Satellite Hearts
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Satellite Hearts

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States | Established. Jan 01, 2009

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Established on Jan, 2009
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Apr
01
Satellite Hearts @ The Barbary

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

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"1. “Philly's Satellite Hearts push mainstream music to rise above the superficial”"

Pop music is garbage, and things aren’t like they used to be, say the boys from Philly band Satellite Hearts, playing in residency throughout February at Ortlieb's in Northern Liberties. It might sound cliché, but they are charming in their ambition.

And don't let the trio trick you into thinking they aren't trying to be a part of the glorious mess of musical fabric that defines popular culture — whether it's simplified but intelligently pissed-off punk rock, or richly produced pop schlock designed to crawl up the charts, or the complex and bold rock 'n' roll that hearkens back to a perceived golden age that thrived decades ago.

Naturally, the bandmates — Justin Pellecchia, Lucas Rinz, and Keaton Thandi — identify with that last mentality. And they’re trying to prove it this month with their Ortlieb’s shows. With two records under their belt, 2012’s "Imperial Green" and last year’s "Desire Forces the Flow," they’re armed to the teeth with tunes that they hope will melt minds and fry brains.

"I just want to get people moving and let the drinks flow and let people have a good time,” says Rinz, the band’s bassist. “We’re having a great time while we’re playing. I feel like our music is pretty straight-forward rock 'n' roll, and it’s pretty easy to get down to, to get people moving and get off their feet a little.”

"You really can’t help yourself," says Pellecchia, chiming in. "You really have to move. You forget where you are, what day it is, what time it is.”

The boys hail from disparate Philly neighborhoods. These days, two-thirds of the band call Fishtown home, but they found their artistic home in New Hope, Pa., where Michael “Mickey” Melchiondo Jr. (better known as Dean Ween) took a shine to them. It's also where Ween's former manager, Greg Frey, took them on. In fact, John and Peter's on Main Street is their spiritual music mecca, a venue that Ween frequented for ages.

And Satellite Hearts is starting to get booked and noticed.

They threw a record release party at Ortlieb’s last year. "We sold it out, and we had a huge night, and it was awesome,” says Pellecchia, who credits Cheerleader’s Josh Pannepacker (sound man at the newly remodeled pseudo-dive on North Third Street) for their current month-long stint. “He approached us and asked if we would want to do a residency there. We’re really excited about it.”

They've tapped all kinds of buddy bands for support at the shows. Members of Up The Chain, The Lawsuits, and Toy Soldiers opened, and next week it’s the Levee Drivers and Bill McCloskey. Strangely, I’m not even sure these buddy bands represent Satellite Hearts’ sound, which is, to say the least, eclectic.

Their latest, for instance, opens up with a barn-burner in “Carry Them Bones,” 2:20 of snot-nosed snarl that sounds like garage punk spiked with California surf guitar and shaken up inside a rockabilly tumbler.



Then “Smoke and Mirrors” is injected with hazy , boozey piano man vibes a la Low Cut Connie. The track “16:12” opens with a great bass dirge, slowly built-up drums, and a psychedelic guitar whammy, a track that’d fit nicely on the "Pulp Fiction" soundtrack. One surprise in the middle is the beauty of “Whisper on the Breeze,” a piano-driven dream that should footnote both Tobias Jesso Jr. and Henry Nilsson.



Ask them to give you a band to compare them to, and it’s as grand as it gets: The Who. "I know people will always need something to compare us to. And I don’t really want to compare us to anything, but for me it’s like you’re watching old Who shows with Pete Townshend jumping and going crazy and Keith Moon going nuts,” says Pellecchia, the band’s theoretical Roger Daltrey. “They’re all doing something different but they’re in unison with each other: it’s chaotic, it’s positive with all kinds of emotions mixed together.”

And it's loud. “When we’re really hitting it and killing it, it feels like we’re unstoppable in the moment," says Pallechia. "It feels like this huge ball of energy just exploding,”

He’s the most talkative, and I could listen to his thoughts trail off all day — they keep going and going. “Mainstream music is crap right now. The political world is just a doozy — it’s just crazy,” he goes on. He even acknowledges that Philly’s band scene is having a bit of a “moment,” one that’ll get looked back on with amazement and fondness. Not unlike how soul music flourished here in the ‘70s or the way the Hooters soared in the ‘80s into the ‘90s.

“The last great rock band from America was Nirvana," says Pellecchia. "They were in the right time and place when they made that record.” (I’m guessing he’s referring to 1991’s “Nevermind.”) He wonders why Gwen Stefani is on "The Voice" and not in the studio, and why "American Idol" lasted as long as it did. (“I’m so glad that it’s over,” he says.)

He hits on something that I love about music — its ability to let you tune out the pop culture noise. “There’s so much going on and all this technology and information overload coming at us 24/7. The music sounds superficial,” Pellecchia pleads. “I think it’s time to raise the bar a little bit.” - Newsworks


"2. “Satellite Hearts – 93.3 WMMR Radio - Jaxon's Local Shots Artist of the Month""

Satellite Hearts is pure rock 'n' roll, wild and dangerous, yet full of awe and childlike wonder. "It's like The Clash infused with unpolished 80's brat punk that trekked through the 60's while flirting with bell-bottomed psychedelics". At the end of the cosmic mind trip Satellite Hearts is truly the distinctive sound of Justin Pellecchia (guitar, vocals, and harmonica), Lucas Rinz (bass, vocals) and Keaton Thandi (drums, percussion, and vocals). Three beings who welcome you graciously into their world. Their latest single, "Doing Things Right", has positively been received and is accompanied by a psyched out spin-tastic music video. Their second LP, "Desire Forces The Flow", is available for purchase and should be played at maximum volume. - WMMR.com


"3. “Toronto Music Scene Band of the Day: Satellite Hearts”"

Sometimes, returning to a place of comfort is more appealing than venturing forth; a mantra that Philadelphia’s Satellite Hearts hold close to heart. This quartet plays unabashed, unfiltered and to-the-roots rock ‘n’ roll, equipped with attitude and Marshall stacks. Drawing influence from a plethora of hit-makers and smack-takers, these raucous Americans promise to bring the party North of the border. Without the gimmicks, these boys manage to skillfully reinterpret a platform that has been heavily diluted and are guaranteed to entertain you this Indie Week. - Indie Week


"4. “Why Aren’t You Listening To: Satellite Hearts”"

“Why Aren’t You Listening to” is an irregularly-running series at Rock on Philly, spotlighting artists in Philly and beyond that you should be keeping an eye (and ear) out for! This installment focuses on spunky Pennsylvania rock trio Satellite Hearts.

Why you should be listening: You may already be listening to them, actually, as the backing band for Philly songstress/screaming siren Ali Wadsworth. These boys are more than just a backing band, though–their recent win as Indie Rock Band of the Year at the Tri State Indie Awards is only a hint of the great things coming out of the New Hope-based trio whose huge sound belies their size. They’ve got numerous summer performances lined up; but the real reason to tune in now is so that you’re all caught up on Satellite Hearts news by the time their second LP, titled Desire Forces the Flow, drops this July. Given how solidly rocking the band’s work has been so far, and the head-bangingly catchy quality of recent single “Doing Things Right“, the new LP promises to be a wholly necessary addition to your collection.

Sounds like: The talented version of what you wish your brother’s high school garage band had sounded like–the perfect mix of basement band and stadium show, best accompanied by an illicit bottle in a brown paper bag.

Listen to: Latest single “Doing Things Right“, which will have you ready to scream and throw up the rock ‘n roll hand salute in perfect time to the video’s psychedelic, dizzying production. - RockonPhilly.com


"5. “Satellite Hearts: The Classic Rock Foundation.”"

Some herald Philadelphia as the city of soul, singer-songwriter vibes, gritty punk and/or unsullied rap. But others question if that is all the city has to offer.

“I thought this city forgot what rock ‘n’ roll was,” says Justin Pellecchia of New Hope’s Satellite Hearts. “I felt Philadelphia forgot how to rock.”

Pellecchia is the front man and lead guitarist of the tight-knit rock trio, which includes bassist Lucas Rinz of Lambertville, New Jersey and percussionist Keaton Thandi of Flemington, New Jersey.

Pellecchia dons wispy shoulder length hair and an arresting yet comforting disposition. In fact, there’s a captivating sincerity present in all three members – whether it’s Rinz’s fetching stoicism or Thandi’s wide-eyed enthusiasm.

It’s their unassuming off-stage presence that renders their onstage performance downright disarming.


It's happening in Philly. For real.

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JUMP Team

Satellite Hearts: The Classic Rock Foundation.
November 7, 2014
tags: fall 2014, satellite hearts
by Geo

SatelliteHeartsSmall02Text by Morgan James. Images by Charles Shan Cerrone.

Some herald Philadelphia as the city of soul, singer-songwriter vibes, gritty punk and/or unsullied rap. But others question if that is all the city has to offer.

“I thought this city forgot what rock ‘n’ roll was,” says Justin Pellecchia of New Hope’s Satellite Hearts. “I felt Philadelphia forgot how to rock.”

Pellecchia is the front man and lead guitarist of the tight-knit rock trio, which includes bassist Lucas Rinz of Lambertville, New Jersey and percussionist Keaton Thandi of Flemington, New Jersey.

Pellecchia dons wispy shoulder length hair and an arresting yet comforting disposition. In fact, there’s a captivating sincerity present in all three members – whether it’s Rinz’s fetching stoicism or Thandi’s wide-eyed enthusiasm.

It’s their unassuming off-stage presence that renders their onstage performance downright disarming.

SatelliteHeartsSmall01
SatelliteHeartsSmall03
SatelliteHeartsSmall04

When it comes to rocking ‘n’ rolling, Satellite Hearts doesn’t disappoint. They’re the real deal.

And Pellecchia, the Yardley, Pennsylvania native, is at the center of it.

His voice is powerful, jolting and sensitive all at once. On stage, he turns up the charm, Thandi drums up the kick and the typically reserved Rinz spazzes out. All the way out – jumping up and down, eyes glazed, lips turning into a smirk as if to say, “Screw you. I’m having fun.” Reticence is for the faint of heart when Satellite Hearts turns on.

The band formed in December 2009 in greater New Hope. While their first songs were Pellecchia’s creations, many of the songs from their first album, Imperial Hearts, were created organically.

“Most of the time it’s the three of us getting off on each other,” Pellecchia says with a laugh.

Indeed, they know how to groove as a unit. But that was not always the case.

The band added Dre DiMura on lead guitar during the production of their 2013 digital album, Four to the Floor. DiMura was invited to join for supplementary depth and layering, something the original members of Satellite Hearts thought the band needed then. But the cohesiveness was lacking and Satellite Hearts returned to just its three original members.

“We realized we had everything we needed to begin with and now we’re working to put us back out there,” Rinz explains.

“I think we all learned our roles better in the three-piece and learned to create more of the sound overall,” Keaton chimes in. “Not necessarily adding another dynamic – or a fourth dynamic – to the band. But using more dynamics.”

Listening to their releases, one is bound to sense notes of The Strokes there, The Beatles here and The Kinks over there – a classic rock foundation riddled with punk rock sensibilities. And hell, even a bit of Latin over yonder.

“Justin takes classical guitar lessons right now,” Keaton says. “Brazilian style. Flamenco style.”

Rinz emphasizes the importance of not wanting to be limited musically.

“You can find inspiration everywhere,” he says. “I think that was always a premise of the band when we started. To never be boxed in. It’s very easy to say we have a punky edge to our music. That’s true. But we draw inspiration from all over and our feel … where we’re coming from happens to be classic.”

Nonetheless, one of their biggest musical influences – Dean Ween of the eponymous experiential rock band Ween – hails from the band’s stomping grounds of New Hope. It was Ween who gave Satellite Hearts their first nod at New Hope haunts such as John & Peter’s. It was Ween who turned to his manager and called them “a real fucking band.”

“Being a Ween fan, that’s the greatest compliment,” Thandi says. “That means a lot to me.”

Their fanbase in New Hope is as passionate about them as Ween is explicit. Satellite Hearts doesn’t like to view them as fans, but as friends.

However, Pellecchia reflects tentatively on their humble beginnings in Philadelphia.

“Playing with a bunch of indie bands around here, they have this look and this attitude,” he says. “I felt like a lot of people didn’t get us. Like, they didn’t fully understand what we were. Or what we are.”

“Now I’m starting to see the changes. We’re coming into our own,” he enthusiastically adds. “And the city is starting to accept us for us.”

Satellite Hearts is set to release its third album, with a working title of Desire Forces the Flow, this fall or winter. They are excited to rock on in the city of Philadelphia and beyond.

But they’ll never lose sight that it’s their fans – no, their friends – in New Hope that make the place feel like home. - JumpPhilly.com


"6. “Satellite Hearts - Desire Forces the Flow (Satellite Hearts)”"

Philadelphia, PA’s Satellite Hearts continue their exploration of eclectic rock’n‘roll with a powerful sophomore effort that nods heavily to the ’70s.

Desire Forces the Flow recalls the dramatic pop aesthetics of Baby Teeth and Tommy Wallach, with lead vocalist, Justin Pellecchia, blustering like T. Rex’s Marc Bolan fronting Muse during a twisted glam freakout. Shades of Lou Reed and David Bowie float freely through a heavy John Lennon and Roxy Music-tinged soundscape. Pellecchia’s guitar solos particularly sound like Roxy’s Phil Manzanera, while subtle keyboard touches remind of Brian Eno’s early contributions to the group. Bassist Lucas Rinz and drummer Keaton Thandi, on the other hand, explode with the lock-step groove of Iggy & the Stooges’ Ron and Scott Asheton and Grand Funk Railroad’s Mel Schacher and Don Brewer at their loudest. It’s a fully engaging, frenzied ride through some of rock’s best influences without the nauseating filler.

Looking for the true modern classic rock? Satellite Hearts have it for real. Sail into their world of heady unpredictability for a truly excellent experience. - BigTakeover.com


"7. Satellite Hearts Residency Kickoff at Ortlieb's"

Satellite Hearts Residency Kickoff at Ortlieb's Feb. 3
Satellite Hearts begin their month-long residency at Ortlieb’s tonight, headlining a lineup that’ll help you get over the hump. The trio unites a myriad of rock-based styles - one that oozes the humid warmth of surf-psych and marries it with steady attitude, asserting heavier rock side. They can sit in a slow-cooking simmer, and then crank up the burner to really get things going. As we await the release of their new album via Randm Records, The Lawsuits bring their custom blend of bluesy-Americana, while the surf-punk pairing of Coin Purse (former Toy Soldiers Matt Kelly & Dom Billett) and the soul-infused rock of Kirby & the VibeTribe kick this night into action. Ortlieb’s, 847 N. 3rd St., 8pm, $10, 21+ - Michael Colavita - philadelphia.thedelimagazine.com


"Recap: Reignwolf & Satellite Hearts at Ortlieb's Lounge"

“Both Reignwolf and Satellite Hearts deliver raw, fearless and unrestrained rock ‘n roll. It’s classic, but not nostalgic; wild and dangerous, yet full of awe and childlike wonder. Certainly everyone in the room that night left reminded of why they fell in love with music in the first place and as a bonus, one hell of a story to tell their wide-eyed grandchildren someday.”

-Wendy McCardle - The Swollen Fox


"Amplified - Satellite Hearts"

They sound like The Clash infused with unpolished 80’s brat punk that trekked through the 60’s while flirting with bell-bottomed psychedelics and heavy rock n’ roll jives.” - JERK MAGAZINE


"Local Flavor Review: Satellite Hearts – “Imperial Green” (2012)"

Based in Philadelphia, Satellite Hearts are a self-proclaimed rock-and-roll band that “[combines] both the raw, unpolished, and unapologetic sound of today, with the soul of true classic rock.” This is a pretty apt description, as these guys can really bring the noise. One needs only to listen to Imperial Green’s opening track to understand Satellite Hearts’ love affair with rock’s roots; “Stuck in the Middle” is a raucous, Stooges-influenced number that acts as the band’s mission statement. This leads in to the video single “New York City,” a well-crafted rocker with hooks as addicting as crack cocaine. Vocalist J.M. Pellecchia’s manic vocal delivery lends an unhinged, Mick Jagger-like quality to the explosive cocktail of guitar, bass, and drums.

“New York City” transitions beautifully into “Dumb Down Daisy,” which brings me to compliment the production job on Imperial Green, which was handled by CKY guitarist Chad Ginsberg. For an independently released recording, the album sounds pretty damn good; there is a delicate balance between clean and raw here, and Ginsberg’s guiding hand locks it down.


“Bombs!” is a short, rapid burst of rock, almost punk in its execution, while “Heavy Fire” opens up with a tasty, heavy riff before mutating into a joyous exercise in catchy chord progressions. The bassist Lucas Rinz shines brightly here, with basslines that provide the chutzpah of the track. Other stand-out tracks include “Substitute,” which contains some of Imperial Green’s best lyrics, and “Delusional Fame,” which sounds like a cross between CCR, Neil Young, and a pinch of Hawkwind spaciness. The album closer “Goodnight, Goodbye” is a powerful, emotionally charged swan song with Bob Dylan-esque harmonica. The band sounds very warm and personal here; listening to the track reminded me of that heart-wrenching last summer sunset in the days when summer vacation was a sanctuary not only from school but also from the pressures of growing up.

Overall, Imperial Green is a dynamic, foot stomping good time, but one can’t help but notice that it sounds like a debut. Don’t get me wrong – the band sounds fine here, but it’s apparent that they were still trying to build a cohesive identity. On Imperial Green, Satellite Hearts unapologetically wear their influences on their sleeves, and it makes for a damn fine opening salvo, but I for one want to see what the band can do with more time to gel. Oh wait…. I can!

Thanks to Satellite Hearts’ Bandcamp page, I heard their newest single “Cost of Living.” Not only have they matured sonically in a mere three months, they sound bigger due to the addition of a second guitarist, Dre DiMura. This band is mega-talented, and have the potential to become huge. So when Satellite Hearts are headlining music halls all over the world in a couple of years, remember where you heard about them first. Wink wink! - Dissonant Geek


"Watch Satellite Hearts perform two new songs at Walla Fest (playing World Cafe Live on 3/24)"

Philly rockers Satellite Hearts played a set at Norristown’s Walla Fest recently, psyching out to songs from their recent Imperial Green LP and sharing two new songs with the enthusiastic crowd, “Fearless Freaks” and “Fools Gold.” The tracks highlight the best of Satellite Hearts, with a rousing instrumental jam, anchored by bassist Lucas Rinz’s driving groove, threading the two songs together. - XPN The Key


"Satellite Hearts by Ron Gallo(Toy Soldiers)"

It’s very rare, as the overexposed and soul-suckingly jaded musician that I am, to come across a brand new band that slaps you in the face like a ton of bricks, one that really seeps into your soul and catches your attention. One of the few bands that have had this effect on me in recent months is Philly-based trio, Satellite Hearts. While their band name may lead you into thinking of a gentler spacey side, it’s more like firey planet-sized meteors plummeting towards the earth and destroying everything in it’s path. These kids got it! They’ve got a drummer who’s too young to legally drink that literally beats the shit out of his drums in perfect time, a bassist who grooves and walks all around like 1,000 watt subwoofers in an el camino, and a lead singer and guitarist who howls and picks like a swordfight between Marc Bolan and Jack White. All retarded comparisons and attempts at description aside, this is a great band that focuses on the raw soul of music rather than being all polished and shiny, that’s what it’s all about! - Folk You Philly


"Satellite Hearts Flexing Some Muscle at The Fire"

The trio brings an unabashed, in-your-face style of psychedelic rock. As the heavy hitting drums buildup an avalanche of momentum, which is met by unforgiving heavy blues-infused guitar licks, the vocals are sensitively strong sharing the duality of a brash exterior with an obviously emotional core. This music is a steamroller always moving forward - not afraid to speak its mind and ready to fight if you want to disagree. - Deli Magazine


"SOFAR SOUNDS: SATELLITE HEARTS, VANESSA INGRAM, THE HILL AND WOOD, RON GALLO, THE DISTRICTS FRIDAY NIGHT"

Sometimes it’s hard to stop in your tracks, relax. It’s okay when you do it, it’s good when you do. You can breathe easier. You might feel lighter. I wonder if that’s any part of the premise behind the Sofar Sounds Series–like, when you’re trapped in a cycle of ups and downs and louds and quiets and something steps in and steals back a few hours for you. Prime time to sit cross-legged on your butt on someone’s kitchen floor, someone you’ve never met, and listen to a set of musicians you didn’t know you’d see earlier that day. Alone time doesn’t have to be when you’re by yourself. This is your alone time with others.

Here are some photos from Friday’s Sofar Sounds show. If you’re not familiar with the series I’ll school you quick: Sofar Sounds is am interactive national non-profit that holds secret shows in various living rooms in tons of cities on a regular basis. You sign up for the mailing list by visiting the site, and the crew will email you weeks prior to a show with sparse specifics (date, time, location) and the option to RSVP. You don’t know who you’re seeing, just where you’re going and that you can’t bring food with you. The show starts with a host introducing the performers of the night (tonight there were five acts) and explaining a bit about the organization for newcomers. Tonights artists include: Satellite Hearts, Vanessa Ingram, the Hill and Wood, Ron Gallo (of Toy Soldiers), and the Districts.

After the show, Sofar sends a follow up email with artist information, links and news on next projects.

Satellite Hearts, from Morrisville, PA, played the first set of the show. Lead vocalist J.M. Pellecchia looked like he was wearing an impressive George Harrison costume. He was not. That’s all him, and that’s rad. - www.phillymusicshowcase.com


"Take a Tour of "New York City" with Satellite Hearts"

Ahead of releasing their debut album Imperial Green at the end of November, local rock foursome Satellite Hearts filmed a video for “New York City” in the Big Apple. Between the percussive clashing and lead singer Justin Pellecchia’s sixties psych-rock vocals, Satellite Hearts are what I imagine a Lou Reed-fronted Steppenwolf would sound like. The video shows the band traveling through the tough city streets, with found-footage of riots as Pellacchia sings about rough living and chaos. Satellite Hearts will play The Fire on December 19th with Spirit Animal and Relatives. Tickets and information for the 21+ show can be found here. Below, watch the video for “New York City” and stream / purchase Imperial Green here. - XPN The Key


Discography

Desire Forces the Flow - 2015
Four To The Floor EP 
- 2013
Imperial Green - 2012

Photos

Bio

Satellite Hearts is pure rock 'n' roll, wild and dangerous, yet full of awe and childlike wonder. "It's like The Clash infused with unpolished 80's brat punk that trekked through the 60's while flirting with bell-bottomed psychedelics". At the end of the cosmic mind trip Satellite Hearts is truly the distinctive sound of Justin Pellecchia (guitar, vocals, and harmonica), Lucas Rinz (bass, vocals) and Keaton Thandi (drums, percussion, and vocals). Three beings who welcome you graciously into their world. 

     Established in December 2009 in Yardley, Pennsylvania, Satellite Hearts has released two albums (Imperial Green & Desire Forces The Flow), one single (Doing Things Right), and one EP (Four To The Floor) respectively since then.  The band continues to write, record, and perform along the east coast of the United States, while residing in Philadelphia, PA.  

     Together they've performed at MusikFest 2013 in Toronto, CA, opened for Lauryn Hill (Fugees) in 2014 at the Electric Factory in Philadelphia, PA, backed up many different singers in various genres, and played in many venues from large to small.  Notably they've opened up for Deen Ween from cult band Ween in the U.S. at the Ottobar in Maryland and in Charleston, South Carolina. 

     As of right now they are currently managed by Greg Frey former manager of Ween and have started recording the follow up to Desire Forces The Flow.

Band Members