Scott Fant
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Scott Fant

Dallas, TX | Established. Jan 01, 2010 | SELF

Dallas, TX | SELF
Established on Jan, 2010
Solo Americana Singer/Songwriter

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"Pig Iron - the Blue Room Sessions 1 reviewed by Wildy Haskell"

James Scott Fant - Pig Iron: The Blue Room Sessions I
2012, James Scott Fant

James Scott Fant gave up dreams of rock n roll stardom long ago. This working class son has been through the ringer of the music world; gone to Nashville and returned home to Northeast Texas. He’s been through the wars both personally and professionally, but he’s always made it through, guitar in hand. Back in his Northeast Texas home, Fant has won the respect of colleagues and fans alike. James Scott Fant continues to work every day to be the best singer/songwriter he can be. It must be working, as he is a regular guest at songwriting circles throughout Texas. James Scott Fant recently embarked on a series of three five-song EPs under the moniker The Blue Room Sessions. Recorded in his home with the help of wife, musician, producer and occasional co-writer Sandra Manseill, The Blue Room Sessions represent Fant’s most personal work to date. The recently released first EP in the series, Pig Iron, will make a believer out of you.

Pig Iron opens with “Out Of Canaan”, a working class an anthem that underscores a carpe diem attitude. It’s the anthem for a man who has run out of patience waiting for deliverance, and is headed out into the world to find it for himself. The song is singularly moving in intent and melody. You’d almost hesitate to use the word gorgeous here due to the stripped down nature of the arrangement, but there is a singular beauty to the song that’s hard to ignore. Fant sounds more than a bit like a younger Willie Nelson on “Worse For The Wear”, a highly nuanced paean to perseverance. Once again, there is sort of a primitive beauty here that’s impossible to miss. The song isn’t a ballad, per se, but definitely pays tribute to the idea of surviving on one’s wits (and perhaps even a little bit of luck). Fant makes a quiet orchestra of his guitar here, crafting an arrangement that perfectly fits the mood of the song; never doing too much or too little in the process.

“Restless Wind” explores the transitory nature of mankind; the need for change. There is a darkness that overhangs this song, as Fant touches on issues of divorce and feeling stuck. The regret here is not so much for the events, but for their base cause. “8 Lb. Sledge” is a delicious bit of acoustic blues that will get inside your head and stay there. It’s not often that a low key acoustic number will make you want to get up and dance, but you can just hear the R&B backbeat trying to break out of this with a screaming electric guitar. Fant manages to do more with his guitar and voice than many artists could do with a full band. Pig Iron winds down with the singer/songwriter panache of “Annie Sings The Blues”. Once again, Fant may remind listeners of a younger Willie Nelson or perhaps even Townes Van Zandt, but these comparisons are incidental. “Annie Sings The Blues” is a living still life to the connection between singer/songwriter and listener, and how an eternity of lifetimes can occur within the bounds of a single song.

James Scott Fant isn’t just a singer/songwriter, he’s an artist. On Pig Iron, Fant paints masterpieces with nothing more than six strings and a road-worn voice full of primitive beauty. Fant is ultimate confirmation that institutions such as Nashville have forgotten what making music is about. Music is about real people like James Scott Fant putting themselves on the line night after night, telling real stories about real people and real life events, in wonderfully crafted and distinctive songs and voices. If you find one new artist to follow in 2012, make it James Scott Fant.
Rating: 5 Stars (Out of 5)

Learn more about James Scott Fant at www.facebook.com/scottfantmusic or www.reverbnation.com/jamesfant. Pig Iron is available through the etailers below. You may also purchase the download through the Wildy's World Amazon store. - Wildy Haskell

MP3 iTunes


Please note that the Amazon.com prices listed above are as of the posting date, and may have changed. Wildy's World is not responsible for price changes instituted by Amazon.com.
- Wildy's World


"Independent Clauses Music Blog - Stephen Caradini's review of 'Pig Iron'"

I’ve been getting into electronic music a little bit more recently, but I still have the deepest part of my musical heart reserved for singer/songwriters armed with nothing but an acoustic guitar. Scott Fant fits that description perfectly, as he employs his careworn tenor over a six-string for the five tunes of Pig Iron. Fant balances precise, melodic guitarwork with a careworn voice that includes weariness but isn’t defined by it. It’s not a gruff or rough tone, but one that has nicks around the edges, as in the excellent “Worse for the Wear.” The memorable vocals are framed well by both chord strumming and fingerpicking. Fant likes to remain in folk-singer mode, but there are some worthy blues inclusions (“8 Lb. Sledge”) and even a bit of classical influence (“Restless Wind”). Fans of Joe Pug, Joe Purdy and maybe even Ray LaMontagne (although without the romantic overtones) will eat this up. Fant is a strong songwriter that should be watched closely: as they say in the draft, he’s got a lot of upside and a really high ceiling. - Independent Clauses Music Blog


"Tom Franks folkwords.com Review of Pig Iron-James Scott Fant"

‘Pig Iron’: The Blue Room Sessions I’ by James Scott Fant (February 12, 2013)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The instant James Scott Fant kicks off 'Pig Iron: The Blue Room Sessions I’ you’re immediately inside the humanity his songs describe – living, surviving, making something out of nothing and above all keeping your sanity by recognising the world for what it is and getting on with it despite the odds.

His voice reaches out and pulls you into songs that take exactly where you expect – into tales you want to hear.

It's a voice that if could you see it rather than hear it, would be calloused like working hands, scuffed like well-loved, worn-in boots but possessing all the experience-laden attraction of both. Listen to ‘Out Of Cannan’ – its simple six-string melody will capture immediately. And the lyrics – “Ridin' hard out of Canaan tonight on four bad tires and one headlight, Ain't no promise this promised land will ever be right. I'm tired of waitin' for a miracle.” Chock full of feeling and already in your head.

The magnetism of the lyrics continues through the resigned reflection of ‘Worse for the Wear’ and the deep seated contemplation of the regret-filled ‘Restless Wind’.

James moves into the realm of acoustic blues with the gutsy ‘8 Lb. Sledge’ complete with its edgy aggressive ‘don’t mess with me’ vocals and pulsating guitar. And just when you think you’ve got a handle on his style there’s ‘Annie Sings The Blues’ – sharp observations that go hand in hand with desperate truths.

Yeah, I know that this EP has been out a while in the USA but it’s only just made its way to my ears. However, if hard-tales and well-written Americana folk gets to you then you’ll love it – I do. And that’s a good enough reason to share it with you.


- http://www.folkwords.com


"James Scott Fant - reviewed by Michael Cusanelli"

James Scott Fant
Pig Iron The Blue Room Sessions 1

James Scott Fant’s bio reads like the description of a character from a Cormac McCarthy novel. He paints a vivid picture of tragedy, sin, and hopelessness, which has shaped not only his life but his art as well. Growing up and living in North Texas he emulates his heroes: Steve Earle, Townes Van Zant, Billy Joe Shaver in more ways than just musically. He carries himself with the same world weary and road worn style of these Texas troubadours.

Pig Iron is the first in a series of five EPs recorded at Fant’s rehearsal and song writing space called The Blue Room. Co-produced by wife Sandra Manseill who is an artist and musician in her own right, the collection is stripped down to the bare essentials of Fant’s voice and his Gibson J45 guitar. The listener will immediately draw comparisons to other Gothic Country artists such as Hank III, Sixteen Horsepower, and even more Alternative Country artists like Drive By Truckers, Neko Case, and Ryan Adams. But there is no posturing here or searching for country credentials. It is clear that James Fant has lived every word.

The first song “Out of Canaan” describes a gritty journey both literal and metaphysical. The biblical references are not out of place as a song writer’s travels can be as much of a pilgrimage as a trip to a destination. “Worse for the Wear” is a pretty ballad that represents many classic and well worn country images of horses, religion, the endless road. The third track, “Restless Wind” starts with a plaintive mariachi flourish which transitions nicely into a driving rhythm. His earnest delivery makes the story completely believable. The next song “8 lb. Sledge” has a compelling blues meets country sound. The classic country theme of man verses the temptations of the Devil are played out with a driving acoustic rhythm. The EP rounds out with “Annie Sings the Blues” which was co-written by Fant’s wife and co-producer Sandra Manseill. It is easily the sweetest and least foreboding track on the collection. Of course the ever present references to drinking, smoking and the bible are still front and center.

James Scott Fant is undeniably a talented song writer and guitar player. His lyrics and vocal delivery projects a man that has lived a hard life making the stories he tells even more interesting. One can only expect the subsequent releases will get darker and more beautiful as time and Fant’s experiences mature. The listener will undoubtedly want to learn more about this mysterious sounding singer, find him, and start drinking with the man.

Review by Michael Cusanelli
Rating: 4.25 Stars (out of 5)
- Michael Cusanelli


"Folk Words Review of Pig Iron-James Scott Fant"

‘Pig Iron’: The Blue Room Sessions I’ by James Scott Fant (February 12, 2013)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The instant James Scott Fant kicks off 'Pig Iron: The Blue Room Sessions I’ you’re immediately inside the humanity his songs describe – living, surviving, making something out of nothing and above all keeping your sanity by recognising the world for what it is and getting on with it despite the odds.

His voice reaches out and pulls you into songs that take exactly where you expect – into tales you want to hear.

It's a voice that if could you see it rather than hear it, would be calloused like working hands, scuffed like well-loved, worn-in boots but possessing all the experience-laden attraction of both. Listen to ‘Out Of Cannan’ – its simple six-string melody will capture immediately. And the lyrics – “Ridin' hard out of Canaan tonight on four bad tires and one headlight, Ain't no promise this promised land will ever be right. I'm tired of waitin' for a miracle.” Chock full of feeling and already in your head.

The magnetism of the lyrics continues through the resigned reflection of ‘Worse for the Wear’ and the deep seated contemplation of the regret-filled ‘Restless Wind’.

James moves into the realm of acoustic blues with the gutsy ‘8 Lb. Sledge’ complete with its edgy aggressive ‘don’t mess with me’ vocals and pulsating guitar. And just when you think you’ve got a handle on his style there’s ‘Annie Sings The Blues’ – sharp observations that go hand in hand with desperate truths.

Yeah, I know that this EP has been out a while in the USA but it’s only just made its way to my ears. However, if hard-tales and well-written Americana folk gets to you then you’ll love it – I do. And that’s a good enough reason to share it with you.


- http://www.folkwords.com


"Vents Magazine Interview May 24, 2012"

Tell us more about yourself, who’s James Scott Fant? How you got started in the music business?

Here’s the story of how it all started…I’m from North Texas and was raised by working class parents. I grew up in a small town south of Dallas. There was this little coffee shop there and I have this vivid memory of walking in there with my dad one morning when I was probably about seven or eight years old…there was an old AM radio playing on a shelf in the corner and I remember the sound of the guitar and the singer singing “Mama Tried”. I had no idea then what a singer/songwriter was, but with a little research I figured out that “Mama Tried” was written and performed by a guy named Merle Haggard. That was my first inspiration to be a performing songwriter. Such an honest and real voice, an eloquent and simple story performed, and more importantly to me, written by the same person. That became a driving force for me and from that moment on I wanted to write my own stuff. We were country people, small town Texas, and writers like Merle Haggard made me realize that we have stories to tell and our lives are part of American culture. When I told my mom I had this dream of writing my own songs and performing them onstage, she bought me a Harmony arch top guitar and gave me an old Hank Williams record. Hearing “Mama Tried” and the subsequent hours listening to and studying that old Hank Williams record were the two biggest early influences for me musically.



Besides guitar, what other instruments do you play?

I play bass guitar, Piedmont style Dobro, electric guitar and since I’ve never been much of a drummer, I’ve gotten pretty good at programming a drum machine.



Talk to us more about your style?

When we were kids my Grandma would sing these old, dark folk songs for us. She had this beautiful voice that could lift these songs up and make them almost live and breathe. I still try to capture some of that old original folk music sound every time write a song. The style I play has been called a lot of things through the years: folk, traditional music, roots music, country music…I think the story telling style makes it very close to being folk music, but not quite. At least not in the sense folk has been written and performed as of late. There of course the country influences, but there again, certainly not ‘country’ in the way Nashville has redefined it. The blues and early rock and roll sound is there also.



When I began to perform as an acoustic act, it made me concentrate more on lyrics. The very concept of one man and a guitar, onstage-playing songs I’d written- to an audience was intimidating at first. It made me write more seriously as a lyricist and it made me be more articulate with my acoustic guitar. My voice? Well, it is what it is, you know **laugh** One critic has been kind enough to describe my voice as “primitive”. I will gladly accept that and be happy just to every now and then hit the right note. But in all seriousness, I think lacking the gift of a really great voice is another reason I have to be so particular with finding the right lyrics. Good words are still good, whether they’re sung well or not.



What are your music influences?

I’m fortunate to have had such a broad range of musical influence. Growing up I had a brother who is nine years older than me. I can remember walking through my old house and hearing Jimi Hendrix coming from one end and my mother playing Buck Owens records on the other. Very diverse and musically educational. I think this diversity at that young age helped me ignore genre’s and musical styles. I still believe that if you aspire to be an artist as well as a singer and songwriter, you must cast aside the idea of genre’s and never let yourself be caught up in the tangle of trying to write ‘hit’ songs. Your own style and your own sound will emerge if you let the songs simply come forth as they’re created. I’ve been told by professional songwri - Vents Music and Entertainment Magazine


"James Scott Fant Interview @ the Indie Band Channel"

01 - Artist Name & Location = James Scott Fant

02 - How did the project come into existence? = I didn't write or play for several years. I went through a tough, heartbreaking divorce and was trying to recover from that. Then when my daughter died in 2008, I turned to music to search for some sort of comfort from the pain of that loss. I've written songs and played most of my life but other responsibilities had taken priority so it had been a year or two since I'd had time to work on songwriting.



I picked up my guitar and the songs I began to write after she died were without a doubt the most personal and autobiographical I'd ever written. A lot of the lyrics were dark and a lot of the themes were complex. I suppose I used music and wrote these songs as some sort of therapy.



As a songwriter, I've always tended to write in concept, as a collection, and by the time I'd finished this collection of songs, I had 12 or 13 songs I considered complete - at least complete enough to think about recording - so I started to get a few gigs and take the songs out of their enviroment and let other people hear the stories they had to tell. I think thats important, to take a song out into the world and perform them live. It's the final step in the process of songwriting, to put a song in motion and let people hear them live and breathe through the performer.



I mentioned the darkness and complexity of some of the lyrics, but I noticed as I began to finish this collection, I had let the songs begin to evolve into stories of hope. I can't even start to describe here what a dark and unhappy time that was in my life, so I was glad that I'd found some sort of light, that when things get bad, find your glimmer of hope and always move toward it.



03 - Who are the members of the band if any and please tell us about it? = Just me, my Martin 000 or my Gibson J45.

04 - How would you describe your sound/genre? = There are so many monikers for this style of music now (ha) Americana, roots music...I use elements of country, delta blues, early rock n roll...

05 - What formal training or previous experience do any of the members have? = I've played music many years, no formal training. Mostly self taught, just always paid close attention to the musicians and songwriters around me as I was growing up to try and learn the craft.

06 - Are you working w/ a producer on your upcoming album? = This was a long process, writing, editing and getting to the final recorded versions of the songs on the EP. My wife, Sandra Manseill, ended up producing the project. It was painful sometimes, fun sometimes and sometimes just hard work. Sandra and I co-wrote one song "Annie Sings the Blues" and that was a new experience for me. I had never written with another writer. We've written a couple of other songs since and our writing style is very informal. We bounce words, lines or ideas off each other and just let the song become what its gonna be.



When I began rehearsing and preparing to record, I would try different versions, different tempos, maybe different ambience with some of these songs and she would give me honest opnions about what worked and what didn't. She spent a lot of time helping me interpret these songs and we finally realized she was producing the project. The finished product sounds very simple really, voice and guitar, but getting there took some time and I think my patience and her drive to get these songs to the place they needed to be paid off. There were times I was willing to call a song finished and she would push me a bit to work on a lyric or experiment with a melody. I'd never had that much personal input and it was at times unnerving but ultimately always appreciated.

07 - Who would you say has been the biggest influence on the bands sound or that you have used as inspiration for your music? = At this time in music we're all so fortunate to have so many great influences, the great artists who c - The Indie Band Channel


"Mad Mackerel Music Blog Top Ten 2010"

8. Scott Fant – 8lb Sledge (Download here)

This might come as a bit of a surprise to the Mackerels because I’ve not made a song and dance about it. But it is a great track and worthy of its place in my top ten at the cost of other great songs such as I Don’t Care if There’s Cursing by Phosphorescent and VCR by The XX. Nice one Mr Fant … I hope there’s many more where this came from.

- Mad Mackerel music blog


Discography

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Photos

Bio


Singer/songwriter/musician Americana, Country and Folk.

"Scott Fant isnt just a singer/songwriter, he's an artist. ...Fant paints masterpieces with nothing more than six strings and a road-worn voice full of primitive beauty".- Wildy Haskell, Wildy's World Music Blog

Scott Fant, an award winning performing songwriter and guitarist was born in Dallas and lives in North East Texas. 

  Scott Fant lives on a small family ranch in Texas with his wife, artist, poet, and songwriter Sandra Manseill and his youngest son RJ. He and Sandra occasionally co-write and perform together.




Band Members