisons out of the way, and then I’ll delve into a more focused review. Because there is NO WAY to review this record without giving a few comparisons. Runaway Dorothy frontman David Parnell manages to evoke a Carolina dust without resorting to twang (which, of course, immediately brings Ryan Adams to mind). There are so many moments on this album that are reminiscent of early Adams– to the point where my favorite cut on the disc (or at least the one I’ve listened to the most times on repeat), “Katharine Song,” has a line, “Tell me please/ where you sleep / tonight.”

This, of course, immediately puts me in the middle of Whiskeytown’s “Factory Girl”– “And now I don’t know where she is / Or what bed she’s sleeping in”. Of course, the direct address is, if nothing else, more straightforward, and there’s a major difference, but it’s like the ghost of Adams is all over these tracks. In fact, I dare you to listen to the opening riff of “Volatile” and not think of “Afraid, Not Scared.”

The band themselves also make reference to sounding a bit like Jakob Dylan and Coldplay– there are some tracks where that is true. In “Abilene,” the music is a lot more Coldplay. And Parnell’s voice is plaintive and evocative, much like Dylan the Younger. I also see a little bit of a young (young, young) Jay Farrar in some of these tracks– the rhymes and patterns are obvious and striking, and though Parnell makes distinctly Southern music in my opinion, there’s still that same dusty sadness.

So what’s wrong with reviewing this album by comparison? Obviously, these are flattering musicians to be compared with. But Runaway Dorothy is NOT Whiskeytown, and they are not Coldplay. And by not discussing what they are, I’m afraid I’m doing the music a disservice.

So I’m going to start with my favorite song– or my favorite song right now. I’ve already switched back and forth a few times. “Katharine Song,” which I was instinctively drawn to because of its name, is stellar. The guitar is simple in a way that is a breath of fresh air: there is restraint in the right places. It’s a song about heartbreak, but with enough objectivity to see the beautiful moments shining through the pain. The song actually ends on the line,

“All my thoughts are turning
And keeping me awake
Stare at my phone
But you won’t call today

Drink myself happy
Til some girl makes me blue
The way she holds her cigarette
Reminds me of you”

I’m a sucker for an unresolved song, and I think this is that. There’s a really neat trick, though: in the first part of the song, he says, “All the bars and subway cars/ They still reflect your face”, and even though he does move to another woman by the end of the song, it all goes back to that reflection. Not bad for a story told in about two minutes.

“Hard Way Home” has a sweet guitar riff over the intro, and is, I think, the easiest song to gain access to. It’s the traditional “homecoming” song that seems to necessary for a Southern band who has relocated (in RD’s case, to NYC).

“Small dirt road still paves the drive

I used to play there when I was five
I can’t remember being so young

But I know the way home
Down the only road that I have ever
Really loved”

There’s something really sweet about it that conflicts with the driving guitar. I think I like the contradiction best of all.

Many of the songs are slow acoustic numbers with either neat slide parts or interesting drum fills. The first track, “Caulfield,” which you can’t even sa - Katie Darby


"11/01/2011 - Anti-Mag Interview"

I like music which creates a mood. When I listen to this band I feel like I'm on open road. An open road with a past in a vintage Chevy. There is something just so sweet and simple about Runaway Dorothy. It's not music that you have to "figure out", it is what it is. When I actually met Dave, I was thinking his singing voice doesn't sound like his talking voice. It may have been the wine listening though. I very much enjoy this band because you can play it in the background and the melodies get stuck in your head, not stuck like some vapid pop song, but stuck as in, whistle worthy. The Arc is full of meadow strolling harmonies and a purity worth rocking your baby to sleep with. Runaway DorothyDo you think hailing from the foothills of North Carolina has lent itself to your music or is this something that has evolved over time?
I would say that it's definitely a combination of the two. Growing up in the South meant I was exposed to country music at a young age. I used to sing along to my dad's country music tapes as a kid. Had I been born, in say Vermont, it would have given me a whole different basis for my writing. My writing evolved as I was exposed to other music. I fell in love with the music coming out of the UK and wanted to write like that, but no matter how hard I tried it just never seemed to sound natural to me. I fought for so long to write that way. Finally I gave in and just allowed myself to write whatever came out. I think it has the elements of both the country writing and the UK style. I would love to say I planned it that way, but I didn't. It just kind of happened.

How do you feel you are being received in the New York area as opposed to elsewhere?
We have been received great here which was actually a shock to me. We don't sound anything like any other band I have heard in NY which helps us stand out from all the others. Initially, I didn't think people in New York would be open to country music, but I think they dig us because we aren't twangy and the songs we sing relate to everyone and not just people who grew up in the South.

You're songs are extremely heartfelt, where does that sentiment come from?
Well, to be quite honest a great deal of this record was written after having my heart broken. It's just a response to that. I am not clever enough to fake that kind of sentiment. It's amazing what kind of feelings and emotions come out when someone tells you they enjoy the company of someone else over you and then continues to try to pull you along.

Do you feel "alt Country" is just a current trend thanks to bands like Wilco, Ryan Adams and theRunaway Dorothy such or do you feel this genre has some staying power? If you weren't doing this genre of music which route would you take?
That is a great question. I think it does have some staying power and has been gaining some momentum for quite sometime now. The first good record I ever bought was The Jayhawks 'Hollywood Town Hall' and it has been out for over 15 years. I love it to this day. I still remember buying it. One of the best decisions I ever made. I think everyone should own that record. As long as alt-country can remain honest and stay away from going with the current Nashville sound it should be okay.

If I weren't doing this kind of music I think would be in a band like Coldplay, U2, or Oasis.

What was the recording process like for you guys? Were there things that had to be rearranged and changed drastically or was there a general direction for the album that just flowed?
The recording process was excellent and easy for us. We wanted to keep things fresh so we didn't do a whole lot of takes on anything. We had a three take rule. That is why you can still hear 'mistakes'. If it was on take three, it was left in. It also helped that our producer (Oran Thornton) was brilliant to work with. If we ever got hung up on anything he would always say 'Let's go smoke on it' and we would head out of the studio while he would smoke and we w - Jo Ann L.B. Duggins


"03/09/2010 - The Gobbler Knob Review"

I am very thankful to get a great amount of music sent to me. I’m even more thankful when the stuff that’s been sent to me is really good and disntinguishes itself from the other newly-arrived items I had been listening to. I recently opened an item from my in-box and found myself hitting repeat on the tracks that the email included. That email was from North Carolina’s Runaway Dorothy (Official / Myspace) and I was listening to their full-length debut, The Arc.

Fronted by David Parnell, Runaway Dorothy showcases a classic alt-country vibe that plain and simple, scratches me where I itch (various ointments and creams have yet to work as well a this album has…too much info?). The production is sparse and the melodies are mournful. The Arc flows with an ease that is laid-back yet completely engaging. - Kelly of The Gobbler's Knob


"10/10/2010 - Absolute Punk Interview"

Who?
Runaway Dorothy is the nom-de-plume of North Carolina native Dave Parnell. He now resides in New York City. The Arc is his debut album. Runaway Dorothy got a boost earlier this year when Adam Duritz publicly announced that The Arc was one of his favorite albums of the last couple years, causing Astor Music Group to re-release the album.

How is it?
Tremendous. Don't expect bells and whistles here, Parnell is uninterested in that. This is simple heartland rock a la Ryan Adams, Jakob Dylan, Duritz and Petty. Album opener "Caulfield," is rustic and plaintive as Parnelel waxes in his clear
spoken voice about falling asleep drunk on a train, blocking out sunlight and sleeping all day and finding little reason to live. Downtrodden stuff for certain, but not without its collective charms.

A full band is introduced on the steel guitar influenced "Where Did I Go Wrong," a timeless and melancholic ode to love gone south. Evoking traces of The Byrds and The Band, there's little about the song that's worth skipping. Inspired third track, "Abilene," opens with winsome guitars and urgent drums and the disc's first home run chorus. Everything about the song is damn near perfect and its the first of many moments that announce Runaway Dorothy as a band to watch in 2011.

The gnomic "Katherine," is a bustling acoustic ditty that draws more on the verses than that of the music itself. That's not to say it's unappealing, it just doesn't exactly go anywhere. Inspired harmonica in the middle half certainly helps the cause, but that's about all that really needs to be written about "Katherine."

The timeless "A Lot of Love," is undoubtedly the disc's centerpiece, a towering, hypnotic and utterly painful declaration of adjusting to solitude. Bolstered by impassioned harmonica, powderkeg drums and driving guitars, it has the kind of oomph and gravitas that artists strive decades to achieve, but never do. That Dave did this on his first full-length attempt should not be ignored.

The meandering "Volatile," is serpentine, hushed and deeply potent, while the deeply resonant "Too Young," is hollow, haunting and undeniably memorable. The rumbling autobiographical "Hard Way Home," is a banjo-fueled excursion down North Carolina's backgrounds and revisits the rustic charm of the disc's earlier tracks. The ruminative "Say," revisits the motif of "Too Young," while penultimate cut "Nights Like These Here," draws on a soft kick drum, pedal steel, banjo and
Parnell's crystalline crooning.

Though the tone isn't nearly as visceral or punchy as "A Lot of Love," there's definitely something deeply affecting about these four minutes. The disc ends with the quiet acoustic prayer "Matter of Time," an aching ode to pain and frustration that does very little wrong. While calling it perfect is probably hyperbolic, the song certainly veers close towards that very title.

When it's all said and done, these are 11 deeply potent, power-packed songs, and while Parnell doesn't veer far from heartache, the power of these very songs does enough to leave that one blemish on the shelf. So maybe in the end Adam Duritz was right. The Arc just might be one of the year's best discs. - Greg Robson


"12/30/2011 - "If you haven’t heard of Runaway Dorothy, you certainly will""

It’s not every day that you come across a record from a band that makes you feel their heart, passion, and life experiences in their words and the way they strum the guitar but that’s what you get from Runaway Dorothy and their debut full-length album, The Arc.

The Arc, is a fresh perspective that breaks from cliche love songs and embraces the ups and downs that come with having loved and lost. These songs aren’t about trying to win back the love of your significant other but relishing the moments you had with the person and growing from them.

After a listen to the record, you could easily compare him to Jakob Dylan (post-The Wallflowers, also, Bob Dylan’s son). There is an emphasis on the vocals and acoustic guitar stylings, forcing you to listen and inevitably capturing your emotions.

The lyrical strength of David Parnell’s work is evident on his song, “Takes Alot of Love,” where he hits you right in the heart with this line “it takes a lot of love/to leave you alone.” I’ve yet to hear a line that came so close to capturing the emotion of putting someone behind you and not bothering them, though all you want to do is hear their voice one more time. Parnell was able to do it.

Another track of the 11-song LP worth checking out is “Hard Way Home.” It’s about that one voice that will put a smile on your face every time you hear it. You can’t help but be there no matter what that person has done to you, bad or good.

On “Nights Like These Here,” it’s about the kind of love you know isn’t right for you and probably won’t work out but for that one night, nothing else seems better or makes more sense.

Overall it’s a straight-forward record that isn’t overbearing in anyway. You hear the acoustic guitar, or a little of the banjo and the harmonica and you feel like you’re experiencing a love-story first-hand, full of heart.

If you haven’t heard of Runaway Dorothy, you certainly will. This band is not only worth your time, it’s worth your money. - Indie Media Mag


"08/16/2010 - "Runaway Dorothy is a friend comforting you""

Runaway Dorothy is a friend comforting you, a hand on your shoulder, a hug, and maybe even a kiss. The Arc has the ability to sneak into your head and release thoughts you didn’t even know you possessed. David Parnell is the lead singer that lets his words fly. The groups various websites constantly pound out that Parnell is comparable to Bob and Jakob Dylan. As this is a bitter pill to swallow it can be seen true by many people. Even if you shake your head and think this may be impossible, it is very easy to find the love in every song. “Say” is embracing and the soft song cradles its words with care around the lulling instrumentals. One song that I played repeatedly and analyzed up and down was “Takes a Lot of Love.” Finally I caught myself, I found that every time I played a piece of this song I ended up making it a soundtrack to a piece of my life. Either Runaway Dorothy has the potential to become the soundtrack to your life too, or crush you under its emotional weight. - Miranda Dillworth


"12/12/2010 - Catching Up With: Runaway Dorothy"

I’ve had the pleasure of interviewing some pretty awesome musicians for this blog, which, since it’s basically an overgrown fansite, has been very gratifying. One of the coolest interviews I’ve had the fortune of publishing was with a new NYC-based band, Runaway Dorothy. They’ve become more and more successful since our last talk, and Dave, the frontman, graciously agreed to talk to me again now that they’re in the studio with their sophomore album.

And more than just the interview, he came bearing really good news about their new single– and where you’ll be able to hear it first.

Hello again! To recap, we’ve spoken before, and it went pretty well for us both. What has happened to you guys, as a band, since our last interview?

We’re back in the studio, and that’s the big thing. We’re playing a few live shows here and there since we last spoke, but the whole reason we were doing live shows was to see how well the new songs were working. Do they stand up?, do people like them?, all that good stuff. We love playing live, really, we’re kind of addicted to it—but the biggest thing we’ve been having is this explosion we’ve had on Twitter. That’s been insane. Ever since the interview with you and the Duritz thing that followed, it’s been non-stop. He usually says something to us at least once a day, and that gets people to email me and say, “Duritz just said something, I heard your songs, how come I’ve never heard of you before?” Every day, it’s some other part of the world that’s contacted me and said, “We found out about you guys on Adam Duritz.” It’s been amazing.

So social media is working out for you guys?

To be quite honest, Twitter is singlehandedly the best thing I’ve ever done, other than learning to play guitar. I went to a BMI Workshop like three years ago, and everyone that was there was boring and self-important, but one lady stood up, and she owns her own online marketing firm and PR firm, and for some reason, I just really paid attention to her. She seemed to really want to help people. But she gave us a list of things that you as an independent artist should be doing and one of the things was Twitter. Part of the reason is it actually gives you a little personality behind the music. It’s not always trying to shove our PR down your throat. It’s gotten ridiculous– since I’ve been recording, I’m losing half of my brain, and this morning, I almost put the milk in the over. I literally made breakfast, and almost put the milk into the oven. This is insane. And I realized I thought about running to Twitter. We’ve paid agencies and firms to promote us and got little to no response. Just going through social media, it seems to be cutting out the middle man. If I go to the PR firm, they go to another an agency, that then connects us to the fans I’d rather skip that and have no filter. I’d rather speak to someone directly about our music.

Well, without as many major labels, PR will eventually be more in the hands of the bands, too.

This is a better time for creativity than actively pursuing major labels. I was in a band before, and that seemed to be the end result, “If we could just get signed,” but we weren’t as concerned about getting better as a band or communicating with our fans. I didn’t want to start music just to get signed. If someone wants to give me money for something I’m already doing, I’ll do that.

What is it like being in the studio with a second album?

It’s kind of weird! We’ve been working on this for about a year. We started about three or four days after Christmas last year, and the whole idea was to put out an EP within a couple of months to kind of bank on the new publicity and exposure we’d been getting. So we went in the studio, but we had no money. Our bass player’s brother owns a studio in NC, so we decided to go there and cut four songs for the new EP. We went in, and it was a huge headache, because we wanted to do it all analog, the old school way. (*EDITOR’S NOTE: Awesome.) - Katie Darby


"06/30/2010 - Talking To: Runaway Dorothy"

First! After getting several entries, both in the comments and to my email, I wanted to say, congratulations to Brittany Ranee! Email me at kwdarby@gmail.com with your address, and I’ll get that in the mail. Thanks for participating, everyone, and keep an eye out– in the next few days, I’ll have a review up of the new Cowboy Junkies album, Renmin Park, and I’ll have three copies of that to give away.

Next! Remember Runaway Dorothy from a few posts back? I had the pleasure of talking to their frontman, Dave, yesterday, and wanted to share that conversation here. It’s always such a pleasure to talk with up and coming musicians, especially ones who are actively building a place in the alt-country world.

Here’s their CD– I recommend putting it on while reading the interview and getting acquainted with everything, the stories and the music, all at once.



Band website hosting

Tell me a little about Runaway Dorothy. How did you guys form?

It started out as a side project of another band. My best friend and I were putting a band together early on, about five years ago, and we just couldn’t seem to get anything rolling until another band in the area wanted a guitar player– two guitar players– and he asked if we were interested in doing it. I was in and out with them, playing for big record companies, and while I was doing it, they didn’t need me to sing or write songs, so I started stockpiling these songs I was working on. The band and I were so different musically, there was no way we’d ever use it. Eventually I had a falling out with that band, and in the meantime I’d written these songs and demoed them and sent them to all of our friends. They asked why I wasn’t pursuing it myself, but I kept doubting myself, that I was good enough to do it.

Then I had a chance meeting with– I lived in Charleston– and I met Ryan Adams. I was a huge fan, and didn’t really put it together, and I was out with my girlfriend at the time, walking around the streets of Charleston, and this guy walks into this bar, and of all people, it was Ryan Adams. From there, we struck up a conversation. Then we were hanging out for the evening, and he came back to my apartment, and we played music together– he’s getting progressively drunk– and I tell him, “I’m doing a showcase for Columbia,” But it was with the other band. And he asked to hear the songs, and I said, “Oh, those are different songs than the ones we’ve been playing,” and then he was like, “Why are you wasting your time in the other band? You should be doing this.” And then all of the sudden, one of the people I hold up to true high esteem told me to quit my band and do my music.

That’s funny. I had a chance meeting with Ryan Adams, and it changed my life, too.

It was really, really strange. I’d just read the first volume of Bob Dylan’s biography, Chronicles, and about halfway through the book, he talks about having a chance encounter with a famous person, and he’d had this moment– and it was like, the torch had passed to him. Meeting Ryan Adams, I had that exact same feeling. Whether he’s telling me the truth or being full of shit about things, I felt he was really passing the torch to me, saying ‘it’s your turn to do this now.’

One of the questions I was planning on asking was how you made the decision to take the risk and become a musician.

Even that was very– it’s not a sure thing for anyone. I knew that I was supposed to do it, I just didn’t know how to do it. I figure, just do what you’re supposed to do, and the how takes care of itself, I hope. If I can move from doing one thing to the next thing in music, I’ll be just fine. The biggest thing is diving in first, I’ve got people who believe in me, people I believe in telling me to do it– what more do you need?

Other than Ryan Adams, who are your influences?

The very first good record I ever bought was The Jayhawks’ Hollywood Town Hall. I was a kid, listening to the worst music possible, and I heard that record - Katie Darby


"06/21/2011 - They came together in New York"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCy4I5ipgDY - KDAR


"06/06/2012 - Just Lovely!"

http://www.sensorydispensary.com/2012/06/abilene-runaway-dorothy/ - Sensory Dispensary


"06/04/2012 - "it’s simply beautiful""

Runaway with Dorothy

BY BILL SMITH
MUSIC CRITIC

Every once in a great while, I discover a band that fills my heart with over whelming happiness that I have a job where I get to share what I discovered with all you good people. Runaway Dorothy, and their album The Arc, is a perfect example of what I mean. Hailing from Brooklyn, New York, RD truthfully sounds nothing like I would expect a band from Brooklyn to sound like. I was assuming they would be a super tough, hard edge, profanity laced group of common placed, shallow three chord hacks we’ve come to expect these days from people who try to pass themselves of as musicians. Was I ever wrong! What I found was a tight knit, well produced and performed band that displayed vulnerability in their music that is seldom heard from these days.

Runaway Dorothy is an Alternative Country band, or what some may call Americana. With a sound similar to Whiskeytown, Ryan Adams, and Counting Crows, while throwing in some elements of Radiohead and U2 in for good measure. The music here is filled with lush harmonica playing, authentic country and western elements such as beautiful pedal steel, and probably the finest acoustic guitar sound captured on tape that I can remember hearing in a long, long while. Even though RD may be an independent artist, they are certainly keeping up with the majors with a steady stream of gigs all across the nation. RD recently finished a 14 show stint in seven days, ending with twelve of these shows being held at last month South by Southwest in Austin, Texas.

Standout tracks on The Arc include “Abilene,” “Volatile,” and “Hard Way Home.” The track that strikes me as a modern Alt-Country masterpiece is “Takes A lot of Love,” this is a powerful and emotive song that cuts straight t to the heart. It’s simply beautiful with its orchestration, and harmonica playing to counterbalance that. I would highly recommend support these guys by purchasing their CD, and getting out there and seeing them next time they’re in town.

Grade: A-

bsmith@lakecounty-sentinel.com or follow us on Twitter @LCSentinelcom
POSTED 06/04/2012 15:57
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Candlebox - Runaway Dorothy CD Cover


























Robert J. Gregor

Attorney and Counselor
at
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29944 Euclid Ave
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- Bill Smith


"05/17/2012 - Winter brought me down, then I found Runaway Dorothy"

One of these days I'll talk about a band that wasn't part of South By South West's Outlaw Roadshow, but they are just all so good! One of the bands which first grabbed my attention was Runaway Dorothy. I think their's was the first album from any of the Roadshow artists that I downloaded in it's entirety, and I couldn't be more in love with it. They call themselves "alternative-country" but I'm really not sure exactly what that means. They do sound country, not sure where the "alternative" comes in. I grew up with country music, and still listen to lots of the stuff that I did growing up, but I separate country music as pre- or post-Dixie Chicks (who, along with Shania Twain, in my opinion, ruined country music) so I really haven't listened to new Country music since like 1998, and really, I'm not saying that I'm going to go back to listening to it, but If these guys are the future of country music, then I may.



Originally from North Carolina, but now haunting the subways, streets and venues of Brooklyn (and greater NYC), Dave Parnell (vocals, guitar, harmonica). Brett Parnell (electric guitar, banjo), Evan Mitchel (drums) and Sammy Gallo (bass) make up Runaway Dorothy. Hard Way Home was the song I got from the Outlaw Roadshow download; a great, toe-tappin', upbeat, story of a song. I love the electric guitar in this song, and the banjo (but then again, I love anything with a banjo, they are just so fun.) After I listened to Hard Way Home a handful of times, I HAD to get more. So I downloaded The Arc.


When I first listened to The Arc, the first thing I thought was "hmm.. I dig this... kinda reminds me of Jakob Dylan (whom I LOVE)" and I couldn't get enough of it. I love everything about this record: the songwriting, the acoustic guitar, the electric guitar, the bass lines, the backing vocals, the harmonica (I love a good harmonica, and I have the utmost respect and admiration for anyone who can play the guitar and the harmonica at the same time, nice job Dave!) Abilene, which is my favorite song on the record, also holds great lyrics and guitars, and I really like the drum line on that track. The Arc also has some great tracks for unwinding, or for when you've got a melancholy mood about you: Takes a Lot of Love, Too Young, Nights Like These, Volatile, and Matter of Time. For something in between Hard Way Home and Too Young, Caulfield and Katherine Song are perfect. Every song on The Arc is perfect for what ever mood you may be in, and I am very much looking forward to a new record from the boys (maybe an advance copy? Hmm?)


Runaway Dorothy is another band which I follow on twitter, and with whom I have exchanged a tweet or two... or a dozen... or so... They are another band which it would be uber cool to be friends with, to be a part of the awesome music, and who also need to work in some sort of a west coast tour (I would love to see these guys live!) Being semi-quasi twitter friends with them has its perks as well, their manager (Nicholas Mishko) sent me a packet of "swag" from the band, including an autographed poster, a guitar pick, a couple buttons, stickers and SXSW schedule cards (of course I framed the poster, it's now hanging in my kitchen.)

I really do love this band. And since I do, you should too. Please help support these guys and buy their record. At least listen to it, then you'll know what I'm talking about. They are playing a gig in Boston this weekend (May 18) if you happen to be there, go to the show. If you're not in Boston: BUY THE RECORD.

- Jennifer Holmes


"05/07/2012 - AMAZING!! - RSL Presents Runaway Dorothy, Gus + Scout and Beautiful Small Machines"

http://www.rslblog.com/2012/05/rsl-presents-runaway-dorothy-gus-scout.html - Ryan Spalding


"03/18/2012 - pretty much amazing"

http://en.paperblog.com/runaway-dorothy-hard-way-home-164682/ - Paper Blog


"03/19/2012 - What The Folk Radio Show"

http://forgetoday.com/radio/shows/specialist/what-the-folk-19th-march-2012/ - Georgie Beardmore


"03/12/2012 - Very Cool Band from New York!!"

http://fox8.com/2012/03/12/runaway-dorothy/ - Fox News


"02/27/2012 - Band that wears their heart on their sleeve.."

http://www.rslblog.com/2012/02/confirmed-to-play-runaway-dorothy.html - RSL Blog


"03/14/2012 - DO NOT MISS: Runaway Dorothy, SXSW"

http://www.katiedarbyrecommends.com/2012/03/14/do-not-miss-runaway-dorothy-sxsw/ - Katie Darby


"Album Review: The Arc by Runaway Dorothy"

t’s not every day that you come across a record from a band that makes you feel their heart, passion, and life experiences in their words and the way they strum the guitar but that’s what you get from Runaway Dorothy and their debut full-length album, The Arc.

The Arc, is a fresh perspective that breaks from cliche love songs and embraces the ups and downs that come with having loved and lost. These songs aren’t about trying to win back the love of your significant other but relishing the moments you had with the person and growing from them.

After a listen to the record, you could easily compare him to Jakob Dylan (post-The Wallflowers, also, Bob Dylan’s son). There is an emphasis on the vocals and acoustic guitar stylings, forcing you to listen and inevitably capturing your emotions.

The lyrical strength of David Parnell’s work is evident on his song, “Takes Alot of Love,” where he hits you right in the heart with this line “it takes a lot of love/to leave you alone.” I’ve yet to hear a line that came so close to capturing the emotion of putting someone behind you and not bothering them, though all you want to do is hear their voice one more time. Parnell was able to do it.

Another track of the 11-song LP worth checking out is “Hard Way Home.” It’s about that one voice that will put a smile on your face every time you hear it. You can’t help but be there no matter what that person has done to you, bad or good.

On “Nights Like These Here,” it’s about the kind of love you know isn’t right for you and probably won’t work out but for that one night, nothing else seems better or makes more sense.

Overall it’s a straight-forward record that isn’t overbearing in anyway. You hear the acoustic guitar, or a little of the banjo and the harmonica and you feel like you’re experiencing a love-story first-hand, full of heart.

If you haven’t heard of Runaway Dorothy, you certainly will. This band is not only worth your time, it’s worth your money. - Aldo Singer


"Music Review: Runaway Dorothy"

Runaway Dorothy is a friend comforting you, a hand on your shoulder, a hug, and maybe even a kiss. The Arc has the ability to sneak into your head and release thoughts you didn’t even know you possessed. David Parnell is the lead singer that lets his words fly. The groups various websites constantly pound out that Parnell is comparable to Bob and Jakob Dylan. As this is a bitter pill to swallow it can be seen true by many people. Even if you shake your head and think this may be impossible, it is very easy to find the love in every song. “Say” is embracing and the soft song cradles its words with care around the lulling instrumentals. One song that I played repeatedly and analyzed up and down was “Takes a Lot of Love.” Finally I caught myself, I found that every time I played a piece of this song I ended up making it a soundtrack to a piece of my life. Either Runaway Dorothy has the potential to become the soundtrack to your life too, or crush you under its emotional weight. - Miranda Dillworth


"Review - Runaway Dorothy - The Arc"

Who?
Runaway Dorothy is the nom-de-plume of North Carolina native Dave Parnell. He now resides in New York City. The Arc is his debut album. Runaway Dorothy got a boost earlier this year when Adam Duritz publicly announced that The Arc was one of his favorite albums of the last couple years, causing Astor Music Group to re-release the album.

How is it?
Tremendous. Don't expect bells and whistles here, Parnell is uninterested in that. This is simple heartland rock a la Ryan Adams, Jakob Dylan, Duritz and Petty. Album opener "Caulfield," is rustic and plaintive as Parnelel waxes in his clear
spoken voice about falling asleep drunk on a train, blocking out sunlight and sleeping all day and finding little reason to live. Downtrodden stuff for certain, but not without its collective charms.

A full band is introduced on the steel guitar influenced "Where Did I Go Wrong," a timeless and melancholic ode to love gone south. Evoking traces of The Byrds and The Band, there's little about the song that's worth skipping. Inspired third track, "Abilene," opens with winsome guitars and urgent drums and the disc's first home run chorus. Everything about the song is damn near perfect and its the first of many moments that announce Runaway Dorothy as a band to watch in 2011.

The gnomic "Katherine," is a bustling acoustic ditty that draws more on the verses than that of the music itself. That's not to say it's unappealing, it just doesn't exactly go anywhere. Inspired harmonica in the middle half certainly helps the cause, but that's about all that really needs to be written about "Katherine."

The timeless "A Lot of Love," is undoubtedly the disc's centerpiece, a towering, hypnotic and utterly painful declaration of adjusting to solitude. Bolstered by impassioned harmonica, powderkeg drums and driving guitars, it has the kind of oomph and gravitas that artists strive decades to achieve, but never do. That Dave did this on his first full-length attempt should not be ignored.

The meandering "Volatile," is serpentine, hushed and deeply potent, while the deeply resonant "Too Young," is hollow, haunting and undeniably memorable. The rumbling autobiographical "Hard Way Home," is a banjo-fueled excursion down North Carolina's backgrounds and revisits the rustic charm of the disc's earlier tracks. The ruminative "Say," revisits the motif of "Too Young," while penultimate cut "Nights Like These Here," draws on a soft kick drum, pedal steel, banjo and
Parnell's crystalline crooning.

Though the tone isn't nearly as visceral or punchy as "A Lot of Love," there's definitely something deeply affecting about these four minutes. The disc ends with the quiet acoustic prayer "Matter of Time," an aching ode to pain and frustration that does very little wrong. While calling it perfect is probably hyperbolic, the song certainly veers close towards that very title.

When it's all said and done, these are 11 deeply potent, power-packed songs, and while Parnell doesn't veer far from heartache, the power of these very songs does enough to leave that one blemish on the shelf. So maybe in the end Adam Duritz was right. The Arc just might be one of the year's best discs.

Track Listing 1. Caulfield
2. With You
3. Abilene
4. Katherine
5. Takes A Lot of Love
6. Volatile
7. Too Young
8. Hard Way Home
9. Say
10. Nights Like These Here
11. Matter of Time


Recommended If You Like Dawes, Whiskeytown, Jakob Dylan, John Hiatt
- Gregory Robson


Discography

The Wait - 2012
The Arc - 2008

Photos

Bio

It took a journey of 500 or so miles from North Carolina to New York City to unite the members of Runaway Dorothy. All hailing from the South, Dave, Brett, Evan and Sammy did not come together as Runaway Dorothy until mutual friends and good fortune brought the foursome together in New York City’s outer borough of Brooklyn.

The origins of Runaway Dorothy can be traced back 5 years as a no name side project of another band. At the time, Dave was a keyboardist in a band that did not need or want another songwriter. It wasn’t until Dave met North Carolina’s own Ryan Adams of Whiskeytown by chance, that he garnered the confidence to quit the band and pursue his own music. Just like Bob Dylan’s life changing moment when gorgeous George Wagner told him “You’re making it come alive”, Dave Parnell got his life changing moment and he was finally able to make his music come alive.

Combining newly gained confidence with a cohesive sound that mixes alternative rock with country’s heartbreak and harmonies. The bands critically acclaimed debut full length album recorded in Nashville, is filled with heartfelt tunes through the melancholy voice of David Parnell.

From raucous busking sessions in the subway to the rooftops in Brooklyn to the star studded famous Manhattan venues, they have the uncanny ability to capture audiences small and large, transient and still. Runaway Dorothy is a band that wears its heart on its sleeve while proudly brandishing the foot-tapping, ear-pleasing sensibilities of its southern roots. Runaway Dorothy possesses both the assurance of seasoned performers as well as the charm of four boys genuinely excited to be doing the thing they truly love.